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(STLToday)   City excise commissioner tells homebrew beer club holding their sixth annual homebrew beer festival they can't serve homebrew beer because giving samples of their legally brewed homebrew beer is illegal   (stltoday.com) divider line 27
    More: Asinine, Heritage Festival, St. Louis, commissioners, maplewood, beer brewing, major sixth, festivals  
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6736 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jun 2012 at 9:40 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-12 09:52:56 AM  
3 votes:

ZAZ: Some of these laws started as attempts to protect small business from big business and now work the opposite way. Where I live you're either a big brewery or a small one. Big breweries must sell through distributors, they can't set up their own outlet stores to put small liquor stores out of business. Small breweries can sell their own beer. Recently the state changed rules to make it difficult to get a small brewery license: you have to use locally grown hops. Most license holders can't do that. So big business found a way to reverse the law to stomp on smaller competitition.


Big Alchohol is actively lobbying states to impose/increase taxes required to distribute alchohol across state lines. This is an attempt to limit smaller breweries/wineries into having to go through them if they wish to expand. Farking mafia tactics. Thank god that MN told the lobbyists to fark off.
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-06-12 09:20:29 AM  
3 votes:
Some of these laws started as attempts to protect small business from big business and now work the opposite way. Where I live you're either a big brewery or a small one. Big breweries must sell through distributors, they can't set up their own outlet stores to put small liquor stores out of business. Small breweries can sell their own beer. Recently the state changed rules to make it difficult to get a small brewery license: you have to use locally grown hops. Most license holders can't do that. So big business found a way to reverse the law to stomp on smaller competitition.
2012-06-12 03:02:43 PM  
2 votes:

meat0918: I've also got this crazy idea that if I can get it good enough, I might be able to make the jump into craft brewing. Maybe. Still thinking about that though.


You are not the only homebrewer with those aspirations. It's a tough game to get into, and succeed in. I used to work in the microbrewing biz, and I have friends currently in the biz, and I can tell you it ain't easy. I'm not trying to discourage you, but you will have tough competition, red tape, financial challenges, markets that seem to be moving targets, and more. Most start ups fail. Be prepared, and do you research before you buy any space or equipment, let alone quit your day job. On that note, if you do decide to make the jump, I wish the best for ya. I like to see brewers succeed at doing what they love for a living.
2012-06-12 02:30:14 PM  
2 votes:

meat0918: Bruxellensis: Did someone say homebrew pr0n?

13 month old Lambic, just after addition of cherries (which now makes it a Kriek). Note the lovely pellicle from the wild yeast and bacterial activity:
[i787.photobucket.com image 640x480]

German style Kölsch, which I brew a couple times each spring/summer:
[i787.photobucket.com image 640x853]
[i787.photobucket.com image 640x853]

Dry stout on my nitrogen (beer gas 80/20) tap. I keep a stout of some type or another on this tap year round:
[i787.photobucket.com image 540x720]

This is where I make it all. Designed and built this electric brewing rig about a year and half ago:
[i787.photobucket.com image 640x480]

Wow.

I'm bottling up a yarrow beer tonight, and tomorrow I am embarking on trying to make a good gluten free dark beer on mostly current equipment (i.e. I'll clean it everything extremely well and use new hoses, but won't go running to my celiac friends when it's done without testing the final product for gluten) in a small batch until I get it comparable.

I figure since I'm not celiac, I can safely do taste comparisons and figure something out before I do the investment into GF only gear.


"Gluten-free beer" is an oxymoron if you ask me.

Just kidding. Good on ya for helping out your celiac friends. That would be a tough disease to live with if you like beer. I assume you use sorghum for that? (pardon my ignorance on GF beer)
2012-06-12 10:57:18 AM  
2 votes:

jfivealive: Quit drinking that American piss you call beer, and have real one. Oh and drink it warm too cause that's the way real beer is supposed to be enjoyed. Ahh ok, theres the right one.


In defense of good taste:
Most of those big "American Beers" are rice beer. Especially bud and coors (no capitals nec.) That is why they taste like nothing and are best served ice cold, so you can't taste the nothing.
2012-06-12 10:01:32 AM  
2 votes:
Ok, just a few clarifications here:

1. It has always been illegal to sell your homebrew

2. This ruling only applies to dispensing homebrew at an event that charges an admission fee

3. Any festival where you can get in for free, you can still dispense homebrew

4. As a homebrewer, I'm not terribly worked up about this. They were planning to dispense over 1000 gallons of beer. This is a big time event.
2012-06-12 10:01:30 AM  
2 votes:
Yay for more regulations! Some of us have been telling you big business has been doing this for years, but we always get shouted down for.causing the bank failures. This is the most common form of new regulation. In many California towns, for example, big signs or window signs are not allowed. Why? Cheapest form of advertisement. Current business is exempt however. Can we have a talk about honest regulations yet? This is what happens when.government keeps expanding its role in society. It is too expensive to start new business today.
2012-06-12 09:46:18 AM  
2 votes:
Brought to you from the home of Anhueser Busch.
2012-06-12 06:17:55 PM  
1 votes:

prjindigo: Bruxellensis: zuce: I didnt think it possible but im on the Govts side on this one. And yes, I think you should need a license to sell food, drink, ect. Even beer.

Can I ask why you think you should have to have a license to sell beer?

Go blind drinking moonshine and its your fault.


Interesting argument.

1. beer isn't moonshine, or any kind of distilled spirit
2. having a license to sell brew doesn't mean that some state appointed inspector tests the quality of your beer.

I'm not entirely against requiring a license to sell beer, but until the laws are taken out of the dark ages, I'm not exactly a fan of it. Citing "booze blindness" as a reason to require a license to sell beer is, well, just farking stupid.
2012-06-12 03:07:12 PM  
1 votes:

meat0918: And I'm paranoid I'll sicken my friends if I don't have a separate set of equipment. I also can use if for other naturally gluten free fermented beverages like mead and wine, so it's not a complete loss.


Yes.

Oh, mead. The unsung hero amongst the fermented nectars of the gods. 90% of my friends who try my homemade mead went from "never even heard of it" (or knowing what it was) to "oh wow, I can I have more of this?" Followed shortly by, "can you call me a cab?"
2012-06-12 02:58:22 PM  
1 votes:

The Homer Tax: Bruxellensis: "Gluten-free beer" is an oxymoron if you ask me.

Just kidding. Good on ya for helping out your celiac friends. That would be a tough disease to live with if you like beer. I assume you use sorghum for that? (pardon my ignorance on GF beer)

I'm amazed he knows that many celiac people to warrant getting a whole separate set of equipment to accommodate them. I agree that it's good on him for doing it though. I don't even know one person who would need GF beer and I am know very thankful for that :)


Oh, I'm also thinking of tapping into the GF market. It benefits those that really cannot have any gluten but want something other than wine and the current offerings of GF beer, and allows me to make some money off of people that may or may not have a problem with gluten.

And I'm paranoid I'll sicken my friends if I don't have a separate set of equipment. I also can use if for other naturally gluten free fermented beverages like mead and wine, so it's not a complete loss.
2012-06-12 02:54:14 PM  
1 votes:

Bruxellensis: "Gluten-free beer" is an oxymoron if you ask me.

Just kidding. Good on ya for helping out your celiac friends. That would be a tough disease to live with if you like beer. I assume you use sorghum for that? (pardon my ignorance on GF beer)


Oh yeah, it's not "beer", but it's close enough for those that used to love beer, but can no longer partake. Beer is hops, barley, water and yeast, but I'm willing to bend the rules a bit.

I'm using sorghum, a touch of molasses, and I'm thinking maybe an addition of one of the darker syrups. I have to run to the shop at lunch for my yeast and I might pick up some candi sugar while there as well I've read it can take some of the sourness from the sorghum out.

This is 100% an experiment. I'm trying to get a simple enough base down before I go adding things like coffee or cocoa or anything else for that matter.

I've also got this crazy idea that if I can get it good enough, I might be able to make the jump into craft brewing. Maybe. Still thinking about that though.
2012-06-12 02:51:06 PM  
1 votes:

Bruxellensis: "Gluten-free beer" is an oxymoron if you ask me.

Just kidding. Good on ya for helping out your celiac friends. That would be a tough disease to live with if you like beer. I assume you use sorghum for that? (pardon my ignorance on GF beer)


I'm amazed he knows that many celiac people to warrant getting a whole separate set of equipment to accommodate them. I agree that it's good on him for doing it though. I don't even know one person who would need GF beer and I am know very thankful for that :)
2012-06-12 01:49:36 PM  
1 votes:
Did someone say homebrew pr0n?

13 month old Lambic, just after addition of cherries (which now makes it a Kriek). Note the lovely pellicle from the wild yeast and bacterial activity:
i787.photobucket.com

German style Kölsch, which I brew a couple times each spring/summer:
i787.photobucket.com
i787.photobucket.com

Dry stout on my nitrogen (beer gas 80/20) tap. I keep a stout of some type or another on this tap year round:
i787.photobucket.com

This is where I make it all. Designed and built this electric brewing rig about a year and half ago:
i787.photobucket.com
2012-06-12 12:37:36 PM  
1 votes:
Charlotte Oktoberfest September 29, 2012 - largest beer festival in the south.
Over 350 beers, including many homebrewed beers from multiple local homebrew groups.
$60,000 donated to local charities last year as a result of the event.

Now THAT is a beer festival.
2012-06-12 11:52:37 AM  
1 votes:
Oregon just fixed their law.

For years, we had home brew festivals, even a competition at the state fair.

Then (I think it was Deschutes Brewery) asked the OLCC to clarify part of the home brew statute, and the AG said, "well fark, according to this, transporting home brewed and home vinted beer and wine offsite from the brewing location is illegal, and has been for years. Whoops."

The lead legislator that proposed the fix for it promised the he would once again be able to bring home brew to fellow legislators if it was passed and signed into law.
2012-06-12 11:34:23 AM  
1 votes:

The Homer Tax: Laws like these are very common, you'd be surprised. Wisconsin of all places just got a similar law overturned - I think, it's been such a long and drawn-out battle I lost track of where it was.


I hadn't heard this. They just passed that law last year. Another wonderful thing the Republicans did here for big business.
2012-06-12 11:07:14 AM  
1 votes:

greenboy: You can take your logic and clarifications and GTFO. They have no place here, and i am offended by your attempt to subdue my anger with your logic and facts.


Well, it's still a weak argument at best. I'm not really worked up over it, but that doesn't really change the fact that if you're paying for admission to the festival, you're not necessarily paying for the beer itself. There's a lot of money that it takes to run a festival, especially one of that magnitude. I don't see why you shouldn't be able to charge admission to cover the logistics, planning, and permits or whatever that goes into running an event and then not be able to give away free homebrew.
2012-06-12 10:51:37 AM  
1 votes:
H31N0US: Brought to you from the home of Anhueser Busch Belgian-Brazilian multinational conglomerate InBev.

/ftfy
2012-06-12 10:27:48 AM  
1 votes:
This sucks, for the home brewers that donated for this event. I have no doubt that a private event will be held soon to sample the beers.

AB, Schlafly, and O'Fallon are strong supporters of the home brew effort. AB every now and then will have excess grain they will give away to home brewers, Schlafly will occasional give away the yeast they use (you bring the sanitized container), and O'Fallon will do the same plus they host our monthly brewers meeting at their brewery.
2012-06-12 10:16:11 AM  
1 votes:
Laws like these are very common, you'd be surprised. Wisconsin of all places just got a similar law overturned - I think, it's been such a long and drawn-out battle I lost track of where it was.

There are some states like Alabama where homebrewing technically isn't even legal - although there was a bill to overturn that this session, I don't know where that one ended up, either.

Alcohol laws in this country are just generally out of control and make no sense. It's like this perfect storm of jackasses when religious busybodies, big corporations, and government tax/regulate addicts all get together.

The Craft Beer industry and the Homebrewing Hobby are both exploding right now, and people/states who can pull their heads out of their asses and get with the program are currently being rewarded for it. Ask North Carolina where not one (Sierra Nevada) but two (New Belgium) Craft Breweries have expanded their east coast operations.
2012-06-12 10:15:22 AM  
1 votes:
Simple solution. Charge a penny per sample.
2012-06-12 10:02:49 AM  
1 votes:
They just have to get together and get the law changed. Or get something added to it that says they can give it away at the annual festival.

I think.
2012-06-12 10:02:34 AM  
1 votes:
I'll be honest. I was more interested in reading the 17 year old complaining to dear Abby about losing her virginity than TFA
2012-06-12 09:56:02 AM  
1 votes:
In Ohio you can't "give" away free alcohol, even in sample sizes. That is why if you go to a winery and do a tasting afterwards, they ask for a quarter for each sample.

Of course, one place had a bucket full of quarters they were handing out for free before the tour...
2012-06-12 09:48:56 AM  
1 votes:
When dealing with bureaucrats like this, there are three steps:

1. Petition clown town council
2. Tar, feathers, fence rail.
3. Guillotine
2012-06-12 09:45:30 AM  
1 votes:
A friend (this in Canada) started a small brewing company a few years ago; amazing how many hoops he had to jump through. Like weighing all the wastage so it can be tracked. He was allowed to give out samples not exceeding a couple of ounces if you toured the place. He even had to buy his own beer, it was that tightly controlled.
 
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