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(Fox News)   How to grill the perfect steak. Yes, you're doing it wrong   (foxnews.com) divider line 388
    More: Spiffy, peppers, Omaha Steaks, salt and pepper, steaks, charcoal, gas grill, seasons  
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24387 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Jun 2012 at 4:08 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-16 05:08:34 PM  

Eshkar: elchip: Theaetetus: Eshkar: YOU NEVER STAB / PIERCE A PIECE OF MEAT,
Eshkar: NO NO NO!!! DO NOT PIERCE COOKING MEAT! It will spill it's juices, you let a steak rest before cutting it in any way.

Yeah, these are wrong:
I cooked two steaks of known weight side by side. The first, I carefully turned with tongs each time. The second, I used a fourchette de cuisine (that's fancy-pants for one of those two-pronged forks) completely indiscriminately, mercilessly (though not excessively) poking the steak this way and that as I flipped it. Afterward, I weighed both steaks again. The result? Exactly the same weight loss.

I even use one of these when I cook steak:

SEARING DOES NOT SEAL IN JUICES

Didn't say it did,but if you break into a steak on a grill or one fresh off the grill before you allow the meat fibers to "relax" it will freely release it's juices;nothing to do with a sear, same thing goes for most meats unless they are slow cooked.


If you cut a steak, it will. If you pierce a steak with a fork, it won't. The fork is not big enough or sharp enough to slash the muscle fibers. Hence why the Jaccard works without turning a steak into dry mush.

(slow cooked meats are usually made 'juicy" by melted fat)

No - they're juicy because the inter-muscular collagen breaks down into gelatin.
 
2012-06-16 05:08:59 PM  

Theaetetus: No - flip every 15 seconds. The steak will be more evenly done and cook faster.

Really? I've been told my whole life to not flip meats more than once or twice.
/can't tell if you're being sarcastic or if that's a genuine tip

For reals: Science!


That's burgers. I'm willing to agree with that. Not steaks though.
 
2012-06-16 05:09:00 PM  

elchip: My father-in-law had a good year at the monocole factory and bought me a Big Green Egg for Christmas.

Everything associated with it is ridiculously overpriced, but I'll be darned if it can't hold its heat. I let it heat up to long and it wrapped around past the 700 degree mark, past 0, all the way to 100 again.

Unfortunately, 900 degrees was good for obliterating the outside before getting the inside to a temperature the sissy ol' wife would eat.


The big green egg is farking incredible, no doubt in my mind that it is the best grill in the universe, and its worth ALMOST half of what they charge for them.

/sounds poor
 
2012-06-16 05:09:26 PM  

Theaetetus: Eshkar: Theaetetus: Eshkar: YOU NEVER STAB / PIERCE A PIECE OF MEAT,
Eshkar: NO NO NO!!! DO NOT PIERCE COOKING MEAT! It will spill it's juices, you let a steak rest before cutting it in any way.

Yeah, these are wrong:
I cooked two steaks of known weight side by side. The first, I carefully turned with tongs each time. The second, I used a fourchette de cuisine (that's fancy-pants for one of those two-pronged forks) completely indiscriminately, mercilessly (though not excessively) poking the steak this way and that as I flipped it. Afterward, I weighed both steaks again. The result? Exactly the same weight loss.

I even use one of these when I cook steak:
[mikespantry.com image 434x375]

Yeah I call Bull Shiat, I know for a fact (worked in restaurants as a line cook through out my life) that if you stab a steak while on a grill or fresh off a grill it will dump out it's juices.

"Screw your data, measurements, and numbers! I have anecdotes, and those prove everything!"

/I don't want to eat at your restaurants


No screw your unscientific methods with no peer review, I have experience and the support of culinary professionals around the globe.
 
2012-06-16 05:09:36 PM  

TheMysticS: Seperate tongs for raw and cooked beef? Really?


yes.
I'm guessing you haven't been in a slaughterhouse. The inside parts of a steak are very clean and steral. The outer bits can get contaminated with anything from the outside of the cow to the inside of its guts. Modern beef processing does its best to separate those steps but there is a risk. Anything on the outside of the uncooked beef should be considered contaminated until it gets up to a high temperature. Its trivial to have a "raw" plate and tongs and "cooked" tongs and plate. The bacteria that is just waking up from the raw side can make you sick for days. Another tool and plate makes that impossible.
 
2012-06-16 05:09:48 PM  

Theaetetus: HeavyD8086: Theaetetus: HeavyD8086: Sear for two minutes, flip.
Wait two minutes, flip.

No - flip every 15 seconds. The steak will be more evenly done and cook faster.

Really? I've been told my whole life to not flip meats more than once or twice.
/can't tell if you're being sarcastic or if that's a genuine tip

HeavyD8086: Theaetetus: HeavyD8086: Sear for two minutes, flip.
Wait two minutes, flip.

No - flip every 15 seconds. The steak will be more evenly done and cook faster.

Really? I've been told my whole life to not flip meats more than once or twice.
/can't tell if you're being sarcastic or if that's a genuine tip

For reals: Science!


Wow. I'm going to try this next time. If this works, you will have made a significant impact on my life.
 
2012-06-16 05:10:21 PM  
I don't have a grill so I go to Ruth's Chris Steakhouse and get one of these:
i46.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-16 05:10:43 PM  
I shoulda read the thread first.
Then I could have just typed
Done in one, and THIS to nearly all of the above posts.

Mmmm...steak.
 
2012-06-16 05:11:04 PM  

ThereAreFourLights: I'm a short order cook in a small diner. I cook steaks to order ALL. Friggin'. Day. Long.

Poke it with your finger, and you know how "done" it is.

Never had one sent back.

I don't need no stinking "ruler", or "thermometer" or "chart".

That is all.

Shameless plug.


I was told the way to gauge a steak's doneness was by giving it a poke and comparing its firmness against how firm the fleshy bit at the base of your thumb is when you lightly touch your thumb to a finger: index finger for rare, middle finger for medium rare, ring finger for medium, and pinkie for you don't deserve steak.
 
2012-06-16 05:11:06 PM  
Buy a decent cut of meat. Poke a bunch of holes in it. Mariade it with stuff you like (beer, honey, barbecue sauce, A1, whatever). Put it on the grill. Pay attention to it while it cooks.
 
2012-06-16 05:11:20 PM  

MoronLessOff: They are convenient. I stopped using mine when the handle busted off and I got tired of turning it over with a crowbar. I'm just to cheap to go replace it. I can now get a pile roaring with one match. It took some practice, but I got that shiat down.


I have a feeling we have much in common....
 
2012-06-16 05:11:26 PM  
Welp for some reason the first version of that link didn't show in my window. Sorry for the mangled post.
 
2012-06-16 05:13:00 PM  

Hondaman4ever: I don't have a grill so I go to Ruth's Chris Steakhouse and get one of these:


The one time I went to Ruth's Chris, my steak was very metallic tasting. It was a little off-putting. Maybe just a bad night?
 
2012-06-16 05:13:28 PM  
The fark
 
2012-06-16 05:13:42 PM  

BigJake: downstairs: Coals with soaked wood chips = beautiful, beautiful smoke.

Smoke is going to have little effect in the few minutes a good steak is on the grill.


I can promise you it does. You just need A LOT of smoke. The grill I bought is awesome. I'll try to describe. It has a grate for the coals, and under it is a curved piece of metal to catch dead coals. So I basically have a surface area *under* the coals which I can put a shiatton of soaked wood chips. It produces enough smoke to smell it from 4-5 doors down the block.

The other method- of putting soaked coals in a tin foil packet with holes cut in it... that never produced enough smoke to matter.

I'm just lucky... I just guessed at this method once I put my grill together and figured I could try this trick.

I guaruntee I can taste the smoke.

Not as much as real, smoked brisket or ribs. But its absolutely present in the steak.
 
2012-06-16 05:13:54 PM  

downstairs: Theaetetus: HeavyD8086: Sear for two minutes, flip.
Wait two minutes, flip.

No - flip every 15 seconds. The steak will be more evenly done and cook faster.

I know a shiatton of great cooks and sous-chefs. None of them would ever flip more than once.


No, you know a great ton of shiat cooks. Probably a typo on your part.

I don't, and my steaks are clearly evenly cooked. Its patently obvious when I cut into it to eat.

You're wrong. You simply have nothing to compare it to.
www.cookingissues.com

This is what a steak should look like:
people.ece.cornell.edu

Also, when I flip, I often get flare ups. Probably the gravity and the juices collected on the top. You're losing all those! And flare-ups cause issues on their own.

That's juices from the center being pushed to the top by the heat and contraction of muscle fibers. You're definitely flipping too infrequently, and your steaks are dry in the center as a result. If you flip more often, you won't get flare ups because those juices will stay where they belong, in the meat.
 
2012-06-16 05:14:28 PM  

thisisarepeat: This DOES make an awesome steak, I do it outside though because I don't have a 300 horsepower 15 foot evacuation fan in the ceiling of my kitchen or re-breathers enough for the whole family. I may exaggerate just a little, but it does make a hell of a mess.


LOL I've got four fans on exhaust in the window right next to the stove. I still have to switch off the ceiling fan and open a window when I'm pan-searing because it'll set the fire alarm off pretty quickly otherwise (and still sometimes do). Hopefully my neighbors enjoy the smell of grilled stuff blasting outta there all the time. :)
 
2012-06-16 05:14:45 PM  

elchip: My father-in-law had a good year at the monocole factory and bought me a Big Green Egg for Christmas.

Everything associated with it is ridiculously overpriced, but I'll be darned if it can't hold its heat. I let it heat up to long and it wrapped around past the 700 degree mark, past 0, all the way to 100 again.

Unfortunately, 900 degrees was good for obliterating the outside before getting the inside to a temperature the sissy ol' wife would eat.


My in-laws gave us a egg for an anniversary gift.
Really expensive, but oh, so great for cooking.
Made any pizzas or breads yet? If you gently clean the inside of the lid, you can slap a naan on it to bake like a traditional tandoori oven.
Yum.
 
2012-06-16 05:15:02 PM  

downstairs: Theaetetus: No - flip every 15 seconds. The steak will be more evenly done and cook faster.

Really? I've been told my whole life to not flip meats more than once or twice.
/can't tell if you're being sarcastic or if that's a genuine tip

For reals: Science!

That's burgers. I'm willing to agree with that. Not steaks though.


You think heat works differently if it's a steak than if it's a burger?

/and people call me crazy
 
2012-06-16 05:15:05 PM  

Theaetetus: This is the proper way to cook steak:


No, that is the way to make watery mash cow.

If your going to charge me $30 for a steak, I don't want it cooked the way my high school mystery meet was cooked and I don't want that taste either.
 
2012-06-16 05:15:50 PM  

Eshkar: No screw your unscientific methods with no peer review, I have experience and the support of culinary professionals around the globe.


Not the high end ones, though.
 
2012-06-16 05:15:54 PM  
Real talk though do not flip your steaks often (though sometimes you gotta flip em more than once for the thick ones) and never, ever, ever use gas. Whoever posted that chimney starter has the right idea, that way you don't even have to use starter fluid. Use real, chunk charcoal if you can, not those formed pellets from Kingsford or whomever. No additives in the charcoal plus a higher temp to boot.
 
2012-06-16 05:16:14 PM  

Theaetetus: HeavyD8086: Sear for two minutes, flip.
Wait two minutes, flip.

No - flip every 15 seconds. The steak will be more evenly done and cook faster.


I have to ask though, why the 15 sec for the beef? Why not 10? 12?
 
2012-06-16 05:17:39 PM  

DON.MAC: TheMysticS: Seperate tongs for raw and cooked beef? Really?

yes.
I'm guessing you haven't been in a slaughterhouse. The inside parts of a steak are very clean and steral. The outer bits can get contaminated with anything from the outside of the cow to the inside of its guts. Modern beef processing does its best to separate those steps but there is a risk. Anything on the outside of the uncooked beef should be considered contaminated until it gets up to a high temperature. Its trivial to have a "raw" plate and tongs and "cooked" tongs and plate. The bacteria that is just waking up from the raw side can make you sick for days. Another tool and plate makes that impossible.


BS. The temperature inside the grill is going to kill everything by the time its done.

Maybe its smart to touch the tongs on the hot coals after touching the raw stuff... I do that, but not because of science... more because of OCD.
 
2012-06-16 05:17:48 PM  

Theaetetus: Eshkar: elchip: Theaetetus: Eshkar: YOU NEVER STAB / PIERCE A PIECE OF MEAT,
Eshkar: NO NO NO!!! DO NOT PIERCE COOKING MEAT! It will spill it's juices, you let a steak rest before cutting it in any way.

Yeah, these are wrong:
I cooked two steaks of known weight side by side. The first, I carefully turned with tongs each time. The second, I used a fourchette de cuisine (that's fancy-pants for one of those two-pronged forks) completely indiscriminately, mercilessly (though not excessively) poking the steak this way and that as I flipped it. Afterward, I weighed both steaks again. The result? Exactly the same weight loss.

I even use one of these when I cook steak:

SEARING DOES NOT SEAL IN JUICES

Didn't say it did,but if you break into a steak on a grill or one fresh off the grill before you allow the meat fibers to "relax" it will freely release it's juices;nothing to do with a sear, same thing goes for most meats unless they are slow cooked.

If you cut a steak, it will. If you pierce a steak with a fork, it won't. The fork is not big enough or sharp enough to slash the muscle fibers. Hence why the Jaccard works without turning a steak into dry mush.

(slow cooked meats are usually made 'juicy" by melted fat)

No - they're juicy because the inter-muscular collagen breaks down into gelatin.


You can keep making bad food, but me and most other professionals will do it right.
And it is fat that makes slow cooked meat juicy. High collagen meats require slow cooking because collagen makes them tough and the slow cooking causes the collagen to break down, while the fat melts and lubricates the meat fibers (you know fat is a lubricant, collagen isn't). Go slow cook a high collagen piece of meat with low fat and you will have a tough piece of meat.
 
2012-06-16 05:17:58 PM  

HeavyD8086: Theaetetus: HeavyD8086: Theaetetus: No - flip every 15 seconds. The steak will be more evenly done and cook faster.

Really? I've been told my whole life to not flip meats more than once or twice.
/can't tell if you're being sarcastic or if that's a genuine tip

For reals: Science!

Wow. I'm going to try this next time. If this works, you will have made a significant impact on my life.


If you do, remember that it will cook faster - half the meat isn't staying at a low temperature and providing thermal inertia while the other half cooks. So, check temperature/doneness more often. It should take around 60-70% of the time your normal cooking does. If you don't remember that, it'll be overdone and you'll hate me.
 
2012-06-16 05:17:58 PM  

Theaetetus: downstairs: Theaetetus: HeavyD8086: Sear for two minutes, flip.
Wait two minutes, flip.

No - flip every 15 seconds. The steak will be more evenly done and cook faster.

I know a shiatton of great cooks and sous-chefs. None of them would ever flip more than once.

No, you know a great ton of shiat cooks. Probably a typo on your part.

I don't, and my steaks are clearly evenly cooked. Its patently obvious when I cut into it to eat.

You're wrong. You simply have nothing to compare it to.
[www.cookingissues.com image 640x480]

This is what a steak should look like:
[people.ece.cornell.edu image 600x401]

Also, when I flip, I often get flare ups. Probably the gravity and the juices collected on the top. You're losing all those! And flare-ups cause issues on their own.

That's juices from the center being pushed to the top by the heat and contraction of muscle fibers. You're definitely flipping too infrequently, and your steaks are dry in the center as a result. If you flip more often, you won't get flare ups because those juices will stay where they belong, in the meat.


Wow. You really are wrong about everything all the time
 
2012-06-16 05:18:48 PM  
This + a good cut of meat + a healthy bed of coals until medium rare.
static.caloriecount.about.com

All I need.
 
2012-06-16 05:18:54 PM  

elchip: Hondaman4ever: I don't have a grill so I go to Ruth's Chris Steakhouse and get one of these:

The one time I went to Ruth's Chris, my steak was very metallic tasting. It was a little off-putting. Maybe just a bad night?


i went to one in pasadena. they used omaha steaks (mistake number one). mine was ok, if a bit bland. but the steak (an 8oz fillet), some asparagus and a glass of wine came out to just under $100 with tip. i can get a much better steak from my local brasserie for a quarter the price.

it just seemed to be a lot of money for a rather mediocre steak.
 
2012-06-16 05:19:02 PM  
Who greenlit this advertising from a mail order clown? Which admin is getting a kickdown from Omaha Steaks?
A f*cking ruler? If you need his advice just buy your meat at WalMart because you don't deserve decent food.
 
2012-06-16 05:19:18 PM  

Theaetetus: You're wrong. You simply have nothing to compare it to.


We cook steak to kill bacteria. The bacteria is on the outside of the slab of meat. Your diagram of flipping ever 15 seconds shows exactly what others are saying.... flip it once.
 
2012-06-16 05:19:24 PM  

rhiannon: Theaetetus: HeavyD8086: Sear for two minutes, flip.
Wait two minutes, flip.

No - flip every 15 seconds. The steak will be more evenly done and cook faster.

I have to ask though, why the 15 sec for the beef? Why not 10? 12?


Easy to remember. If you could flip constantly, it would be even better. That's the concept behind rotisserie.
That said, 15 seconds is a nice trade off between perfect temperature management and not requiring you to be constantly working the steak.
 
2012-06-16 05:20:27 PM  

Theaetetus: downstairs: Theaetetus: HeavyD8086: Sear for two minutes, flip.
Wait two minutes, flip.

No - flip every 15 seconds. The steak will be more evenly done and cook faster.

I know a shiatton of great cooks and sous-chefs. None of them would ever flip more than once.

No, you know a great ton of shiat cooks. Probably a typo on your part.

I don't, and my steaks are clearly evenly cooked. Its patently obvious when I cut into it to eat.

You're wrong. You simply have nothing to compare it to.
[www.cookingissues.com image 640x480]

This is what a steak should look like:
[people.ece.cornell.edu image 600x401]

Also, when I flip, I often get flare ups. Probably the gravity and the juices collected on the top. You're losing all those! And flare-ups cause issues on their own.

That's juices from the center being pushed to the top by the heat and contraction of muscle fibers. You're definitely flipping too infrequently, and your steaks are dry in the center as a result. If you flip more often, you won't get flare ups because those juices will stay where they belong, in the meat.



That is genuinely fascinating.
 
2012-06-16 05:20:30 PM  
No subby. I haven't been doing it wrong.

If you want to up your grilling game, get a Thermapen and never over cook anything again.

cooklikejames.typepad.com
 
2012-06-16 05:20:53 PM  

DON.MAC: Cyclometh: How do we break it to this idiot that his family has been farking up good steaks for a century?

I hate to tell farkers that they are wrong....
but the extra virgin wankery isn't a century old. So no they haven't been screwing up steaks that way for that long.

/my ancestors have been growing better steak for more than a century and half along the Mississippi and long before Iowa ever had a cow. My Aunt lives in a building that is nearly 270 years old.


She can't afford a newer home? that's sad.

/housing prices are down
//now might be a good time to upgrade
 
2012-06-16 05:20:54 PM  

Theaetetus: You're wrong. You simply have nothing to compare it to.


This is what a steak should look like:


Well, fine. I'll try it.
 
2012-06-16 05:22:08 PM  
DRTFC, but that sure was a great advertisement for Omaha Steaks, I almost thought I was reading an article!
 
2012-06-16 05:22:29 PM  

downstairs:
BS. The temperature inside the grill is going to kill everything by the time its done.

Maybe its smart to touch the tongs on the hot coals after touching the raw stuff... I do that, but not because of science... more because of OCD.


The tongs aren't on the grill are they? They touch the outside of the raw meat and never even get hot enough so you can't touch them do they? Any bacteria there is happy and looking to breed.
 
2012-06-16 05:22:53 PM  

Theaetetus: rhiannon: Theaetetus: HeavyD8086: Sear for two minutes, flip.
Wait two minutes, flip.

No - flip every 15 seconds. The steak will be more evenly done and cook faster.

I have to ask though, why the 15 sec for the beef? Why not 10? 12?

Easy to remember. If you could flip constantly, it would be even better. That's the concept behind rotisserie.
That said, 15 seconds is a nice trade off between perfect temperature management and not requiring you to be constantly working the steak.


When it comes to someone like me, 15 seconds is constantly working the steak.
 
2012-06-16 05:22:59 PM  
Mr_Fabulous

That is genuinely fascinating.

Word.
 
2012-06-16 05:23:13 PM  

TheMysticS: elchip: My father-in-law had a good year at the monocole factory and bought me a Big Green Egg for Christmas.

Everything associated with it is ridiculously overpriced, but I'll be darned if it can't hold its heat. I let it heat up to long and it wrapped around past the 700 degree mark, past 0, all the way to 100 again.

Unfortunately, 900 degrees was good for obliterating the outside before getting the inside to a temperature the sissy ol' wife would eat.

My in-laws gave us a egg for an anniversary gift.
Really expensive, but oh, so great for cooking.
Made any pizzas or breads yet? If you gently clean the inside of the lid, you can slap a naan on it to bake like a traditional tandoori oven.
Yum.


I have not made pizzas or breads. What do you use to clean the inside? I have the plate setter for indirect cooking (any suggestions on how to clean that thing?) but no baking stone.

I haven't used it nearly as much as I ought to, because I've been working late a lot recently and don't feel like cooking when I get home. I've forced myself to use it more by not buying a propane refill for my gas grill, though.

Also: Does a chimney starter work with lump charcoal? I always have issues with all my coals not lighting.
 
2012-06-16 05:23:40 PM  
He literally grew up grilling.
 
2012-06-16 05:23:43 PM  

whereisian:
The Food Lab: How to Grill a Steak, a Complete Guide

Use a thermometer if you have one, but if not, go ahead and poke or cut-and-peek (it won't adversely harm the end product).

Let your meat rest (your meat should rest for about 1/3 of the time it took to cook in order to prevent excess moisture loss).


Whoever wrote that didn't think things all the way through.
 
2012-06-16 05:23:57 PM  

Eshkar: You can keep making bad food, but me and most other professionals will do it right.


images.winespectator.com
Thomas Keller frowns on your shenanigans.

And it is fat that makes slow cooked meat juicy. High collagen meats require slow cooking because collagen makes them tough and the slow cooking causes the collagen to break down, while the fat melts and lubricates the meat fibers (you know fat is a lubricant, collagen isn't). Go slow cook a high collagen piece of meat with low fat and you will have a tough piece of meat.

Sorry, you're wrong. Collagen breaks down into gelatin, which is soft and juicy. You can cook a high collagen piece of meat at 60 degrees Celsius for a sufficient time, and the meat will be incredibly juicy, even though the fat doesn't melt at that temperature.
seattlefoodgeek.com
What 72 hour short ribs may look like.
 
2012-06-16 05:25:35 PM  

Theaetetus: This is what a steak should look like:


Did you cook that yourself, or just do a Google image search. Because that looks like a steak cooked on extremely high heat using a different method than a normal grill. Like some steakhouses do with porterhouse... very, very, very hot equipment.

Alton Brown replicated this in an interesting way:
Link

I tried this and was very successful at getting a steak looking just like what you have there.
 
2012-06-16 05:25:46 PM  

DON.MAC: tarhammer: He forgot step #1: Buy prime beef at your local butcher or at least costco where it wasnt frozen, was actually graded by the usda, and actually tastes good. You won't get ripped off by the sky high prices for the bundled hotdogs and hash browns either.

Graded by the USDA? You have to be joking. They have "useless, dog meat, choice and prime" where "prime" is anything above nasty.

My grandmother used to take me to places where they severed steak from non USDA approved but but she knew who raised the cow on the plate. Some of that was the best of best and my uncle sent live cows to Japan to be turned into $1000 steaks.


I'm quite sure. This is not that meat you remember well, this is simply crappy meat that wasn't usda graded because then they'd have to say 'choice' or worse. They imply its better than prime. Its not.

So no, I'm not joking when its about a company avoiding a certification because then people would know what they're getting isnt any better than what they can find at the supermarket.
 
2012-06-16 05:26:19 PM  
Actually, with the exception of needing an app and a Bluetooth meat probe I've been doing it correctly.

Clearly subby is a vegetarian.
 
2012-06-16 05:26:21 PM  

TheMysticS: elchip: My father-in-law had a good year at the monocole factory and bought me a Big Green Egg for Christmas.

Everything associated with it is ridiculously overpriced, but I'll be darned if it can't hold its heat. I let it heat up to long and it wrapped around past the 700 degree mark, past 0, all the way to 100 again.

Unfortunately, 900 degrees was good for obliterating the outside before getting the inside to a temperature the sissy ol' wife would eat.

My in-laws gave us a egg for an anniversary gift.
Really expensive, but oh, so great for cooking.
Made any pizzas or breads yet? If you gently clean the inside of the lid, you can slap a naan on it to bake like a traditional tandoori oven.
Yum.


I never even thought of that option, this could be a vast improvement over slapping them onto the bottom of my muffler. the bread tastes bad but the truck smells terrific.
 
2012-06-16 05:26:29 PM  

DON.MAC: Theaetetus: You're wrong. You simply have nothing to compare it to.

We cook steak to kill bacteria. The bacteria is on the outside of the slab of meat.


No, we cook steak to improve texture. Otherwise, everyone would eat their steaks blue.

Your diagram of flipping ever 15 seconds shows exactly what others are saying.... flip it once.

No, see the colored block with the big dark blue section through the middle next to the 15 second graph? That shows an even, uniform temperature. See the colored block next to the flip once graph, with a smaller dark blue section, offset to one side of the center? That's uneven heating.
 
2012-06-16 05:26:47 PM  
That entire article was complete crap.

Grill brush? C'mon, man, clean the grill?! Thanks for telling me that. I would never have thought of that...
Gas over charcoal being a preference?! Really?!
A timer?! A ruler to measure the thickness?! Are you f'n kidding me?!

And this from a guy who is part of Omaha steaks. And this is the same guy that leaves out one crucial point... Omaha steaks are delivered FROZEN. So none of this applies until the meat is defrosted properly. And he totally left that point out.

You are better off watching the food network for 15 minutes than putting any stock in this article.
 
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  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

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