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(Daily Mail)   Voyager 1 voyages beyond interstellar space   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 24
    More: Cool, interstellar space  
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2012-06-16 01:00:01 PM
tgfb.net
 
2012-06-16 01:14:48 PM
It'll be back
 
2012-06-16 01:19:18 PM
Didn't we do this yesterday?
 
2012-06-16 01:57:20 PM
I just hope they put the actor who played Neelix in it so we never have to deal with him again
 
2012-06-16 02:07:05 PM
Where exactly is beyond interstellar space? Is that like the Galactic Barrier in TOS?
 
2012-06-16 02:07:53 PM
something something self-aware knowledge-gathering entity something something
 
2012-06-16 02:15:48 PM

cman: I just hope they put the actor who played Neelix in it so we never have to deal with him again


www.sfdebris.com

Enjoy.
 
2012-06-16 02:16:26 PM

lysdexic: Didn't we do this yesterday?


We did. With a much better link, to boot.
 
2012-06-16 02:19:38 PM

Ennuipoet: Where exactly is beyond interstellar space? Is that like the Galactic Barrier in TOS?


I think arriving in another solar system would fit the description. Of course, Voyager hasn't done that, so we can just chalk it up to subby not knowing the meanings of words.
 
2012-06-16 02:23:25 PM
Shouldn't that be "into interstellar space" or "we think soon it may actually enter interstellar space, just not just yet, and we won't know exactly when as there is no actual barrier to cross that defines the boundry between the Sol system and interstellar space"???

No matter, still a big deal.
 
2012-06-16 02:28:39 PM
When is it going to meet that space ship of pure logic and become self-aware?
 
2012-06-16 02:30:19 PM
And when it suddenly stops transmitting it will prove my theory the solar system is flat and it has fallen off the edge.
 
2012-06-16 02:34:16 PM
BEYOND Interstellar space? Like it's gone into intergalactic space?

Wow... here I thought it had just gone beyond stellar space yesterday. It sure travels fast once it gets beyond our system, I guess.
 
2012-06-16 02:38:23 PM
Personally, I'm hoping as soon as it leaves the solar system we loose contact with it, and then they find it 180 degrees opposite direction entering the solar system. That would really shake shiat up around here.
 
2012-06-16 02:56:40 PM

BigLuca: Personally, I'm hoping as soon as it leaves the solar system we loose contact with it, and then they find it 180 degrees opposite direction entering the solar system. That would really shake shiat up around here.


I'm preparing my best "Haw haw!" for just such an occasion. Take that, modern physics!
 
2012-06-16 02:58:31 PM
The Oort Cloud might extend over a light year from the sun. It could be 40,000 years before Voyager gets somewhere where the sun is completely irrelevant or another star is equally relevant from its position.
 
2012-06-16 03:00:07 PM
Yeah, once it's in the clear it will engage its hyperdrive... everyone knows you can't go to hyper too close to a star, right?
 
2012-06-16 03:00:47 PM
rhiannon: And when it suddenly stops transmitting it will prove my theory the solar system is flat and it has fallen off the edge.

In before office building pirates from the Meaning of Life.
 
2012-06-16 03:08:07 PM

LesserEvil: BEYOND Interstellar space? Like it's gone into intergalactic space?


Another dimension.

i105.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-16 03:25:47 PM
It's gone outside the environment. Let me know when the front falls off.
 
2012-06-16 03:26:38 PM
Because when I think of scientific stories of intelligence and depth, I think of the Daily Fail.

/farking linkspammers
 
2012-06-16 03:46:21 PM
Hey, Daily Fail, have another dollop of pageclicks from Fark, even though this is a retread of a link not all that far down the page.
 
2012-06-16 03:54:43 PM
Josh Lyman: "Voyager, in case it's ever encountered by extraterrestrials, is carrying photos of life on earth, greetings in fifty-five languages, and a collection of music from Gregorian chants to Chuck Berry, including "Dark Was the Night, Cold Was the Ground" by 1920s bluesman Blind Willie Johnson, whose stepmother blinded him at seven by throwing lye in his eyes after his father beat her for being with another man. He died penniless of pneumonia after sleeping bundled in wet newspapers in the ruins of his house that burned down, but his music just left the solar system."
 
2012-06-16 04:23:10 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: It'll be back


img.trekmovie.com
 
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