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(Slate)   "J. D. Salinger bill" that would limit commercial use of a person's likeness after their death is vetoed by New Hampshire's governor, who is really just a big phony and all full of horse manure, if you want to know the truth   (slatest.slate.com) divider line 34
    More: Sad, J. D. Salinger, New Hampshire, Abbie Cornish, key chain, overly broad  
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1203 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 14 Jun 2012 at 12:25 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-14 12:28:49 PM
Is his name Ackley?
 
2012-06-14 12:34:24 PM
...am I the only person who thinks that book would be vastly improved by a fatal mugging in chapter one?

If Salinger didn't like seeing his picture on the books, then why did he submit his pic to the publisher in the first place? Why didn't he say, "I don't want my picture on the cover?"

As for the bill itself, I have to agree that the language is too broad. Biographies and the study and teaching of history would be horrendously stunted.

Robert Caro would be out of work.
 
2012-06-14 12:42:25 PM
Link

/Oblig
 
2012-06-14 12:56:27 PM
Strangely, I agree w/ the governor. I mean, despite your opinion on the artistic merits of "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter," you can't starve artists of potential inspiration and material b/c someone wants to leech off his/her great-grandfather's talent. Of course, there should be exceptions (Marilyn Monroe sex dolls would be controversial, to say the least.)
 
2012-06-14 01:13:39 PM

Trocadero: Strangely, I agree w/ the governor. I mean, despite your opinion on the artistic merits of "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter," you can't starve artists of potential inspiration and material b/c someone wants to leech off his/her great-grandfather's talent. Of course, there should be exceptions (Marilyn Monroe sex dolls would be controversial, to say the least.)


I think you have a good business idea
 
2012-06-14 01:25:06 PM
He lived free and died. Now it's time for all the flits and phonies to cash in.
 
2012-06-14 01:35:57 PM
www.geekosystem.com
 
2012-06-14 01:43:59 PM
I'm still pissed that his family is keeping his works out of Ebooks. All you can get are "reference" editions at multiples of the hardcover price.
 
2012-06-14 02:06:44 PM
fc01.deviantart.net
 
2012-06-14 02:21:40 PM

KiplingKat872: ...am I the only person who thinks that book would be vastly improved by a fatal mugging in chapter one?


My problem with Catcher in the Rye is twofold: I have no sympathy and no interest in whining emo bastards. Do something about it, you little turd. Secondly, I struggle to sympathise with rich, trust-fund kids. You think you got problems? Bruce Wayne saw his parents slaughtered. Did he talk about phonies? No, he became the goddamn Batman.

The only reason it is where it is is because of some swearing and the controversy happened in High Schools, and happened in the 60s, and so the boomers consider this to be an event of monumental importance.
 
2012-06-14 02:33:43 PM

farkeruk: KiplingKat872: ...am I the only person who thinks that book would be vastly improved by a fatal mugging in chapter one?

My problem with Catcher in the Rye is twofold: I have no sympathy and no interest in whining emo bastards. Do something about it, you little turd. Secondly, I struggle to sympathise with rich, trust-fund kids. You think you got problems? Bruce Wayne saw his parents slaughtered. Did he talk about phonies? No, he became the goddamn Batman.

The only reason it is where it is is because of some swearing and the controversy happened in High Schools, and happened in the 60s, and so the boomers consider this to be an event of monumental importance.


CSB: I remember bringing a the copy I was assigned to read in class home. On the back there was a blurb that said, "The book teenagers were reading under the desk in the 1950's!"

My father saw that and said, "We were not. We were reading "Battle Cry" and "Peyton Place." "Peyton Place" had sex in it."
 
2012-06-14 02:51:30 PM
Gah..Typos. Sorry.
 
2012-06-14 03:06:11 PM
The bill would be a lot more popular if they'd named it after Che Guevara.
 
2012-06-14 03:15:10 PM
I read this book because of its "classic" status and found myself genuinely loathing a protagonist for the first time ever. Whether this was intentional on the part of the author or not is immaterial to me; I couldn't stop gritting my teeth at the hurricane of useless whining and thought-terminating cliches flying at me from every page. He's not a hero, he's not a villain, hell he's not even an anti-hero. He's just a boring douche.
 
2012-06-14 03:16:33 PM

farkeruk: My problem with Catcher in the Rye is twofold: I have no sympathy and no interest in whining emo bastards. Do something about it, you little turd. Secondly, I struggle to sympathise with rich, trust-fund kids. You think you got problems? Bruce Wayne saw his parents slaughtered. Did he talk about phonies? No, he became the goddamn Batman.


You just got quoted on my FB.
 
2012-06-14 03:23:46 PM

Lord_Dubu: farkeruk: My problem with Catcher in the Rye is twofold: I have no sympathy and no interest in whining emo bastards. Do something about it, you little turd. Secondly, I struggle to sympathise with rich, trust-fund kids. You think you got problems? Bruce Wayne saw his parents slaughtered. Did he talk about phonies? No, he became the goddamn Batman.

You just got quoted on my FB.


I stole it too
 
2012-06-14 03:23:48 PM
OMG, if this is yet another whining about CitR thread, the phonies have won....
 
2012-06-14 03:38:46 PM
Governor a Democrat?

Let's see...A little Google-Fu...Yep, Democrat

/Never cared for the book, or much fiction for that matter. I always thought my senior-year school English teacher was trying to shovel crap down our throats that wasn't relevant or particularly interesting, but stuff they read as kids. And I thought he was hitting on some of the female students (zero evidence of that, other than that he tried way too hard to be "cool").
 
2012-06-14 05:31:54 PM

farkeruk: The only reason it is where it is is because of some swearing and the controversy happened in High Schools, and happened in the 60s, and so the boomers consider this to be an event of monumental importance.


Do you really believe this?
 
2012-06-14 08:23:25 PM

Krustofsky: Governor a Democrat?

Let's see...A little Google-Fu...Yep, Democrat


Well in the interest of fairness, Lynch isn't much of either side. Everyone can find something to agree with Lynch at one point or another. Just a question of whether or not it's before he changes his mind for the third time.
 
2012-06-14 09:06:45 PM
I'm hoping my death is vetoed when the time comes too.
 
2012-06-14 09:41:46 PM
When I first read it at 14, I sympathized with Holden. I knew where he came from and where he was at. The last time a read it (a couple of years ago at 51), I could understand the hate for the book. Salinger never did write a sympathetic character. They were all broken whiners that were on the edge of suicide.
 
2012-06-14 09:45:46 PM
I teach this novel every year to my grade 12 class. They seem to enjoy it -- I think that they can relate to Holden in a lot of ways, though he is rather tame by today's standards. We have a lot of great conversations in class about the novel.

They have to read it once. I've read and discussed it for hundred of hours over the past six years. I hated Holden at first. The rich-kid-emo-whine factor was too much for me. I wanted the "fatal mugging" scenario that KiplingKat872 wished for. However. . . over the past two years, my feelings have changed drastically. It could be my maternal empathy kicking in as I approach my 30s, however, I just feel so sad for the character. This is a boy who couldn't even pay a prostitute to talk to him. A boy who can't think of a single person in the entire world that he could pick up the phone and call, knowing that they would be there to listen to him. To me, there's just something heartbreaking about that character. I can't bring myself to be angry at the character anymore -- I just want to hug him.

/CSS
//Never gets to talk about books with anyone older than 18
 
2012-06-14 10:14:22 PM

xpennyroyaltyx: I teach this novel every year to my grade 12 class. They seem to enjoy it -- I think that they can relate to Holden in a lot of ways, though he is rather tame by today's standards. We have a lot of great conversations in class about the novel.

They have to read it once. I've read and discussed it for hundred of hours over the past six years. I hated Holden at first. The rich-kid-emo-whine factor was too much for me. I wanted the "fatal mugging" scenario that KiplingKat872 wished for. However. . . over the past two years, my feelings have changed drastically. It could be my maternal empathy kicking in as I approach my 30s, however, I just feel so sad for the character. This is a boy who couldn't even pay a prostitute to talk to him. A boy who can't think of a single person in the entire world that he could pick up the phone and call, knowing that they would be there to listen to him. To me, there's just something heartbreaking about that character. I can't bring myself to be angry at the character anymore -- I just want to hug him.

/CSS
//Never gets to talk about books with anyone older than 18


Because of school and friends raving about it, I re-read it at 20 and 27.

Still think Holden is spoiled, whiny hypocrite. People who have no one to call usually have only themselves to blame.

I love Salinger's short stories. "To Esme, With Love and Squallor" moves me to tears, but IMO Catcher in the Rye is overrated. It never spoke to me. I know it speaks to a lot if people (and I honestly wonder of it is a symptom of something wrong with our culture that so many identify with such a petty, self absorbed hypocrite), but I resented having it repeatedly rammed down my throat how amazing that book was. It has been so institutionalized, I wonder if it is being judged on it's merits, or uf it as much a "phony" as the protagonist talks about.

Or maybe the entire thing is a satiric joke on the academic and literary world the intelligentsia were too dense to get.

My teen angst novel was The Rainbow, a book about a girl who finds her own way. I re-read that last year when I turned 40, and there is so much more in it now that I have more awareness.
 
2012-06-14 10:21:57 PM
Ursula actually grows, changes, learns, matures, becomes more self aware and independant.

And she actually had to overcome social and economic station, family tragedy, limiting gender roles, etc.

Holden faces no challenges he does not create himself, and he just collapses in on himself. Why does this speak to so many? What does that say about us?
 
2012-06-14 10:53:08 PM

KiplingKat872: Holden faces no challenges he does not create himself, and he just collapses in on himself. Why does this speak to so many? What does that say about us?

I haven't read The Rainbow, so I can't comment on that, however, I agree that 'Catcher' is over-rated. I probably would never have read it more than once had it not been on the curriculm. So maybe what I feel is literary Stockholm Syndrome - I'm forced to face this book every year, so maybe that's why I started to empathize so much.

What you said -- I think this book and the circumstances speak to so many because it's rather human to fark up when you're that age. Also, Holden is in a state of arrested development - he was never able to cope with Allie's death, which co-incided with the onset of puberty. It's hard for me to hate a child for throwing a tantrum -- that's what a lot of Holden's actions remind me of. He's just a child in this big old body he doesn't understand and doesn't know how to cope because he doesn't have that skill set. His parents, despite their wealth did nothing for him when Allie died, other than ship him off to school after school after school - how did that harm him? While he has to be accountable for his actions and for the mess he got himself into, I can kind of forgive him for getting himself there. . .

I can't say that the book has ever moved me to tears, or that it is even ranked among my favourites - I just empathize with the character and i think i "get" why teenagers tend to feel the same way, too.
 
2012-06-14 11:09:38 PM

xpennyroyaltyx: KiplingKat872: Holden faces no challenges he does not create himself, and he just collapses in on himself. Why does this speak to so many? What does that say about us?
I haven't read The Rainbow, so I can't comment on that, however, I agree that 'Catcher' is over-rated. I probably would never have read it more than once had it not been on the curriculm. So maybe what I feel is literary Stockholm Syndrome - I'm forced to face this book every year, so maybe that's why I started to empathize so much.

What you said -- I think this book and the circumstances speak to so many because it's rather human to fark up when you're that age. Also, Holden is in a state of arrested development - he was never able to cope with Allie's death, which co-incided with the onset of puberty. It's hard for me to hate a child for throwing a tantrum -- that's what a lot of Holden's actions remind me of. He's just a child in this big old body he doesn't understand and doesn't know how to cope because he doesn't have that skill set. His parents, despite their wealth did nothing for him when Allie died, other than ship him off to school after school after school - how did that harm him? While he has to be accountable for his actions and for the mess he got himself into, I can kind of forgive him for getting himself there. . .

I can't say that the book has ever moved me to tears, or that it is even ranked among my favourites - I just empathize with the character and i think i "get" why teenagers tend to feel the same way, too.


...o.k., That explains it better than anyone else has been able to thus far.

Thanks. :)
 
2012-06-14 11:15:00 PM

xpennyroyaltyx: I teach this novel every year to my grade 12 class. They seem to enjoy it


In high school it was a great way to tell the really smart kids from the kid's who just got good grades and played the game.


The really smart kids hated it and saw what Holden really was.
 
2012-06-14 11:20:35 PM

SharkTrager: The really smart kids hated it and saw what Holden really was


I agree, sort of. However, I think "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" is a better gauge. :P
 
2012-06-15 05:22:55 AM

Trocadero: Strangely, I agree w/ the governor. I mean, despite your opinion on the artistic merits of "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter," you can't starve artists of potential inspiration and material b/c someone wants to leech off his/her great-grandfather's talent. Of course, there should be exceptions (Marilyn Monroe sex dolls would be controversial, to say the least.)


Controversial should not mean illegal. Monroe has been dead for 50 years. Market the doll, I say.


To give an example of how ridiculous this shiat is there was a TV show that did some filming in the theater where Elvis Presley had played and the phrase "Elvis has left the building" was supposedly announced to the audience of rabid fans. They explained all that on the show and apparently there's a statue of Elvis in front of the theater now, BUT on the show they blurred it out. The farking statue is in front of it on a goddamned sidewalk in plain view of the public. Apparently nearly 35 years after Elvis's death they could not use his likeness on this TV show without paying his estate whatever the going rate for using his likeness is - even though the statue is on the sidewalk.

It reminds me of a joke I saw on a sitcom about 20 years ago. To paraphrase "Vampires definitely exist. How else do you explain Yoko Ono and Lisa Marie Presley living off the dead?"
 
2012-06-15 06:53:13 AM
Hated the book. No irony, no humor, no drama...just a whining asshole.
 
2012-06-15 11:40:57 AM
My favourite Salinger book (and one of my favourite books of all time):
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-06-15 01:04:31 PM
Loved the short stories, For Esme With Love and Squalor, The Laughing Man, and De Daumier-Smiths Blue Period.
 
2012-06-15 04:24:44 PM

xpennyroyaltyx: SharkTrager: The really smart kids hated it and saw what Holden really was

I agree, sort of. However, I think "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" is a better gauge. :P


Lots of schools don't teach it though due to "that word".
 
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