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(Medical Daily)   Study finds that you can judge 90% of a stranger's personal characteristics just by looking a their shoes. It's like looking into their sole   ( medicaldaily.com) divider line
    More: Interesting  
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22955 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jun 2012 at 6:03 PM (5 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-13 11:04:56 AM  
New Balance #623

White and blue.

16 wide.

Basic, comfortable, and easy to find in that size.


/Or basic black crocs--comfortable as hell.
 
2012-06-13 12:01:38 PM  

BrainyBear: [3.bp.blogspot.com image 640x410]


Those shoes suggest that the wearer has a wide stance.
 
2012-06-13 12:30:31 PM  
So, you're saying they've found a cure for cancer?
 
2012-06-13 12:43:36 PM  
I am an inhabitant of Frogstar World B, so I reject your claim.

[tree]
 
2012-06-13 12:50:58 PM  

xpennyroyaltyx: [shoe-shopping.org image 640x425]
Work
[cdn.indulgy.com image 300x300]
Play
[supergalacticawesomeblog.files.wordpress.com image 400x300]
in-between.

WHO AM I?!?!?!?


You are a person who believes in dressing your part.
 
2012-06-13 01:24:15 PM  

Calmamity: Kazrath: You have a very good eye for photography. Do you do some sort of art (Drawing, Painting, Photography) as a hobby?

Thanks... assuming you aren't being sarcastic. Funny you mention that though, I took a photography class my senior year as a filler and loved it, especially the darkroom work. I've often said that if I had taken that class as a freshman I would have switched majors.

My art is steel machinery, not to wax all snooty about it.


Nah, was not being sarcastic. It was a very well composed photo.
 
2012-06-13 01:25:04 PM  

Pilikia: solovus: [barefootrunningshoes.org image 440x440]

The most comfortable shoes i've ever owned.

I keep hearing that. Will have to try a pair soon as I actually don't like shoes much. Hate having my toes scrunched into a big farking leather mitten unless it's for hiking or something. Actually, I hate it then too, but hate barefoot hiking even more. I've worn tabis (for spearfishing and other rocky shoreline type stuff) and loved those, but not sure how they compare.


I wear my KSOs pretty much all the time. The little rocks and big rocks are fine when hiking, but it can get uncomfortable when there are a bunch of rocks about the size of your fist and you have no other place to step. The other thing I notice is that you can really get used to the added agility from actively using your toes more and you can feel kind of clumsy in regular shoe "mittens."
 
2012-06-13 01:35:27 PM  

billymillion: [wapsculpture.com image 640x426]

[wapsculpture.com image 640x426]

What does it way about me that I made these?


Wooden shoe like to know.
 
2012-06-13 03:06:56 PM  

tuna fingers: farksake, wear whatever makes you comfortable.

[www.apostropher.com image 300x167]


What the fark???
 
2012-06-13 03:09:58 PM  

FloydA: billymillion: [wapsculpture.com image 640x426]

[wapsculpture.com image 640x426]

What does it way about me that I made these?

Wooden shoe like to know.


*clapclapclap*
 
2012-06-13 03:10:44 PM  

Isildur: FloydA: billymillion: [wapsculpture.com image 640x426]

[wapsculpture.com image 640x426]

What does it way about me that I made these?

Wooden shoe like to know.

*clapclapclap*



...or should that be "*clopclopclop*"?
 
2012-06-13 03:47:50 PM  

Isildur: Isildur: FloydA: billymillion: [wapsculpture.com image 640x426]

[wapsculpture.com image 640x426]

What does it way about me that I made these?

Wooden shoe like to know.

*clapclapclap*


...or should that be "*clopclopclop*"?


Well, I don't want to clog up the thread with puns. That would be sabotage!
 
2012-06-13 04:18:45 PM  

cptjeff: wallywam1: SirGeorgeBurkelwitzIII: I work in a shoe store, and I can definitely tell what a customer will be like, his/her personality, and whether or not they will be a pain in the ass based entirely on the type of shoes they are wearing or looking for. I've found it fascinating ever since I began to pick up on it.

/seriously, this almost never fails.
//people wearing or looking for hiking boots are almost universally the worst customers to wait on. They tend to be giant pains in the ass.

If you go on a 12-hour hike with the wrong boots, you can wind up with huge blisters, lose some skin, maybe even lose a toenail. That's probably why they're so picky.

How many are actually hiking in them? I would imagine most are fat slobs who think that wearing hiking boots around every day makes them more less vain and more apocalypse ready then thou, despite the fact that the most strenuous activity they'll be doing is waddling to and from their car. It's the sanctimony of the "practical dresser" who wears all sorts of deliberately ugly crap he'll never actually need. Cargo shorts to be jungle ready, hiking boots just in case he gets scooped up from his air conditioned office and dropped in Panama, high tech wicking shirts to keep him cool and dry for all the exercise he's not doing.

It must be said, not all of them are fat. Some just have a lack of self awareness.

Seriously, if you're wearing hiking boots in a context other than hiking, stop. It's stupid. You don't need them.


I bought $180 hiking boots back in December during a Christmas sale, and you're goddamn right I made sure I tried on a bunch of different ones before settling on those. Last week on our camping trip I hiked 19 miles and unfortunately even with all that 'pickiness' I STILL got a huge blister, because you can't always tell where the boot's going to rub until you've started breaking them in more. I may be overweight but hiking is the one form of exercise I truly enjoy. Anyone buying the boots not to use them as intended should be dropped off (something), sure, but tons of people who buy them are actually going to wear them. It's like buying a car or mattress, you don't just pull them off the shelf and pay for them without a lot of consideration and testing. Not if you're smart, anyway.
 
2012-06-13 07:12:45 PM  

ladyfortuna: cptjeff: wallywam1: SirGeorgeBurkelwitzIII: I work in a shoe store, and I can definitely tell what a customer will be like, his/her personality, and whether or not they will be a pain in the ass based entirely on the type of shoes they are wearing or looking for. I've found it fascinating ever since I began to pick up on it.

/seriously, this almost never fails.
//people wearing or looking for hiking boots are almost universally the worst customers to wait on. They tend to be giant pains in the ass.

If you go on a 12-hour hike with the wrong boots, you can wind up with huge blisters, lose some skin, maybe even lose a toenail. That's probably why they're so picky.

How many are actually hiking in them? I would imagine most are fat slobs who think that wearing hiking boots around every day makes them more less vain and more apocalypse ready then thou, despite the fact that the most strenuous activity they'll be doing is waddling to and from their car. It's the sanctimony of the "practical dresser" who wears all sorts of deliberately ugly crap he'll never actually need. Cargo shorts to be jungle ready, hiking boots just in case he gets scooped up from his air conditioned office and dropped in Panama, high tech wicking shirts to keep him cool and dry for all the exercise he's not doing.

It must be said, not all of them are fat. Some just have a lack of self awareness.

Seriously, if you're wearing hiking boots in a context other than hiking, stop. It's stupid. You don't need them.

I bought $180 hiking boots back in December during a Christmas sale, and you're goddamn right I made sure I tried on a bunch of different ones before settling on those. Last week on our camping trip I hiked 19 miles and unfortunately even with all that 'pickiness' I STILL got a huge blister, because you can't always tell where the boot's going to rub until you've started breaking them in more. I may be overweight but hiking is the one form of exercise I truly enjoy. Anyone buying the boots ...


Do you wear them when you're not hiking? To the office and on errands? I'm just saying that that demographic, which tends to be a fairly rotund one, typically falls into some category of "very annoying person".
 
2012-06-13 07:16:17 PM  
I should add that I own $300 boots, though I only paid half that. They're very nice, the leather lining is incredibly soft, and I've never gotten a blister from them. Buying hiking boots can be a chore- but I really doubt the majority sold are being worn on trails.
 
2012-06-13 07:26:21 PM  
I realize this thread is dead but if anyone benefits from the following advice that is the intention. I own a ski service shop and the following is a basic run down of how to get "fit" for a ski boot. This applies to any footwear purchase. It's basic information that should help you make informed decisions.

Replace shoe for ski boot for the most part.

I have never had a blister, bone spur, bunion.

Why do my feet hurt?
My advice for getting the right boot:

1. Measure and assess your foot not just with a Brannock Device but instep and arch.
2. Find a place with selection. Try on as many different boots as possible.
3. Find someone who understands fitting and can modify the boot to your foot if that is the only option.
4. Don't go for a brand; go for the "last" that is the closest to your foot shape.
5. Don't ever settle for ill fitting footwear.
6. Understand that the more oddball your feet, the less chance of finding something out of the box that will fit.
7. Don't forget under the foot is essential to fit properly, most footwear comes with a sh**ty 10 cent piece of foam for an insole, consider a custom foot bed or at least a proper supportive insole.

I consider these the 7 Essential Steps to finding a proper alpine/ski-touring/telemark boot. I have also posted this advice on Cold Thistle (Dane's Alpine Climbing blog, lots of good info there; check it!) in regards to some of the new double boots ie. Sportiva Spantiks for ice and alpine climbing. I go into some tips on how to heat form the moldable liners (see comments on Golden Pillar of Spantik Post).

Basically what we all confront in buying footwear is that our feet are unique and boots are lasted on generic shapes. This presents little problem for those whose feet are close to the last used to make a particular brand of boots. For example in alpine skiing the Salomon X-Wave last fits pretty much 80% of the feet that come through the door of the shop with little if any modification. They have a graduated flex 120, 110, 100, 90 etc. to match skiers weight and ability. That said, if you have a very narrow, low instep foot it is not the right boot for you. In that case something like the Full-Tilt with the Intuition liner would work for your foot shape.

So lets go through the steps above:

1) Measure your foot on a Brannock device. This measures length of your foot, the arch length and gives a width in relation to the length. The arch length is a crucial measurement because your foot might measure 26.5 in mondo point but the arch length is 28 which may require going to a larger size to properly fit your foot. As well most people have slightly different sized feet usually by a 1/4 to 1/2 size in mondo point. The width is essential especially in fitting ski boots as if your foot is narrow, a boot with a wide last may make it difficult to impossible to control your ski tips; it is easy to push out plastic for space but difficult to take up volume or shrink plastic. You must also assess whether your foot has a high or low instep both of these conditions cause fitting issues generic lasts don't address. Finally look at your arch is it high, average or non-existant. A very high arch generally is best addressed with a custom foot bed an average one with a generic one and flat foot might find no foot bed at all may work best. Taking all those parameters into account you should have at least a few choices in foot wear which an experienced bootfitter will recognize and identify.

2) Try on as many boots as possible that are reasonable for your foot shape, spend time in them (at least 10 minutes) flex them, walk around in them, when you take them off remove your socks and see if you have any pressure points ie. bright red spots. If the shop only has one brand find a shop that has another choice until you exhaust your possibilities.

3) If you haven't found something off the shelf that is a good fit you will have to modify the closest fitting boot to fit your foot. If you have a wide foot a good fitter can punch out a shell with a press to accommodate the width of your foot. If you have a low instep a fitter can shim up the boot board with foam to take up volume. The more your foot deviates from a "normal" foot the more extensive the modifications.

4) I see this as the most common problem in bootfitting is people buy a brand because it is light or got good reviews or their friend says it's rad. If the Lange last fits your foot the best that is the boot you should get, or the Salomon or whatever. It is that simple.

5) In the effort to save money or by making poor choices I see people with various issues. Things like bone spurs (calcium build ups) should be addressed immediately or they will eventually either require surgery or quitting skiing. Too big of boots require cranking buckles so tight especially across the instep that you reduce circulation to toes risking frost bite, etc. Too stiff of boots bruise your shins and because there is little circulation there it takes a long time to heal. Boots are by far your most important piece of gear, compromise on skis, bindings, and clothing don't compromise on your feet.

6) It is worth spending the money on custom fit boots as with the new technology you will get many seasons of enjoyable skiing. It would be nice to find something that fits perfect and is inexpensive but unlikely if your foot shape is unusual.

7) Pretty much all high end and very expensive ski boots come with a sh*tty 10 cent piece of foam for an insole.
The exception are Black Diamond and some Atomic. I am guessing that they assume you are going to do a custom footbed but for boots retailing for upwards of $600 this is just plain weak. That said if you have a high arch a custom foot bed is a great idea as is it for really anyone. It is a perfect mold of your unique foot. These are a good investment and last for many years and can be moved between footwear. This is a crucial place to fit as it will enhance both comfort and performance.

I've underlined what I believe to be the crux of finding good footwear.
 
2012-06-14 12:37:50 AM  

pdieten: tent


Thank you for the tip. Based on your post I did some Googling, found some forums that discussed Allen Edmonds, thier Tent Sale in WI and how to go about purchasing shoes from them via the phone.

Net/net...called the number, left a message and a very kind lady called me back about 2 hours later. She said that they ship Tent Sale shoes and other items (shoe trees, belts) all the time, and at no charge. I picked up a pair of Park Avenue for $199, they should arrive in a week.

Thanks again.
 
2012-06-14 10:20:35 PM  

cptjeff: ladyfortuna: cptjeff: wallywam1: SirGeorgeBurkelwitzIII:
Do you wear them when you're not hiking? To the office and on errands? I'm just saying that that demographic, which tends to be a fairly rotund one, typically falls into some category of "very annoying person".


Occasionally but I'm actually more likely to wear combat boots for mundane stuff, especially if it involves going to an urban area (aka nowhere near the boonies where I live). The perfectly fitting, worn looking combat boots keep people from messing with me.

I've never really met anyone who wore hiking boots to the office other than my husband, but it's because he hates shoe shopping, not because of an image thing. Plus he wears them for plenty of hiking.
 
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