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(Newsnet5)   Can you live below the poverty line on $1.50 a day? How much is Ramen flavored noodles and a 40oz of Old English 800 nowadays?   (newsnet5.com) divider line 163
    More: Interesting, Old English, noodles, poverty line, ramen, nowadays, Global Poverty Project  
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9138 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jun 2012 at 3:04 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-14 11:55:40 AM
More than $1.50. Not much more, I will grant you that, but more.
 
2012-06-14 12:03:07 PM
$1.5 for food a day

Yeah, I could do it. But then again, I have a huge garden this time of year that cuts about $20-30(sometimes more) out of my grocery bill, and this year the rain has been odd for Oregon. It's been raining in the morning, then getting sunny out in the afternoon. The plants are loving it.

I get kinda pissed if my grocery bill for the week gets over $100 for my family of 4 (kids are only 5 and 7). Meanwhile I hear about people's $250 grocery bill for their similar sized family, and ask myself, "How the fark do you spend $250 on food a week?".
 
2012-06-14 12:21:15 PM
Living on $1.50 a day in a place like New York City or even Memphis is a little bit different than living on $1.50 a day in Ethiopia.
 
2012-06-14 12:21:26 PM
The real challenge is to see if you can live above the poverty line on 1.50 a day.
 
2012-06-14 12:22:00 PM

meat0918: $1.5 for food a day

Yeah, I could do it. But then again, I have a huge garden this time of year that cuts about $20-30(sometimes more) out of my grocery bill, and this year the rain has been odd for Oregon. It's been raining in the morning, then getting sunny out in the afternoon. The plants are loving it.

I get kinda pissed if my grocery bill for the week gets over $100 for my family of 4 (kids are only 5 and 7). Meanwhile I hear about people's $250 grocery bill for their similar sized family, and ask myself, "How the fark do you spend $250 on food a week?".


Living farther from the coast, food gets pricier in decent areas. Somehow the food is still cheap in crappy areas, though.

Also, some people don't know about the awesome Mexican greengrocer.
 
2012-06-14 12:31:12 PM
If you didn't mind being homeless, sure you could.
 
2012-06-14 12:36:29 PM
$1.50 of FOOD per day? Yeah, you could do that for a few weeks, assuming you have access to a kitchen, potable water and no dietary issues, and you don't mind eating bland food with no spices or taste.

Chicken parts/bag of rice/bag of beans/canned veg/canned milk will feed you for a week or so.
 
2012-06-14 01:03:44 PM
shiat I spend $1.50 on gas just getting to work every day.
 
2012-06-14 01:10:07 PM

bdub77: shiat I spend $1.50 on gas just getting to work every day.


That's nothing: I spend $1.50 on food just getting gas every day!
 
2012-06-14 01:23:05 PM
When we were all down on our luck and homeless, the one place I invested more money was our diet. Even when I was shopping for the family on food stamps, I did not go the Mac 'n' Cheese / Ramen route. Eating a well-balanced, healthy diet, especially if you are able to do more from-scratch cooking (which doesn't have to be time consuming) will not only keep you healthier in the long run, but reduce cravings and binge eating brought on by drastic blood sugar fluctuations.

Of course, access to stores that carry fresh foods, knowledge of meal prep and a whole bunch of other factors come in to play. But for a lot of families, this notion that food budgets must be couponed to death really irks me. Most coupon offers are for foods that lack in the "substance" category.
 
Pud [TotalFark]
2012-06-14 01:23:52 PM
Can you live below the poverty line on $1.50 a day? Well I sure as hell can't live above the poverty line on that.
 
2012-06-14 01:25:55 PM

bdub77: shiat I spend $1.50 on gas just getting to work every day.


I spend $15 a day just commuting to and from work :(
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-06-14 01:41:52 PM

T. Dawg: When we were all down on our luck and homeless, the one place I invested more money was our diet. Even when I was shopping for the family on food stamps, I did not go the Mac 'n' Cheese / Ramen route. Eating a well-balanced, healthy diet, especially if you are able to do more from-scratch cooking (which doesn't have to be time consuming) will not only keep you healthier in the long run, but reduce cravings and binge eating brought on by drastic blood sugar fluctuations.

Of course, access to stores that carry fresh foods, knowledge of meal prep and a whole bunch of other factors come in to play. But for a lot of families, this notion that food budgets must be couponed to death really irks me. Most coupon offers are for foods that lack in the "substance" category.


I really think that many people who can't support themselves simply never learned the skills that most people learn from their parents. They need to learn home economics and basics like that.
 
2012-06-14 01:56:45 PM
If I went back in time to 1900, yes I could live on $1.50 a day.
 
2012-06-14 02:31:02 PM
I hate "challenges" like this. They're designed to make you fail, and fail in ways completely at odds with the people you're supposed to feel sympathy for:

From May 7th - 11th, you can spend no more than $1.50 a day on food and drink.
Is that PPP adjusted? It doesn't say.

For items such as salt, pepper, herbs and spices, simply work out the cost of each item per ounce and budget your shopping proportionally.
We're not talking saffron here. Are the program operators asserting that everyone internationally buys every ingredient fresh daily, including salt?

You can use food sourced from your garden as long as you can account for the price of production!
Awesome! What price do you assign someone farming at poverty level, and has this challenge taken that value into account? Since the goal is to see how those people live, shouldn't I get to use that number?

You cannot accept 'donated' food from family or friends, but monetary donations towards your fundraising goals are acceptable, and encouraged!
Do the poverty-ridden people we're emulating turn down international food aid? If not, why do I have to turn down assistance in kind?

You are allowed to drink tap water - remember you should try and drink at least 6-8 glasses of water each day.
Just to be clear: reserves of salt never happen, but potable water is presumed to be cheap and plentiful. Have these program designers ever been to a third-world country?
 
2012-06-14 02:41:15 PM

gerrymander: I hate "challenges" like this. They're designed to make you fail, and fail in ways completely at odds with the people you're supposed to feel sympathy for:


True, but you just spent some time thinking about eating food without any spices, where to get fresh water in a third world country, relying on handouts to eat, and subsistence farming.

Which is really the point.
 
2012-06-14 03:05:57 PM
imgboot.com
 
2012-06-14 03:06:34 PM
What is this Cheap food trifecta... Subby Ramen is 79cents
 
2012-06-14 03:07:00 PM
What Do "Pretend to Be Poor" Experiments Really Teach Us

"Saying you're living like them because you've decided to give up fancy sandwiches for five days is like someone saying they can empathize with Nelson Mandela because they spent a night in the drunk tank."
 
2012-06-14 03:09:33 PM
www.triadcouponing.com
 
2012-06-14 03:09:50 PM

Pocket Ninja: Living on $1.50 a day in a place like New York City or even Memphis is a little bit different than living on $1.50 a day in Ethiopia.


I lived in Memphis, and aside from the cost of living, it was quite a bit like Ethiopia
 
2012-06-14 03:10:38 PM
These kinds of questions solve nothing. The real question is WHY are these people living on 1.50 a day?
 
2012-06-14 03:12:33 PM
Tree bark is free.
 
2012-06-14 03:13:12 PM

Euell Gibbons: Tree bark is free.


So are dumpsters.
 
2012-06-14 03:13:48 PM
Been there done that....sucks....its great motivation to find a job/ build a marketable skill.
 
2012-06-14 03:14:19 PM
I'm eating 20 bucks worth of sushi for lunch, so I'm really getting a kick out of...

Well, no I'm not really.

/it's an infrequent treat for myself.
//grew up in poverty.
 
2012-06-14 03:15:10 PM
an even bigger challenge---live above the poverty line on 1.50 per day...

/may require gate-crashing MLB alum parties
 
2012-06-14 03:15:16 PM

meat0918: I get kinda pissed if my grocery bill for the week gets over $100 for my family of 4 (kids are only 5 and 7). Meanwhile I hear about people's $250 grocery bill for their similar sized family, and ask myself, "How the fark do you spend $250 on food a week?".


The cost of living varies from state to state, city to city. I'm sure somewhere in America, if someone bought the exact same stuff you paid $100 on... the bill would be $250.
 
2012-06-14 03:15:34 PM

what_now: gerrymander: I hate "challenges" like this. They're designed to make you fail, and fail in ways completely at odds with the people you're supposed to feel sympathy for:

True, but you just spent some time thinking about eating food without any spices, where to get fresh water in a third world country, relying on handouts to eat, and subsistence farming.

Which is really the point.


That's thinking I did 20 years ago, recalled for this pointless campaign. Nothing has substantially changed about living at poverty level in the third world since then, because if it had, it wouldn't be the third world.

"Thinking about" things changes nothing, if it's the wrong people thinking -- and this program is aimed at the wrong people.
 
2012-06-14 03:15:37 PM
Only being able to spend $1.50 per day on food is a lot different than spending only $1.50 per day on average. One is much, much harder.
 
2012-06-14 03:16:26 PM

D-Liver: These kinds of questions solve nothing. The real question is WHY are these people living on 1.50 a day?


Pretty much this. And if you succeed, you now have Internet Tough Guy ammunition to say poverty is not an issue in the world!
 
2012-06-14 03:16:36 PM
1.50$? I could do it. I wouldn't enjoy it, but I could do it. I already cook all my own food, and if you're frugal and buy everything as cheap as possible (and on sale when you can), I'd guesstimate I could get at least a week's worth of food out of a couple bucks worth of rice, the cheapest chicken I could find, maybe a bit of pasta or some cheese, etc. (and as far as seasoning goes, just plain salt & pepper can go a surprisingly long way toward making stuff taste good, and it's pretty cheap relative to how much you use.) It just wouldn't be very interesting/high variety or come in huge quantities. It helps that I already don't drink much in the way of soft drinks/etc, though I'd hate to give up the coffee.
 
2012-06-14 03:16:53 PM
Ramen is packed with carbs and meant to fill you up, but provides zilch in the way of nutritional value
 
2012-06-14 03:17:34 PM
Grad school stipend was $1000 a month after tuition & fees, and rent was $500 (even with roommates). So that left $16 a day to live on, for everything other than lodging.

I don't recall if I spent only $1.50 a day on food, but I know damn well that I walked to campus and back because $1.50 per day for the bus ($.75 each way) was out of my budget. I also know that I weighed 25 pounds less then, and I'm by no means plus-sized now. So perhaps I really didn't eat much more each day than a banana, canned soup, and the local Chinese restaurant Kung Pao platter to go (cost $3.95 but I always got three meals out of it).
 
2012-06-14 03:18:09 PM

what_now: gerrymander: I hate "challenges" like this. They're designed to make you fail, and fail in ways completely at odds with the people you're supposed to feel sympathy for:

True, but you just spent some time thinking about eating food without any spices, where to get fresh water in a third world country, relying on handouts to eat, and subsistence farming.

Which is really the point.


MSG is pretty cheap if you buy it in bulk from the Japanese grocery store, that's all the spice you need.

If you want condiments you can find some ketchup and mustard packets for free somewhere, maybe even some hot sauce ;-)
 
2012-06-14 03:18:43 PM
In order to keep our expenses under control, we do the following:

1. Have a phat garden (that alone saves a LOT!)
2. Shop for things at the right stores. Non-perishables and some food items are cheaper at Walmart than at the regular grocery store. So split the shopping up.
3. Go to the farmers market for produce that we didn't grow.
4. We have a local food store that specializes in all manner of fresh juices and milks (plus some other dairy stuff). They have the cheapest prices around because they make and package everything on site. No delivery costs to pass on. A 1/2 gallon of organic milk is like $1.75 there and like $3.80 at the grocery store.
5. Use coupons as often as possible.

Back in the days where we did all of our shopping in one place, we would spend $350 a week, easy. Now it's more like $250.
 
2012-06-14 03:18:48 PM
The solution to $1.50 per day for food is to have more children.
 
2012-06-14 03:19:03 PM
I'll just leave this here

The Perfect 3.3 Cent Breakfast
 
2012-06-14 03:19:04 PM

D-Liver: These kinds of questions solve nothing. The real question is WHY are these people living on 1.50 a day?


Because they wouldn't work for less than that. Greedy bastards.
 
2012-06-14 03:19:57 PM

gerrymander: That's thinking I did 20 years ago, recalled for this pointless campaign. Nothing has substantially changed about living at poverty level in the third world since then, because if it had, it wouldn't be the third world.

"Thinking about" things changes nothing, if it's the wrong people thinking -- and this program is aimed at the wrong people.


To expand personally... yes, I know I *could* do it for a week. And I know I'd be miserable. So what? What have I learned? I don't even need to partake in this stupid exercise to realize there are people living on $1.50/day in the world, and it sucks for them, and its a complicated problem that we owe the third world at least some resources and thinking to help *solve* it.
 
2012-06-14 03:20:23 PM
It's not exactly the healthiest diet and I don't know what the long term negative impact would be, but Plain Oatmeal (or lightly sweetened with a packet of Splenda you can take from any McDonalds/Dunkin Donuts) for breakfast and Ramen for lunch and Dinner costs less than $1.50. Trust me, I know.
 
2012-06-14 03:21:22 PM
Depends on the weather. In the sunny parts of the US and the tropics - no doubt. Anywhere else - not without help.
 
2012-06-14 03:21:29 PM

D-Liver: These kinds of questions solve nothing. The real question is WHY are these people living on 1.50 a day?


Because the alternative is dying?
 
2012-06-14 03:21:30 PM

downstairs: The cost of living varies from state to state, city to city. I'm sure somewhere in America, if someone bought the exact same stuff you paid $100 on... the bill would be $250.


More likely it's people in his location, and the reason is that they likely buy processed foods. The idea of companies like Kraft (actually the idea behind any successful business) is to add value to a product, thus being able to sell it for more than they bought it. For instance, a bag of potatoes may cost 2 dollars (or less if bought in bulk, but ignore that) and if you can process many bags of potatoes into many more boxes of "au gratin potatoes", "frozen hashbrowns" and the like, they have added value to the potatoes in a profitable way.

sometimes it's worth it to just buy processed food, because the time you spend on cooking is also worth money---i don't make my own pesto, for instance. but buying and eating ONLY processed food has deleterious effects both on the wallet and your health.
 
2012-06-14 03:22:34 PM
Also, they're just talking food here. What the hell does singling that out accomplish? So someone tries to live on $1.50/day in food in their $800 apartment, with a $600 fridge, $600 stove, and appliances that automate most of their chores?

That's not living below the world poverty line. That's just eating a lot of salad and rice.
 
2012-06-14 03:23:03 PM

meat0918: $1.5 for food a day

Yeah, I could do it. But then again, I have a huge garden this time of year that cuts about $20-30(sometimes more) out of my grocery bill, and this year the rain has been odd for Oregon. It's been raining in the morning, then getting sunny out in the afternoon. The plants are loving it.


That's awesome. I live up in Seattle and we have a container garden growing on our front balcony. I love doing it, but I definitely find I spend more on getting the plants, the soil, the tools, and the seeds than I get back in a lower grocery bill.

Do you think there's a tipping point where it becomes coste effective?
 
2012-06-14 03:23:40 PM
You should do this so you can tell people about how poor you used to be. If you thought you could reverse brag about that time back in college where you only ate ramen, just wait until you see the looks on peoples' faces when you reverse brag about living on $1.50 a day. They'll be blown away with how real you are and how far you've achieved in life.

If that fails you could talk about the marathons you run, how you never watch TV, or how you'll only get dog from a shelter.
 
2012-06-14 03:24:26 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: [www.triadcouponing.com image 357x309]


6g of saturated fat (30% DV), 580mg of sodium (24%), 270 calories, and almost no vitamins and minerals. Even worse, that's only for half the package.

Probably better off with PB&J, at least until the diabetes kicks in
 
2012-06-14 03:24:43 PM

proteus_b: More likely it's people in his location, and the reason is that they likely buy processed foods. The idea of companies like Kraft (actually the idea behind any successful business) is to add value to a product, thus being able to sell it for more than they bought it. For instance, a bag of potatoes may cost 2 dollars (or less if bought in bulk, but ignore that) and if you can process many bags of potatoes into many more boxes of "au gratin potatoes", "frozen hashbrowns" and the like, they have added value to the potatoes in a profitable way.

sometimes it's worth it to just buy processed food, because the time you spend on cooking is also worth money---i don't make my own pesto, for instance. but buying and eating ONLY processed food has deleterious effects both on the wallet and your health.


Oh, I know. I wasn't expanding on all issues on the point.

Also- pesto is very, very easy to make on your own! And its generally better.

/pesto is one of the very few things I'm able to actually make.
 
2012-06-14 03:25:54 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: [www.triadcouponing.com image 357x309]


Those are tasty but not nearly as good as....

tjonlinestore.com

These things are like crack.
 
2012-06-14 03:26:07 PM

Pocket Ninja: Living on $1.50 a day in a place like New York City or even Memphis is a little bit different than living on $1.50 a day in Ethiopia.


You are living like a farking king for $1.50 in Ethiopia.

A farking king.
 
2012-06-14 03:26:23 PM
*ahem*

I grew a pepper. Right now, on my porch, is a baby pepper. I anticipate it will be ripe in a few weeks.

/cost about $30 for supplies, dirt, water, etc, but damnit: I created food!
 
2012-06-14 03:28:17 PM
Refuse to do it? Yes. I'd rather walk to work and have more money to spend on food. If I only had $1.50 for food, I'd prefer to die.
 
2012-06-14 03:28:44 PM
I just don't get it. How can you make less than $2 a day in the USA? If everything else in my life went to shiat I'd still know how to gather enough legit scrap to make $20-$30 a day. Of course, if all those people getting by on less than $2 a day were to get motivated then things might get harder.

/Done about $2k profit in the past week while mostly sitting around.
//I managed to outsource most of my own job.
 
2012-06-14 03:28:57 PM
0.tqn.com
 
2012-06-14 03:30:08 PM

Euell Gibbons: Tree bark is free.


I used to be a Barkeater.
 
2012-06-14 03:31:36 PM
More feel-good bullsh*t that does nothing to actually reduce poverty, or improve people's lives.

But hey, if it makes you feel better, go for it.
 
2012-06-14 03:31:40 PM
Easy... don't eat for 2 days, day 3 get a 20 piece nugget... repeat...
 
2012-06-14 03:32:23 PM
there would be much intestinal pain as my big fat american stomach slowly shrank to nothing.

on a food budget of $1.50 daily i believe i would resort to dumpster diving, begging, garden raiding and outright theft. after i got thin i would consider hooking. no one like a fat hooker.

ps: i still need $ for 3 packs a day
 
2012-06-14 03:32:29 PM

Broktun: Pocket Ninja: Living on $1.50 a day in a place like New York City or even Memphis is a little bit different than living on $1.50 a day in Ethiopia.

You are living like a farking king for $1.50 in Ethiopia.

A farking king.


Not really. That's double the average, but much like the US, there isn't a huge lifestyle difference between $60k a year and $30k a year. You live much more comfortably, but I wouldn't say "like a king".
 
2012-06-14 03:32:58 PM

ToeKnee666: meat0918: $1.5 for food a day

Yeah, I could do it. But then again, I have a huge garden this time of year that cuts about $20-30(sometimes more) out of my grocery bill, and this year the rain has been odd for Oregon. It's been raining in the morning, then getting sunny out in the afternoon. The plants are loving it.

That's awesome. I live up in Seattle and we have a container garden growing on our front balcony. I love doing it, but I definitely find I spend more on getting the plants, the soil, the tools, and the seeds than I get back in a lower grocery bill.

Do you think there's a tipping point where it becomes coste effective?


Yeah, it's called a farm.
 
2012-06-14 03:33:34 PM
They aint' starvin'.
I saw a kid on the news the other day from Ethiopia that was so stuffed his belly was sticking out. Must of just had a picnic cause the flies were all over the place.And man the women go naked over there. I bet I could bang a whole tribe for three dollars in pennies. BTW anyone et a chance at the new BK Bacon Sundae??
 
2012-06-14 03:33:45 PM
I was homeless for 18 months at one point, and since I refused to accept charity I got most of my food from the trash. I went weeks at a time without spending any money at all, so I could certainly live on $1.50 a day. It would suck ass, though, so fark all that.
 
2012-06-14 03:34:45 PM
j.wigflip.com
 
2012-06-14 03:34:50 PM
OE 800 yes that's my brand, take it in a 40, bottle, quart, or can.
 
2012-06-14 03:35:36 PM

malaktaus: I was homeless for 18 months at one point, and since I refused to accept charity I got most of my food from the trash. I went weeks at a time without spending any money at all, so I could certainl live on $1.50 a day. It would suck ass, though, so fark all that.


Just curious, but why would you refuse help?
 
2012-06-14 03:36:04 PM

ChipNASA: [j.wigflip.com image 439x552]


OK DUMBASS


If I KULD SPELL!!!! This MIGHT be funny...

j.wigflip.com
 
2012-06-14 03:37:19 PM

ToeKnee666: meat0918: $1.5 for food a day

Yeah, I could do it. But then again, I have a huge garden this time of year that cuts about $20-30(sometimes more) out of my grocery bill, and this year the rain has been odd for Oregon. It's been raining in the morning, then getting sunny out in the afternoon. The plants are loving it.

That's awesome. I live up in Seattle and we have a container garden growing on our front balcony. I love doing it, but I definitely find I spend more on getting the plants, the soil, the tools, and the seeds than I get back in a lower grocery bill.

Do you think there's a tipping point where it becomes coste effective?



We have an 800 sq foot garden, and we haven't hit the tipping point. maybe if we grew from seed, but the cost of the plants, plant food, garden supplies and if you calculatd the amount of time and work put into it....forget it.

I am currenlty engaged in woodchuck wars. Just spent $250 bucks on supplies to electirfy the garden fence. If effective it will be well worth it.
 
2012-06-14 03:39:52 PM
I just spent $1.50 on a diet soda. Spent $8 on lunch today, too. I'll also have consumed a whopping $0.20 worth of fuel by the time the day is done. Nevermind the mini window A/C that will keep me comfortable throughout this evening while I hack away on some projects and play video games, all powered by a subsidized electrical grid, and all done from within the confines of the house that I rent for $500/mo.

I spent $40 on beer and liquor last night. Nothing exceeds like excess. YOLO, cholo.

FWIW, you can take $8 and turn it into 3.5 days worth of delicious and nutritious soup. Not quite at the $1.50/day mark, but one can easily get there with a small garden.
 
2012-06-14 03:41:42 PM
OK, let's see: A pound of black powder costs about $25, and there are 7000 grains in a pound. I shoot between 90 and 110 grains, so say 100, so I'm getting 70 shots for that $25, or about $0.36 per shot. A flint costs about $1 to $2, but I've been knapping my own as of late, so they are essentially free, but I'll go with $1, and I get at least 50 shots from one, so that's $0.02. I use linen patching material. A yard costs about $9, but I can get about 1,000 patches from it, so that costs me about $0.01 per shot. Fat rendered from whatever meat I happened to have on hand for patch lube is essentially free, but lets put it at a penny a shot also because I might have to use Crisco or something like that.

So, every time I touch the trigger I'm spending about $0.40. Say between practice and actual hunting, I shoot 20 times. That's a cost of $8.00. Add to that the cost of a hunting license ($19 for a big game license in NY). If I shoot a smallish deer, and get 50 lbs of usable meat, it will have cost me $27 in direct costs, or about $0.54 per pound. If I eat about a pound of it a day, that still leaves me with nearly a dollar per day for veg-edibles and the like.

Yeah, I think I could do it.
 
2012-06-14 03:42:34 PM

Degenerate Monkey: I just spent $1.50 on a diet soda. Spent $8 on lunch today, too. I'll also have consumed a whopping $0.20 worth of fuel by the time the day is done. Nevermind the mini window A/C that will keep me comfortable throughout this evening while I hack away on some projects and play video games, all powered by a subsidized electrical grid, and all done from within the confines of the house that I rent for $500/mo.

I spent $40 on beer and liquor last night. Nothing exceeds like excess. YOLO, cholo.

FWIW, you can take $8 and turn it into 3.5 days worth of delicious and nutritious soup. Not quite at the $1.50/day mark, but one can easily get there with a small garden.


Small gardens are a hobby and a source of flavorful vegetables. They are not a source of cheap food.
 
2012-06-14 03:43:09 PM

2 grams: I am currenlty engaged in woodchuck wars. Just spent $250 bucks on supplies to electirfy the garden fence. If effective it will be well worth it.


Woodchuck fricassee. NOM NOM NOM
 
2012-06-14 03:43:27 PM
I was so poor once as a young man I had to take vacation as I had no gas in my car. Dinner was 4 x popsicles at 5p each.

/europoor.
 
2012-06-14 03:45:18 PM
Stupid challenge. Asking someone in the USA to live on $1.50 a day is retarded. Asking someone to live on $1.50 day in actual poverty, like Sudan, is retarded. You can probably live on $1.50 a WEEK in Sudan.
 
2012-06-14 03:46:37 PM
My Dove bar cost more than $1.50......
 
2012-06-14 03:46:51 PM

Maynotlast: Stupid challenge. Asking someone in the USA to live on $1.50 a day is retarded. Asking someone to live on $1.50 day in actual poverty, like Sudan, is retarded. You can probably live on $1.50 a WEEK in Sudan.


If it's not robbed from you, my the local warlords
 
2012-06-14 03:48:04 PM

Maynotlast: Stupid challenge. Asking someone in the USA to live on $1.50 a day is retarded. Asking someone to live on $1.50 day in actual poverty, like Sudan, is retarded. You can probably live on $1.50 a WEEK in Sudan.


What's the average daily warlord tithe in Sudan these days?
 
2012-06-14 03:48:13 PM

dittybopper: OK, let's see: A pound of black powder costs about $25, and there are 7000 grains in a pound. I shoot between 90 and 110 grains, so say 100, so I'm getting 70 shots for that $25, or about $0.36 per shot. A flint costs about $1 to $2, but I've been knapping my own as of late, so they are essentially free, but I'll go with $1, and I get at least 50 shots from one, so that's $0.02. I use linen patching material. A yard costs about $9, but I can get about 1,000 patches from it, so that costs me about $0.01 per shot. Fat rendered from whatever meat I happened to have on hand for patch lube is essentially free, but lets put it at a penny a shot also because I might have to use Crisco or something like that.

So, every time I touch the trigger I'm spending about $0.40. Say between practice and actual hunting, I shoot 20 times. That's a cost of $8.00. Add to that the cost of a hunting license ($19 for a big game license in NY). If I shoot a smallish deer, and get 50 lbs of usable meat, it will have cost me $27 in direct costs, or about $0.54 per pound. If I eat about a pound of it a day, that still leaves me with nearly a dollar per day for veg-edibles and the like.

Yeah, I think I could do it.


Where are you going to store 50 pounds of deer meat for over a month? Add in the cost of refrigeration.
What about smoking to turn it into jerkey?
 
2012-06-14 03:49:15 PM

Pocket Ninja: Living on $1.50 a day in a place like New York City or even Memphis is a little bit different than living on $1.50 a day in Ethiopia.


i141.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-14 03:50:18 PM

Vlad_the_Inaner: I'll just leave this here

The Perfect 3.3 Cent Breakfast


Intriguing...

"Empty the sprouted grains into a two cup measure and put four more ounces of wheat in the jar, flood and set aside overnight as before. Now you have a perpetual routine taking up no real time and producing a fantastic amount of food for little cost."

Hmm... little cost, unless you count the time it takes to make? Every 4 hours I need to be home to change the water. I guess I run home during lunch, which still is going to cost at least $1 in gas. Not to mention buying the grinder, the thermos, boiling the water (running a stove costs money too you know!) getting jars, screens, etc.

Or I can buy a box of cereal for $3, and just pour some milk in the morning.

Yeah, I'll stick this on my list of "great, healthy meals I'll eat when I have a butler to do all the preparation for me."
 
2012-06-14 03:51:14 PM
No.
No one eats for $1.50 a day.
Street beggars have more than that to spend.
The cheapest McDonald's burger costs that much.
 
2012-06-14 03:51:34 PM

vernonFL: If I went back in time to 1900, yes I could live on $1.50 a day.


Now THAT'S the kind of thinking "outside the box" we need!
 
2012-06-14 03:56:04 PM
So when can we start outsourcing our poor?
 
2012-06-14 03:56:07 PM
Banana: 20₵
2/3 cup dry rice: 36₵
1 zucchini: 69₵
Dandelion Greens: Free

I'll invest my 25₵ in seeds and Haitian penny stocks and live like a sir.

slackstack.com

Because I already eat my food raw (except grains) with no seasonings. (OMG MALNUTRITION!)

/But seriously, I am a survivalist, so thanks for the free money.
//also itg
///acually is dolan
 
2012-06-14 03:56:51 PM

stonicus: malaktaus: I was homeless for 18 months at one point, and since I refused to accept charity I got most of my food from the trash. I went weeks at a time without spending any money at all, so I could certainl live on $1.50 a day. It would suck ass, though, so fark all that.

Just curious, but why would you refuse help?


Several reasons, some of them better than others. I was young and healthy and capable of getting what I needed without assistance, for one thing, and I was raised to regard charity as something you took only if you had no other choice. In addition you can't get assistance without interacting with people in some way, and due to mental health issues that was not a simple matter- that's why I was homeless in the first place, really.
 
2012-06-14 03:57:45 PM

Vlad_the_Inaner: 2 grams: I am currenlty engaged in woodchuck wars. Just spent $250 bucks on supplies to electirfy the garden fence. If effective it will be well worth it.

Woodchuck fricassee. NOM NOM NOM


A well placed loop of wire would resolve your issue for less than a buck.
 
2012-06-14 03:58:04 PM

proteus_b: downstairs: The cost of living varies from state to state, city to city. I'm sure somewhere in America, if someone bought the exact same stuff you paid $100 on... the bill would be $250.

More likely it's people in his location, and the reason is that they likely buy processed foods. The idea of companies like Kraft (actually the idea behind any successful business) is to add value to a product, thus being able to sell it for more than they bought it. For instance, a bag of potatoes may cost 2 dollars (or less if bought in bulk, but ignore that) and if you can process many bags of potatoes into many more boxes of "au gratin potatoes", "frozen hashbrowns" and the like, they have added value to the potatoes in a profitable way.

sometimes it's worth it to just buy processed food, because the time you spend on cooking is also worth money---i don't make my own pesto, for instance. but buying and eating ONLY processed food has deleterious effects both on the wallet and your health.


On the last part about eating only processed foods being bad for you, says who? I mean I guess it depends on how you define processed, but 5 days a week I have some skim milk (any dairy you can buy in the store is at least pasturized) and instant oatmeal (Individually packaged and flavored) for breakfast, for lunch its a turkey sandwich(turkey is not from the butcher, its the leftovers pounded into circles) cheese, honey mustard, and pickles, baby carrots, yogurt, fruit cup, 2 fish oil pills, and a multi-vitamin. So far the only unprocessed thing is the carrots which I could easily sub for shredded carrots. let's say I have hamburger helper for dinner, please tell me how this diet is so horrible for me?
 
2012-06-14 03:58:30 PM

Pocket Ninja: Living on $1.50 a day in a place like New York City or even Memphis is a little bit different than living on $1.50 a day in Ethiopia.


That was the first thing I thought of. Prices in places where people only have $1,50 are quite a bit lower than where I do my shopping. The value of a chicken is roughly the same as the price for an AK-47. Which according to this source will cost you about $600. A living chicken can't be all that expensive ($10 at most?) so that $1,50 should be multiplied by (at most) 60. This gives us an upper limit of daily expenses around the $90 which means I already live far below the poverty level.

/They should be exporting AK-47 and importing chickens.
 
2012-06-14 03:59:51 PM

Vlad_the_Inaner: I'll just leave this here

The Perfect 3.3 Cent Breakfast


FTA: "An Economic Note: All the prices quoted on this page are in 1976 U.S. currency" - now we know how, we just have to build a time machine and we're all set for that sweet, sweet wheatsludge breakfast!
 
2012-06-14 04:01:51 PM
In Shanghai, a lot of folks live on 5 kuai a day (about 80 cents). You can get a decent bowl of noodles with chicken and a beer (depending on the street vendor).
 
2012-06-14 04:01:53 PM

dittybopper: Euell Gibbons: Tree bark is free.

I used to be a Barkeater.


But then you took an arrow to the knothole?
 
2012-06-14 04:02:03 PM

stellarossa: I was so poor once as a young man I had to take vacation as I had no gas in my car. Dinner was 4 x popsicles at 5p each.

/europoor.


I too have done this. Had to call in sick to work a day, because I had not enough gas to get to work, much less take a bus to work.

It was years ago, but it still sucked.
 
2012-06-14 04:02:56 PM

vpb: T. Dawg: When we were all down on our luck and homeless, the one place I invested more money was our diet. Even when I was shopping for the family on food stamps, I did not go the Mac 'n' Cheese / Ramen route. Eating a well-balanced, healthy diet, especially if you are able to do more from-scratch cooking (which doesn't have to be time consuming) will not only keep you healthier in the long run, but reduce cravings and binge eating brought on by drastic blood sugar fluctuations.

Of course, access to stores that carry fresh foods, knowledge of meal prep and a whole bunch of other factors come in to play. But for a lot of families, this notion that food budgets must be couponed to death really irks me. Most coupon offers are for foods that lack in the "substance" category.

I really think that many people who can't support themselves simply never learned the skills that most people learn from their parents. They need to learn home economics and basics like that.


this. it kills me to see people who are on food stamps buying complete garbage for their family; nothing of real sustenance...when we grocery shop, we tend to look at what we can get the most bang for our buck with...ie, 10lbs of hamburger meat = at least 7 complete different meals...for like $20 (including the stuff you add to it; hamburger helper, spaghetti, taco stuff, etc)...rather than spend $20 on two steaks and a bag of doritos...
 
2012-06-14 04:03:31 PM

big pig peaches: Vlad_the_Inaner: 2 grams: I am currenlty engaged in woodchuck wars. Just spent $250 bucks on supplies to electirfy the garden fence. If effective it will be well worth it.

Woodchuck fricassee. NOM NOM NOM

A well placed loop of wire would resolve your issue for less than a buck.


That solution sounds so... final.

/godwind
 
2012-06-14 04:03:53 PM

Telos: Vlad_the_Inaner: I'll just leave this here

The Perfect 3.3 Cent Breakfast

Intriguing...

"Empty the sprouted grains into a two cup measure and put four more ounces of wheat in the jar, flood and set aside overnight as before. Now you have a perpetual routine taking up no real time and producing a fantastic amount of food for little cost."

Hmm... little cost, unless you count the time it takes to make? Every 4 hours I need to be home to change the water. I guess I run home during lunch, which still is going to cost at least $1 in gas. Not to mention buying the grinder, the thermos, boiling the water (running a stove costs money too you know!) getting jars, screens, etc.

Or I can buy a box of cereal for $3, and just pour some milk in the morning.

Yeah, I'll stick this on my list of "great, healthy meals I'll eat when I have a butler to do all the preparation for me."



I like the part where he says that eating his 3.3 cent meal will give you the runs, but that only rich people can afford not to have the runs. 90% of the article is spent on justifying his (IMHO stupid) idea.
 
2012-06-14 04:06:33 PM

stonicus: Easy... don't eat for 2 days, day 3 get a 20 piece nugget... repeat...


20 piece McNuggets = $4.99
$4.99 / 3 = $1.66

Since $1.66 > $1.50, your "easy" answer is also a fail.
 
2012-06-14 04:08:51 PM
Budaechigae (US Army Base Stew)

This is a recipe for a damn tasty stew that became popular in Korea using leftover American army surplus rations like Spam and Vienna Sausages:


1.bp.blogspot.com

Ingredients:
•3/4 cup Vienna Sausages in small chunks
•3/4 cup Spam in small chunks
•1 1/2 cups sliced vegetables (combination of any: mushrooms, bean sprouts, chrysanthemum leaves)
•2 raw eggs
•3 Tbsp kochujang (Korean hot pepper paste)
•1 package ramen noodles (you can add the spice packets if you want)
•Kimchi
•Sliced American government cheese (optional topping)

Preparation:

1.Put all ingredients except eggs into a large pot.
2.Cover with enough water to just cover ingredients.
3.Bring to a rapid boil.
4.Reduce to simmer for 20 minutes.
5.Add raw eggs

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-06-14 04:10:43 PM

happyleper: stonicus: Easy... don't eat for 2 days, day 3 get a 20 piece nugget... repeat...

20 piece McNuggets = $4.99
$4.99 / 3 = $1.66

Since $1.66 > $1.50, your "easy" answer is also a fail.


Oh damn, and I was trying to post a totally legitimate option too... Good spot!
 
2012-06-14 04:12:40 PM
Shiat, most people's house/apartment payments are $1.50 per hour.
 
2012-06-14 04:16:36 PM
It's the things you can't get under $1.50 that cause problems. Diapers, feminine stuff, shoes, clothes, gas, bus passes, etc. that are harder to get when you're that broke. When I was that far below the line, finding food was never a problem. Practically every major intersection in Austin has someone holding a sign asking for money for food. Having been homeless, penniless, and hungry before, I'm probably a little more critical than I should be, but getting food is easy if you know where to go. There are tons of food pantries, soup kitchens, etc. You just have to look. I live a few blocks from one of the many Human Services offices and if you have no food, all you have to do is go into their office and say so. You may have to sit there for an hour or two but when you leave you'll have a special debit card for food.
 
2012-06-14 04:21:04 PM

Telos: Vlad_the_Inaner: I'll just leave this here

The Perfect 3.3 Cent Breakfast

Intriguing...

"Empty the sprouted grains into a two cup measure and put four more ounces of wheat in the jar, flood and set aside overnight as before. Now you have a perpetual routine taking up no real time and producing a fantastic amount of food for little cost."

Hmm... little cost, unless you count the time it takes to make? Every 4 hours I need to be home to change the water. I guess I run home during lunch, which still is going to cost at least $1 in gas. Not to mention buying the grinder, the thermos, boiling the water (running a stove costs money too you know!) getting jars, screens, etc.

Or I can buy a box of cereal for $3, and just pour some milk in the morning.

Yeah, I'll stick this on my list of "great, healthy meals I'll eat when I have a butler to do all the preparation for me."


Because sitting in attendance is the only way to keep something moist? Surplus water to account for absorption? Impossible!

If you're not busy, do the 4 hour thing. Its probably an optimal period thing. If busy, I suspect that before bed, and before breakfast is enough. I doubt the wheat is going to get depressed and commit suicide because it's neglected.
 
2012-06-14 04:36:54 PM
Been there. Done that.

When I first applied for disability, I got put on SSI (Social Security Income) meaning they gave me $450 a month. Plus Medicaid. My basic living expenses were around $675.

Pretty well, to keep from loosing everything as I went through the long, drawn out disability process, I maxed out my credit card and had to drain my savings. Luckily, I had a very understanding land lord. (That, plus the fact when I moved in, while working, I foot the bill for around $2000 worth of electrical upgrades, saved him another $1500 by repairing the old monster through the wall a/c by catching the a/c repairman he sent in a lie. He said the A/C was dead. I knew it burned out a buss plate. So my landlord got the plate and I installed it.)

I learned all about rice, bullion cubes, margarine, potatoes and 'day old' bread. I took cheap, krap beef, boiled the shiat out of it, cut off the gristle and tossed the rest back into the pot and tossed in cheap onions, celery and carrots and cheap frozen peas and then rice.

Buy a cheap bag of chicken quarters -- and cut off about a pound and a half of hidden fat -- and you can use them right down to the bones. Leftover bones can be stored in the freezer, then, when you have enough, baked in the oven for a bit and tossed into a pot of water with some meaty thighs and drumsticks, assorted cheap veggies and you have a pot of chicken soup. Remove the bones and it's chicken stock. Cook the krap out of it and remove the soggy vegetables and pulverized meat and it's broth. (The meat gets saved to add to things later.)

There was a time when grocery store butchers would either give you a few pounds of beef bones or sell them at maybe 10 cents a pound. Sometimes, less. They had no use for them. Those bones could produce a great beef stock.

Around the time the oil crisis put thousands out of work, the grocery stores started charging for the bones -- usually about half the price of beef, because the demand went up.

Each time folks turned to cheaper food alternatives, the costs went UP! Folks turned to chicken, which was under $0.50 a pound and now it runs about $2.00. Pork was dirt cheap and suddenly it became almost as costly as beef and the price of basic hams just exploded.

Scrap pork, meaning 'seasoning bits', consisting of fat, hide, gristle and a tiny bits of meat quadrupled in price.

Beef ribs went so high that you nearly needed to take out a loan to buy a pack. Cheap stew meat surpassed the cost of previous London broil. Seafood costs just went absolutely insane.

I discovered sardines. I discovered off brand canned vegetables -- usually with a bit more stems and twigs in them than the premium. I discovered cheap, frozen broccoli chunks -- with stem pieces in them that could NEVER be cooked beyond the fibrous stage.

Tomato prices soared to obscene heights and I found that canned tomato's stayed cheap. Then they came out with canned tomato's from Mexico with a bunch of celery and krap tossed in. (Give it a whole new fancy name but in reality, it was tossing in cheap filler vegetables to get more bang for their buck.)

I discovered bent and dent stores -- which were becoming a thing back then -- church pantries, the Salvation Army and pasta. Lots of pasta.

When I won my disability, my income jumped to $750. Because I made so much money, I lost my Medicaid and had to pay for my meds. I did get a bulk sum of cash from back payments, of which my lawyer took 1/3 off the top. The rest went to paying off my accumulated bills.

I splurged. I bought a big family bucket of KFC with all the trimmings and it lasted me for three days. With what little I had left over, I went to discount stores and stocked up on cheap canned and dry goods.
Shortly after, when I was starting to get a grasp on things, my bank upped it's fees and kept upping them. My truck started falling apart and I did a lot of business with junk yards. Credit card interest rates exploded. The cost of 'cheap' propane gas doubled and doubled again.

Medicare stopped providing dentures and the costs of dentists jumped higher than anything else. I discovered why low cost dentists are not often the best to go to. One tried to pull a tooth without numbing it and another cracked a socket getting one out. Another jabbed me with numbing agent from a needle gun he had just used on another patient -- meaning he didn't change the needle.

One made me a set of economy dentures that I later found out were what they call 'a starter set'. They give them to you as they make your real set. Teeth popped out.

Been there and done that and didn't like it. When I moved home to take care of my elderly Mom -- and because my landlord evicted me because I fell behind in the rent -- things improved.

It took me 5 years of searching to find financial assistance programs for her, which in turn saved her money, which in turn helped us both out. The programs are there, but damn hard to find.

She had been paying $400 for 1 prescription until one of my brothers stumbled across an elder assistance plan which covers everything. However, her health insurance, which helped pay for her meds, still deducts a monthly payment, even though costs to them have dropped down to nearly zero.

Being poor in America is not a pleasant thing. It's much better than over in Africa or several nations, especially India, but it's a struggle. What makes it so bad is that in the US as poor folks go and live in cheap, krappy homes, in bad neighborhoods, scramble for cheap foods or wind up living under bridges, all around them they see major luxuries.

That eats at you after a time. It changes your perspective and though patterns. You grow resentful.

Yeah, I can survive off $1.50 a day -- but I don't like it. Plus, in the long run, it would affect my health. There's a gut feeling you get when, in a food store, you're pricing 'seasoning pork' while, behind you, a couple are squabbling over what cut of steak to buy. You buy a 'log' of ground beef, which is packed with fat, beef seconds and water while a few feet away, someone is ordering hamburger made from prime steak, 84% lean and grass fed.

I didn't mention that today, it's legal to recycle cellulose -- the original clear 'plastic' wrap made from plants, into food products, to cut costs, bulk them up and provide you with absolutely no nutritional values at all. It can be added to any processed food or cheap round beef.
 
2012-06-14 04:45:02 PM
Back when the dot-com bubble burst I found myself unemployed along with a few tens of thousands of other geeks. Jobs were scarce and there was always a thousand other geeks applying for the same job. I was out of work a long time. My unemployment check was enough to cover my rent and motorcycle payment and not much more. I lost my cell phone and my internet because I couldn't pay the bill. I was living on ramen and peanut butter sandwiches. A close friend discovered my situation and ordered my ass over for dinner every night, no later than 6pm. The following evening at 6:05pm she called (land-line), demanding to know where the hell I was. They kept me fed and healthy for the next few months until I finally landed a job at google. I never forgot her kindness so a few years ago I gave her a car for xmas (reproduction of a 1929 Mercedes).

So the answer is, yes, I could live on a buck fifty a day. I've lived on less.
 
2012-06-14 04:51:09 PM

Vlad_the_Inaner: I doubt the wheat is going to get depressed and commit suicide.


Maybe not, but I might if I had to do all that stuff just so I could
eat some crap that gave me the runs.
 
2012-06-14 04:52:09 PM
Heck I'm close to doing that now almost.

content.costco.com

At Costco, these are a little under $1.50 each (bulk obviously). I don't eat breakfast, no lunch except for maybe half a granola bar (also Costco bulk), dinner is the chicken pot pie. Sometimes I go extra fancy and add a slice of cheese to it.
 
2012-06-14 04:53:30 PM

Spiralmonkey: Vlad_the_Inaner: I'll just leave this here

The Perfect 3.3 Cent Breakfast

FTA: "An Economic Note: All the prices quoted on this page are in 1976 U.S. currency" - now we know how, we just have to build a time machine and we're all set for that sweet, sweet wheatsludge breakfast!


At least its not a silver dime.

Funny how google comes up mostly with survivalist sites offering buckets of it.

But just as a benchmark

25# for $27 (free super saver shipping)
Link

(about $0.27 a serving)

Then there is Walmart for $14

/Funny that farm stores don't seem to do a lot of internet purchasing. Maybe if they advertised with a sock monkey or something...
 
2012-06-14 04:59:42 PM

Lipspinach: Vlad_the_Inaner: I doubt the wheat is going to get depressed and commit suicide.

Maybe not, but I might if I had to do all that stuff just so I could
eat some crap that gave me the runs.


He actually covered that.

HIs claim is merely loose stools, and your body adjusts quickly.

/I hear hunger makes the best sauce.
 
2012-06-14 05:01:09 PM
One of the many reasons that I will never be an atheist is the requirement to be a whiny baby touch-me-not pussy about all things religious.
 
2012-06-14 05:01:58 PM
Wrong thread oops.
 
2012-06-14 05:05:10 PM

Lipspinach: Vlad_the_Inaner: I doubt the wheat is going to get depressed and commit suicide.

Maybe not, but I might if I had to do all that stuff just so I could
eat some crap that gave me the runs.


Not to mention that, for roughly the same cost in modern money, you could just eat a bowl of old fashioned oatmeal.
 
2012-06-14 05:07:16 PM
where did they get $1.50 a day?
for a family of two, the poverty level is $1184 per month.
that family of two that makes 1184.83 a month qualifies for a food stamp allowance of $264 a month according to the feds.
shouldn't the question be whether you can live off $132 a month or $4.40 a day?
or is this what its like to be an african?
 
2012-06-14 05:10:20 PM

Vlad_the_Inaner: Lipspinach: Vlad_the_Inaner: I doubt the wheat is going to get depressed and commit suicide.

Maybe not, but I might if I had to do all that stuff just so I could
eat some crap that gave me the runs.

He actually covered that.

HIs claim is merely loose stools, and your body adjusts quickly.

/I hear hunger makes the best sauce.


Maybe so, but I just couldn't let your comment about suicidal wheat go
uncommented upon. I lol'd. :)
 
2012-06-14 05:12:31 PM

BKITU: Lipspinach: Vlad_the_Inaner: I doubt the wheat is going to get depressed and commit suicide.

Maybe not, but I might if I had to do all that stuff just so I could
eat some crap that gave me the runs.

Not to mention that, for roughly the same cost in modern money, you could just eat a bowl of old fashioned oatmeal.


Plain? The wheat thing is self sweetened.

/you can get rolled oats at the feed store too
 
2012-06-14 05:17:20 PM

Jixa: I'm probably a little more critical than I should be, but getting food is easy if you know where to go.


Depends where. In cities, yeah. We have all sorts of free food events in my neighborhood (I'm lucky enough to never have been that broke).

But if you lived in a rural or maybe even some smaller towns... it may be harder.

Again, no experience... maybe others know more than I do.
 
2012-06-14 05:20:49 PM
Ramen has flavor?
 
2012-06-14 05:22:48 PM
img.thisismoney.co.uk
 
2012-06-14 05:24:41 PM

BKITU: Lipspinach: Vlad_the_Inaner: I doubt the wheat is going to get depressed and commit suicide.

Maybe not, but I might if I had to do all that stuff just so I could
eat some crap that gave me the runs.

Not to mention that, for roughly the same cost in modern money, you could just eat a bowl of old fashioned oatmeal.


Yup. And if anything, it would put some heft in your stool as opposed to this other thing.
 
2012-06-14 05:28:32 PM
I do take too much takeout in a very expensive city to live in.
 
2012-06-14 05:36:19 PM
wait, wtf are you supposed to do with a 25 pound bag of wheat?
 
2012-06-14 05:45:59 PM

cup of tea: Pocket Ninja: Living on $1.50 a day in a place like New York City or even Memphis is a little bit different than living on $1.50 a day in Ethiopia.

I lived in Memphis, and aside from the cost of living, it was quite a bit like Ethiopia


Because black people. Get it?
 
2012-06-14 05:49:23 PM

relcec: wait, wtf are you supposed to do with a 25 pound bag of wheat?


3.3 cent (1975 dollars) breakfast (look back the thread)
 
2012-06-14 05:58:53 PM
In college, I'd have to:

• Wander through the food court (worked in a mall) and scope fairly untouched left-overs left on tables.
• Go to the Pizza Inn lunch buffet, and fill a shopping bag with tons of tupperware containers so I could eat for 7-10 days on that alone.
• Eat while "shopping" at the grocery store, then (once full), leave my cart and just walk out.

/liberal arts major
 
2012-06-14 06:01:44 PM
If you're going to try to live of beer pick a mit heffe variety. Brewers yeast is extremely nutritious.

//probably still won't work
 
2012-06-14 06:11:15 PM

cchris_39: One of the many reasons that I will never be an atheist is the requirement to be a whiny baby touch-me-not pussy about all things religious.


It doesn't make any sense in the intended thread either, for any wondering.
 
2012-06-14 06:11:43 PM
Go to the farmers' market 15 minutes before closing and dicker like an elderly Chinese lady. Buy stuff in bulk and share with friends. I'll get a flat of berries end-of-day and split it with friends. Comes out to a dollar a basket.

Big thing is buying in bulk. So, you have to assume you start off with the cash ahead of time and then see how far it goes. Just giving someone 1.50 a day and saying, "OK use this now", is very different than "Here's 45 bucks. See you in a month."
 
2012-06-14 06:13:33 PM

downstairs: Jixa: I'm probably a little more critical than I should be, but getting food is easy if you know where to go.

Depends where. In cities, yeah. We have all sorts of free food events in my neighborhood (I'm lucky enough to never have been that broke).

But if you lived in a rural or maybe even some smaller towns... it may be harder.

Again, no experience... maybe others know more than I do.


Living in a smaller town, I can attest to the difficulty of getting assistance. Between the scarcity and being looked at like you're the scum of the Earth (it happens, a lot) it can be difficult.

So tired of being talked down to, being looked at like I'm trash, and all the other fun stuff that comes with being poor.
 
2012-06-14 06:16:41 PM

Wangiss: meat0918: $1.5 for food a day

Yeah, I could do it. But then again, I have a huge garden this time of year that cuts about $20-30(sometimes more) out of my grocery bill, and this year the rain has been odd for Oregon. It's been raining in the morning, then getting sunny out in the afternoon. The plants are loving it.

I get kinda pissed if my grocery bill for the week gets over $100 for my family of 4 (kids are only 5 and 7). Meanwhile I hear about people's $250 grocery bill for their similar sized family, and ask myself, "How the fark do you spend $250 on food a week?".

Living farther from the coast, food gets pricier in decent areas. Somehow the food is still cheap in crappy areas, though.

Also, some people don't know about the awesome Mexican greengrocer.


we know about him. we just want him to go back to where he came from.
 
2012-06-14 06:20:52 PM

NyteStorm: Living in a smaller town, I can attest to the difficulty of getting assistance. Between the scarcity and being looked at like you're the scum of the Earth (it happens, a lot) it can be difficult.


I'd bet. Small tows- where everyone knows everyone and aren't afraid to judge.
 
2012-06-14 06:26:25 PM

downstairs: NyteStorm: Living in a smaller town, I can attest to the difficulty of getting assistance. Between the scarcity and being looked at like you're the scum of the Earth (it happens, a lot) it can be difficult.

I'd bet. Small tows- where everyone knows everyone and aren't afraid to judge.


That can be turned to mutual advantage.
 
2012-06-14 06:29:48 PM

BarkingUnicorn: D-Liver: These kinds of questions solve nothing. The real question is WHY are these people living on 1.50 a day?

Because the alternative is dying?


Missed the point. Point is "why are there people here in this country, a country where there are those who will spend $250 on dinner at some frou frou steakhouse and leave half of it on their plates to be thrown away (and high end restaurants are notorious for their waste), a country which wastes more than 40% of the food it produces, usually because it isn't "perfect"... a cucumber that isn't the right shape, a potato that isn't the right size etc.

In a nation of so much abundance that we've made a sport of eating itself (yes this is real) there are no excuses imaginable which would justify having anyone need to survive on just $1.50 worth of food a day.
 
2012-06-14 06:32:11 PM

rewind2846: BarkingUnicorn: D-Liver: These kinds of questions solve nothing. The real question is WHY are these people living on 1.50 a day?

Because the alternative is dying?

Missed the point. Point is "why are there people here in this country, a country where there are those who will spend $250 on dinner at some frou frou steakhouse and leave half of it on their plates to be thrown away (and high end restaurants are notorious for their waste), a country which wastes more than 40% of the food it produces, usually because it isn't "perfect"... a cucumber that isn't the right shape, a potato that isn't the right size etc.

In a nation of so much abundance that we've made a sport of eating itself (yes this is real) there are no excuses imaginable which would justify having anyone need to survive on just $1.50 worth of food a day.


I take it you're talking about America. I think you may have missed something.
 
2012-06-14 06:33:50 PM

meat0918: ....I get kinda pissed if my grocery bill for the week gets over $100 for my family of 4 (kids are only 5 and 7). Meanwhile I hear about people's $250 grocery bill for their similar sized family, and ask myself, "How the fark do you spend $250 on food a week?".


If you add in the other stuff, like shampoo and toilet paper n stuff to the grocery bill I'd imagine, even though those aren't groceries.

And, if you want to eat seafood like they say is good for you, that'll do it.
 
2012-06-14 06:39:25 PM

NyteStorm: downstairs: Jixa: I'm probably a little more critical than I should be, but getting food is easy if you know where to go.

Depends where. In cities, yeah. We have all sorts of free food events in my neighborhood (I'm lucky enough to never have been that broke).

But if you lived in a rural or maybe even some smaller towns... it may be harder.

Again, no experience... maybe others know more than I do.

Living in a smaller town, I can attest to the difficulty of getting assistance. Between the scarcity and being looked at like you're the scum of the Earth (it happens, a lot) it can be difficult.

So tired of being talked down to, being looked at like I'm trash, and all the other fun stuff that comes with being poor.


The upside is you get to kill most of the small town police force then go on to starring in 3 more movies and be 2nd in badass legends to only Chuck Norris
 
2012-06-14 06:56:48 PM
I have around 1000 EUR disposable income a month. I spend it almost all on restaurants and food. Cooked up some scallops and Jumbo shrimp as a midnight snack just now.



Couldn't imagine trying to live on $1.50 a day.
 
2012-06-14 06:58:16 PM

NyteStorm: downstairs: Jixa: I'm probably a little more critical than I should be, but getting food is easy if you know where to go.

Depends where. In cities, yeah. We have all sorts of free food events in my neighborhood (I'm lucky enough to never have been that broke).

But if you lived in a rural or maybe even some smaller towns... it may be harder.

Again, no experience... maybe others know more than I do.

Living in a smaller town, I can attest to the difficulty of getting assistance. Between the scarcity and being looked at like you're the scum of the Earth (it happens, a lot) it can be difficult.

So tired of being talked down to, being looked at like I'm trash, and all the other fun stuff that comes with being poor.


Rural and smaller areas are more difficult. Military bases are like that too. Everyone knows practically everyone else, and everyone is up in your business. There's only so much of a callous you can build up to the sneers and looks from the pretentious jerks that sometimes run the food banks and thrift stores.
 
2012-06-14 06:59:04 PM

Wangiss: rewind2846: BarkingUnicorn: D-Liver: These kinds of questions solve nothing. The real question is WHY are these people living on 1.50 a day?

Because the alternative is dying?

Missed the point. Point is "why are there people here in this country, a country where there are those who will spend $250 on dinner at some frou frou steakhouse and leave half of it on their plates to be thrown away (and high end restaurants are notorious for their waste), a country which wastes more than 40% of the food it produces, usually because it isn't "perfect"... a cucumber that isn't the right shape, a potato that isn't the right size etc.

In a nation of so much abundance that we've made a sport of eating itself (yes this is real) there are no excuses imaginable which would justify having anyone need to survive on just $1.50 worth of food a day.

I take it you're talking about America. I think you may have missed something.


What did I miss? The story is on an american website (channel 5 Cleveland), the 40% waste figure is from here, here, and here, the $250 steak figure is from several other websites (here and here), the $1.50 a day challenge is posted on www.livebelowtheline.com/us, D-Liver's profile says they are from Santa Monica California (no idea where BarkingUnicorn is from).

So what was missed?
 
2012-06-14 07:00:26 PM
TFA
 
2012-06-14 07:03:32 PM
We get by on $250 of groceries a month, round here.

/no other choice
/family of four
 
2012-06-14 07:10:19 PM

stonicus: malaktaus: I was homeless for 18 months at one point, and since I refused to accept charity I got most of my food from the trash. I went weeks at a time without spending any money at all, so I could certainl live on $1.50 a day. It would suck ass, though, so fark all that.

Just curious, but why would you refuse help?


Because charity in this country comes with a heavy cost.
Namely the scorn and spittle of your fellow man.
 
2012-06-14 07:29:24 PM
how about that downloadable cookbook .That fit in well with the 1.50 food budget you would blow week budget on copies at the library.
 
2012-06-14 07:30:22 PM

Blackwind: stonicus: malaktaus: I was homeless for 18 months at one point, and since I refused to accept charity I got most of my food from the trash. I went weeks at a time without spending any money at all, so I could certainl live on $1.50 a day. It would suck ass, though, so fark all that.

Just curious, but why would you refuse help?

Because charity in this country comes with a heavy cost.
Namely the scorn and spittle of your fellow man.


Take that scorn and spittle, add an old steak bone and some veggies from the dumpster, and you've got yourself a stew going!
 
2012-06-14 07:53:05 PM

Rik01: Been there. Done that.


Great post. One of, if not the best one I've ever read on fark.
 
2012-06-14 07:54:07 PM
I'm trying to.Actually, i'm trying to live on $3/day, (for food, which is twice that

1.50/day is $45 a month. You can live on it if you save up, but not with a lot of variety or excess.

At my local safeway, this week

1 entire BBQ chicken 8.50
2 loaves of bread/buns half priced before 11 am $3 for both
Fruits can be bout for $1/per pound- $1.50/pound depending what is on sale
Bag of salad mix is often 1.50
Celery is $1.25/bundle
green peppers are $1/pound
Right now, Ocean spray juice is $2.50 for $1.89 liters. I will buy 10 when I go out tonight.
Peanut butter can be bought for $5 for 2 kg if you wait for sale
Cheese can be bought for around $1/100 g if you wait for a sale(But you will have to buy the large package)
Cereal is variently priced from $3-$4 per box pending sales. Some weeks you can get a 4 liter milk free with 3 boxes
bananas are about 7 for $1.00
 
2012-06-14 07:55:23 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: [
Yakisoba image 357x309]


I have one of those in my desk right now!
 
2012-06-14 07:55:51 PM
i don't know how much my food costs. the maid does the shopping, the cook cooks the food, and the servants bring it to me in the dining room.

now get off my lawn or ill sick the dogs with bees in their mouths on you
 
2012-06-14 08:05:18 PM
the $1.50 challenge is an affront to my uptick in beer consumption during Euro 2012
 
2012-06-14 08:05:51 PM

dittybopper: OK, let's see: A pound of black powder costs about $25, and there are 7000 grains in a pound. I shoot between 90 and 110 grains, so say 100, so I'm getting 70 shots for that $25, or about $0.36 per shot. A flint costs about $1 to $2, but I've been knapping my own as of late, so they are essentially free, but I'll go with $1, and I get at least 50 shots from one, so that's $0.02. I use linen patching material. A yard costs about $9, but I can get about 1,000 patches from it, so that costs me about $0.01 per shot. Fat rendered from whatever meat I happened to have on hand for patch lube is essentially free, but lets put it at a penny a shot also because I might have to use Crisco or something like that.

So, every time I touch the trigger I'm spending about $0.40. Say between practice and actual hunting, I shoot 20 times. That's a cost of $8.00. Add to that the cost of a hunting license ($19 for a big game license in NY). If I shoot a smallish deer, and get 50 lbs of usable meat, it will have cost me $27 in direct costs, or about $0.54 per pound. If I eat about a pound of it a day, that still leaves me with nearly a dollar per day for veg-edibles and the like.

Yeah, I think I could do it.


What do you do for the other 300 plus days? I think NY allows for 1 deer per season.
 
2012-06-14 08:29:48 PM

highendmighty: Euell Gibbons: Tree bark is free.

So are dumpsters.


.

Wrong! I can't tell you how many Fark articles I've read where people get into trouble dumpster diving and being told the crap in trash is still business property.
 
2012-06-14 08:40:53 PM

Yuri Futanari: Heck I'm close to doing that now almost.

[content.costco.com image 300x300]

At Costco, these are a little under $1.50 each (bulk obviously). I don't eat breakfast, no lunch except for maybe half a granola bar (also Costco bulk), dinner is the chicken pot pie. Sometimes I go extra fancy and add a slice of cheese to it.


Aren't you severely malnourished? One of those pies is what, 400-500 calories, tops? Half a granola bar is maybe 100(I'm being generous),

So even if you have a slice of cheese, you're probably topping out at 700 calories if you're lucky. Unless you are of severely short stature, and not very active, that's not even close to the amount an adult should have.
 
2012-06-14 08:47:27 PM
When there was no meat, we ate fowl and when there was no fowl, we ate crawdad and when there was no crawdad to be found, we ate sand.
 
2012-06-14 09:23:52 PM
Whose poverty line? 1.5 USD sounds like a limit for brown people.
 
2012-06-14 09:54:18 PM
~42.50 a month! A sack of rice, 1 head of cabbage a week, beans... Might be able to make it a month.

Maybe better to sell the bass fishing boat, buy a used car, cut the cable tv, hold off on those 22" rims, give up smoking, etc.....
 
2012-06-15 12:08:11 AM
Tried visiting the website.
Apparently, their hosting service is above the line.
 
2012-06-15 12:10:18 AM
Idiotic to ask. That's the world poverty rate. In the US there isn't a bum alive that can't get at least ten bucks a day.
 
2012-06-15 02:07:53 AM
Most asinine choice of words ever?

i743.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-15 02:20:40 AM

ToeKnee666: I definitely find I spend more on getting the plants, the soil, the tools, and the seeds than I get back in a lower grocery bill. Do you think there's a tipping point where it becomes cost effective?


THIS. Everybody wants to claim they're saving big bucks on their grocery bill by gardening, but how much is the gardening bill? For example, if jalapenos are .39 cents a pound, your $4 pepper plant will need to crank out about 10 pounds of peppers to break even. Assuming an average weight of 2 ounces per pepper (the smaller variety), that's.... a helluva lot more than a single plant can realistically produce.

That's without figuring in the cost of extra water, any fencing you might need to keep the hungry wildlife out, pest control, weed control, gardening tools, etc. It's not necessarily cheaper to grow your own, and growing from cheap seed is hit or miss. Grow food because you enjoy dining on the fruits of your labor.
 
2012-06-15 04:10:48 AM

Pocket Ninja: Living on $1.50 a day in a place like New York City or even Memphis is a little bit different than living on $1.50 a day in Ethiopia.


Of course it is. But you know the bleeding hearts don't think rationally.

/I'm already living below the poverty line, I only shop at Aldi
 
2012-06-15 08:40:49 AM

Yuri Futanari: Heck I'm close to doing that now almost.

[content.costco.com image 300x300]

At Costco, these are a little under $1.50 each (bulk obviously). I don't eat breakfast, no lunch except for maybe half a granola bar (also Costco bulk), dinner is the chicken pot pie. Sometimes I go extra fancy and add a slice of cheese to it.


Chicken pot pie is wonderful, also why I no longer have an appendix.

Still yummy tho, I prefer homemade takes a few minutes and is even better than food in a box ones.
 
2012-06-15 11:53:30 AM

WordyGrrl: ToeKnee666: I definitely find I spend more on getting the plants, the soil, the tools, and the seeds than I get back in a lower grocery bill. Do you think there's a tipping point where it becomes cost effective?

THIS. Everybody wants to claim they're saving big bucks on their grocery bill by gardening, but how much is the gardening bill? For example, if jalapenos are .39 cents a pound, your $4 pepper plant will need to crank out about 10 pounds of peppers to break even. Assuming an average weight of 2 ounces per pepper (the smaller variety), that's.... a helluva lot more than a single plant can realistically produce.

That's without figuring in the cost of extra water, any fencing you might need to keep the hungry wildlife out, pest control, weed control, gardening tools, etc. It's not necessarily cheaper to grow your own, and growing from cheap seed is hit or miss. Grow food because you enjoy dining on the fruits of your labor.


It's a good question. In Vegas I plowed $1000 a year into that soil for the privelege of a one-eleventh-acre paradise. It was worth it to have a cool, green oasis in the Mojave Desert.

Now I live in the Rocky Mountains. All I paid for this year were seeds ($28 one time) and I'm eating a few bucks of produce a day and it's only June.
 
2012-06-15 12:23:11 PM

probesport: Yuri Futanari: Heck I'm close to doing that now almost.

Chicken pot pie is wonderful, also why I no longer have an appendix.


How do you credit Chicken pot pie with no longer having an appendix?
 
2012-06-15 12:25:24 PM

davidab: probesport: Yuri Futanari: Heck I'm close to doing that now almost.

Chicken pot pie is wonderful, also why I no longer have an appendix.

How do you credit Chicken pot pie with no longer having an appendix?


I'm picturing a Rumplestiltskin type deal.
 
2012-06-15 12:34:27 PM

WordyGrrl: THIS. Everybody wants to claim they're saving big bucks on their grocery bill by gardening, but how much is the gardening bill?


I think it really depends on what you grow. I would have no reason to spend that much growing and protecting zucchini plants as people almost give them away since they are so prolific in this zone. Snow peas, sugar snap peas, herbs, lettuce and tomatoes is where I would save money (or at least make up the cost or a portion of the cost of supplies).

People looking to actually save money or at least keep costs down also start from seed and dont spend four bucks per seedling...
 
2012-06-15 12:47:56 PM

wildcardjack: I just don't get it. How can you make less than $2 a day in the USA? If everything else in my life went to shiat I'd still know how to gather enough legit scrap to make $20-$30 a day. Of course, if all those people getting by on less than $2 a day were to get motivated then things might get harder.

/Done about $2k profit in the past week while mostly sitting around.
//I managed to outsource most of my own job.


How did you outsource your job? Elance? Sounds awesome, I have been interested in doing this in the Accounting field.

Let me know what you think!
 
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