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(NJ.com)   As a local GOP official after President Obama's election, I had a front-row seat as it became infected by a dangerous and virulent form of political rabies   (nj.com) divider line 275
    More: Hero, President Obama, Stafford, GOP, Republican, Walter Mondale, Federalist Society, Norman Ornstein, GOP officials  
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8392 clicks; posted to Politics » on 13 Jun 2012 at 12:10 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-14 04:51:00 AM

Gyrfalcon: But I'm trying to create a third party, so I don't want to take over the Democrats, who also need it. I need an existing party large enough to have some clout but small enough that a massive influx of Smart People's Partiers can completely take charge.


Chiropractors.

Seriously.

They're nothing but a bunch of fakes, but they have solidarity and a press machine like few others.
 
2012-06-14 05:49:52 AM

HeadLever: Mercutio74: Stockholm Syndrome?

Nah, more along the lines of this

That and a few Clinton-era environmental policies and groups that really hit home.


Just in case anyone has an idea to check out this article, let me know how it comes out. I stopped after "I score a 63 in Charles Murray's "bubble quiz,"
 
2012-06-14 05:57:14 AM

Cythraul: I don't see how the Republican party has changed that much. To quote my father, they've always been "screw the poor, more for the rich." Maybe the most significant change, if any, over the past couple of decades is their adoption of the Christian Right.


No. They've been coo-coo for Jesus Puffs since 1979. That's how they got Reagan in the White House in '81.
 
2012-06-14 05:57:51 AM

HeadLever: demaL-demaL-yeH: Citations, please?

Medicare fraud would be the posterchild for this. Just look up the 60 Minutes/ABC piece they did on this a few years ago regarding the estimated $60 Billion a year in fraud. Also, do you remember the lottery winner that was still getting welfare payments? Stuff like this.


Who is defrauding Medicare? Private business, that's who.
There will always be fraud and corruption in any organization. I would guess that government is not more, not less corrupt than any other large organization.
 
2012-06-14 05:59:33 AM

Ricardo Klement: It's sad to see so many hinged Republicans leaving the Party. I'm not ready to do that - not because I am more tolerant, but because I'm going to go down fighting.

Maybe that will leave me an embittered shell of a man, but fark them. I'm not making it easy for the idiots.


You know, the gop was made up from what was left of the Whigs. I think it's time to cast off the crazies and reform into a new party again.
 
2012-06-14 06:49:46 AM

Gyrfalcon: Smart People's Partiers


Lordy, no. Washington is scalp-deep in Smart People already. Just ask them and they'll tell you at great length.
 
2012-06-14 07:00:49 AM

shower_in_my_socks: Cythraul: I don't see how the Republican party has changed that much.


REALLY? They used to compromise so both sides could work together to solve the nation's problems. That's gone now. That's the biggest change, and it will doom this country if it continues.

They also have their own propaganda network now, in the form of Fox News, which is run by a man who built his entire career out of running propaganda for the Republican Party. America has their first news network where a political party insider is literally running the channel and dictating what stories are reported and how. The GOP has their very own State-controlled television network, and that's not even hyperbole.

And then, of course, there's the total takeover of the party by religious fundamentalists, who were once on the outskirts of the party, but now form its very foundation. These people want to force their religious beliefs onto every single American, and they have the power of a major political party with which to do it now.

Those are HUGE changes from the Republican Party that gave us people like Reagan.


And as I said earlier, in today's GOP, Reagan would have been labeled as a RINO and driven out of the party with torches and pitchforks.

Barry Goldwater's words regarding the religious right were rather prophetic.
 
2012-06-14 07:23:03 AM

Dog Welder: shower_in_my_socks: Cythraul: I don't see how the Republican party has changed that much.


REALLY? They used to compromise so both sides could work together to solve the nation's problems. That's gone now. That's the biggest change, and it will doom this country if it continues.

They also have their own propaganda network now, in the form of Fox News, which is run by a man who built his entire career out of running propaganda for the Republican Party. America has their first news network where a political party insider is literally running the channel and dictating what stories are reported and how. The GOP has their very own State-controlled television network, and that's not even hyperbole.

And then, of course, there's the total takeover of the party by religious fundamentalists, who were once on the outskirts of the party, but now form its very foundation. These people want to force their religious beliefs onto every single American, and they have the power of a major political party with which to do it now.

Those are HUGE changes from the Republican Party that gave us people like Reagan.

And as I said earlier, in today's GOP, Reagan would have been labeled as a RINO and driven out of the party with torches and pitchforks.

Barry Goldwater's words regarding the religious right were rather prophetic.


Which was probably why he was crushed by Johnson in '64
 
2012-06-14 07:25:31 AM

Job Creator: ... I would guess that government is not more, not less corrupt than any other large organization.


Mebbe y'all oughta try reasoning insteada guessin?
 
2012-06-14 07:25:43 AM

Guntram Shatterhand: We know Republicans like this are not without shame as they are running away from the embarrassing party with all speed. But it's the same sort of Fark Independent who bashes the embarrassing party but simply won't change their views: it's all bullshiat so they can wait until the Jesus Freaks are gone so they can go back to being total jackasses without having to deal with the embarrassment.


Or they can do what a lot of Fark Independents did and simply turn into Paultards, so they can champion the same asshole-ish, "fark you I got mine" views while simultaneously claiming not to be "partisan".
 
2012-06-14 07:30:25 AM
FTFA

In Republican proposals, the wealthy win, and the rest of us lose- one only has to look at Rep. Paul Ryan's budget to see that.

which is followed by...

But my mind conjured innumerable reasons for delay- for putting off the day of reckoning in the desperate hope that some game-changing miracle would occur, such as a victory by Governor Jon Huntsman in the Republican presidential primary.


Even in their mea culpas, can Republicans not be disingenuous and/or misinformed? I mean, he does realize Jon Huntsman has a raging hard-on for the Ryan budget, right? He wholeheartedly endorsed it.
 
2012-06-14 07:56:01 AM

Job Creator: Who is defrauding Medicare? Private business, that's who.
There will always be fraud and corruption in any organization. I would guess that government is not more, not less corrupt than any other large organization.


There is plenty of upcoding fraud going on among "legitimate" providers, but a huge number of the so-called private businesses committing fraud are simply phony companies set up to steal from the system - on paper it says they're a private business but they're just an empty storefront with somebody showing up once in a while to pick up the mail.

Here's a taste of how it works:

There was no inventory or pharmacist. There were no customers. "The walls were bare," Hill says. As soon as the agents took a look at the interior, they called the U.S. Attorney's Office to ask prosecutor H. Ron Davidson to help issue a search warrant. An hour and a half later, warrant in hand, the agents returned to Elbia's to conduct a search. But there was nothing to find.

There is health-care fraud all over the country, to be sure, but in the region of South Florida comprising Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, it is in an advanced state. Here, it is fueled by large populations of the elderly, who are enrolled in Medicare; and by poor immigrants, who because of economic desperation or language barriers can be easily manipulated by criminals. This area has the densest concentration of Medicare providers in the country, with one for every 500 Medicare beneficiaries. In contrast, the rest of the country averages about one provider for every 3,000 beneficiaries. To judge by the medical data, you would think South Florida was made up entirely of the sick, the limbless, the crazy. And in this sense, South Florida is both an illustration of the Medicare fraud problem and its bellwether. If the fraud here can't be contained, it does not bode well for the rest of the country.

Over the past decade, individual criminal rings in South Florida have netted hundreds of millions of dollars at a time. This is drug-cartel level profit, but without the gunfights. And it has spawned a supporting economy to service it. There is a brisk trade in stolen patient and doctor IDs. Shady car dealerships and check-cashing stores provide fronts for money laundering. Disreputable lawyers reportedly hold seminars on how to set up shop and bill the government. One former prosecutor I talked with speculated that Miami's economy would grind to a halt if all Medicare fraud stopped overnight. In certain parts of town, it is easy to find low-rent office complexes packed with doctors' offices, therapy clinics, and medical-supply stores all closed in the middle of the day. Many of the ones that are open have the exact same sign posted by the door: please be advised that this office will not allow unannounced visits by insurance company investigators.


The best part is one line at the end.

Postscript: Milian was sentenced to 33 months in prison and ordered to pay back $70 for the Elbia's Pharmacy fraud.

Yeah, that's showing 'em we take the issue seriously. Seventy bucks.

Anyway, various estimates of the private-sector insurance fraud rate put it in the
 
2012-06-14 08:08:00 AM
The republicans ruin this country and then blame others for not fixing it fast enough. Then they hand things over to people with already too much. At least this guy sounds like a good american, rather than what his screw ball, two faced, treasonous just say no to everything party sounds. They need more guys like him to take that party back.

I was never a huge Regan fan, but I think he even would be disgusted by what his party has become.
 
2012-06-14 08:15:30 AM
That end bit should read 1-7% for the private sector and 10+% for Medicare, both figures estimated.

Which stands to reason - one system is biased in favor of denying claims even if legitimate, and the other is biased in favor of paying claims even if obviously fraudulent like 991 dental procedures in one day.

The thing is, you can fix a wrongly-denied claim simply by paying it - but for a wrongly paid claim? That monkey is GONE save for a few pennies.


Which go right back into the system to be stolen again.
 
2012-06-14 09:28:06 AM

HeadLever: Citrate1007: The thing is, the only thing that the GOP has said is REPEAL, REPEAL, REPEAL. I'd be ok with this if they were also proposing something better to replace it with. There are some things that pose concerns in the bill; however, I think the vast majority of it are bipartisan improvements that I think the majority of American's would support. Sadly both sides got butthurt and instead of continuing negotiations about specifics they have taken an all (democrats) or nothing (republicans) approach.

The perfect marriage for what we need for social programs would be the financial backing and reach of the goverment with the drive and inginuity of the private sector.

As a conservative, I want to have social programs the help those that really need it. I don't want to see the lazy and bureaucratic processes and inefficiencies that plauge the current programs. I also don't want to see these programs become so large and cumbersome that they help to deteriorate our financial health. There needs to be a balance.


In Minnestoa we take our TANIF (Federal cash welfare program) and incorporate it into MFIP (State program based on TANIF with more emphasis on training and greater expectations for participation in job search, voluteering, etc. than the federal regulations). The vast majority of the training, job search monitoring and career guidance is not administered by the government, but contracted out to private agencies that specialize in employment services. Compare our rates of time families spend on cash assitance, recidivism, family equity upon exit, etc. to other states. We're doing it right. I believe that this has a lot to do with the slight differences in policy, but has even more to do with the privitization of the employment service aspect. If an agency is not performing every year they can lose their contracts.
 
2012-06-14 10:08:11 AM

Alphax: Dog Welder: To address Wisconsin, I really think a lot of what happened behind the failed recall is that there was a sizable chunk of the voters in Wisconsin who believe that a recall election shouldn't be used against someone because you disagree with his policies. Recalls are there to protect the populace against corruption and malfeasance, not because you don't like the politician or he did something you don't like. This meant, you had people voting against the recall despite the fact they don't necessarily appreciate the guy they were keeping in office. The exit poll numbers, with many democrats and union households voting against the recall, seem to verify this sentiment.

Which still doesn't make sense to me, as it looks like Walker's entire term in office has been corruption and malfeasance.


I live in WI. The reason people voted for Walker was simple. Property taxes didn't go up for the first time in 12 or so years. People with heavy teaching blood lines in their family voted for him b/c of it. Nevermind it went into the hands of his corporate sponsors. I can't tell you how many times people have inadvertently told me they support Walker's rat face and then immediately after gloated about not having to pay higher property taxes.

The biggest problem of course, is that the money will have to come from somewhere b/c the way we're doing it right now is unsustainable. Plus, his "balanced" budget is using an old political (even though they all do it) accounting trick where it's counting forecasted revenues, which of course won't come.
 
2012-06-14 11:47:34 AM

intelligent comment below: That's because you're so stupid you vote against your own self interests.


In some ways, yes. In other ways no. Overall you have to take your own self-interest and ideals and match them up with what the different parties policies are. 99.99% of the time no one is going to match up perfectly. Where I live and what is important to these folks, the Republicans win hands down. For these folks, even though they may be poor, it is not about how much money and services they can get from goverment.
 
2012-06-14 12:00:41 PM

Job Creator: Who is defrauding Medicare? Private business, that's who.


That is some of it. Individuals get in on the action quite a bit, too. Go read the ABC/60 Minutes article in the link above. They do a pretty good job of showing how some of this works.

There will always be fraud and corruption in any organization. I would guess that government is not more, not less corrupt than any other large organization.

True, but the fraud in Medicare is about 10% of the total budget, if the $60 Billion estimate is correct. That would seem to be a little bit out of line from what to expect in the private sector. In any case, the issue with Medicare as a whole is that this program has on of the highest unfunded liabilities of any goverment program. Ways to help reduce this cost will not only help the taxpayer, but will also help the finanical viability of this nation going forward.
 
2012-06-14 12:07:11 PM

Citrate1007: In Minnestoa we take our TANIF (Federal cash welfare program) and incorporate it into MFIP (State program based on TANIF with more emphasis on training and greater expectations for participation in job search, voluteering, etc. than the federal regulations). The vast majority of the training, job search monitoring and career guidance is not administered by the government, but contracted out to private agencies that specialize in employment services. Compare our rates of time families spend on cash assitance, recidivism, family equity upon exit, etc. to other states. We're doing it right. I believe that this has a lot to do with the slight differences in policy, but has even more to do with the privitization of the employment service aspect. If an agency is not performing every year they can lose their contracts.


And that type of stuff is what gives me hope that we can get things turned around for many of these programs. However, the status-quo has become so entrenced with regard to the big 3 - Medicaid, SS, and Defense - that it is nearly impossible to get any measure of reform passed without being called a grandma killer.
 
2012-06-14 12:30:36 PM
dookdookdook: [img7.imageshack.us image 553x228]

GOP, I am dissapoint!!!
 
2012-06-14 02:01:38 PM

fsbilly: squidgod2000: Man, those comments are great...

The Earth was 7 degrees hotter when King Henry VIII was in power, so I guess they must have been driving alot of SUV's on those days.

That amounts to "I don't understand rocket science, therefore there is no space program."


Pretty much this.
 
2012-06-14 04:31:36 PM

HeadLever: For these folks, even though they may be poor, it is not about how much money and services they can get from goverment.



That's just proving my point even more.

Of course it is, they all rely on government handouts. Social security, medicare, disability, pensions. But they tell everyone how they hate government handouts... except the ones that give them money.
 
2012-06-14 06:13:20 PM

HeadLever: intelligent comment below: That's because you're so stupid you vote against your own self interests.

In some ways, yes. In other ways no. Overall you have to take your own self-interest and ideals and match them up with what the different parties policies are. 99.99% of the time no one is going to match up perfectly. Where I live and what is important to these folks, the Republicans win hands down. For these folks, even though they may be poor, it is not about how much money and services they can get from goverment.


i'll bite

so what exactly is "important to these folks"?

what are their priorities that the republicans are handling so beautifully
 
2012-06-15 08:05:56 PM

ordinarysteve: Obama's melatonin levels.


Shouldn't that be melanin?
 
2012-06-16 12:55:18 AM

Trayal: ordinarysteve: Obama's melatonin levels.

Shouldn't that be melanin?


yeah I'm a dummy, i guess that would make sense if Obama had trouble sleeping :)
 
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