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(Reuters)   There's a great way to replace the lost calories after gastric bypass surgery   (in.reuters.com) divider line 60
    More: Fail, gastric bypass surgery, bariatric surgery, effects of alcohol  
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22038 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jun 2012 at 11:07 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-18 10:45:10 PM  
Nacho cheese sauce enemas?
 
2012-06-18 10:59:32 PM  
2 % points? Amateurs.
 
2012-06-18 11:11:28 PM  
Not necessarily.

^ First low-carb diet book, afaik.
 
2012-06-18 11:12:12 PM  
Most studies have weak sauce definitions of binge drinking. What's their definition of a drinking problem?

Yeah, thinner people have a Better shot at getting laid In a bar. Drinking goes up. Enjoy the poon or Johnson as the case may be.
 
2012-06-18 11:12:15 PM  
Morbidly obese people replace addictions to food with other addictions, including alcoholism. Brought to you by the Rick Romero Institute for Health.
 
2012-06-18 11:12:22 PM  
Miller 64 will keep your calorie count in check.
 
2012-06-18 11:13:43 PM  

wardlyone: Miller 64 will keep your calorie count in check.


As well as your sobriety.
 
2012-06-18 11:14:02 PM  
Looks like I picked the wrong week to stop butt-chugging Jager.
 
2012-06-18 11:18:33 PM  
Drinking strait Bacon grease?
 
2012-06-18 11:19:30 PM  

majestic: wardlyone: Miller 64 will keep your calorie count in check.

As well as your sobriety.


My dad drinks this stuff, gives me crap when I'm out early after keeping pace while drinking craft beers and local brews.

/it tastes like water
//kicks like water too
 
2012-06-18 11:20:29 PM  
Pfft...

2%?

Anecdotal at best
 
2012-06-18 11:22:32 PM  
Meh, I know two people who got this done who don't understand that the meals are to get smaller with this procedure. Now their fat and lazy asses eat the same amount, it just takes them three times as long to eat.

/and then biatch because the surgery didn't do a thing for them....
 
2012-06-18 11:34:19 PM  
gastric bypass is just sickening. humans have just got to get a grip here.

if 2% represents 2000 people, then that makes 100,000 people having this procedure.


WTF. invasive radical guts replumbing surgery for morbidly obese people with no other options...and we have these kinds of numbers ?
 
2012-06-18 11:35:10 PM  

dopeydwarf: 2 % points? Amateurs.


Gonad the Ballbarian: Pfft...

2%?

Anecdotal at best


I thought that at first, too. But the way they present it in that sentence is misleading.

alcohol abuse climbed only 2 percentage points

Further down:

Before surgery, 7.6 percent of the patients had drinking problems, but two years after surgery, it had increased to 9.6 percent.

In total that's WAY more than a 2% increase.
 
2012-06-18 11:35:33 PM  

basemetal: Meh, I know two people who got this done who don't understand that the meals are to get smaller with this procedure. Now their fat and lazy asses eat the same amount, it just takes them three times as long to eat.

/and then biatch because the surgery didn't do a thing for them....


I worked in a clinic that patients were referred to before surgery. A psychologist signed off on whether people were good candidates and since we were a research clinic we collected a lot of data. A lot of people in the entrance forms indicated that they didn't intend to alter their lifestyle at all afterwards.

Many people did change and used the surgery to get to a place where they could more easily exercise and change their lives. It can help. Still, the number who weren't interested in eating any differently after or exercising more was extremely large. There were also a few files that contained notes from surgeons detailing complications that lead to death in surgery. That's the part that boggles my mind. If you have no interest in changing even though you are explicitly told you need to for the surgery to make a difference long term, why are you risking your life?
 
2012-06-18 11:39:09 PM  
One of my friend's exes had the surgery like 9 months before they started dating. Well, apparently he had fallen off the wagon food wise for a couple of weeks before they met so my friend took it upon himself to keep him straight (so to speak). That included that he forbade him from drinking at all because his doctor expressly limited him to something like 2oz of booze a day while this guy would try to sneak a bottle of Schnapps up to his place.

Everything came to a head when the BF threw a party at his place and all of a sudden there was this colossal melt down. My friend asked me to drive him home and I had to literally, with the help of 2 other people, pry the ex's fingers off of my bud's leg to let him go.

/yeah. he was completely wasted at the time.
//he also gained back all his weight and apparently an additional 100 lbs
 
2012-06-18 11:41:20 PM  

fusillade762: dopeydwarf: 2 % points? Amateurs.

Gonad the Ballbarian: Pfft...

2%?

Anecdotal at best

I thought that at first, too. But the way they present it in that sentence is misleading.

alcohol abuse climbed only 2 percentage points

Further down:

Before surgery, 7.6 percent of the patients had drinking problems, but two years after surgery, it had increased to 9.6 percent.

In total that's WAY more than a 2% increase.


I notice it was mostly younger men. So what was happening is these guys got their radical surgery, hoping to become trim, fit, chick magnets. They lost the weight and found out chick magnets also have to have good personalities, which these sad fools didn't develop all the time they were using food to replace their social lives.

So now they're skinny and the girls still don't like them. Hence they drink.
 
2012-06-18 11:44:37 PM  
2% sounds like it would be within the margin of error.

/yes?
 
2012-06-18 11:44:58 PM  
Yep. This happened to a friend's aunt. She got the bypass treatment and then became extra sensitive to alcohol. She used to be able to handle 4 or 5 glasses of wine, but now she gets sloppy drunk from just one.
 
2012-06-18 11:47:20 PM  

jbrooks544: 2% sounds like it would be within the margin of error.

/yes?


Hard to say. The study might have shown that 2% of the people had not had a drinking problem before, and then developed one. Then it would not be an error thing.
 
2012-06-18 11:50:17 PM  

jbrooks544: 2% sounds like it would be within the margin of error.

/yes?


It would be. Unless you read my post above, in which it seems the actual increase is more like 20%.
 
2012-06-18 11:52:24 PM  
I'm actually surprised that the before group had a 7.6% rate of alcohol problems.

what physician gives gastric bypass to someone with an alcohol problem ? alcohol is the most common way these people fail to lose weight after treatment. They should be dry for a year before they go under the knife.
 
2012-06-18 11:53:44 PM  

jaybeezey: What's their definition of a drinking problem?


How about this?

www.jeepfan.com
 
2012-06-18 11:56:05 PM  

fragMasterFlash: Looks like I picked the wrong week to stop butt-chugging Jager.


Why don't you ask Jager how he feels about you stopping?
 
2012-06-19 12:01:47 AM  
Really? You paid a lot of money for the surgery and suddenly realize it's still going to require a lifestyle change to maintain your success and this revelation is going to cause some people to drink more is scientify. Why not just start handing out anti-fat pills.
 
2012-06-19 12:07:48 AM  
I have known two women who have had a bypass, both became raging "binge" drinkers (bingers because their window from 1st drink to passed out in a puddle of piss is only an hour), promiscuous and divorced.

The medical community deliberately looks past the Hippocratic Oath on this one (as they do any plastic surgery in the name of vanity) by requiring bypass patients to "prove" that they have tried all other methods and that they have failed. This proof is in the form of a letter the patient writes, describing all of the diets and exercise regimens that have failed them. Never mind that they have never tried them.

WHY ARE WE GIVING GASTRIC BYPASSES TO PEOPLE WHO CANNOT PERFORM A CHEESEBURGER BYPASS?

The two that I know were fat because they didn't exercise and used food as a drug. Take away their food hole and they just stuff it with Pinot and Penis.
 
2012-06-19 12:12:43 AM  
Isn't the purpose of gastric bypass to lose weight? Doesn't a loss of weight mean less alcohol is required for intoxication? Don't people tend to associate frequency of higher levels of intoxication with drinking problems? Therefore, gastric bypass surgeries cause drinking problems in a loose sense of "cause".
 
2012-06-19 12:20:27 AM  
But, I bet if you look at the dollar amount spent on that alcohol, it will be a lot less after the surgery than before. I hear you can get pretty snockered on 2 shots of booze after surgery.
 
2012-06-19 12:26:00 AM  
No need for gastric bypass - save 20K and start the couch to 5K program and then just keep building mileage. Worked wonders for my lazy ass - lost 70lbs since last year and ran my 2nd half marathon at a 1:36 in April. Looking forward to running my first full marathon in the fall.

/ We get fat because we choose to be lazy - just exercise and eat healthy, it isn't rocket science.
 
2012-06-19 12:26:29 AM  

Captain_Ballbeard: I have known two women who have had a bypass, both became raging "binge" drinkers (bingers because their window from 1st drink to passed out in a puddle of piss is only an hour), promiscuous and divorced.

The medical community deliberately looks past the Hippocratic Oath on this one (as they do any plastic surgery in the name of vanity) by requiring bypass patients to "prove" that they have tried all other methods and that they have failed. This proof is in the form of a letter the patient writes, describing all of the diets and exercise regimens that have failed them. Never mind that they have never tried them.

WHY ARE WE GIVING GASTRIC BYPASSES TO PEOPLE WHO CANNOT PERFORM A CHEESEBURGER BYPASS?

The two that I know were fat because they didn't exercise and used food as a drug. Take away their food hole and they just stuff it with Pinot and Penis.


Wait a minute. Do you mean to tell me that people who lack the discipline to eat healthily and exercise also lack the discipline to control their drinking and sexuality after they lose the weight the easy way? Preposterous, I blame the drinking on a gland problem; because fark personal responsibility.
 
2012-06-19 12:31:33 AM  
So it's new that an addictive personality finds a new addiction after losing their first addiction?

I'm gobsmacked
 
2012-06-19 12:39:25 AM  
Guinness, it's a cereal, an astringent and a painkiller all in one.
 
2012-06-19 12:42:20 AM  
www.ifsociety.com

sooner or later it happens to everyone.
 
2012-06-19 01:05:35 AM  
I had the surgery. 8 yrs later and it is still a success. They told us that we would have to go on a 2 week sugar-free liquid diet after the surgery. Emphasis on sugar-free. Some idiot melted chocolate and drank it. Ended up in the ER. Dumbass.

/not an alcoholic
 
2012-06-19 01:05:53 AM  
As someone who had a ridiculously hard time controlling my weight even with diet and exercise, gastric band was a godsend. I wasn't that overweight to begin with, but I did have type 2 diabetes, which runs in my family - even my grandpa, who weighed maybe a buck fifty.

That said, I went from not being able to lose any weight to losing 50 lbs. And it's true - stomach surgery, even a band (as opposed to a bypass) turns you into a lightweight when it comes to alcohol. I can be good and hammered after two drinks now. It's weird, but at least I'm a cheap date!
 
2012-06-19 01:09:39 AM  
Gastric bypass blah blah blah. Alcoholic now. Blah blah blah. Getting a kick out of this.
 
2012-06-19 01:11:12 AM  

fusillade762: jbrooks544: 2% sounds like it would be within the margin of error.

/yes?

It would be. Unless you read my post above, in which it seems the actual increase is more like 20%.


Fractions are funny. Funny things aren't real. Therefore math is made up.
 
2012-06-19 01:12:08 AM  

fusillade762: dopeydwarf: 2 % points? Amateurs.

Gonad the Ballbarian: Pfft...

2%?

Anecdotal at best

I thought that at first, too. But the way they present it in that sentence is misleading.

alcohol abuse climbed only 2 percentage points

Further down:

Before surgery, 7.6 percent of the patients had drinking problems, but two years after surgery, it had increased to 9.6 percent.

In total that's WAY more than a 2% increase.


Your maths, they confuse me. The difference is exactly 2. How is it more?
 
2012-06-19 01:14:11 AM  
So they had the surgery to lose weight and they got more confident and felt pretty so they went out and partied more, is that a big shock?
 
2012-06-19 01:15:14 AM  

fragMasterFlash: Looks like I picked the wrong week to stop butt-chugging Jager.


I nearly choked on my #4 Supersized extra value meal with a large chocolate/strawberry milkshake.

/not really...broke, no food, nearly choked on my bologna sandwich, though. Props.
 
2012-06-19 01:20:08 AM  
From the article: " according to a large study ". Indeed.

For the super-huge people, it's the folk that keep feeding them that are a big part of the problem. Why not give them gastric band surgery?
 
2012-06-19 01:31:43 AM  
I've known two people that received this procedure. A mother and a daughter. The mother repeatedly told her nineteen year old daughter that she would never get a man as a fatty. So they had her gain even more weight to have a qualifying BMI.

The daughter loses the weight, actually looks somewhat pretty afterward, and decides to use Lindsey Lohan as a role model. After a year of smoking and drinking, complications set in. Scar tissue builds up at the newly engineered "stomach exit point" and effectively blocks any solid food from being digested. Within 18 months of surgery she goes from 230lbs to 89lbs. A second surgery was performed, where a significant portion of her "plumbing" was removed. In order to keep her alive they had to change the bypass architecture. Now she has gained much of the original weight back.

Perhaps these surgeries shouldn't be treated as cosmetic. Vanity is a sick farking game.

/cbs
 
2012-06-19 01:46:01 AM  

dopekitty74: fusillade762: dopeydwarf: 2 % points? Amateurs.

Gonad the Ballbarian: Pfft...

2%?

Anecdotal at best

I thought that at first, too. But the way they present it in that sentence is misleading.

alcohol abuse climbed only 2 percentage points

Further down:

Before surgery, 7.6 percent of the patients had drinking problems, but two years after surgery, it had increased to 9.6 percent.

In total that's WAY more than a 2% increase.

Your maths, they confuse me. The difference is exactly 2. How is it more?


Going from a total of 7.6% of the population in question to 9.6% isn't merely a 2% increase. If it went, say, from 5% to 10% wouldn't that mean that the incidence had doubled?

Someone who has more experience with statistics feel free to correct me if I'm talking out of my ass here.
 
2012-06-19 02:11:32 AM  
This happened to my cousin. She (like everyone in my family) had a weight problem. She was also I think a binge eater and maybe an alcoholic too, presurgery. She got the surgery, and she kept it all together while she was losing weight, but then about a year afterwards she just about lost her mind. In any case she went from drinking to smoking crack and became a crack addict.

Personally I think being addicted to twinkies is better. You don't usually try to hold up your daughters friends parents for a hit of twinkie.

I'm not so sure I blame the surgery completely - she might have ended up in the same place without it, but it certainly didn't help. She didn't have much willpower or followthrough before becoming an addict, and at this point her mind is completely gone.
 
2012-06-19 02:30:20 AM  

Ken VeryBigLiar: jaybeezey: What's their definition of a drinking problem?

How about this?

[www.jeepfan.com image 320x200]


Hahaha classic
 
2012-06-19 03:02:35 AM  
OK. What I find surprising is that a person known to have a drinking problem is still eligible for the surgery.

On second thought, it's not like an organ transplant - there is no limit to the number of gastric bypasses that can be performed.
 
2012-06-19 03:06:13 AM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Yep. This happened to a friend's aunt. She got the bypass treatment and then became extra sensitive to alcohol. She used to be able to handle 4 or 5 glasses of wine, but now she gets sloppy drunk from just one.


Did she actually lose weight? Because I've lost close to 25% of my body weight in the past 2.5 years and I can tell you that it made a hell of a difference to my alcohol tolerance. I was always kind of a lightweight, but the first drink I had after dropping a significant portion of the weight hit me like a ton of bricks.
 
2012-06-19 03:24:31 AM  

fusillade762: dopekitty74: fusillade762: dopeydwarf: 2 % points? Amateurs.

Gonad the Ballbarian: Pfft...

2%?

Anecdotal at best

I thought that at first, too. But the way they present it in that sentence is misleading.

alcohol abuse climbed only 2 percentage points

Further down:

Before surgery, 7.6 percent of the patients had drinking problems, but two years after surgery, it had increased to 9.6 percent.

In total that's WAY more than a 2% increase.

Your maths, they confuse me. The difference is exactly 2. How is it more?

Going from a total of 7.6% of the population in question to 9.6% isn't merely a 2% increase. If it went, say, from 5% to 10% wouldn't that mean that the incidence had doubled?

Someone who has more experience with statistics feel free to correct me if I'm talking out of my ass here.


It's a 26.32% increase.
 
2012-06-19 07:32:39 AM  
My mother never touched alcohol before her gastric bypass surgery. Now she's my alcoholic father's drinking buddy.
 
2012-06-19 07:55:40 AM  
"Wendy King of the University of Pittsburgh and colleagues"

Is one of her colleagues Carl McDonald, Jr.?
 
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