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(Philly.com)   Man describes his role in the biggest art theft in history   (philly.com) divider line 67
    More: Sad, Atelier Art, Lower Merion, Mount Airy, Matisse, crates, Atelier  
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15017 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Jun 2012 at 3:06 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-11 05:35:08 PM

Oldiron_79: Its only theft if you end up losing the war, its called to the Victors go the Spoils if you win.


Sure, but UNESCO and the various international treaties still call it looting regardless of the nation that does it.
 
2012-06-11 05:53:20 PM
Was subby trying to make a heist/hoist pun and just failed?
 
2012-06-11 05:54:11 PM
LOL how's that ownage feel? Is what I would ask that Barn guy but he's dead and in hell.
 
2012-06-11 06:40:41 PM

Marcus Aurelius: The artwork belonged to Barnes


Up until the collection went bankrupt, anyway.
 
2012-06-11 06:42:53 PM
I was expecting an in interview with Seth McFarlane.
 
2012-06-11 07:10:30 PM
VIEW ALL

/You're a jerk, subby
 
2012-06-11 07:16:26 PM

Kanemano: Barnes??? hell I thought someone found the amber room


destroyed by the Red Army.
 
2012-06-11 07:47:45 PM

This text is now purple: Marcus Aurelius: The artwork belonged to Barnes

Up until the collection went bankrupt, anyway.


oh look, another person who doesn't know the meaning of the word "bankrupt".
 
2012-06-11 07:49:20 PM
If it is a "priceless" collection, how much did the trust eventually get for it?
 
2012-06-11 08:35:12 PM
I'm a professional art writer* so I'm really getting a kick...

But this is an argument where it's impossible to pick a side. Yes, the guy had what should have been an ironclad trust to protect something that was truly special and beautiful -- a heart-breakingly incredible assemblage of some of the great wonders of our time for the sole purpose of educating others and sharing his love. On the other hand, he's been dead a long time, his grudges were old ones, people "need" to see that art, and most importantly the trust wasn't able to fulfill its obligations to house, protect, and care for the art. Should something truly special, a pinnacle of human cultural achievement, be allowed to rot because the long-dead guy that paid for it first decreed it so?

In a lot of ways, moving to the Philly museum was the best possible outcome (in as much as moving to Philly can be an upgrade for anything ever because that's the worst city on Earth...and I'm from Baltimore...). I still, however, find it incredibly sad that the Barnes collection couldn't last just as Barnes had left it for time immemorial. But it wasn't to be.

* = I write books with other peoples' names on them and do unpaid work for magazines and websites...but the connections and perks are worth it.
 
2012-06-11 08:46:47 PM
Albert Barnes envisioned his foundation as an art school rather than a museum, and he wrote a detailed will to dictate the future of his highly desirable collection (valued at $25 billion) of impressionist and postimpressionist works by artists like Picasso, Renoir, Matisse, van Gogh, Cezanne, and others.

Ummm...
 
2012-06-11 08:53:44 PM

beta_plus: relevant to his interests

[www.jonathanrosenbaum.com image 600x400]

/one of my favorite movies


That's an underrated movie. The original sucked donkey balls though.
 
2012-06-12 05:19:58 AM

beta_plus: relevant to his interests

[www.jonathanrosenbaum.com image 600x400]

/one of my favorite movies


Why ? Because she wore nothing under that dress ?
 
2012-06-12 05:30:06 AM

Wyrdbrthr: Marcus Aurelius: Wyrdbrthr: Yeah, subby, moving a museum's collection from one building to another, making it more accessible to the public is totally the same thing as stealing it.

The Barnes Foundation was NOT a museum.

Except that it was in the public trust since the 90's when the foundation went bankrupt due to the BoT's mismanagement and had to be bailed out by the state, twice, and received public funds. If it looks like a museum and quacks like a museum, it's going to be treated like one. Calling it theft is just the shrill hyperbole of the trustees.

That, and the fact that the terms of Barnes' own will was causing irreparable damage to the art itself, like putting van gogh's in direct sunlight. The new building is better for the art, as well as the public.


That's not how it went down (tho, that is how it was presented to the public). It was theft, plain and simple (on Netflix streaming, for those who are too lazy to read a book).
 
2012-06-12 05:33:45 AM

dusty15893: Weidbrewer: Someone wanna give those of us who don't have our short-and-curlies all tied in big-ass knot an explanation as to WTF Subby's on about? How is moving an art installation from a (from what I've gathered here) bankrupt foundation into a museum "theft"?

1st world problems

I'm as open-minded as the next guy but on the list of things I/we should give a shiat about this just comes in near the bottom for me. I just can't summon up enough impotent rage about this.


For me, property rights are near the top of things we should give a shiat about.
 
2012-06-12 07:34:35 AM

DrPainMD: dusty15893: Weidbrewer: Someone wanna give those of us who don't have our short-and-curlies all tied in big-ass knot an explanation as to WTF Subby's on about? How is moving an art installation from a (from what I've gathered here) bankrupt foundation into a museum "theft"?

1st world problems

I'm as open-minded as the next guy but on the list of things I/we should give a shiat about this just comes in near the bottom for me. I just can't summon up enough impotent rage about this.

For me, property rights are near the top of things we should give a shiat about.


The Barnes Foundation never lost ownership of the art and objects.
 
2012-06-12 05:21:56 PM
whyy.org
I wonder how many of you claiming these paintings were left to rot & irreparably damaged from direct sun have ever visited Latches Lane. While I am glad more tourists will see the Impressionist works now that they are on the Parkway with the Rodin Museum & Philly Museum of Art, I will miss seeing them in their true home across City Line Avenue.

Remember, this is Philly, your will only matters here if we don't want your stuff... see Albert Barnes or Stephen Girard.

/Fark the lawyers
//Fark Lincoln U too
///Yay slashies
 
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