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(ZDNet)   Windows 8: a design disaster   (zdnet.com) divider line 207
    More: Interesting, error messages, Windows Explorer, Start Menu, disasters, tool-bars, Windows Phones  
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10944 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Jun 2012 at 9:49 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-17 12:19:39 PM

ryarger: People simply won't adopt a completely new metaphor like this. Windows 95 is doomed from the start, and an Amiga is now president.

/Have no idea if W8 is any good
//But saying that it'll fail because of a new interaction metaphor is stupid


The difference is that Win 95 offered a huge number of benefits over Win 3.11. People would accept a leap for it.

The problem today is that operating systems are a mature product. I still have a PC on Vista because, for the sake of the license cost and upgrade cost, I can't be bothered upgrading. Sure, Win 7 is faster, but most of my delays are my network and hard drive.

And the differences between Win 7 and Win 8 are even smaller. built-in USB 3? Login using a PIN? Mount ISO natively rather than downloading a free application? Yeah, BFD. I ain't going to risk upgrading my PC, let alone go through a whole new UI paradigm just for that.
 
2012-06-17 12:20:27 PM
Something like Metro "on the desktop" might make sense when desks start looking like this:

www.stowiki.org

Until then, it just gets in the way.
 
2012-06-17 12:47:35 PM

farkeruk: ryarger: People simply won't adopt a completely new metaphor like this. Windows 95 is doomed from the start, and an Amiga is now president.

/Have no idea if W8 is any good
//But saying that it'll fail because of a new interaction metaphor is stupid

The difference is that Win 95 offered a huge number of benefits over Win 3.11. People would accept a leap for it.

The problem today is that operating systems are a mature product. I still have a PC on Vista because, for the sake of the license cost and upgrade cost, I can't be bothered upgrading. Sure, Win 7 is faster, but most of my delays are my network and hard drive.

And the differences between Win 7 and Win 8 are even smaller. built-in USB 3? Login using a PIN? Mount ISO natively rather than downloading a free application? Yeah, BFD. I ain't going to risk upgrading my PC, let alone go through a whole new UI paradigm just for that.


These complaints make sense.

I'm primarily an OS X user and Lion and Mountain Lion are showing signs of moving in the same direction. The saving grace had been that the iOS elements moving into OS X have been easily ignorable and the fundamental metaphors remain intact.

/Have not once used "Launchpad" seriously
//Wake me when an OS comes with built in slashies
 
2012-06-17 12:52:08 PM

ryarger: Have not once used "Launchpad" seriously


Launchpad would be better for a new user. When you've already got an Applications folder stuffed with programs, the effort required to organize the Launchpad is too great relative to how easy it is to organize.

On the flip side, the Mac App Store is actually halfway decent. It seems to have attracted less of the shovelware that the iOS App Store has, the DRM is easily breakable, and there are a few nice marquee titles (c'mon Arkham City- the Arkham Asylum port was decent!)
 
2012-06-17 01:17:54 PM
I run SLAX, PuppyArcade, Hiren's and Xubuntu from a 32gig Flash drive

you, sir, are a doofus hipster; or is it hipster doofus??
 
2012-06-17 01:22:15 PM

E_Henry_Thripshaws_Disease: I run SLAX, PuppyArcade, Hiren's and Xubuntu from a 32gig Flash drive

you, sir, are a doofus hipster; or is it hipster doofus??


At least he's a grown-up.
 
2012-06-17 01:39:19 PM

ryarger: I'm primarily an OS X user and Lion and Mountain Lion are showing signs of moving in the same direction. The saving grace had been that the iOS elements moving into OS X have been easily ignorable and the fundamental metaphors remain intact.


Apple have done this much better, thinking about what is appropriate for different sorts of users.

MS have an engineer's view of things "hey, it'd be much tidier to have a single code base". The problem is, there isn't that much overlap between how people want to use tablets and how they want to use desktops.
 
2012-06-17 01:51:56 PM

Charles_Nelson_Reilly: gingerjet: Consistency and predictability are hallmarks of interface design and Microsoft has basically thrown all that out the window with these idiotic designs.

This, this, this! Microsoft will not be happy until the OS and Office completely randomize their UI every time the machine is started.


What bothers and stresses me about it is that the office interface is so different than in 2003, that my skills at excel are hampered by it. I feel I have to buy the latest office every time for my home PC to study it for future employment, because when you're an accountant these stupid agencies make you take excel tests. However, I have yet to see anyone using 2007 or 2010 in the workplace. I guess some IT people figured out that MS didn't add any features, and used the ribbon to pull the wool over the customer's eyes.
 
2012-06-17 01:53:20 PM

E_Henry_Thripshaws_Disease: I run SLAX, PuppyArcade, Hiren's and Xubuntu from a 32gig Flash drive

you, sir, are a doofus hipster; or is it hipster doofus??


So now hipster is analogous to nerd?

It is amazing how "hipster" can be anything the user wants it to be. It is a magic word, a mighty word. A hipster word.
 
2012-06-17 03:06:18 PM
cman

Hopefully Windows 8 will be such a flop that companies that make OSes stop this bullshiat mobile on desktop philosophy.

fark Windows 8, fark GNOME 3, fark Unity

Fark KDE's crystal cr*p.
 
2012-06-17 03:11:26 PM

IanMoone: Somewhere along the line, MS missed an important market research point. Consumers are going to return their PCs in droves the moment they can't play Farmville by touching/clicking on the "Internet Explorer" button on the "desktop"


I'm someone who works with "average" consumers and this pretty much sums it up...unless MS makes some MAJOR changes, the resulting consumer shiatstorm is going to make the Vista debacle look like a lovefest by comparison.
 
2012-06-17 03:33:16 PM

RandomAxe: Windows' general design has been going downhill since 3.11, and that one wasn't terrific, either.


I'd say that all of the application managers back in the day sucked. Windows 3.1 Program Manager, Amiga Workbench 3.1, Mac System 7 Finder and twm for X. There were some nice third party tools for launching commonly used apps, but there was no official system integration, so it was usually all done by hand.

I thought the Start Menu in Windows 95 and NT4 was a huge jump forward. You didn't have to scroll around big windows of icons anymore or dig down through the filesystem for a program icon. My largest complaint was that they continued to allow applications to create their own program groups rather than to have the OS sort programs by type. Sometimes a company would create one program group for all of their apps (ie, Adobe → Photoshop 6 → Photoshop), other times they'd create a separate program group for each app (ie, Adobe Master Collection CS3 → Photoshop). But I do remember it being a little better... sometimes installers would add 2 or 3 program groups under the 3.1 days. Not so such under 95/NT4.

I don't see the changes to the Start Menu introduced in XP were a step back. I like the menu personalization that hides the unused junk that ends up in the program groups. I also like how it remembers my favorites and that I have the option to disable personalization if I choose.

I really like the way that KDE4 handles program management. It creates program groups based off of type (development, education, games, graphics, internet, etc...) and places program icons there. You don't get a lot of clutter from other crap (links to readme files) that program installers add to their Start Menu program group. That is probably the #1 thing I wish Windows would adopt.

As for Metro... I tried a couple of Windows phones before getting my Android and I really, really hated the tile interface. It was the #1 reason I decided not to get it. Now that it is coming to the Windows Desktop, I'm not very happy. I do not want to switch to the cult of Jobs. While the KDE environment is nice, I wouldn't want to use GNU/Linux or FreeBSD as my main desktop OS. So I guess unless they "fix" the Metro issue in Win8SP1, I'll be sticking with Win7 for the foreseeable future.
 
2012-06-17 03:48:43 PM

swahnhennessy: It is amazing how "hipster" can be anything the user wants it to be. It is a magic word, a mighty word. A hipster word.


I liked the word "hipster" before it was cool. Now it's all mainstream and overused.

I prefer the word "bourgeois". Not that you've ever head of it.
 
2012-06-17 03:54:12 PM
I don't see why this got this far. The interface for touchscreen devices and mouse n' keyboard devices are different - for good reasons. Why shoehorn one into the other?Since Metro is just a presentation layer why not have it on mobile devices and the "traditional" windows type interface on PC's? It isn't like skinning UI's is a radically new idea.

I've never hated MS products. They're not pretty but they work (and I don't have the myriad of issues other people have with them apparently). I'm not seeing what Metro does for me.
 
2012-06-17 05:35:43 PM

ryarger:
/Have not once used "Launchpad" seriously


I spent time organizing the Launchpad, but I still use Spotlight (cmd+space bar) to launch any application that isn't already in the Dock. It's just faster that way.
 
2012-06-17 05:38:00 PM
I was tasked with a project for my company to determine licensing requirements for a new project. It would have been worth several million dollars. I spent two to three times a week, for two months, on calls with Microsoft just to get just a quote. No one could figure out whether we needed OEM, ISV, Open, Select, Select-Plus, Reseller, Embedded, or ad infinitum licensing.

By the time someone finally figured out what we needed I decided to do the project on Linux. So, yeah, MS is a dinosaur. I just hope that the software people actually use gets ported to Linux before they buckle.
 
2012-06-17 05:39:02 PM

Archimedes' Principal: Windows 8 was expected to suck. It's the next version after a successful one.

/ Windows8, Windows7, Windows Vista, Windows XP, Windows ME, etc.


Yeah, what's with that? It really is the even-numbered releases that bomb.

After all these years, how can Microsoft still "not get it"?
 
2012-06-17 05:45:42 PM
SkunkWerks: If a cluttered desktop signifies a cluttered mind, what does an empty desktop signify?

Personally, I'm all about partitioning.

lordargent.com
 
2012-06-17 06:02:09 PM
I work for state government, we are just now finishing migration to Windows 7.

I can't see us ever going to Windows 8...
 
2012-06-17 06:10:01 PM

theurge14: Flint Ironstag: I'm still on XP. Tried 7 for a while, but went back to XP.

Why should I change? XP runs all the programmes I want, and that's all I want an OS to do.

Well, for one because XP's built in file search is the absolute worst search ever invented by anyone or anything in the universe for all time. Windows 7's search is worlds better.


I haven't even located the search in Win 7 ...
 
2012-06-17 06:21:10 PM
ekdikeo4: I haven't even located the search in Win 7 ...

File search? What's that?

// My files are right where I filed them. I don't need to 'search' for anything.

// using basically the same directory structure that I used back in the win 3.1 days

1) A separate partition for different types of files (as per the screenshot above, stuff from my cameras is Images, music is Frequency, etc

2) Nothing sits at the root.

3) A single folder on the desktop, named 'projects', that contains subfolders for everything that I'm currently working on.

// now that I'm using linux (ubuntu) as my primary OS, I can use ln -s to make shortcuts that actually work the way shortcuts should work (not those half aborted shortcuts that always used to piss me off about windows).
 
2012-06-17 06:43:29 PM
I do not want to switch to the cult of Jobs.

FWIW, you are allowed to just *use* mac computers without signing anything in blood. You know, like a regular person?

But feel free to continue thinking people only use macs because they idolize the guy who invented them, if it makes you feel any better about your current choice of platform.
 
2012-06-17 07:47:35 PM

ekdikeo4: I haven't even located the search in Win 7 ...


askyourpc.com

It's not exactly hidden, how could you miss it?
 
2012-06-17 08:33:11 PM

dennysgod: RandomAxe: Windows' general design has been going downhill since 3.11, and that one wasn't terrific, either.

I've stuck with XP because XP was actually an improvement over its immediate predecessors. Expecting any later version to be an improvement on XP is an act of absurd optimism, and I'm rarely absurd and optimistic at the same time.

Win7 is most certainly an improvement over XP, Win7 makes XP look like Win98r2


This.
 
2012-06-17 08:37:55 PM
Hand Banana : It's not exactly hidden, how could you miss it?

If they're anything like me, the first thing they did after installing windows 7 was find something to revert that awful start menu back to the windows XP version.

lordargent.com

// tangent / I am currently (right this moment) tweaking a fresh ubuntu 10.04 install on my netbook. I used the netbook as a testbed for 12.04 and for the latest version of mint, didn't care for either of them, reverting to Lucid.
 
2012-06-17 08:43:08 PM

enik: By the time someone finally figured out what we needed I decided to do the project on Linux. So, yeah, MS is a dinosaur. I just hope that the software people actually use gets ported to Linux before they buckle.


That's not going to be easy. I do cross-platform development and I find that it is a PITA. Even simple stuff like the C standard library is inconsistent across platforms, especially when dealing with 64-bit integers.

The fastest way to get people to port their Windows apps over to GNU/Linux or FreeBSD is to give them a compatible Win32 API layer. Supposedly WINE allows you to compile native ELF binaries that link to their shared libraries, but I haven't tried it. A few other commercial development kits allow the same thing.

But WINE brings up an interesting problem. As it gets better and better at running Windows binaries, there is less pressure for software developers to release Linux- or FreeBSD-specific binaries. Two cases in point: OS/2 ran Win32 and DOS programs so well, many companies skipped developing native OS/2 binaries; FreeBSD is the same way regarding Linux binaries. But because the public never saw software for those platforms, it gave the impression that they were hard to get software for.

I really think that the API compatibility layer is the way to go. The main debate would be if you would design it to the documented specifications or if you'd include all of the known quirks as well.
 
2012-06-17 08:44:48 PM

dustman81: ryarger: People simply won't adopt a completely new metaphor like this. Windows 95 is doomed from the start, and an Amiga is now president.

From Win95 onwards through Win7, people understood that everything revolved around the Start button. When Win95 came out, their commercials highlighted the Start button, even using The Rolling Stones "Start Me Up". Want to launch a program? Start -> Programs. Want to change a computer setting? Start -> Settings -> Control Panel. Want to set up a printer? Start -> Settings -> Printers.

Did Win95 have its issues? Yes, but that happens when you change architectures, as Win95 did going to 32-bit from Win 3.1's 16-bit. But, Win95 also made it easier for people to access the Internet as it had a built-in TCP stack. It didn't come preinstalled, but it was available to be installed and you didn't have to mess with Trumpet Winsock's settings. Win95 also introduced 'Plug-and-play', which means you didn't have to mess with IRQ and memory address settings. 'Plug-and-play' was buggy at first (having the nickname 'Plug-and-pray'), but it got better. Now, you just plug in a device, boot the machine, install the drivers and you're set. Things introduced in Win95 are things people expect today when they buy a Windows based computer.

With Windows 8, to find a program to launch, you need to right-clock and choose 'All Programs' from the Metro Start screen. Change a computer setting? You have to hover on the right side of the screen and choose 'Settings'. It's disjointed and one thing people won't like is having to learn all how to use their computers all over again. Other than Metro, there really isn't anything groundbreaking. There are no new architectures, nothing that really says "Hey, you need to get this."


This, this by so much.
 
2012-06-17 08:47:51 PM

Hand Banana: ekdikeo4: I haven't even located the search in Win 7 ...

[askyourpc.com image 409x255]

It's not exactly hidden, how could you miss it?


I still hate the Taskbar in Win 7. So big and clunky looking; that was one thing that keeps me from switching from Vista.

/But slowly coming around to it
//Only 'cause I need DX11
 
2012-06-17 09:34:45 PM
Most people only use a handful of apps. And many of those are accessed by navigating to content/files.

What MSFT needs to do is make it easier to find, organize, index, and search your content. Why can't I put tags on any file (even ones Windows doesn't recognize) and search by those? Why can a file only exist in one folder, and to represent it anywhere else I have to make a shortcut to it (a process which itself is far from intuitive).

In many places in Windows, it will show me a file name without telling me the path to it - I can only find it out until I hit "Save As" and then see where it puts me. Even worse, there are many times when a file search in Win Explorer doesn't show files that are clearly there - I have no idea why this glitch exists, but it does, even in Windows 7.

And why is the entire interface for finding and organizing files two dimensional? A three dimensional space is too hard to represent?
 
2012-06-17 09:37:12 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: Hacker_X: I'd wager that far less than half of all computer users intentionally pay for an OS. Any OS.

You'd really wager that? Have you met many people?


Have you met many people? Really think about it. If it didn't come with a machine how many people do you know of that actually paid for an OS? I can only think of 5 examples in my lifetime of me or anybody I had encountered to did so. Twice it was copies of Windows for a small business, once it was an upgrade for MS Dos that my dad bought, Once in the days of dial up when I paid a small amount for a copy of Mandrake so I wouldn't have to spend weeks downloading the ISOs, and once that half counts when I bought a copy of Amiga Forever because of everything it came bundled with.

For years users of pretty much any OS other than that made by Microsoft got the OS and the updates for it for free. Apple finally started charging for OS X, neither MS or IBM have anything to do with it but OS/2 lives on as eComStation, Microsoft keeps trying to sell retail copies of Windows, and a few companies try to "sell" copies of various linux distros with support contracts. But for the most part anybody installing an OS after already having the hardware is using a copy that was downloaded regardless of rather or not it was legal to do so. Even microsofts own estimates on the number of illegal copies of windows vs legal are massive. Just in China alone they estimate that 90% of all copies of Windows are illegal ones.

The vast majority of paid copies of any OS are to businesses. Some are for use on their own machines and a lot are for resale by OEMs. Only a very small fraction of users directly pay for an OS or and "upgrade" to the OS when purchasing a system. It was different back in the 80's and the first half of the 90's but these days people either buy a whole new machine or use their nice fast connections to download whatever they want.
 
2012-06-17 09:46:18 PM
It is crap because Microsoft wants it to be crap.

Crap makes money.

1) User training.
2) Coder training and tools.
3) But mostly, annoying people leads them to forming support groups, where they can suffer together.

/Fark Microsoft.
//Fark You.
///Fark Everyone.
////Fark Everything.
//Profit.
 
2012-06-17 10:19:31 PM
I don't need ZDnet to tell me that a pastel block colored tablet OS for the desktop that lacks multitasking is garbage.
 
2012-06-17 10:21:08 PM

SwingDancer: And as I understand it, you can disable the metro interface, so............. Why all the pouty faces


The Start menu is gone even if you disable Metro. This is going to be a problem for many people. For example, how many people know how to shut down or log off without using the Start menu?

And trying to find the Control Panel is a nightmare. I stumbled upon it by accident once but can't remember how I did it. Thank God for Google.
 
2012-06-17 10:27:45 PM

Befuddled: Maybe there are reasons why this can't work, but why can't MS make it so their new OS can be 'downgraded' when it comes to the user interface? I really haven't seen anything in their newer OSes that works better than it did in Windows 2000. I'd happily buy a new and improved OS that let me set the user interface so it looks and works exactly like Win2k.

So many places use WinXP right now I wonder how they'll be able to switch without seeing a really large productivity drop.


Make Windows 7 look like Vista or 2000
 
2012-06-17 10:31:05 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: DamnYankees: I'm confused. Are the new Windows computers touchscreen or something?

Not exactly. First, let's define 'Windows computers': Microsoft does not make general-use computers. I assume you mean new machines running Windows 8, which are just regular computers of various kinds, including some touch devices such as pads and tablets.

Windows 8 is meant to be a head-to-head challenger to extant market touch-based UIs, and so it is -- in theory -- optimised for that purpose. On the one hand, this means that it has some design changes that may confuse or frustrate traditional desktop users. On the other, it sounds from TFA that some of the features don't work well for touch use, either.

The thrust of TFA is that MS should have gone with their older model of different UIs for different users -- a more traditional UI for desktop users, especially enterprise users, and reserve the touch-optimised UI for those environments where touch use is predominant. There's a lot more, but these are the main issues.


There have been touch screen desktop PCs available for a couple of years. The ones I've seen are running Windows 7.

HP Touchsmart
 
2012-06-17 10:32:39 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: wee: cman: Hopefully Windows 8 will be such a flop that companies that make OSes stop this bullshiat mobile on desktop philosophy.

fark Windows 8, fark GNOME 3, fark Unity

I agree. And I must say, I'm digging Xfce lately. It'd been a while since Id seen it, and it's come along nicely. If Unity did one thing for me, it was getting me to come across a great alternative.

Every time I read about Win8, I think of all the things I don't like about Unity. What you said is exactly how I feel about it: If it hadn't been for unity, I never would have checked out Mint.

I'm making myself use the current Unity on my spare (under 12.04), in the hopes of getting used to it, though I think I'll never like it. But I run a Metacity-like hack of Gnome3 on my daily driver (under 11.10 with Unity crippled). I've got a bunch of other desks to choose from, including Xfce, but I rarely use them. I installed Mint on a junker in the corner, and I think it's pretty sweet. It's like my quasi-Metacity, except that real experts did all the work for me (and didn't break anything along the way). I also test-drove Puppy on that, which defaults to Xfce, and I found it just as usable as any other basic desktop.


As horrible as it is Unity is not as confusing as Metro.
 
2012-06-17 10:37:01 PM

Hacker_X: Just in China alone they estimate that 90% of all copies of Windows are illegal ones. The vast majority of paid copies of any OS are to businesses.


That is because Microsoft charges too much for their entry level consumer versions, especially when it comes to OS upgrades. The majority of PC upgrades I've done for family and friends where I swap out the guts for new motherboard, processor, memory and disk have been running just under $300. But then Microsoft wants $100 for Windows 7 Home Premium. That's a big chunk and many people aren't willing to pay that.

All four copies of Windows 7 I have are legit, but that's mostly because I got them via a discount program. Had that not been available, I'd still be running XP on three of my four PCs.

I'm not surprised at the level of piracy. Microsoft really needs to offer their starter editions (Win7 Starter and Win7 Home Basic) to more markets. And lower the price.
 
2012-06-17 10:40:35 PM

FormlessOne: Read this slowly. The Metro interface is not required for desktops. You can turn it off.

Every time Windows 8 comes up, all you hear is "I don't want to use an interface styled for mobiles on my desktop, and that's why Windows 8 is gonna suck." See, the thing is, you don't have to use it. Metro is an option. The non-Metro desktop for Windows 8 looks remarkably similar to Windows 7, with some improvements.


The Start menu is still gone though. I know you can add shortcuts to the desktop and task bar just like in Windows 7, but how do you Shutdown, Log Out, Switch Users, Access the Control Panel or run a command prompt?

Those of us who are computer savvy will Google the answers. Most people are not computer savvy, and Microsoft risks losing them to Apple.

Someone posted a link to a page that discusses getting the Start menu back. I'll take a look at that tonight.
 
2012-06-17 10:42:00 PM

Rwa2play: Hand Banana: ekdikeo4: I haven't even located the search in Win 7 ...

[askyourpc.com image 409x255]

It's not exactly hidden, how could you miss it?

I still hate the Taskbar in Win 7. So big and clunky looking; that was one thing that keeps me from switching from Vista.

/But slowly coming around to it
//Only 'cause I need DX11


Right-click on taskbar. Properties.Check "Use small icons".
 
2012-06-17 10:43:33 PM

deadguyinc: Bloody Templar: deadguyinc: FormlessOne: Read this slowly. The Metro interface is not required for desktops. You can turn it off.

Every time Windows 8 comes up, all you hear is "I don't want to use an interface styled for mobiles on my desktop, and that's why Windows 8 is gonna suck." See, the thing is, you don't have to use it. Metro is an option. The non-Metro desktop for Windows 8 looks remarkably similar to Windows 7, with some improvements.

No, you can't. There are no built-in options to turn off Metro and Microsoft is doing everything they can to make sure hacks to turn it off and/or return the old Start button will not be possible in the final release. Know what you're talking about before you reply like you know what you're talking about.


Good lord. I can't believe how much biatching there is over the refactoring of the start button, which most people have quit using in favor of the Win7 taskbar.

How freakin' hard is this: Windows key, W key, O key, Enter. That's what it takes to launch word in Windows 8.

I will grant you, digging around with a mouse in the Start Screen takes a bit of patience, but then, so does digging through nested folders in the Start Menu.


/Disclaimer: I am a Microsoft employee, but my opinions are my own and do not represent those of Microsoft.

Yeah, it's really not this basket of evil some people seem to think it is. Then again, neither was Vista. The Internet Hate Echo Chamber at work. Most of the people who shiat on Vista have never used it, either.


I used Vista. I didn't find it to be horrible but it was way too slow. Windows 7 fixed the speed issue.
 
2012-06-17 10:59:35 PM
Execrable? He really had to stoop to the "e" word?

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-06-18 01:02:05 AM
ive been playing with the pre-releases for a while and have to say that i LOATH this UI.

When it takes you 5 minutes to try and find the hidden, poorly worded menu to do something as simple as turn your computer off, you know you UI sucks ass.

I simply can't find any logic in the design at all. Its like they want everyone to reject it.
 
2012-06-18 01:52:44 AM

Archimedes' Principal: Windows 8 was expected to suck. It's the next version after a successful one.

/ Windows8, Windows7, Windows Vista, Windows XP, Windows ME, etc.


I agree. At the very least public opinion tends to follow that same trend - I personally have been using Vista for years now without any real inconvenience.
I'll probably switch to Windows 8 when it comes out simply because it'll coincide with me upgrading the desktop.
 
2012-06-18 02:00:46 AM

SwingDancer: Archimedes' Principal: Windows 8 was expected to suck. It's the next version after a successful one.

/ Windows8, Windows7, Windows Vista, Windows XP, Windows ME, etc.

I used Vista fro years, never had a single problem with it. I have noticed a trend amongst those who did, they were not computer literate. But thought they were.


/2c


1/10
 
2012-06-18 07:52:12 AM
I was fine with XP. It seem everything is just a way of re-milking the same cows (us) over and over and over and over again. Damn the teats are falling off already...STOP... just STOP
 
2012-06-18 09:09:17 AM
Linux Mint with Cinnamon desktop. Problem solved.
 
2012-06-18 09:11:02 AM

Linux_Yes: Linux Mint with Cinnamon desktop. Problem solved.



or MATE, if you liked Gnome 2.
 
2012-06-18 09:12:26 AM
now you all jest load up yer' winders and don't forget to send Gill Bates his check.
 
2012-06-18 09:32:08 AM

Somacandra: FTFA: Microsoft has thrown away this concept and instead adopted a system called the Start Screen where the links to all your apps are spread across the screen.

Wow. This was odd to read. I've done this for years anyway. I cluster app shortcuts I use 90% of the time in different screen areas. That's how I've liked it. I can't stand the Start button and scrolling through different columns. I guess its the opposite for lots of people? Actually now I cluster my working document folders on one side of the screen and the app that I need opens when I open the document. After all, who opens apps for the sake of the app? I open things I need to work on--the program its linked to is just a means to an end. Of course I use Macs personally.


Why not just use the quicklaunch menu with large icons (taskbar on left)?
 
2012-06-18 09:34:57 AM

MisterRonbo: What MSFT needs to do is make it easier to find, organize, index, and search your content. Why can't I put tags on any file (even ones Windows doesn't recognize) and search by those? Why can a file only exist in one folder, and to represent it anywhere else I have to make a shortcut to it (a process which itself is far from intuitive).


There actually is a method of doing this and they are really pushing it. The problem is it's tailored for the enterprise and I doubt most people will want to run a Sharepoint server at home.
 
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