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(Newsnet5)   Can you live below the poverty line on $1.50 a day? How much is Ramen flavored noodles and a 40oz of Old English 800 nowadays?   (newsnet5.com) divider line 163
    More: Interesting, Old English, noodles, poverty line, ramen, nowadays, Global Poverty Project  
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9139 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jun 2012 at 3:04 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-14 11:55:40 AM
More than $1.50. Not much more, I will grant you that, but more.
 
2012-06-14 12:03:07 PM
$1.5 for food a day

Yeah, I could do it. But then again, I have a huge garden this time of year that cuts about $20-30(sometimes more) out of my grocery bill, and this year the rain has been odd for Oregon. It's been raining in the morning, then getting sunny out in the afternoon. The plants are loving it.

I get kinda pissed if my grocery bill for the week gets over $100 for my family of 4 (kids are only 5 and 7). Meanwhile I hear about people's $250 grocery bill for their similar sized family, and ask myself, "How the fark do you spend $250 on food a week?".
 
2012-06-14 12:21:15 PM
Living on $1.50 a day in a place like New York City or even Memphis is a little bit different than living on $1.50 a day in Ethiopia.
 
2012-06-14 12:21:26 PM
The real challenge is to see if you can live above the poverty line on 1.50 a day.
 
2012-06-14 12:22:00 PM

meat0918: $1.5 for food a day

Yeah, I could do it. But then again, I have a huge garden this time of year that cuts about $20-30(sometimes more) out of my grocery bill, and this year the rain has been odd for Oregon. It's been raining in the morning, then getting sunny out in the afternoon. The plants are loving it.

I get kinda pissed if my grocery bill for the week gets over $100 for my family of 4 (kids are only 5 and 7). Meanwhile I hear about people's $250 grocery bill for their similar sized family, and ask myself, "How the fark do you spend $250 on food a week?".


Living farther from the coast, food gets pricier in decent areas. Somehow the food is still cheap in crappy areas, though.

Also, some people don't know about the awesome Mexican greengrocer.
 
2012-06-14 12:31:12 PM
If you didn't mind being homeless, sure you could.
 
2012-06-14 12:36:29 PM
$1.50 of FOOD per day? Yeah, you could do that for a few weeks, assuming you have access to a kitchen, potable water and no dietary issues, and you don't mind eating bland food with no spices or taste.

Chicken parts/bag of rice/bag of beans/canned veg/canned milk will feed you for a week or so.
 
2012-06-14 01:03:44 PM
shiat I spend $1.50 on gas just getting to work every day.
 
2012-06-14 01:10:07 PM

bdub77: shiat I spend $1.50 on gas just getting to work every day.


That's nothing: I spend $1.50 on food just getting gas every day!
 
2012-06-14 01:23:05 PM
When we were all down on our luck and homeless, the one place I invested more money was our diet. Even when I was shopping for the family on food stamps, I did not go the Mac 'n' Cheese / Ramen route. Eating a well-balanced, healthy diet, especially if you are able to do more from-scratch cooking (which doesn't have to be time consuming) will not only keep you healthier in the long run, but reduce cravings and binge eating brought on by drastic blood sugar fluctuations.

Of course, access to stores that carry fresh foods, knowledge of meal prep and a whole bunch of other factors come in to play. But for a lot of families, this notion that food budgets must be couponed to death really irks me. Most coupon offers are for foods that lack in the "substance" category.
 
Pud [TotalFark]
2012-06-14 01:23:52 PM
Can you live below the poverty line on $1.50 a day? Well I sure as hell can't live above the poverty line on that.
 
2012-06-14 01:25:55 PM

bdub77: shiat I spend $1.50 on gas just getting to work every day.


I spend $15 a day just commuting to and from work :(
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-06-14 01:41:52 PM

T. Dawg: When we were all down on our luck and homeless, the one place I invested more money was our diet. Even when I was shopping for the family on food stamps, I did not go the Mac 'n' Cheese / Ramen route. Eating a well-balanced, healthy diet, especially if you are able to do more from-scratch cooking (which doesn't have to be time consuming) will not only keep you healthier in the long run, but reduce cravings and binge eating brought on by drastic blood sugar fluctuations.

Of course, access to stores that carry fresh foods, knowledge of meal prep and a whole bunch of other factors come in to play. But for a lot of families, this notion that food budgets must be couponed to death really irks me. Most coupon offers are for foods that lack in the "substance" category.


I really think that many people who can't support themselves simply never learned the skills that most people learn from their parents. They need to learn home economics and basics like that.
 
2012-06-14 01:56:45 PM
If I went back in time to 1900, yes I could live on $1.50 a day.
 
2012-06-14 02:31:02 PM
I hate "challenges" like this. They're designed to make you fail, and fail in ways completely at odds with the people you're supposed to feel sympathy for:

From May 7th - 11th, you can spend no more than $1.50 a day on food and drink.
Is that PPP adjusted? It doesn't say.

For items such as salt, pepper, herbs and spices, simply work out the cost of each item per ounce and budget your shopping proportionally.
We're not talking saffron here. Are the program operators asserting that everyone internationally buys every ingredient fresh daily, including salt?

You can use food sourced from your garden as long as you can account for the price of production!
Awesome! What price do you assign someone farming at poverty level, and has this challenge taken that value into account? Since the goal is to see how those people live, shouldn't I get to use that number?

You cannot accept 'donated' food from family or friends, but monetary donations towards your fundraising goals are acceptable, and encouraged!
Do the poverty-ridden people we're emulating turn down international food aid? If not, why do I have to turn down assistance in kind?

You are allowed to drink tap water - remember you should try and drink at least 6-8 glasses of water each day.
Just to be clear: reserves of salt never happen, but potable water is presumed to be cheap and plentiful. Have these program designers ever been to a third-world country?
 
2012-06-14 02:41:15 PM

gerrymander: I hate "challenges" like this. They're designed to make you fail, and fail in ways completely at odds with the people you're supposed to feel sympathy for:


True, but you just spent some time thinking about eating food without any spices, where to get fresh water in a third world country, relying on handouts to eat, and subsistence farming.

Which is really the point.
 
2012-06-14 03:05:57 PM
imgboot.com
 
2012-06-14 03:06:34 PM
What is this Cheap food trifecta... Subby Ramen is 79cents
 
2012-06-14 03:07:00 PM
What Do "Pretend to Be Poor" Experiments Really Teach Us

"Saying you're living like them because you've decided to give up fancy sandwiches for five days is like someone saying they can empathize with Nelson Mandela because they spent a night in the drunk tank."
 
2012-06-14 03:09:33 PM
www.triadcouponing.com
 
2012-06-14 03:09:50 PM

Pocket Ninja: Living on $1.50 a day in a place like New York City or even Memphis is a little bit different than living on $1.50 a day in Ethiopia.


I lived in Memphis, and aside from the cost of living, it was quite a bit like Ethiopia
 
2012-06-14 03:10:38 PM
These kinds of questions solve nothing. The real question is WHY are these people living on 1.50 a day?
 
2012-06-14 03:12:33 PM
Tree bark is free.
 
2012-06-14 03:13:12 PM

Euell Gibbons: Tree bark is free.


So are dumpsters.
 
2012-06-14 03:13:48 PM
Been there done that....sucks....its great motivation to find a job/ build a marketable skill.
 
2012-06-14 03:14:19 PM
I'm eating 20 bucks worth of sushi for lunch, so I'm really getting a kick out of...

Well, no I'm not really.

/it's an infrequent treat for myself.
//grew up in poverty.
 
2012-06-14 03:15:10 PM
an even bigger challenge---live above the poverty line on 1.50 per day...

/may require gate-crashing MLB alum parties
 
2012-06-14 03:15:16 PM

meat0918: I get kinda pissed if my grocery bill for the week gets over $100 for my family of 4 (kids are only 5 and 7). Meanwhile I hear about people's $250 grocery bill for their similar sized family, and ask myself, "How the fark do you spend $250 on food a week?".


The cost of living varies from state to state, city to city. I'm sure somewhere in America, if someone bought the exact same stuff you paid $100 on... the bill would be $250.
 
2012-06-14 03:15:34 PM

what_now: gerrymander: I hate "challenges" like this. They're designed to make you fail, and fail in ways completely at odds with the people you're supposed to feel sympathy for:

True, but you just spent some time thinking about eating food without any spices, where to get fresh water in a third world country, relying on handouts to eat, and subsistence farming.

Which is really the point.


That's thinking I did 20 years ago, recalled for this pointless campaign. Nothing has substantially changed about living at poverty level in the third world since then, because if it had, it wouldn't be the third world.

"Thinking about" things changes nothing, if it's the wrong people thinking -- and this program is aimed at the wrong people.
 
2012-06-14 03:15:37 PM
Only being able to spend $1.50 per day on food is a lot different than spending only $1.50 per day on average. One is much, much harder.
 
2012-06-14 03:16:26 PM

D-Liver: These kinds of questions solve nothing. The real question is WHY are these people living on 1.50 a day?


Pretty much this. And if you succeed, you now have Internet Tough Guy ammunition to say poverty is not an issue in the world!
 
2012-06-14 03:16:36 PM
1.50$? I could do it. I wouldn't enjoy it, but I could do it. I already cook all my own food, and if you're frugal and buy everything as cheap as possible (and on sale when you can), I'd guesstimate I could get at least a week's worth of food out of a couple bucks worth of rice, the cheapest chicken I could find, maybe a bit of pasta or some cheese, etc. (and as far as seasoning goes, just plain salt & pepper can go a surprisingly long way toward making stuff taste good, and it's pretty cheap relative to how much you use.) It just wouldn't be very interesting/high variety or come in huge quantities. It helps that I already don't drink much in the way of soft drinks/etc, though I'd hate to give up the coffee.
 
2012-06-14 03:16:53 PM
Ramen is packed with carbs and meant to fill you up, but provides zilch in the way of nutritional value
 
2012-06-14 03:17:34 PM
Grad school stipend was $1000 a month after tuition & fees, and rent was $500 (even with roommates). So that left $16 a day to live on, for everything other than lodging.

I don't recall if I spent only $1.50 a day on food, but I know damn well that I walked to campus and back because $1.50 per day for the bus ($.75 each way) was out of my budget. I also know that I weighed 25 pounds less then, and I'm by no means plus-sized now. So perhaps I really didn't eat much more each day than a banana, canned soup, and the local Chinese restaurant Kung Pao platter to go (cost $3.95 but I always got three meals out of it).
 
2012-06-14 03:18:09 PM

what_now: gerrymander: I hate "challenges" like this. They're designed to make you fail, and fail in ways completely at odds with the people you're supposed to feel sympathy for:

True, but you just spent some time thinking about eating food without any spices, where to get fresh water in a third world country, relying on handouts to eat, and subsistence farming.

Which is really the point.


MSG is pretty cheap if you buy it in bulk from the Japanese grocery store, that's all the spice you need.

If you want condiments you can find some ketchup and mustard packets for free somewhere, maybe even some hot sauce ;-)
 
2012-06-14 03:18:43 PM
In order to keep our expenses under control, we do the following:

1. Have a phat garden (that alone saves a LOT!)
2. Shop for things at the right stores. Non-perishables and some food items are cheaper at Walmart than at the regular grocery store. So split the shopping up.
3. Go to the farmers market for produce that we didn't grow.
4. We have a local food store that specializes in all manner of fresh juices and milks (plus some other dairy stuff). They have the cheapest prices around because they make and package everything on site. No delivery costs to pass on. A 1/2 gallon of organic milk is like $1.75 there and like $3.80 at the grocery store.
5. Use coupons as often as possible.

Back in the days where we did all of our shopping in one place, we would spend $350 a week, easy. Now it's more like $250.
 
2012-06-14 03:18:48 PM
The solution to $1.50 per day for food is to have more children.
 
2012-06-14 03:19:03 PM
I'll just leave this here

The Perfect 3.3 Cent Breakfast
 
2012-06-14 03:19:04 PM

D-Liver: These kinds of questions solve nothing. The real question is WHY are these people living on 1.50 a day?


Because they wouldn't work for less than that. Greedy bastards.
 
2012-06-14 03:19:57 PM

gerrymander: That's thinking I did 20 years ago, recalled for this pointless campaign. Nothing has substantially changed about living at poverty level in the third world since then, because if it had, it wouldn't be the third world.

"Thinking about" things changes nothing, if it's the wrong people thinking -- and this program is aimed at the wrong people.


To expand personally... yes, I know I *could* do it for a week. And I know I'd be miserable. So what? What have I learned? I don't even need to partake in this stupid exercise to realize there are people living on $1.50/day in the world, and it sucks for them, and its a complicated problem that we owe the third world at least some resources and thinking to help *solve* it.
 
2012-06-14 03:20:23 PM
It's not exactly the healthiest diet and I don't know what the long term negative impact would be, but Plain Oatmeal (or lightly sweetened with a packet of Splenda you can take from any McDonalds/Dunkin Donuts) for breakfast and Ramen for lunch and Dinner costs less than $1.50. Trust me, I know.
 
2012-06-14 03:21:22 PM
Depends on the weather. In the sunny parts of the US and the tropics - no doubt. Anywhere else - not without help.
 
2012-06-14 03:21:29 PM

D-Liver: These kinds of questions solve nothing. The real question is WHY are these people living on 1.50 a day?


Because the alternative is dying?
 
2012-06-14 03:21:30 PM

downstairs: The cost of living varies from state to state, city to city. I'm sure somewhere in America, if someone bought the exact same stuff you paid $100 on... the bill would be $250.


More likely it's people in his location, and the reason is that they likely buy processed foods. The idea of companies like Kraft (actually the idea behind any successful business) is to add value to a product, thus being able to sell it for more than they bought it. For instance, a bag of potatoes may cost 2 dollars (or less if bought in bulk, but ignore that) and if you can process many bags of potatoes into many more boxes of "au gratin potatoes", "frozen hashbrowns" and the like, they have added value to the potatoes in a profitable way.

sometimes it's worth it to just buy processed food, because the time you spend on cooking is also worth money---i don't make my own pesto, for instance. but buying and eating ONLY processed food has deleterious effects both on the wallet and your health.
 
2012-06-14 03:22:34 PM
Also, they're just talking food here. What the hell does singling that out accomplish? So someone tries to live on $1.50/day in food in their $800 apartment, with a $600 fridge, $600 stove, and appliances that automate most of their chores?

That's not living below the world poverty line. That's just eating a lot of salad and rice.
 
2012-06-14 03:23:03 PM

meat0918: $1.5 for food a day

Yeah, I could do it. But then again, I have a huge garden this time of year that cuts about $20-30(sometimes more) out of my grocery bill, and this year the rain has been odd for Oregon. It's been raining in the morning, then getting sunny out in the afternoon. The plants are loving it.


That's awesome. I live up in Seattle and we have a container garden growing on our front balcony. I love doing it, but I definitely find I spend more on getting the plants, the soil, the tools, and the seeds than I get back in a lower grocery bill.

Do you think there's a tipping point where it becomes coste effective?
 
2012-06-14 03:23:40 PM
You should do this so you can tell people about how poor you used to be. If you thought you could reverse brag about that time back in college where you only ate ramen, just wait until you see the looks on peoples' faces when you reverse brag about living on $1.50 a day. They'll be blown away with how real you are and how far you've achieved in life.

If that fails you could talk about the marathons you run, how you never watch TV, or how you'll only get dog from a shelter.
 
2012-06-14 03:24:26 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: [www.triadcouponing.com image 357x309]


6g of saturated fat (30% DV), 580mg of sodium (24%), 270 calories, and almost no vitamins and minerals. Even worse, that's only for half the package.

Probably better off with PB&J, at least until the diabetes kicks in
 
2012-06-14 03:24:43 PM

proteus_b: More likely it's people in his location, and the reason is that they likely buy processed foods. The idea of companies like Kraft (actually the idea behind any successful business) is to add value to a product, thus being able to sell it for more than they bought it. For instance, a bag of potatoes may cost 2 dollars (or less if bought in bulk, but ignore that) and if you can process many bags of potatoes into many more boxes of "au gratin potatoes", "frozen hashbrowns" and the like, they have added value to the potatoes in a profitable way.

sometimes it's worth it to just buy processed food, because the time you spend on cooking is also worth money---i don't make my own pesto, for instance. but buying and eating ONLY processed food has deleterious effects both on the wallet and your health.


Oh, I know. I wasn't expanding on all issues on the point.

Also- pesto is very, very easy to make on your own! And its generally better.

/pesto is one of the very few things I'm able to actually make.
 
2012-06-14 03:25:54 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: [www.triadcouponing.com image 357x309]


Those are tasty but not nearly as good as....

tjonlinestore.com

These things are like crack.
 
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