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(The Tennessean)   Bad: You get locked inside your restaurant's cooler. Good: You find a way to trip the burglar alarm to summon police. Fail: Cops find the restaurant dark and the doors locked, so they ignore it   (tennessean.com) divider line 130
    More: Sad, communications center  
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16470 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jun 2012 at 11:05 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-18 08:58:09 PM  
Wow. Death by TV trope.
 
2012-06-18 09:14:25 PM  
Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?

I worked at a zoo and we had a 50' long freezer for seafood and meat. It had a giant handle on the door. You couldn't get trapped inside unless someone locked you in there.
 
2012-06-18 09:24:55 PM  

doglover: Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?


Maybe it's a kill switch or interior door handle? I dunno.

But in this case, a kill switch wouldn't work because it was being temporarily cooled by dry ice.
 
2012-06-18 09:26:50 PM  

Babwa Wawa: doglover: Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?

Maybe it's a kill switch or interior door handle? I dunno.

But in this case, a kill switch wouldn't work because it was being temporarily cooled by dry ice.


But the interior door handle. . .

Anyway, I thought they solved this problem ages ago. Moral of the story: don't own a cooler alone.
 
2012-06-18 09:30:30 PM  

doglover: Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?

I worked at a zoo and we had a 50' long freezer for seafood and meat. It had a giant handle on the door. You couldn't get trapped inside unless someone locked you in there.


Reading the Article. The interior door opening mech was broken---and had been for some time.
They had also filled the freezer with Dry Ice because of a power outage.
 
2012-06-18 09:38:41 PM  

optikeye: doglover: Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?

I worked at a zoo and we had a 50' long freezer for seafood and meat. It had a giant handle on the door. You couldn't get trapped inside unless someone locked you in there.

Reading the Article. The interior door opening mech was broken---and had been for some time.
They had also filled the freezer with Dry Ice because of a power outage.


(o.O)

And the dude went in there!? Alone!?

(´・_・`)

I guess he was

(`◎_◎)

too cool for school.


YEEEAHH!
 
2012-06-18 09:48:32 PM  
I saw this episode of Three's Company.
 
2012-06-18 10:22:39 PM  
That reminds me: The Shining is coming on tonight.
 
2012-06-18 11:03:35 PM  
Most coolers have emergency trips for the motor inside, and safety releases for the door.

Did someone lock the door behind him with a padlock?
 
2012-06-18 11:07:40 PM  

Apos: That reminds me: The Shining is coming on tonight.


4.bp.blogspot.com

It had to be done.
 
2012-06-18 11:09:30 PM  
FTA Police do not suspect foul play. There was no trauma on the body.

So the perfect murder is that easy now.
 
2012-06-18 11:10:33 PM  
A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Whoever designed this with an electrical button and not a physical release mechanism needs to be shot.

Whoever owns a cooler where the emergency release mechanism is known to be broken gets little sympathy from me.
 
Oak
2012-06-18 11:12:04 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: FTA Police do not suspect foul play. There was no trauma on the body.

So the perfect murder is that easy now.


Part of planning the "perfect murder" is picking a jurisdiction where the cops are really stupid and lazy.
 
2012-06-18 11:14:52 PM  

Oak: J. Frank Parnell: FTA Police do not suspect foul play. There was no trauma on the body.

So the perfect murder is that easy now.

Part of planning the "perfect murder" is picking a jurisdiction where the cops are really stupid and lazy.


Sanford?
 
2012-06-18 11:15:23 PM  
That's just cold

/I wonder if there was still dry ice in there?
 
2012-06-18 11:15:44 PM  

Oak: J. Frank Parnell: FTA Police do not suspect foul play. There was no trauma on the body.

So the perfect murder is that easy now.

Part of planning the "perfect murder" is picking a jurisdiction where the cops are really stupid and lazy.


So the police are supposed to break in to check on an alarm when the building appears secure? Even if they have an emergency contact and that person shows up with a key what are the chances anyone would have checked the cooler?
 
2012-06-18 11:17:04 PM  
My parents (who are older than the guy who died) and even my grandparents carry their cell phones with them almost everywhere they go. I'm hardly ever without mine in my house, and never outside of it. When I was last on co op (working at GE) they had a humidity controlled storage room with two big metal doors - you couldn't operate one if the other was open. I heard from one of the guys I worked with that he once got trapped in between the doors because the one behind him got stuck in limbo where it wasn't fully closed but he couldn't open it again or close it further from his side, and if he hadn't had his phone on him he'd have been trapped for the better part of a day. Wouldn't have died, but it would've sucked big time regardless. After he told me that, never went into that room without my phone for any reason.

I feel like if you have a freezer or other secured room, the first and biggest rule no matter what is you either don't go in unless someone else knows you went in (and knows to check if you're gone too long) or you don't go in without a phone.
 
2012-06-18 11:19:08 PM  

RoyBatty:
Whoever owns a cooler where the emergency release mechanism is known to be broken gets little sympathy from me.


It's a pity the guy died, but at least it was the same guy who was responsible for not replacing an emergency release mechanism that had been broken for some time, rather than some schmuck.

Also, at least he died from gas inhalation, and not freezing to death, like I thought when I read the headline. *shudders*

Then again, running out of oxygen is probably not the greatest way to go.
 
2012-06-18 11:19:20 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: That's just cold

/I wonder if there was still dry ice in there?



Know how I know you DRTFA? They suspect he died from inhaling carbon dioxide from the dry ice...
 
2012-06-18 11:20:56 PM  

adeist69: MaudlinMutantMollusk: That's just cold

/I wonder if there was still dry ice in there?


Know how I know you DRTFA? They suspect he died from inhaling carbon dioxide from the dry ice...


I did skim it...

/obviously missed that detail, though
//thanks
 
2012-06-18 11:21:55 PM  

maxximillian: So the police are supposed to break in to check on an alarm when the building appears secure? Even if they have an emergency contact and that person shows up with a key what are the chances anyone would have checked the cooler?


Yeah, it's called don't make assumptions.
 
2012-06-18 11:22:45 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: FTA Police do not suspect foul play. There was no trauma on the body.

So the perfect murder is that easy now.


Well, if Joe Shmoe or someone did murder you in that exact manner, all you'd have to do would be to find something sharp and carve JOE SHMOE DID IT into the wall. Then again, if you really hated Joe, you could do that even if he wasn't the one who locked you inside the cooler....
 
2012-06-18 11:26:50 PM  

Ed Finnerty: Wow. Death by TV trope.


*laughtrack*
 
2012-06-18 11:27:43 PM  

Kurmudgeon: maxximillian: So the police are supposed to break in to check on an alarm when the building appears secure? Even if they have an emergency contact and that person shows up with a key what are the chances anyone would have checked the cooler?

Yeah, it's called don't make assumptions.


No police department breaks in to a building for an alarm if it appears secure. You have more false alarms than positives. So ignoring that lets say the police break down the door and the they don't find anything suspicious, now the building has a gaping opening were a secure door used to be. So now what? Do we have the police stay there and guard the broken door? For how long? if they don't stay then you have a building wide open for the taking.
 
2012-06-18 11:27:47 PM  

RoyBatty: Whoever owns a cooler where the emergency release mechanism is known to be broken gets little sympathy from me.



Agreed. I was feeling bad for the guy until I read that. His own neglect cost him his life.
 
2012-06-18 11:31:46 PM  
Conversation secretly acquired moments before:

"Hey man...you think we should fix that door handle inside?"
"Naw...we should be fine...just don't get locked in there, ha ha ha ha!"
"Yeah! Ha...I'm just gonna go take inventory, okay? You lock up."
 
2012-06-18 11:32:30 PM  

dopeydwarf: Apos: That reminds me: The Shining is coming on tonight.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 500x375]

It had to be done.



Yup.
 
2012-06-18 11:33:51 PM  

Tanishh: My parents (who are older than the guy who died) and even my grandparents carry their cell phones with them almost everywhere they go. I'm hardly ever without mine in my house, and never outside of it. When I was last on co op (working at GE) they had a humidity controlled storage room with two big metal doors - you couldn't operate one if the other was open. I heard from one of the guys I worked with that he once got trapped in between the doors because the one behind him got stuck in limbo where it wasn't fully closed but he couldn't open it again or close it further from his side, and if he hadn't had his phone on him he'd have been trapped for the better part of a day. Wouldn't have died, but it would've sucked big time regardless. After he told me that, never went into that room without my phone for any reason.

I feel like if you have a freezer or other secured room, the first and biggest rule no matter what is you either don't go in unless someone else knows you went in (and knows to check if you're gone too long) or you don't go in without a phone.


Our walk-in cooler, at least, acts as a faraday cage. A cell phone probably won't work in most.
 
2012-06-18 11:35:03 PM  
So the owner was killed because he refused to fix a safety feature that would have saved his life?

Well, my sympathy just went out the window.
 
2012-06-18 11:36:24 PM  

optikeye: doglover: Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?

I worked at a zoo and we had a 50' long freezer for seafood and meat. It had a giant handle on the door. You couldn't get trapped inside unless someone locked you in there.

Reading the Article. The interior door opening mech was broken---and had been for some time.
They had also filled the freezer with Dry Ice because of a power outage.


That tidbit kind of turned the situation from "tragic accident with lazy police" to "possible darwin award recipient with lazy police." He was part owner so the decision not to repair the broken safety was likely at least partially on him, placing anyone working there in danger of a similar situation happening.
 
2012-06-18 11:37:00 PM  

Tanishh: My parents (who are older than the guy who died) and even my grandparents carry their cell phones with them almost everywhere they go. I'm hardly ever without mine in my house, and never outside of it. When I was last on co op (working at GE) they had a humidity controlled storage room with two big metal doors - you couldn't operate one if the other was open. I heard from one of the guys I worked with that he once got trapped in between the doors because the one behind him got stuck in limbo where it wasn't fully closed but he couldn't open it again or close it further from his side, and if he hadn't had his phone on him he'd have been trapped for the better part of a day. Wouldn't have died, but it would've sucked big time regardless. After he told me that, never went into that room without my phone for any reason.

I feel like if you have a freezer or other secured room, the first and biggest rule no matter what is you either don't go in unless someone else knows you went in (and knows to check if you're gone too long) or you don't go in without a phone.


I understand where you're coming from, but I do have to wonder what kind of signal one would get on a cell phone from inside a walk in cooler, which is really just a large metal box with thick insulation, that is inside a (judging from the pic in the article) poured concrete building, the interior walls of which most likely have metal studs. I guessing not much of one, but I'm no EE either. Sucks that he didn't have one to at least find out if there's a signal in there.
 
2012-06-18 11:37:42 PM  
A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Darwin.

RoyBatty: A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Whoever designed this with an electrical button and not a physical release mechanism needs to be shot.


Yup. I had to raise holy hell about implementing an e-stop in software rather than hardware. Nobody else got it about the danger. (This was for a saw that would have had no problem sawing a person in half if they weren't too fat.)
 
2012-06-18 11:38:09 PM  

Tanishh: My parents (who are older than the guy who died) and even my grandparents carry their cell phones with them almost everywhere they go. I'm hardly ever without mine in my house, and never outside of it. When I was last on co op (working at GE) they had a humidity controlled storage room with two big metal doors - you couldn't operate one if the other was open. I heard from one of the guys I worked with that he once got trapped in between the doors because the one behind him got stuck in limbo where it wasn't fully closed but he couldn't open it again or close it further from his side, and if he hadn't had his phone on him he'd have been trapped for the better part of a day. Wouldn't have died, but it would've sucked big time regardless. After he told me that, never went into that room without my phone for any reason.

I feel like if you have a freezer or other secured room, the first and biggest rule no matter what is you either don't go in unless someone else knows you went in (and knows to check if you're gone too long) or you don't go in without a phone.



Would a phone even get reception inside a big freezer? Would it not depend on the carrier as well? Some are shiat in some places. They all vary.
 
2012-06-18 11:38:27 PM  

Ed Finnerty: Wow. Death by TV trope.


Final Destination 6?
 
2012-06-18 11:38:58 PM  
I've broken down several Cooler/Freezer units and he must have quickly been overcome with gas. It shouldn't be that hard to bust the door open.
 
2012-06-18 11:39:04 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: So the owner was killed because he refused to fix a safety feature that would have saved his life?

Well, my sympathy just went out the window.


Do you think he knew it was going to happen? Makes me wonder? What a way to go? A long period of time to know you did it to yourself.... ouch. I had a scuba diving class in college and the professor told us stories of cave divers that got lost and had enough time to write notes to their loved ones. if i go because of my own stupidity I'd hate for it to take a long time

/this is also why I wont skydive. Way to much time to think well we sure farked up this time.
 
2012-06-18 11:41:14 PM  
we need a darwin tag
 
2012-06-18 11:42:31 PM  
He was destined for a wood chipper accident anyway. Less pain this way.
 
2012-06-18 11:43:19 PM  
So this guy's next of kin get to sue ... themselves? for an unsafe work environment?
 
2012-06-18 11:43:37 PM  

Loren: A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Darwin.

RoyBatty: A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Whoever designed this with an electrical button and not a physical release mechanism needs to be shot.

Yup. I had to raise holy hell about implementing an e-stop in software rather than hardware. Nobody else got it about the danger. (This was for a saw that would have had no problem sawing a person in half if they weren't too fat.)


I hate to be so harsh... but the guy who died owned the cooler, failed to repair emergency exit features of the freezer, and subsequently died. The only lucky thing about this is that it wasn't just some lackey who died in the freezer, but the guy who should've cared about safety in the first place. Also, the default of safety mechanisms when broken should be on the safe side...eg the door should not be able to lock shut if the exit features are not working... on my power toys and all over my shop, when a safety is tripped or non-functional, it doesn't make the place less safe, just less functional (no power, mechanical stops, etc.). I can't imagine being any less careful if there was a potential for other people to get hurt as a result of my action/inaction.
 
2012-06-18 11:50:03 PM  

Kurmudgeon: maxximillian: So the police are supposed to break in to check on an alarm when the building appears secure? Even if they have an emergency contact and that person shows up with a key what are the chances anyone would have checked the cooler?

Yeah, it's called don't make assumptions.


Question: What percentage of burglary alarms received by the police are false? I'll give you a hint: It's between 99 and 100 percent.
 
2012-06-18 11:53:09 PM  
Reminds me of the time I called the cops on a man assaulting a woman for stealing drugs from his car. The one cop car that responded about 15 minutes later slowed down to about 25 mph as he drove past the guy's house.
 
2012-06-18 11:56:58 PM  
Dry ice emits carbon dioxide

In much the same way rain emits water.
 
2012-06-18 11:57:44 PM  
Jesus, in this day and age people still don't use mechanical emergency door openers? Even the trunk on my 2010 Chrysler had an emergency release lever (until I removed it.) It sucks this guy died but a simple release latch was all he needed to prevent this.
 
2012-06-18 11:58:04 PM  
blogs.orlandoweekly.com

Unavailable for comment.
 
2012-06-19 12:00:27 AM  

dopeydwarf: Apos: That reminds me: The Shining is coming on tonight.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 500x375]

It had to be done.


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-06-19 12:01:56 AM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Jesus, in this day and age people still don't use mechanical emergency door openers? Even the trunk on my 2010 Chrysler had an emergency release lever (until I removed it.) It sucks this guy died but a simple release latch was all he needed to prevent this.


It weren't in werkin' order.
 
2012-06-19 12:03:32 AM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Jesus, in this day and age people still don't use mechanical emergency door openers? Even the trunk on my 2010 Chrysler had an emergency release lever (until I removed it.) It sucks this guy died but a simple release latch was all he needed to prevent this.


Just curious. Why did you remove it?
 
2012-06-19 12:03:54 AM  
A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

I have no sympathy for him. He, as co-owner, should have gotten the cooler door fixed the instant someone alerted him to it not functioning properly. I worked at a bakery once that had a broken handle, you could get in but you couldn't get out. With the bonus of, if you were in the cooler your cell phone couldn't get reception. I got trapped in there once, and I was lucky that the assistant manager noticed I was gone after ten minutes.

The owner always said it was too expensive to get fixed. I always wanted to shove the owner in there for ten minutes and let him see how he liked wondering whether or not someone would let him out felt like.
 
2012-06-19 12:05:43 AM  
Maybe make sure your place is up to code and you can actually get out of the freezer when the door is closed. We are instructed where I'm at to close the freezer door behind you if you are going to be in there for any period of time. However there is a big, manually operated latch to let you out from the inside.
 
GBB
2012-06-19 12:07:38 AM  

maxximillian: Oak: J. Frank Parnell: FTA Police do not suspect foul play. There was no trauma on the body.

So the perfect murder is that easy now.

Part of planning the "perfect murder" is picking a jurisdiction where the cops are really stupid and lazy.

So the police are supposed to break in to check on an alarm when the building appears secure? Even if they have an emergency contact and that person shows up with a key what are the chances anyone would have checked the cooler?


Yes. At least until the next story about a restaurant that is vandalized by police who broke in to make absolutely sure it was a false alarm, and they refuse to pay for the damages.
 
2012-06-19 12:08:07 AM  

maxximillian: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Jesus, in this day and age people still don't use mechanical emergency door openers? Even the trunk on my 2010 Chrysler had an emergency release lever (until I removed it.) It sucks this guy died but a simple release latch was all he needed to prevent this.

Just curious. Why did you remove it?


It was a little dangling hook thing and stuff kept catching on it and releasing the trunk. I just removed the handle part, you can still work the release mechanism by pulling a little cable.
 
GBB
2012-06-19 12:08:54 AM  

maxximillian: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Jesus, in this day and age people still don't use mechanical emergency door openers? Even the trunk on my 2010 Chrysler had an emergency release lever (until I removed it.) It sucks this guy died but a simple release latch was all he needed to prevent this.

Just curious. Why did you remove it?


Kids kept escaping.
 
2012-06-19 12:10:11 AM  
Why didn't he make one of these while he was in the cooler?:

www.nasa.gov
 
2012-06-19 12:20:01 AM  
My bet? It was this guy's fault. Everything these days fails safe, when something goes wrong it shuts down, or opens up, or stops or whatever. Whatever is needed to make it safe. The reason is, of course, liability and lawsuits. So device makers make everything fail safe. I cannot image freezers being any different. So here's my bet:

The safety unlock breaks, and the freezer won't lock itself anymore one day. This guy is a cheapass and decided to just play McGuyvery and bypasses the failsafe, so it'll lock again, but now there is no unlock from the inside. He never fixes it (obviously) and then this happens.

I have real trouble believing that the freezer didn't have a proper failsafe designed in it, so my bet it that it was bypassed by the owner.

Guy obviously wasn't top of his class in safety. Heck even with a proper failsafe you wouldn't catch me going in a freezer with dry ice unless I had someone with me. What happens if I pass out due to lack of oxygen? Easy to do. I'd have someone along with me who'd wait outside incase something happened.
 
2012-06-19 12:22:11 AM  
News flash, it's a bad idea to enter an enclosed space where a large amount of CO2 is sublimating without regard to what safety features may or may not be working.
 
2012-06-19 12:23:49 AM  
At a supermarket where I worked one of the freight guys was trapped in the walk in freezer when a manager parked a forklift against the door. He kept warm by re-arranging the products. Fortunately, he was found a few hours later.

And yes, this manager was as dumb as you imagine and usually higher than a monkey on bath salts. I talked to him one day and noticed his eyes were vibrating like an off balance washing machine. He was eventually transfered to "the store where careers go to die" as it was known in the company, then fired. Or quit.

/cold story bro
 
2012-06-19 12:24:31 AM  

Welfare Xmas: News flash, it's a bad idea to enter an enclosed space where a large amount of CO2 is sublimating without regard to what safety features may or may not be working.


Welfare Xmas: News flash, it's a bad idea to enter an enclosed space where a large amount of CO2 is sublimating without regard to what safety features may or may not be working.


THIS TIHS THIS THIS THIS!!!1!
 
2012-06-19 12:24:46 AM  

Mugato: I saw this episode of Three's Company.


I saw it on an episode of All in the Family...so I'm older than you.

Or was that Archie Bunker's Place... maybe I'm younger.

I'm so confused.

/Screw it... I saw it in a Harold Lloyd silent film.over 80 years ago,
//23 skidoo!
 
2012-06-19 12:24:58 AM  
www.google.co.uk

Meh!
 
GBB
2012-06-19 12:32:25 AM  
First, coolers like this need to have a panic alarm installed in the event that 1) you accidentally lock yourself in there, or 2) you are purposely locked in there. I'm beginning to suspect that he tripped that panic alarm.

If that was the panic alarm, why didn't the alarm company report it as a "panic button" instead of a simple burglary trip? Maybe they did and the dispatcher or officer didn't realize it? Or perhaps the alarm company had that zone labeled wrong?

Which reminds me; whenever I get my home alarm installed, I'm having the tech write in all sorts of interesting descriptions for the different zones. "Gorilla enclosure, moat motion, alien vault, divide by zero, stripper pole failure". Put any one of those at the end of, "Please respond to 123 Main St for a residential alarm, audible, indicating ______________".

No one really cares what the alarm indicates when they respond if it's not a keypad activation. Even then, it's probably a fat fingered home owner setting or disarming the system.

"Front or garage entry door, Fill-in-the-blank window, sliding glass door, interior motion...": they are not going to change the way the officer responds to the scene. Once the officer gets there, all that matters is if it is in-progress, someone is probably going to be running with a TV. Otherwise, it's a real break-in and the suspect is gone, or it's a false alarm. Run the tags of any cars in the driveway or near the home, check the perimeter for open door or window, try to take a peek in a window, ask dispatch if a responder is coming out, and either wait for them, or clear the scene. Happens dozens, if not a hundred times a day, especially in the upper-middle class neighborhoods.
 
2012-06-19 12:32:51 AM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: maxximillian: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Jesus, in this day and age people still don't use mechanical emergency door openers? Even the trunk on my 2010 Chrysler had an emergency release lever (until I removed it.) It sucks this guy died but a simple release latch was all he needed to prevent this.

Just curious. Why did you remove it?

It was a little dangling hook thing and stuff kept catching on it and releasing the trunk. I just removed the handle part, you can still work the release mechanism by pulling a little cable.


Leave it to Chrysler to fark up someone as simple as a trunk release.
 
2012-06-19 12:33:52 AM  
Dear medical-minded Fark expertise:

If it was the CO2 that caught up with him: Would it have been a more, or less, traumatic death than Carbon Monoxide would be? (I'm not suggesting Dry Ice Suicides, but am genuinely curious).

Thanks much,

KM
 
2012-06-19 12:37:35 AM  

kenny's mom: f it was the CO2 that caught up with him: Would it have been a more, or less, traumatic death than Carbon Monoxide would be?


Ever get a nose full of the gas coming off your soda. CO2 is acidic (carbonic acid). I can't imagine it would be a comfortable death.
 
2012-06-19 12:38:06 AM  

kenny's mom: Dear medical-minded Fark expertise:

If it was the CO2 that caught up with him: Would it have been a more, or less, traumatic death than Carbon Monoxide would be? (I'm not suggesting Dry Ice Suicides, but am genuinely curious).

Thanks much,

KM


More. CO2, being what we breathe out, is what triggers the "oh shiat death is approaching" alarm in your body. It's why holding your breathe will turn painful.

Basically: Any other inert/poison gas (like CO), and you die peacefully and unaware of what is happening. But if it is CO2, you get a panicky, painful asphyxiation.
 
2012-06-19 12:38:51 AM  

CruiserTwelve: Question: What percentage of burglary alarms received by the police are false? I'll give you a hint: It's between 99 and 100 percent.


www.standupamericaus.org
 
2012-06-19 12:39:18 AM  
When I did my stint in the fast food industry, every walk-in cooler I'd ever seen had a fire axe hanging up inside it, just in case all the other fail-safes went awry.
 
2012-06-19 12:44:23 AM  

maxximillian: ArcadianRefugee: So the owner was killed because he refused to fix a safety feature that would have saved his life?

Well, my sympathy just went out the window.

Do you think he knew it was going to happen? Makes me wonder? What a way to go? A long period of time to know you did it to yourself.... ouch. I had a scuba diving class in college and the professor told us stories of cave divers that got lost and had enough time to write notes to their loved ones. if i go because of my own stupidity I'd hate for it to take a long time

/this is also why I wont skydive. Way to much time to think well we sure farked up this time.


Maybe, but "I died trying something I've always wanted to do" is a might bit better than "I died because I was too lazy or cheap or criminal* to fix a farking door handle".

*not sure if these things are required in any way

kenny's mom: Dear medical-minded Fark expertise:

If it was the CO2 that caught up with him: Would it have been a more, or less, traumatic death than Carbon Monoxide would be? (I'm not suggesting Dry Ice Suicides, but am genuinely curious).

Thanks much,

KM


[csb]

Went to a Halloween party at a friend-of-a-friend's in NJ. Showed up, knocked on the door, door was answered and I went inside ... where it was just as cold as outside....

The host had gone all out for the event, buying shiatloads of dry ice to get that "foggy" effect you see in movies. Had bowls of water with dry ice chunks in it, a dragon's head with such a bowl inside it so the dragon was fuming.....

Only, because of the temperatures, they had the apartment sealed up. One of my friends and fellow part-goers is a short fellow, cresting at 5' or so. He'd complain about a headache, "go outside for some fresh air" for a bit, feel better and return only to feel crappy again later. Eventually, one of them noticed all the coffee-table-level candles had gone out / wouldn't stay lit. Then someone put 2 and 2 together and they opened all the windows in the place.

I can't help but sometimes thinking it could've been the awesomest Halloween if I'd showed up and everyone were dead. Slightly more memorable, anyway.

[/csb]
 
2012-06-19 12:48:23 AM  

kenny's mom: Dear medical-minded Fark expertise:

If it was the CO2 that caught up with him: Would it have been a more, or less, traumatic death than Carbon Monoxide would be? (I'm not suggesting Dry Ice Suicides, but am genuinely curious).


The poison goes to work on the central nervous system, causing severe muscle spasms followed by the inevitable drooling. At this point, the entire digestive system collapses accompanied by uncontrollable flatulence. Until finally, the poor bastard is reduced to a quivering wasted piece of jelly
 
2012-06-19 12:50:38 AM  
I guess that's NOT how he went...

images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-06-19 01:03:55 AM  
Even telling someone that you went in does not always worked. Greg Brady told Bobby he was going into Sam's cooler and then Bobby, dumbass that he is, came in after him and locked the cooler.
 
2012-06-19 01:12:15 AM  
images.buddytv.com
The poor bastard slipped up on dry ice, while cutting corners too fast.
 
2012-06-19 01:14:10 AM  

Mugato: I saw this episode of Three's Company.


That is always the first image that pops into my head when I think about getting locked in a cooler. Jack taught be an important lesson that episode.
 
2012-06-19 01:15:29 AM  
I live in Germantown. The cops here aren't known for being particularly bright.

That said, if the inner door release on your walk-in deep freezer breaks, you fix the damn thing Immediately. Recreation activities can wait.

Lots of stupid in this story.
 
2012-06-19 01:18:23 AM  
Oh, this one was downtown (didn't read the very last paragraph before previous post). That's even worse; Memphis cops are generally idiots.
 
2012-06-19 01:24:21 AM  

Welfare Xmas: Ever get a nose full of the gas coming off your soda. CO2 is acidic (carbonic acid). I can't imagine it would be a comfortable death.


Just to be specific, H2CO3 (carbonic acid) is acidic because when CO2 dissolved in water the H-O bonds are weak allowing it to act as a proton donor (acid). Plain CO2, not so much.

illicit: More. CO2, being what we breathe out, is what triggers the "oh shiat death is approaching" alarm in your body. It's why holding your breathe will turn painful.

Basically: Any other inert/poison gas (like CO), and you die peacefully and unaware of what is happening. But if it is CO2, you get a panicky, painful asphyxiation.


I agree with the symptoms of CO2 buildup, and inert gases can kill you peacefully unaware (nitrogen asphyxiation), but there are plenty of poison gases including CO that cause unpleasant symptoms, assuming you're conscious to experience them.
 
2012-06-19 01:32:55 AM  

maxximillian:
Do you think he knew it was going to happen? Makes me wonder? What a way to go? A long period of time to know you did it to yourself.... ouch. I had a scuba diving class in college and the professor told us stories of cave divers that got lost and had enough time to write notes to their loved ones. if i go because of my own stupidity I'd hate for it to take a long time


There was almost certainly no way for him to know that the cops were already there and decided it was a false alarm, right? Maybe he died with the hope that someone was still going to respond to the alarm.
 
2012-06-19 01:35:26 AM  

GBB: First, coolers like this need to have a panic alarm installed in the event that 1) you accidentally lock yourself in there, or 2) you are purposely locked in there. I'm beginning to suspect that he tripped that panic alarm.

If that was the panic alarm, why didn't the alarm company report it as a "panic button" instead of a simple burglary trip? Maybe they did and the dispatcher or officer didn't realize it? Or perhaps the alarm company had that zone labeled wrong?

Which reminds me; whenever I get my home alarm installed, I'm having the tech write in all sorts of interesting descriptions for the different zones. "Gorilla enclosure, moat motion, alien vault, divide by zero, stripper pole failure". Put any one of those at the end of, "Please respond to 123 Main St for a residential alarm, audible, indicating ______________".

No one really cares what the alarm indicates when they respond if it's not a keypad activation. Even then, it's probably a fat fingered home owner setting or disarming the system.

"Front or garage entry door, Fill-in-the-blank window, sliding glass door, interior motion...": they are not going to change the way the officer responds to the scene. Once the officer gets there, all that matters is if it is in-progress, someone is probably going to be running with a TV. Otherwise, it's a real break-in and the suspect is gone, or it's a false alarm. Run the tags of any cars in the driveway or near the home, check the perimeter for open door or window, try to take a peek in a window, ask dispatch if a responder is coming out, and either wait for them, or clear the scene. Happens dozens, if not a hundred times a day, especially in the upper-middle class neighborhoods.


I work for a security company setting up burglary ando fire alarm accounts, and I got a real kick out of your reply.

Seriously though, the police responded to a panic alarm? And didn't call the alarm company back to ask for a keyholder? Our company protocol is to call the cops back after 30 minutes on panic/hold-ups/duress alarms for dispositions. Then we reach out to the emergency contacts. Usually someone is being reached out too.

/don't get me started on the crazy ass customers that pull panic alarms for company. So lonely.
 
2012-06-19 01:43:06 AM  
In all honestly, I spent a good many years working in restaraunts back in the late 70's and early 80's. Every single freezer and refrigerator and an inside push button to work the latch so that you could never lock yourself in it. I guess the new advanced restaraunt freezers and refrigerators have been designed much better to keep people from gettting away with stealing that veal cutlet.
 
2012-06-19 01:46:40 AM  

cheap_thoughts: Seriously though, the police responded to a panic alarm? And didn't call the alarm company back to ask for a keyholder? Our company protocol is to call the cops back after 30 minutes on panic/hold-ups/duress alarms for dispositions. Then we reach out to the emergency contacts. Usually someone is being reached out too.

/don't get me started on the crazy ass customers that pull panic alarms for company. So lonely.


Sometimes, I listen to the local police scanner to help me sleep. It's amazing how many 911 calls are like that.

"An elderly gentleman at 124 Floral has called in requesting police assistance with his receding gumline. Again."

In any case, man. 30 minutes? That's a long time for me to in the cooler.
 
2012-06-19 01:49:37 AM  
I managed to lock myself in an industrial walk-in cooler once, during a high school summer job at a biotechnology plant. On the door that had just latched behind me was a big white sign with red letters:

IF ACCIDENTALLY LOCKED INSIDE,
PULL HANDLE TO RELEASE DOOR.

To the right of the sign was a red metal handle, and a red arrow behind it showing the travel path in 1:1 scale.

I pulled the handle as shown, and the door opened smoothly as if nothing were amiss.

...holy cats...that was nice...

I stepped into the hallway thinking that I needed to pay a little more attention to detail on the job.
 
2012-06-19 01:56:31 AM  

GBB: First, coolers like this need to have a panic alarm installed in the event that 1) you accidentally lock yourself in there, or 2) you are purposely locked in there. I'm beginning to suspect that he tripped that panic alarm.

If that was the panic alarm, why didn't the alarm company report it as a "panic button" instead of a simple burglary trip? Maybe they did and the dispatcher or officer didn't realize it? Or perhaps the alarm company had that zone labeled wrong?

Which reminds me; whenever I get my home alarm installed, I'm having the tech write in all sorts of interesting descriptions for the different zones. "Gorilla enclosure, moat motion, alien vault, divide by zero, stripper pole failure". Put any one of those at the end of, "Please respond to 123 Main St for a residential alarm, audible, indicating ______________".

No one really cares what the alarm indicates when they respond if it's not a keypad activation. Even then, it's probably a fat fingered home owner setting or disarming the system.

"Front or garage entry door, Fill-in-the-blank window, sliding glass door, interior motion...": they are not going to change the way the officer responds to the scene. Once the officer gets there, all that matters is if it is in-progress, someone is probably going to be running with a TV. Otherwise, it's a real break-in and the suspect is gone, or it's a false alarm. Run the tags of any cars in the driveway or near the home, check the perimeter for open door or window, try to take a peek in a window, ask dispatch if a responder is coming out, and either wait for them, or clear the scene. Happens dozens, if not a hundred times a day, especially in the upper-middle class neighborhoods.


Or you know, the guy could of made sure they had a cooler that opens from the inside like safety regulations require in some cases. I know they do here, when I was volunteering at the Food Bank they had huge walk in coolers, but guess what there was a push lever so I could open the thing from the inside.
 
2012-06-19 02:20:57 AM  

maxximillian:

No police department breaks in to a building for an alarm if it appears secure. You have more false alarms than positives. So ignoring that lets say the police break down the door and the they don't find anything suspicious, now the building has a gaping opening were a secure door used to be. So now what? Do we have the police stay there and guard the broken door? For how long? if they don't stay then you have a building wide open for the taking.



If the lazy cops weren't so busy eating doughnuts, the SWAT team could have come and blown the door off its hinges just to be safe. What if a thief broke in and locked the doors behind him? i gotta think of everything?
 
2012-06-19 02:22:38 AM  
A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.
dumbass committed suicide.

YAWN
 
2012-06-19 02:25:00 AM  
OSHA violation?
 
2012-06-19 02:25:50 AM  

RoyBatty: A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Whoever designed this with an electrical button and not a physical release mechanism needs to be shot.

Whoever owns a cooler where the emergency release mechanism is known to be broken gets little sympathy from me.


You have to assume that the "button" was a mechanical button, not an electrical "switch".
Every walk in that I have ever been in had a large PUSH BUTTON (mechanical) which would unlatch the door. Sounds like this was broken??? HAHAHAHAH
and was broken for some time???
HAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAH

So, the light in my bathroom has bare wires that spark while I am in the shower. It has been doing that for some time, but no worries .... bhwhahahahahaha
ahahahahah ahahahahaha

/I love when stupid people die because they are stupid.
 
2012-06-19 02:27:27 AM  

bbfreak: Or you know, the guy could of made sure they had a cooler that opens from the inside like safety regulations require in some cases. I know they do here, when I was volunteering at the Food Bank they had huge walk in coolers, but guess what there was a push lever so I could open the thing from the inside.


I wonder what kind of violations were committed for food safety using dry ice to keep the food cool. Of course, this is floriduh Tenn???? so strange. figured it had to be fluriduh
 
2012-06-19 02:31:59 AM  

zamboni: Mugato: I saw this episode of Three's Company.

I saw it on an episode of All in the Family...so I'm older than you.

Or was that Archie Bunker's Place... maybe I'm younger.

I'm so confused.

/Screw it... I saw it in a Harold Lloyd silent film.over 80 years ago,
//23 skidoo!


and there was the time on the brady bunch where two of the boys gets locked up in sam's meat locker---the small one climbs out of the window and saves the day.
 
2012-06-19 02:36:16 AM  

freewill: cheap_thoughts: Seriously though, the police responded to a panic alarm? And didn't call the alarm company back to ask for a keyholder? Our company protocol is to call the cops back after 30 minutes on panic/hold-ups/duress alarms for dispositions. Then we reach out to the emergency contacts. Usually someone is being reached out too.

/don't get me started on the crazy ass customers that pull panic alarms for company. So lonely.

Sometimes, I listen to the local police scanner to help me sleep. It's amazing how many 911 calls are like that.

"An elderly gentleman at 124 Floral has called in requesting police assistance with his receding gumline. Again."

In any case, man. 30 minutes? That's a long time for me to in the cooler.


Some police departments can't respond in 30 minutes to a hold up alarm.

Memphis, Dallas, and Las Vegas come to mind..
 
2012-06-19 02:58:08 AM  
farm8.staticflickr.com

Amateur! Didn't he know that he could just use the phone line in the wall to send touch tone tunes to his girlfriend who would then find him with the help of a stereotypical new york cabbie?
 
2012-06-19 03:04:56 AM  

illicit: kenny's mom: Dear medical-minded Fark expertise:

If it was the CO2 that caught up with him: Would it have been a more, or less, traumatic death than Carbon Monoxide would be? (I'm not suggesting Dry Ice Suicides, but am genuinely curious).

Thanks much,

KM

More. CO2, being what we breathe out, is what triggers the "oh shiat death is approaching" alarm in your body. It's why holding your breathe will turn painful.

Basically: Any other inert/poison gas (like CO), and you die peacefully and unaware of what is happening. But if it is CO2, you get a panicky, painful asphyxiation.


CSB time:

I bought a box of what I thought were whipped cream chargers (N2O). Turned out they were CO2 chargers. THAT was an unpleasant experience I have no intention of repeating.

/csb
 
2012-06-19 03:22:55 AM  

fusillade762: illicit: kenny's mom: Dear medical-minded Fark expertise:

If it was the CO2 that caught up with him: Would it have been a more, or less, traumatic death than Carbon Monoxide would be? (I'm not suggesting Dry Ice Suicides, but am genuinely curious).

Thanks much,

KM

More. CO2, being what we breathe out, is what triggers the "oh shiat death is approaching" alarm in your body. It's why holding your breathe will turn painful.

Basically: Any other inert/poison gas (like CO), and you die peacefully and unaware of what is happening. But if it is CO2, you get a panicky, painful asphyxiation.

CSB time:

I bought a box of what I thought were whipped cream chargers (N2O). Turned out they were CO2 chargers. THAT was an unpleasant experience I have no intention of repeating.

/csb


What happened? You gotta finish the story!
 
2012-06-19 03:40:53 AM  

cheap_thoughts: What happened? You gotta finish the story!


I think it might have been so unpleasant that it shouldn't be repeating.

Nice cat.
 
2012-06-19 04:06:41 AM  

libranoelrose: cheap_thoughts: What happened? You gotta finish the story!

I think it might have been so unpleasant that it shouldn't be repeating.


Oh, sorry. I didn't inhale very much because it just felt *wrong*. Much like when soda goes down the wrong pipe. I spent the next 5 minutes coughing and cursing myself for not checking the label more carefully.
 
2012-06-19 04:17:28 AM  

fusillade762: Much like when soda goes down the wrong pipe.


Grape soda is the worst.
 
2012-06-19 06:15:05 AM  

choo: The poison goes to work on the central nervous system, causing severe muscle spasms followed by the inevitable drooling. At this point, the entire digestive system collapses accompanied by uncontrollable flatulence. Until finally, the poor bastard is reduced to a quivering wasted piece of jelly


I had the lasagna
 
2012-06-19 06:15:08 AM  

SouthernFriedYankee: I live in Germantown. The cops here aren't known for being particularly bright.

That said, if the inner door release on your walk-in deep freezer breaks, you fix the damn thing Immediately. Recreation activities can wait.

Lots of stupid in this story.


The cops did nothing wrong. As was pointed out earlier they ate not obligated o BREAK IN to a secure building. A contact was there with the alarm code.

Dude died of his own stupidity , not that of the cops.
 
2012-06-19 06:29:36 AM  
And they'll still expect free coffee from there, just watch.
 
2012-06-19 06:34:31 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: So the owner was killed because he refused to fix a safety feature that would have saved his life?

Well, my sympathy just went out the window.


This. If one of his employees had died you can bet he'd fight his responsibility for maintaining a dangerous nuisance.
 
2012-06-19 07:50:54 AM  
Like RAAAIIINNNN on your wedding dayyyyyyy....

/locked door, OF own making
//CO2
///DARWIN
 
2012-06-19 08:07:06 AM  
/csb on

I was held hostage in an armed robbery and locked in a walk in refrigerator. I too used the "silent" alarm to summon the police. Turns out the "silent" alarm wasn't "silent" at all. Yes the "" are for emphasis.

/csb off
/getting a kick out of these replies.
 
2012-06-19 08:11:55 AM  

maxximillian: So the police are supposed to break in to check on an alarm when the building appears secure? Even if they have an emergency contact and that person shows up with a key what are the chances anyone would have checked the cooler?


I think the idea is not that the responding cops should have broken in, but that the investigators shouldn't jump to conclusions based solely on the appearance of the scene.

But yeah, the cops bear zero responsibility for this.

Need_MindBleach: Then again, running out of oxygen is probably not the greatest way to go.


definitely not the worst. You just start feeling sleepy, take a nap, and don't wake up.
 
2012-06-19 08:28:55 AM  
My office building is in a marginal part of town. About three times a year I get a call from the security company. They dispatch a cop who sticks a ticket on our door for false alarm. They never ever come in or inspect it outside of driving around the two sides of the building that you can see from the road. That's on true. Once when the alarm went off in the middle of a Saturday and the only person here was a young cute art director, they walked all through the building with her despite there was near zero chance that there was anyone here.

When I am summoned at 3 am they give it a cursory look and are back at the donut shop long before it drive the 20 minutes it takes to get here. That is one of the many reasons I am happy I have an 80 pound dog that makes the ride with me. He's a cupcake, but he barks mean.
 
2012-06-19 08:51:37 AM  
www.showcase.ca
 
2012-06-19 08:58:08 AM  

Tanishh: My parents (who are older than the guy who died) and even my grandparents carry their cell phones with them almost everywhere they go. I'm hardly ever without mine in my house, and never outside of it. When I was last on co op (working at GE) they had a humidity controlled storage room with two big metal doors - you couldn't operate one if the other was open. I heard from one of the guys I worked with that he once got trapped in between the doors because the one behind him got stuck in limbo where it wasn't fully closed but he couldn't open it again or close it further from his side, and if he hadn't had his phone on him he'd have been trapped for the better part of a day. Wouldn't have died, but it would've sucked big time regardless. After he told me that, never went into that room without my phone for any reason.

I feel like if you have a freezer or other secured room, the first and biggest rule no matter what is you either don't go in unless someone else knows you went in (and knows to check if you're gone too long) or you don't go in without a phone.


Cell phone might not have helped since at that point you are sitting in a big metal box that would work like a faraday cage.
 
2012-06-19 08:58:44 AM  
Oh, well, someone will realize I'm gone and come looking for me. I'll be out of here in no time.

i86.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-19 09:15:19 AM  
death by carbon dioxide is quicker and less painful than freezing to death, so he had that going for him. But it also means he had less time to be rescued. Perhaps he was already incapacitated by the time police arrived five minutes later and was unable to shout to them.
 
2012-06-19 09:15:34 AM  
images.tvrage.com

This is the burglar alarm. This is the trapped-in-the-cooler-breathing-carbon-dioxide alarm.

It's a semi-tone higher!
 
2012-06-19 09:17:13 AM  
Police are inept fools. You're right, "It's not news".
 
2012-06-19 09:41:14 AM  
good thing i have a bottle of GABA on me at all times!!!@

afterstream.com
 
2012-06-19 09:52:07 AM  

zamboni: Mugato: I saw this episode of Three's Company.

I saw it on an episode of All in the Family...so I'm older than you.

Or was that Archie Bunker's Place... maybe I'm younger.

I'm so confused.

/Screw it... I saw it in a Harold Lloyd silent film.over 80 years ago,
//23 skidoo!


I saw this acted out in the Roman Coliseum during an intermission while some Christian dismemberments were being removed. Oddly enough, Mr. Firley was in that rendition and would not cuddle with Jack to stay warm.
 
2012-06-19 10:00:57 AM  

Kurmudgeon: maxximillian: So the police are supposed to break in to check on an alarm when the building appears secure? Even if they have an emergency contact and that person shows up with a key what are the chances anyone would have checked the cooler?

Yeah, it's called don't make assumptions.


Here we meet someone that knows absolutely nothing about emergency response.

Let me help.

If the cops broke in every locked structure with an activating alarm, the would spend their days doing nothing except forcing entry and farkers would be ranting about the cops always tearing stuff up for no reason. I would be shocked if 1 in 100 alarms triggered due to an actual burglary.

I'm a volunteer firefighter/emt in a department that makes 500-600 responses a year. About 10% of those are alarms. In almost 15 years, know how many automatic alarms I've answered that were real fires?

NONE.

Burglar alarms are even worse.

Further, the PD/FD doesn't usually have keyholder information. The alarm company is typically responsible for making that contact or providing the info - and they often don't have current numbers or have downright wrong information.

It sucks for this guy, but the cops did everything right.
 
2012-06-19 10:01:48 AM  

kenny's mom: Dear medical-minded Fark expertise:

If it was the CO2 that caught up with him: Would it have been a more, or less, traumatic death than Carbon Monoxide would be? (I'm not suggesting Dry Ice Suicides, but am genuinely curious).

Thanks much,

KM


I wouldn't think it would be pleasant. CO2 is what makes you need to breathe. If there's enough of it it's fairly quick, though.

SlothB77: death by carbon dioxide is quicker and less painful than freezing to death, so he had that going for him. But it also means he had less time to be rescued. Perhaps he was already incapacitated by the time police arrived five minutes later and was unable to shout to them.


Things which provide good temperature isolation (the insulation around the fridge) also provide reasonable sound isolation. It's unlikely the cops could have heard him.
 
2012-06-19 10:20:01 AM  
Ben Jarhvi: [is locked in a freezer with Fred and reading fortune cookies] "The warmth in your heart makes others ha-ha-happy".

Fred: I still like this one
[reads the one in his hand]

Fred: "Opportunity is waiting, you need but to open the door".
 
2012-06-19 11:10:05 AM  

Babwa Wawa: doglover: Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?

Maybe it's a kill switch or interior door handle? I dunno.

But in this case, a kill switch wouldn't work because it was being temporarily cooled by dry ice.


A kill switch is obviously not needed, the guy is dead.
 
2012-06-19 11:21:11 AM  
Bet the cooler door gets fixed now...
 
2012-06-19 11:25:07 AM  

RoyBatty: A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Whoever designed this with an electrical button and not a physical release mechanism needs to be shot.

Whoever owns a cooler where the emergency release mechanism is known to be broken gets little sympathy from me.


^ all that

Dude knew the door was broken and locked himself in anyway. +1 for Darwin
 
2012-06-19 12:30:06 PM  
You know, it sucks that someone had to die because of a broken safety handle on a cooler that could have been fixed so easily. And while it saddens me that ANYONE had to die, I'm at least a LITTLE bit relieved to know that is wasn't an innocent employee who got stuck in there; it was the cheap, neglectful owner who never fixed a simple safety handle.
 
2012-06-19 12:36:31 PM  

bbcard1: Once when the alarm went off in the middle of a Saturday and the only person here was a young cute art director, they walked all through the building with her despite there was near zero chance that there was anyone here.


Of course!

/cops are great
//not really
///anarchy is worse
////but not by much
//slashies!!!
 
2012-06-19 02:01:38 PM  

MatrixOutsider: Why didn't he make one of these while he was in the cooler?:

[www.nasa.gov image 300x259]


Nice carbon scrubber.
 
2012-06-19 04:18:37 PM  

Ensnared Wit: [farm8.staticflickr.com image 480x344]

Amateur! Didn't he know that he could just use the phone line in the wall to send touch tone tunes to his girlfriend who would then find him with the help of a stereotypical new york cabbie?


Came for this, leaving satisfied.

/Help me Rhonda
// Help Help, me Rhonda
 
2012-06-19 08:55:13 PM  
nickolas

Bet the cooler door gets fixed now...

Or not. Those mooks are probably thinking "What are the odds of THAT happening again? ZERO"
 
2012-06-19 11:01:28 PM  

optikeye: doglover: Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?

I worked at a zoo and we had a 50' long freezer for seafood and meat. It had a giant handle on the door. You couldn't get trapped inside unless someone locked you in there.

Reading the Article. The interior door opening mech was broken---and had been for some time.
They had also filled the freezer with Dry Ice because of a power outage.


So, Darwin award material. This guy owned the place, and he cheaped out on the safety features. Like door handles. WTF? How much could that repair have cost?

But going back to the kill switch thing, I don't see how they could help a lot, because a well-insulated cool room will keep the heat out for a long time, even after it;s turned off.
 
2012-06-20 12:45:38 AM  

firefly212: Loren: A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Darwin.

RoyBatty: A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Whoever designed this with an electrical button and not a physical release mechanism needs to be shot.

Yup. I had to raise holy hell about implementing an e-stop in software rather than hardware. Nobody else got it about the danger. (This was for a saw that would have had no problem sawing a person in half if they weren't too fat.)

I hate to be so harsh... but the guy who died owned the cooler, failed to repair emergency exit features of the freezer, and subsequently died. The only lucky thing about this is that it wasn't just some lackey who died in the freezer, but the guy who should've cared about safety in the first place. Also, the default of safety mechanisms when broken should be on the safe side...eg the door should not be able to lock shut if the exit features are not working... on my power toys and all over my shop, when a safety is tripped or non-functional, it doesn't make the place less safe, just less functional (no power, mechanical stops, etc.). I can't imagine being any less careful if there was a potential for other people to get hurt as a result of my action/inaction.



This is something I don't understand about nuclear reactor meltdowns. Shouldn't nuclear rods hang from electromagnet joints that release if power fails, letting the rods drop into lead sheathes so they can't emit to each other anymore? Or even drop to different vertical levels, so they're not close to each other anymore? Or is something like that already done, and I'm misunderstanding the problem?

I guess I must be misunderstanding something...
 
2012-06-20 02:34:17 AM  
Isildur

This is something I don't understand about nuclear reactor meltdowns. Shouldn't nuclear rods hang from electromagnet joints that release if power fails, letting the rods drop into lead sheathes so they can't emit to each other anymore? Or even drop to different vertical levels, so they're not close to each other anymore? Or is something like that already done, and I'm misunderstanding the problem?

How much vertical seperation is needed, two or three times the normal height?

That's going to be one big pressure vessel.
 
2012-06-20 03:51:29 AM  

studebaker hoch: Isildur

This is something I don't understand about nuclear reactor meltdowns. Shouldn't nuclear rods hang from electromagnet joints that release if power fails, letting the rods drop into lead sheathes so they can't emit to each other anymore? Or even drop to different vertical levels, so they're not close to each other anymore? Or is something like that already done, and I'm misunderstanding the problem?

How much vertical seperation is needed, two or three times the normal height?

That's going to be one big pressure vessel.



Wouldn't
| | | | |
 | | | | |

already be a lot better than
||||||||||
?

/or, like I said, dropped into sheaths
 
2012-06-20 04:09:26 AM  

Nana's Vibrator: zamboni: Mugato: I saw this episode of Three's Company.

I saw it on an episode of All in the Family...so I'm older than you.

Or was that Archie Bunker's Place... maybe I'm younger.

I'm so confused.

/Screw it... I saw it in a Harold Lloyd silent film.over 80 years ago,
//23 skidoo!

I saw this acted out in the Roman Coliseum during an intermission while some Christian dismemberments were being removed. Oddly enough, Mr. Firley was in that rendition and would not cuddle with Jack to stay warm.


There was this time in a cave in Neandertal when a rock slide trapped Ug and me. As we had not yet discovered fire, it was rather cold, let me tell you. So I says to Ug "OY! Stop drawing on the wall and crank the thermostat up to like 412 ooks." He told me "Fark off. If we don't have fire, we sure as hell don't have thermostats. And what the hell is an ook. That won't be invented until the Cro Magnons get here... dumbass." I didn't think that was necessary, so I killed him with a rock.
 
2012-06-20 10:41:56 AM  
Isildur

Wouldn't
| | | | |
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already be a lot better than
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/or, like I said, dropped into sheaths


That's at least doubling the siize of the reactor vessel.

Your idea sounds fine, but wouldn't a better idea be to get off nuclear power entirely and build huge thermal solar collectors in the western deserts? These have already been started.

/how about a nice game of chess?
 
2012-06-20 01:25:57 PM  
RIPLEY: Stay here a minute, Newt.

...One fire alarm later...

HICKS: Vasquez, Hudson, meet me in medical! We got a fire!
 
2012-06-21 12:04:47 AM  

studebaker hoch: That's at least doubling the siize of the reactor vessel.

Your idea sounds fine, but wouldn't a better idea be to get off nuclear power entirely and build huge thermal solar collectors in the western deserts? These have already been started.

/how about a nice game of chess?



Entirely

? Using what for power at night? Turbines at pumped storage lakes?

Also, how many square miles of panels or reflectors would be needed at current solar power conversion efficiency?
 
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