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(The Tennessean)   Bad: You get locked inside your restaurant's cooler. Good: You find a way to trip the burglar alarm to summon police. Fail: Cops find the restaurant dark and the doors locked, so they ignore it   (tennessean.com) divider line 130
    More: Sad, communications center  
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16466 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jun 2012 at 11:05 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-18 08:58:09 PM  
Wow. Death by TV trope.
 
2012-06-18 09:14:25 PM  
Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?

I worked at a zoo and we had a 50' long freezer for seafood and meat. It had a giant handle on the door. You couldn't get trapped inside unless someone locked you in there.
 
2012-06-18 09:24:55 PM  

doglover: Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?


Maybe it's a kill switch or interior door handle? I dunno.

But in this case, a kill switch wouldn't work because it was being temporarily cooled by dry ice.
 
2012-06-18 09:26:50 PM  

Babwa Wawa: doglover: Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?

Maybe it's a kill switch or interior door handle? I dunno.

But in this case, a kill switch wouldn't work because it was being temporarily cooled by dry ice.


But the interior door handle. . .

Anyway, I thought they solved this problem ages ago. Moral of the story: don't own a cooler alone.
 
2012-06-18 09:30:30 PM  

doglover: Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?

I worked at a zoo and we had a 50' long freezer for seafood and meat. It had a giant handle on the door. You couldn't get trapped inside unless someone locked you in there.


Reading the Article. The interior door opening mech was broken---and had been for some time.
They had also filled the freezer with Dry Ice because of a power outage.
 
2012-06-18 09:38:41 PM  

optikeye: doglover: Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?

I worked at a zoo and we had a 50' long freezer for seafood and meat. It had a giant handle on the door. You couldn't get trapped inside unless someone locked you in there.

Reading the Article. The interior door opening mech was broken---and had been for some time.
They had also filled the freezer with Dry Ice because of a power outage.


(o.O)

And the dude went in there!? Alone!?

(´・_・`)

I guess he was

(`◎_◎)

too cool for school.


YEEEAHH!
 
2012-06-18 09:48:32 PM  
I saw this episode of Three's Company.
 
2012-06-18 10:22:39 PM  
That reminds me: The Shining is coming on tonight.
 
2012-06-18 11:03:35 PM  
Most coolers have emergency trips for the motor inside, and safety releases for the door.

Did someone lock the door behind him with a padlock?
 
2012-06-18 11:07:40 PM  

Apos: That reminds me: The Shining is coming on tonight.


4.bp.blogspot.com

It had to be done.
 
2012-06-18 11:09:30 PM  
FTA Police do not suspect foul play. There was no trauma on the body.

So the perfect murder is that easy now.
 
2012-06-18 11:10:33 PM  
A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Whoever designed this with an electrical button and not a physical release mechanism needs to be shot.

Whoever owns a cooler where the emergency release mechanism is known to be broken gets little sympathy from me.
 
Oak
2012-06-18 11:12:04 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: FTA Police do not suspect foul play. There was no trauma on the body.

So the perfect murder is that easy now.


Part of planning the "perfect murder" is picking a jurisdiction where the cops are really stupid and lazy.
 
2012-06-18 11:14:52 PM  

Oak: J. Frank Parnell: FTA Police do not suspect foul play. There was no trauma on the body.

So the perfect murder is that easy now.

Part of planning the "perfect murder" is picking a jurisdiction where the cops are really stupid and lazy.


Sanford?
 
2012-06-18 11:15:23 PM  
That's just cold

/I wonder if there was still dry ice in there?
 
2012-06-18 11:15:44 PM  

Oak: J. Frank Parnell: FTA Police do not suspect foul play. There was no trauma on the body.

So the perfect murder is that easy now.

Part of planning the "perfect murder" is picking a jurisdiction where the cops are really stupid and lazy.


So the police are supposed to break in to check on an alarm when the building appears secure? Even if they have an emergency contact and that person shows up with a key what are the chances anyone would have checked the cooler?
 
2012-06-18 11:17:04 PM  
My parents (who are older than the guy who died) and even my grandparents carry their cell phones with them almost everywhere they go. I'm hardly ever without mine in my house, and never outside of it. When I was last on co op (working at GE) they had a humidity controlled storage room with two big metal doors - you couldn't operate one if the other was open. I heard from one of the guys I worked with that he once got trapped in between the doors because the one behind him got stuck in limbo where it wasn't fully closed but he couldn't open it again or close it further from his side, and if he hadn't had his phone on him he'd have been trapped for the better part of a day. Wouldn't have died, but it would've sucked big time regardless. After he told me that, never went into that room without my phone for any reason.

I feel like if you have a freezer or other secured room, the first and biggest rule no matter what is you either don't go in unless someone else knows you went in (and knows to check if you're gone too long) or you don't go in without a phone.
 
2012-06-18 11:19:08 PM  

RoyBatty:
Whoever owns a cooler where the emergency release mechanism is known to be broken gets little sympathy from me.


It's a pity the guy died, but at least it was the same guy who was responsible for not replacing an emergency release mechanism that had been broken for some time, rather than some schmuck.

Also, at least he died from gas inhalation, and not freezing to death, like I thought when I read the headline. *shudders*

Then again, running out of oxygen is probably not the greatest way to go.
 
2012-06-18 11:19:20 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: That's just cold

/I wonder if there was still dry ice in there?



Know how I know you DRTFA? They suspect he died from inhaling carbon dioxide from the dry ice...
 
2012-06-18 11:20:56 PM  

adeist69: MaudlinMutantMollusk: That's just cold

/I wonder if there was still dry ice in there?


Know how I know you DRTFA? They suspect he died from inhaling carbon dioxide from the dry ice...


I did skim it...

/obviously missed that detail, though
//thanks
 
2012-06-18 11:21:55 PM  

maxximillian: So the police are supposed to break in to check on an alarm when the building appears secure? Even if they have an emergency contact and that person shows up with a key what are the chances anyone would have checked the cooler?


Yeah, it's called don't make assumptions.
 
2012-06-18 11:22:45 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: FTA Police do not suspect foul play. There was no trauma on the body.

So the perfect murder is that easy now.


Well, if Joe Shmoe or someone did murder you in that exact manner, all you'd have to do would be to find something sharp and carve JOE SHMOE DID IT into the wall. Then again, if you really hated Joe, you could do that even if he wasn't the one who locked you inside the cooler....
 
2012-06-18 11:26:50 PM  

Ed Finnerty: Wow. Death by TV trope.


*laughtrack*
 
2012-06-18 11:27:43 PM  

Kurmudgeon: maxximillian: So the police are supposed to break in to check on an alarm when the building appears secure? Even if they have an emergency contact and that person shows up with a key what are the chances anyone would have checked the cooler?

Yeah, it's called don't make assumptions.


No police department breaks in to a building for an alarm if it appears secure. You have more false alarms than positives. So ignoring that lets say the police break down the door and the they don't find anything suspicious, now the building has a gaping opening were a secure door used to be. So now what? Do we have the police stay there and guard the broken door? For how long? if they don't stay then you have a building wide open for the taking.
 
2012-06-18 11:27:47 PM  

RoyBatty: Whoever owns a cooler where the emergency release mechanism is known to be broken gets little sympathy from me.



Agreed. I was feeling bad for the guy until I read that. His own neglect cost him his life.
 
2012-06-18 11:31:46 PM  
Conversation secretly acquired moments before:

"Hey man...you think we should fix that door handle inside?"
"Naw...we should be fine...just don't get locked in there, ha ha ha ha!"
"Yeah! Ha...I'm just gonna go take inventory, okay? You lock up."
 
2012-06-18 11:32:30 PM  

dopeydwarf: Apos: That reminds me: The Shining is coming on tonight.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 500x375]

It had to be done.



Yup.
 
2012-06-18 11:33:51 PM  

Tanishh: My parents (who are older than the guy who died) and even my grandparents carry their cell phones with them almost everywhere they go. I'm hardly ever without mine in my house, and never outside of it. When I was last on co op (working at GE) they had a humidity controlled storage room with two big metal doors - you couldn't operate one if the other was open. I heard from one of the guys I worked with that he once got trapped in between the doors because the one behind him got stuck in limbo where it wasn't fully closed but he couldn't open it again or close it further from his side, and if he hadn't had his phone on him he'd have been trapped for the better part of a day. Wouldn't have died, but it would've sucked big time regardless. After he told me that, never went into that room without my phone for any reason.

I feel like if you have a freezer or other secured room, the first and biggest rule no matter what is you either don't go in unless someone else knows you went in (and knows to check if you're gone too long) or you don't go in without a phone.


Our walk-in cooler, at least, acts as a faraday cage. A cell phone probably won't work in most.
 
2012-06-18 11:35:03 PM  
So the owner was killed because he refused to fix a safety feature that would have saved his life?

Well, my sympathy just went out the window.
 
2012-06-18 11:36:24 PM  

optikeye: doglover: Do they make coolers without door handles and kill switches inside still?

I worked at a zoo and we had a 50' long freezer for seafood and meat. It had a giant handle on the door. You couldn't get trapped inside unless someone locked you in there.

Reading the Article. The interior door opening mech was broken---and had been for some time.
They had also filled the freezer with Dry Ice because of a power outage.


That tidbit kind of turned the situation from "tragic accident with lazy police" to "possible darwin award recipient with lazy police." He was part owner so the decision not to repair the broken safety was likely at least partially on him, placing anyone working there in danger of a similar situation happening.
 
2012-06-18 11:37:00 PM  

Tanishh: My parents (who are older than the guy who died) and even my grandparents carry their cell phones with them almost everywhere they go. I'm hardly ever without mine in my house, and never outside of it. When I was last on co op (working at GE) they had a humidity controlled storage room with two big metal doors - you couldn't operate one if the other was open. I heard from one of the guys I worked with that he once got trapped in between the doors because the one behind him got stuck in limbo where it wasn't fully closed but he couldn't open it again or close it further from his side, and if he hadn't had his phone on him he'd have been trapped for the better part of a day. Wouldn't have died, but it would've sucked big time regardless. After he told me that, never went into that room without my phone for any reason.

I feel like if you have a freezer or other secured room, the first and biggest rule no matter what is you either don't go in unless someone else knows you went in (and knows to check if you're gone too long) or you don't go in without a phone.


I understand where you're coming from, but I do have to wonder what kind of signal one would get on a cell phone from inside a walk in cooler, which is really just a large metal box with thick insulation, that is inside a (judging from the pic in the article) poured concrete building, the interior walls of which most likely have metal studs. I guessing not much of one, but I'm no EE either. Sucks that he didn't have one to at least find out if there's a signal in there.
 
2012-06-18 11:37:42 PM  
A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Darwin.

RoyBatty: A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Whoever designed this with an electrical button and not a physical release mechanism needs to be shot.


Yup. I had to raise holy hell about implementing an e-stop in software rather than hardware. Nobody else got it about the danger. (This was for a saw that would have had no problem sawing a person in half if they weren't too fat.)
 
2012-06-18 11:38:09 PM  

Tanishh: My parents (who are older than the guy who died) and even my grandparents carry their cell phones with them almost everywhere they go. I'm hardly ever without mine in my house, and never outside of it. When I was last on co op (working at GE) they had a humidity controlled storage room with two big metal doors - you couldn't operate one if the other was open. I heard from one of the guys I worked with that he once got trapped in between the doors because the one behind him got stuck in limbo where it wasn't fully closed but he couldn't open it again or close it further from his side, and if he hadn't had his phone on him he'd have been trapped for the better part of a day. Wouldn't have died, but it would've sucked big time regardless. After he told me that, never went into that room without my phone for any reason.

I feel like if you have a freezer or other secured room, the first and biggest rule no matter what is you either don't go in unless someone else knows you went in (and knows to check if you're gone too long) or you don't go in without a phone.



Would a phone even get reception inside a big freezer? Would it not depend on the carrier as well? Some are shiat in some places. They all vary.
 
2012-06-18 11:38:27 PM  

Ed Finnerty: Wow. Death by TV trope.


Final Destination 6?
 
2012-06-18 11:38:58 PM  
I've broken down several Cooler/Freezer units and he must have quickly been overcome with gas. It shouldn't be that hard to bust the door open.
 
2012-06-18 11:39:04 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: So the owner was killed because he refused to fix a safety feature that would have saved his life?

Well, my sympathy just went out the window.


Do you think he knew it was going to happen? Makes me wonder? What a way to go? A long period of time to know you did it to yourself.... ouch. I had a scuba diving class in college and the professor told us stories of cave divers that got lost and had enough time to write notes to their loved ones. if i go because of my own stupidity I'd hate for it to take a long time

/this is also why I wont skydive. Way to much time to think well we sure farked up this time.
 
2012-06-18 11:41:14 PM  
we need a darwin tag
 
2012-06-18 11:42:31 PM  
He was destined for a wood chipper accident anyway. Less pain this way.
 
2012-06-18 11:43:19 PM  
So this guy's next of kin get to sue ... themselves? for an unsafe work environment?
 
2012-06-18 11:43:37 PM  

Loren: A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Darwin.

RoyBatty: A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

Whoever designed this with an electrical button and not a physical release mechanism needs to be shot.

Yup. I had to raise holy hell about implementing an e-stop in software rather than hardware. Nobody else got it about the danger. (This was for a saw that would have had no problem sawing a person in half if they weren't too fat.)


I hate to be so harsh... but the guy who died owned the cooler, failed to repair emergency exit features of the freezer, and subsequently died. The only lucky thing about this is that it wasn't just some lackey who died in the freezer, but the guy who should've cared about safety in the first place. Also, the default of safety mechanisms when broken should be on the safe side...eg the door should not be able to lock shut if the exit features are not working... on my power toys and all over my shop, when a safety is tripped or non-functional, it doesn't make the place less safe, just less functional (no power, mechanical stops, etc.). I can't imagine being any less careful if there was a potential for other people to get hurt as a result of my action/inaction.
 
2012-06-18 11:50:03 PM  

Kurmudgeon: maxximillian: So the police are supposed to break in to check on an alarm when the building appears secure? Even if they have an emergency contact and that person shows up with a key what are the chances anyone would have checked the cooler?

Yeah, it's called don't make assumptions.


Question: What percentage of burglary alarms received by the police are false? I'll give you a hint: It's between 99 and 100 percent.
 
2012-06-18 11:53:09 PM  
Reminds me of the time I called the cops on a man assaulting a woman for stealing drugs from his car. The one cop car that responded about 15 minutes later slowed down to about 25 mph as he drove past the guy's house.
 
2012-06-18 11:56:58 PM  
Dry ice emits carbon dioxide

In much the same way rain emits water.
 
2012-06-18 11:57:44 PM  
Jesus, in this day and age people still don't use mechanical emergency door openers? Even the trunk on my 2010 Chrysler had an emergency release lever (until I removed it.) It sucks this guy died but a simple release latch was all he needed to prevent this.
 
2012-06-18 11:58:04 PM  
blogs.orlandoweekly.com

Unavailable for comment.
 
2012-06-19 12:00:27 AM  

dopeydwarf: Apos: That reminds me: The Shining is coming on tonight.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 500x375]

It had to be done.


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-06-19 12:01:56 AM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Jesus, in this day and age people still don't use mechanical emergency door openers? Even the trunk on my 2010 Chrysler had an emergency release lever (until I removed it.) It sucks this guy died but a simple release latch was all he needed to prevent this.


It weren't in werkin' order.
 
2012-06-19 12:03:32 AM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Jesus, in this day and age people still don't use mechanical emergency door openers? Even the trunk on my 2010 Chrysler had an emergency release lever (until I removed it.) It sucks this guy died but a simple release latch was all he needed to prevent this.


Just curious. Why did you remove it?
 
2012-06-19 12:03:54 AM  
A button that would have opened the cooler from the inside was not working and had been broken for some time.

I have no sympathy for him. He, as co-owner, should have gotten the cooler door fixed the instant someone alerted him to it not functioning properly. I worked at a bakery once that had a broken handle, you could get in but you couldn't get out. With the bonus of, if you were in the cooler your cell phone couldn't get reception. I got trapped in there once, and I was lucky that the assistant manager noticed I was gone after ten minutes.

The owner always said it was too expensive to get fixed. I always wanted to shove the owner in there for ten minutes and let him see how he liked wondering whether or not someone would let him out felt like.
 
2012-06-19 12:05:43 AM  
Maybe make sure your place is up to code and you can actually get out of the freezer when the door is closed. We are instructed where I'm at to close the freezer door behind you if you are going to be in there for any period of time. However there is a big, manually operated latch to let you out from the inside.
 
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