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(Phys Org2)   Cornell student creates algorithm that can solve 10,000 piece jigsaw puzzles in 24 hours, pretty much guaranteeing he will never solve the riddle that is woman   (phys.org) divider line 23
    More: Spiffy, Cornell University, Eastman Kodak, solvers, computer engineering, algorithms, computer vision, slopes, orientation  
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1778 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Jun 2012 at 9:32 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-17 09:09:57 AM
"pretty much guaranteeing he will never solve the riddle that is woman"

So, he will be just like the rest of us guys, right?
 
2012-06-17 09:39:04 AM
Solution:

Step 1. Assume a square jig saw piece.
Step 2. Repeat Step 1 10,000 times.
Step 3. Profit!
 
2012-06-17 09:57:34 AM

Boudica's War Tampon: Solution:

Step 1. Assume a square jig saw piece.
Step 2. Repeat Step 1 10,000 times.
Step 3. Profit!


The approach isn't limited to squares. It's just there was no reason to introduce detailed edges in this case.
 
2012-06-17 10:01:47 AM
void solve_puzzle(Puzzle puzzle){
while(puzzle!solved)
solve_puzzle(puzzle);
}


easy
 
2012-06-17 10:06:15 AM

Loren: Boudica's War Tampon: Solution:

Step 1. Assume a square jig saw piece.
Step 2. Repeat Step 1 10,000 times.
Step 3. Profit!

The approach isn't limited to squares. It's just there was no reason to introduce detailed edges in this case.


Don't cloud the issue with facets. Now if you'll excuse me I have to go round off some chickens.
 
2012-06-17 10:55:47 AM

Beerguy: "pretty much guaranteeing he will never solve the riddle that is woman"

So, he will be just like the rest of us guys, right?


DONE IN ONE!
 
2012-06-17 11:17:15 AM
I've solved a couple of these:
ecx.images-amazon.com
Fun, frustrating, and satisfying as hell when you get it set.
 
2012-06-17 11:28:01 AM
I'm trying to decide whether now (given that everything is moving slowly but surely away from paper) is the worst or the perfect time to develop anti-document-shredding algorithms.
 
2012-06-17 11:38:13 AM

LockeOak: I'm trying to decide whether now (given that everything is moving slowly but surely away from paper) is the worst or the perfect time to develop anti-document-shredding algorithms.


What would an anti-document-shredding algorithm be? Would it prevent the deletion of documents? Or would it prevent the disk sectors from being overwritten? I see exactly no way this could be decently worked out without the need to buy a new disk drive every time it fills up because you can't get rid of any of the data.
 
2012-06-17 12:15:07 PM
He could write an algorithm to solve puzzles, an algorithm to build a house, and an algorithm on how to cry algorithmic tears onto his algorithmic pillow because the one thing - the only thing - that he couldn't write an algorithm for...was love.
 
2012-06-17 12:41:06 PM

Beerguy: "pretty much guaranteeing he will never solve the riddle that is woman"

So, he will be just like the rest of us guys, right?


Protip: the answer is "money"
 
2012-06-17 01:56:39 PM

bukketmaster: Beerguy: "pretty much guaranteeing he will never solve the riddle that is woman"

So, he will be just like the rest of us guys, right?

Protip: the answer is "money"


you might think so, but you;d be wrong.
 
2012-06-17 02:08:28 PM
But what about the riddle of steel?
 
2012-06-17 04:39:22 PM

DerAppie: LockeOak: I'm trying to decide whether now (given that everything is moving slowly but surely away from paper) is the worst or the perfect time to develop anti-document-shredding algorithms.

What would an anti-document-shredding algorithm be? Would it prevent the deletion of documents? Or would it prevent the disk sectors from being overwritten? I see exactly no way this could be decently worked out without the need to buy a new disk drive every time it fills up because you can't get rid of any of the data.


I meant an algorithm that can reconstruct a physically shredded paper document after the individual fragments have been scanned, like the DARPA challenge mentioned in TFA. This would have to include the ability to account for missing fragments (= to solving a jigsaw puzzle with missing pieces).
 
2012-06-17 04:55:37 PM
Seems straightforward...step 1, look at picture on box.
 
2012-06-17 05:03:15 PM

LockeOak: DerAppie: LockeOak: I'm trying to decide whether now (given that everything is moving slowly but surely away from paper) is the worst or the perfect time to develop anti-document-shredding algorithms.

What would an anti-document-shredding algorithm be? Would it prevent the deletion of documents? Or would it prevent the disk sectors from being overwritten? I see exactly no way this could be decently worked out without the need to buy a new disk drive every time it fills up because you can't get rid of any of the data.

I meant an algorithm that can reconstruct a physically shredded paper document after the individual fragments have been scanned, like the DARPA challenge mentioned in TFA. This would have to include the ability to account for missing fragments (= to solving a jigsaw puzzle with missing pieces).


Ah, I only skimmed the first paragraph and looked at the pretty pictures. Then my mind went document + algorithm = digital files after reading your comment.

/Ashamed
 
2012-06-17 07:14:31 PM
The guy's not a Cornell student, and the algorithm doesn't work on traditionally-shaped jigsaw puzzle pieces, but this headline is otherwise correct.
 
2012-06-17 07:38:59 PM

poot_rootbeer: The guy's not a Cornell student


Yeah, kinda weird how people make that assumption. I was a visiting scientist once for a couple of months, and in that time I had about a dozen people refer to me as a student. It was really annoying when they would introduce me to someone else like that. Its my fault in part because I could never affect the whole up-my-own-ass thing the faculty do.
 
2012-06-17 08:55:57 PM
Still no cure for Eternity II.
 
2012-06-17 10:04:46 PM
Chicks dig scientists. It looks like he has a lady and a few kids, based on my limited facebook research.
 
2012-06-17 10:36:10 PM
That's less than a match on average every 8 seconds. I'm unimpressed. Even as a lowly software engineer I'm sure I could do better.
 
2012-06-18 01:33:26 AM

PsyLord: But what about the riddle of steel?



Dammit, I was gonna to ask that
 
2012-06-18 01:52:31 AM
...ha!
 
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