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(UPI)   Stay at home dads collect 12 hours of overtime a week   (upi.com) divider line 51
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4332 clicks; posted to Business » on 11 Jun 2012 at 11:41 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-11 11:51:59 AM
Last month, 8,000 moms quantified their hours by job description at Salary.com and found the average stay-at-home U.S. mom juggled a 94.7-hour work week and calculated her salary, including overtime, at $112,962 a week.

I have never known a stay at home mom who talked about how much work she did who didn't grossly overestimate it.
 
2012-06-11 11:53:34 AM
If you don't get paid - Its not a real job.
 
2012-06-11 11:54:30 AM
Meh... I've stayed at home when my wife had things to do... and I not cut out for that much work. At least I can escape to the office.
 
2012-06-11 11:57:33 AM
The average stay-at-home US mom calculates her own salary to be over $5.8M yearly? Holy shiat stay-at-home moms are stupid.

/ I'm betting it's actually whoever wrote and edited that article that's dumber than a bag of hair.
 
2012-06-11 12:02:29 PM
The calculator they used.

Anyone who buys this nonsense doesn't deserve to paid at all and probably shouldn't be raising children.

BTW, it was the writer of the article that changed per year to per week. Stay-at-home moms aren't quite as stupid as the article would lead you to believe.
 
2012-06-11 12:19:48 PM

SharkTrager: Last month, 8,000 moms quantified their hours by job description at Salary.com and found the average stay-at-home U.S. mom juggled a 94.7-hour work week and calculated her salary, including overtime, at $112,962 a week.

I have never known a stay at home mom who talked about how much work she did who didn't grossly overestimate it.


Either that, or stay-at-home dads are able to do all the work of a stay-at-home mom in half the time.
 
2012-06-11 12:21:39 PM
It is indeed work, and sometimes pretty hard work, I think it's equivalency diminishes somewhat when you consider the risk of being fired or laid off is not really there.
 
2012-06-11 12:22:40 PM
The dump I took last night needed three flushes to get rid of it, therefore, I was worth plumber's wages for that 15 minutes.
 
2012-06-11 12:22:45 PM
Boy, I sure hope "overtime" is some kind of code for bj's.
 
2012-06-11 12:23:41 PM

rugman11: SharkTrager: Last month, 8,000 moms quantified their hours by job description at Salary.com and found the average stay-at-home U.S. mom juggled a 94.7-hour work week and calculated her salary, including overtime, at $112,962 a week.

I have never known a stay at home mom who talked about how much work she did who didn't grossly overestimate it.

Either that, or stay-at-home dads are able to do all the work of a stay-at-home mom in half the time.


If they are claiming they spend 13.5 hours per day working, they're doing something wrong. This is particularly true for those with school age children.
 
2012-06-11 12:25:01 PM
don't these articles typically come out around mother's day?

here we are approaching father's day and we have an article trying to advocate how hard women work. So, women are even nagging men at the holiday level and can't let us have a day in peace without hearing them complain.

so lets go for it. Apparently men are better than women since we can do the same job in less time 52.9 vs.94.7. I would assume that either stay-at-home gender has the same amount of housework. And this is why men get paid more than women.
 
2012-06-11 12:28:39 PM
The average stay-at-home U.S. dad juggled a 52.9-hour work week and if paid for his top 10 jobs it would cost $61,814 a year, a salary Web site calculated.

I've read this sentence a number of times and can't figure out what his top 10 jobs are and how they relate to his work at home.
 
2012-06-11 12:35:28 PM
Um, no. The annual of $61K is about right, but the estimate of the value of women doing the same work is wildly, grotesquely overestimated. Note how this top-flight piece of jornography doesn't include variances for the number of children. But when you're making shiat up, who needs actual data, right?

/Stay at home dad to two kids, four and five.
//I do it all, no joke.
///No sick days, no days off, no breaks, every day has a mandatory number of dance steps and clean-ups and etc. Hardest work I've ever done.
 
2012-06-11 12:35:51 PM

SharkTrager: Last month, 8,000 moms quantified their hours by job description at Salary.com and found the average stay-at-home U.S. mom juggled a 94.7-hour work week and calculated her salary, including overtime, at $112,962 a week.

I have never known a stay at home mom who talked about how much work she did who didn't grossly overestimate it.


To be fair, most people at my office do the same thing.
 
2012-06-11 12:36:43 PM

Hyjamon: don't these articles typically come out around mother's day?

here we are approaching father's day and we have an article trying to advocate how hard women work. So, women are even nagging men at the holiday level and can't let us have a day in peace without hearing them complain.


It truly is the worst time in history to be male. The cards are stacked against us.


Oh wait... no it still kicks ass.
 
2012-06-11 12:38:16 PM

SharkTrager: rugman11: SharkTrager: Last month, 8,000 moms quantified their hours by job description at Salary.com and found the average stay-at-home U.S. mom juggled a 94.7-hour work week and calculated her salary, including overtime, at $112,962 a week.

I have never known a stay at home mom who talked about how much work she did who didn't grossly overestimate it.

Either that, or stay-at-home dads are able to do all the work of a stay-at-home mom in half the time.

If they are claiming they spend 13.5 hours per day working, they're doing something wrong. This is particularly true for those with school age children.


My guess is that they include all the stuff that would have to be done anyway as "chores" and call it "stay-at-home mom work". For example, I did laundry last night and I'm cooking tonight. If I were a stay-at-home dad would those things be considered stay-at-home dad work? No, because they would have to be done whether I have a job or not.

If I had kids, I could reasonably see having 13.5 hours/day of work to do, but most of that is stuff that will have to be done whether a parent stays home or not (cooking, cleaning, grocery shopping taking kids to soccer practice/piano lessons, etc.)
 
2012-06-11 12:39:17 PM
FTA: A working dad's projected at-home salary should be combined with his actual outside work salary to determine his yearly compensation value, Salary.com said.

Just wait till the IRS finds out about this.
 
2012-06-11 12:42:20 PM
utsagrad123

FTA: A working dad's projected at-home salary should be combined with his actual outside work salary to determine his yearly compensation value, Salary.com said.

Just wait till the IRS finds out about this.


Imputed income.

/does NOT include the work of Vajajay licking.
 
2012-06-11 12:43:06 PM

jaylectricity: The average stay-at-home U.S. dad juggled a 52.9-hour work week and if paid for his top 10 jobs it would cost $61,814 a year, a salary Web site calculated.

I've read this sentence a number of times and can't figure out what his top 10 jobs are and how they relate to his work at home.


Go to the calculator I linked above, it's a special kind of stupid. There's a list of jobs and you put in how much time you spend in an average week on each. I'm not sure how they came to that list of jobs, but I'm sure it's profoundly moronic. Anyway, number of hours * average pay for that job = this bullshiat.

One of the jobs is CEO. The calculator says you should be making about $60/hr for time spent as the CEO of your family. I'm not sure what salary.com does when they're not doing this, but that last sentence is all I need to know to know that I don't want to find out.
 
2012-06-11 12:46:07 PM
male female pay inequality WHAR!
 
2012-06-11 12:48:12 PM

SharkTrager: rugman11: SharkTrager: Last month, 8,000 moms quantified their hours by job description at Salary.com and found the average stay-at-home U.S. mom juggled a 94.7-hour work week and calculated her salary, including overtime, at $112,962 a week.

I have never known a stay at home mom who talked about how much work she did who didn't grossly overestimate it.

Either that, or stay-at-home dads are able to do all the work of a stay-at-home mom in half the time.

If they are claiming they spend 13.5 hours per day working, they're doing something wrong. This is particularly true for those with school age children.


Yeah, I'm not going to say raising kids isn't work (I think it's important for mothers to spend time with their young children), but 13.5 hours a day is a stretch. I suspect they are including things like dishes and laundry which everyone else with 'normal' jobs have to do too. If I added up my work hours plus all the household chores I'm sure I could claim that much.
 
2012-06-11 12:53:04 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: Um, no. The annual of $61K is about right, but the estimate of the value of women doing the same work is wildly, grotesquely overestimated. Note how this top-flight piece of jornography doesn't include variances for the number of children. But when you're making shiat up, who needs actual data, right?

/Stay at home dad to two kids, four and five.
//I do it all, no joke.
///No sick days, no days off, no breaks, every day has a mandatory number of dance steps and clean-ups and etc. Hardest work I've ever done.



You were doing fine till that last part. I did it for a year and I call bullshiat. Either that or you have had very easy "real" jobs.
 
2012-06-11 12:53:14 PM

rugman11: SharkTrager: rugman11: SharkTrager: Last month, 8,000 moms quantified their hours by job description at Salary.com and found the average stay-at-home U.S. mom juggled a 94.7-hour work week and calculated her salary, including overtime, at $112,962 a week.

I have never known a stay at home mom who talked about how much work she did who didn't grossly overestimate it.

Either that, or stay-at-home dads are able to do all the work of a stay-at-home mom in half the time.

If they are claiming they spend 13.5 hours per day working, they're doing something wrong. This is particularly true for those with school age children.

My guess is that they include all the stuff that would have to be done anyway as "chores" and call it "stay-at-home mom work". For example, I did laundry last night and I'm cooking tonight. If I were a stay-at-home dad would those things be considered stay-at-home dad work? No, because they would have to be done whether I have a job or not.

If I had kids, I could reasonably see having 13.5 hours/day of work to do, but most of that is stuff that will have to be done whether a parent stays home or not (cooking, cleaning, grocery shopping taking kids to soccer practice/piano lessons, etc.)


^This, right here.

Furthermore, if you're preparing a family meal, you (I'm guessing) probably wouldn't deem yourself worthy of the combined salaries of a professional chef and server (plus 20% gratuity) when determining your hypothetical wage... because you most likely cooked something decent, but simple and certainly didn't cook/serve for several tables of guests simultaneously... whereas these "studies" tend to do just that (citation for the nitpickers).

/stay-at-home parenting DOES sound damn demanding
//if you're parenting "job" is 30 to 50 more hours per week than your spouse, that sounds like a personal/relationship problem.
 
2012-06-11 01:01:43 PM
They should unionize.
 
2012-06-11 01:17:25 PM
Don't forget that it's not just the street value of the household work that's involved here. Small children also require continuous supervision, however distracted or at whatever varying degree of intensity, in order to get the through each day alive. Actually, the raw work -- the food prep, cleaning, laundry, clean-up, dealing with bodily functions of all kinds, vacuuming, resource management, planning, and acquisition [We're out of milk!], not to mention playdates or outings of any kind -- is stuff that takes place within the supervision job. Just watching kids is a job all by itself; never mind the rest. Then there's the getting it all done with kindness and good humor and without the presence of other adult company for days on end.

With two kids, four and five, my day starts at 6:15 and runs until past sunset, usually about 12.5 hours all told, mostly every day. At $61K per year, that works out to about $13.37 per hour. To be paid enough enough to pocket that amount, I'd have to get about $17.41 per hour (to make up for state and federal income taxes, etc.), or about $81,130 per year. My last week-long personal vacation away from home and kids was 793 days ago.
 
2012-06-11 01:26:11 PM
<b><a href="http://www.fark.com/comments/7156201/77413332#c77413332" target="_blank">jaylectricity</a>:</b> <i>The average stay-at-home U.S. dad juggled a 52.9-hour work week and if paid for his top 10 jobs it would cost $61,814 a year, a salary Web site calculated.

I've read this sentence a number of times and can't figure out what his top 10 jobs are and how they relate to his work at home.</i>

I think they mean cooking, cleaning, playtime, diaper changes and such. So really, for stay-at-home moms and dads, this adds up to 1 job...early childhood care provider. So, see what the average rate is for day cares in the area and that would be a better estimate of their salary.
 
2012-06-11 01:29:24 PM
I work from home and we have a nanny come to our house to watch our two year old & 6 month old.

It's exhausting. I go straight from watching the kids to work, take my breaks during the day as the kids need me and the nanny leaves as soon as I'm off work. Between dinner, baths, laundry and everything else, it's usually around 9PM before I have time to take a break and have some quiet time. But it's not difficult.

I used to work 10-12 hours a night as a machinist doing physical labor, then my last year of college I did the overnight supervision at a Group Home and was responsible for getting ten physically/emotionally abused kids up and ready for the day. Now THOSE were real jobs where I was underpaid for the amount I busted my ass.
 
2012-06-11 01:35:59 PM

MoronLessOff: So, see what the average rate is for day cares in the area and that would be a better estimate of their salary.


I don't think day-care prices would be an accurate reflection of the street value of this work. Better would be to contact full-time child care providers who would do the job in your home. Day cares tend to part out the child tending among a team of people and it runs as a volume business, not a private home. But even day care isn't cheap by any normal standard. No sane person would do 13-hour days on an hourly wage basis and most sane people wouldn't/couldn't afford to pay them at that rate.
 
2012-06-11 01:37:33 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: I don't think day-care prices

Day care wages

is closer to what I meant, btw.
Day care wages and prices don't necessarily reflect each other.
 
2012-06-11 01:56:48 PM
I'm a working single dad. It's not hard work. It is time intensive. The payoff is a well adjusted kid who I suspect will become a succesfull adult. Now that I think about it, it's trashy to look at raising your children, and calculating what you should be getting paid.
 
2012-06-11 02:20:46 PM
There is no pay scale for being a parent. Get over it.

/parent
 
2012-06-11 02:43:30 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: Don't forget that it's not just the street value of the household work that's involved here. Small children also require continuous supervision


Of course the typical American parent does not, in fact, provide continuous supervision.
 
2012-06-11 02:53:45 PM

thurstonxhowell: jaylectricity: The average stay-at-home U.S. dad juggled a 52.9-hour work week and if paid for his top 10 jobs it would cost $61,814 a year, a salary Web site calculated.

I've read this sentence a number of times and can't figure out what his top 10 jobs are and how they relate to his work at home.

Go to the calculator I linked above, it's a special kind of stupid. There's a list of jobs and you put in how much time you spend in an average week on each. I'm not sure how they came to that list of jobs, but I'm sure it's profoundly moronic. Anyway, number of hours * average pay for that job = this bullshiat.

One of the jobs is CEO. The calculator says you should be making about $60/hr for time spent as the CEO of your family. I'm not sure what salary.com does when they're not doing this, but that last sentence is all I need to know to know that I don't want to find out.


MoronLessOff: I think they mean cooking, cleaning, playtime, diaper changes and such. So really, for stay-at-home moms and dads, this adds up to 1 job...early childhood care provider. So, see what the average rate is for day cares in the area and that would be a better estimate of their salary.


It's a poorly constructed sentence to start an article with. It relies on already knowing the content of the article. And then it revolves around the father being the subject of the sentence, but then says it will "cost" $61,814. Cost whom?

So I'm guessing after a couple careful explanations that they meant the top 10 duties the father spent the most time on, and then they added up the salaries of each based on percentage of work done, and that's how they came up with that number.
 
2012-06-11 03:26:41 PM

pounddawg: There is no pay scale for being a parent. Get over it.

/parent


That.


I saw the headline and thought, "Boy it would be nice to only work 53 hours a week. Then I saw the salary you get for that and thought "fark it, I'll stay in the office".
 
2012-06-11 03:55:00 PM

Dear Jerk: I'm a working single dad. It's not hard work. It is time intensive. The payoff is a well adjusted kid who I suspect will become a succesfull adult. Now that I think about it, it's trashy to look at raising your children, and calculating what you should be getting paid.


I don't hear any SAHMs clamoring to get paid. They're demanding respect for the work that they do. Stating its equivalent in dollars is a just a way to make the point.
 
2012-06-11 04:29:22 PM
Single parent here (whose ex-spouse lives out of state and hasn't contributed time or money to raising our daughter for over 10 years). If you see parenting as a job, you suck at it. Being able to do nice stuff for someone you love is the greatest gift you can ever receive.
 
2012-06-11 04:30:47 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Dear Jerk: I'm a working single dad. It's not hard work. It is time intensive. The payoff is a well adjusted kid who I suspect will become a succesfull adult. Now that I think about it, it's trashy to look at raising your children, and calculating what you should be getting paid.

I don't hear any SAHMs clamoring to get paid. They're demanding respect for the work that they do. Stating its equivalent in dollars is a just a way to make the point.


Overstating it's value in monetary terms detracts from the point.
 
2012-06-11 04:34:43 PM
In other words men are able to accomplish everything almost twice as quickly as women? Is that what we're supposed to take away from the two studies?
 
2012-06-11 04:40:35 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Dear Jerk: I'm a working single dad. It's not hard work. It is time intensive. The payoff is a well adjusted kid who I suspect will become a succesfull adult. Now that I think about it, it's trashy to look at raising your children, and calculating what you should be getting paid.

I don't hear any SAHMs clamoring to get paid. They're demanding respect for the work that they do. Stating its equivalent in dollars is a just a way to make the point.


The article about SAHMs came out a while ago. Boobies had it.
 
2012-06-11 05:23:43 PM
The mom-pay stories always crack me up. Dads are on the clock too. They get paid more by default and their positions are more professional. Security guard - always on duty. Food critic. Television critic. Chauffeur. Personal trainer. Contractor/builder/repairman. Quarter mil easy.
 
2012-06-11 05:34:30 PM
Once you have kids, you're a parent. Life changes. Nobody pays you. You are accompanied through life by subcreatures.

/Commodification and dollar-valuing every farking thing sucks.
//Bu that's life here on the Ferengi home world.
///I'll bet judges and lawyers love this shiat.
 
2012-06-11 06:19:32 PM
I'm a stay at home dad, and I think these stories are bullshiat.

I don't get paid like a chef because I never went to cooking school, and because I think Kraft Dinner with a veggie on the side is a perfectly acceptable thing to serve my customers very once in a while.

I don't need respect, because respect is for people that sacrifice things. If I had an office job, I'd have a picture of my kid my desk and spend my days wishing I was home with my kid building a zoo or a castle or whatever out of Legos. Instead of dreaming about it, I'm doing it.
 
2012-06-11 07:17:30 PM
If you feel a need to monetize your choice to be a parent, you are probably a bad one.

/or have a shiatty spouse
//or are divorced, and you both suck anyway
 
2012-06-11 07:34:29 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: HotIgneous Intruder: I don't think day-care prices

Day care wages is closer to what I meant, btw.
Day care wages and prices don't necessarily reflect each other.


In this area, day care workers with no specialized training typically start at $10 per hour.
 
2012-06-11 11:09:33 PM
Kids aren't a job. They're a bill. A bill you pay in blood and money.
 
2012-06-12 12:11:35 AM
I'm a SAHM, and every time I leave my husband with the kids (3 and 8m), he keeps them alive, but nothing else gets done around the house. It's up to me to watch the kids AND do the chores...and my day doesn't end at bedtime...the 8m old still nurses at night, and I'm the only one with the equipment. Not to mention potty accidents with the 3 year old. I don't resent it, I love being with my kids; but I hate when people think it's easy.
 
2012-06-12 02:27:12 AM
So it would only cost 60,000 a year to have a child and have someone care for it to the point that you never see it?
 
2012-06-12 03:02:21 AM

rugman11: SharkTrager: Last month, 8,000 moms quantified their hours by job description at Salary.com and found the average stay-at-home U.S. mom juggled a 94.7-hour work week and calculated her salary, including overtime, at $112,962 a week.

I have never known a stay at home mom who talked about how much work she did who didn't grossly overestimate it.

Either that, or stay-at-home dads are able to do all the work of a stay-at-home mom in half the time.


Clearly this is the case. Men are simply more efficient. Even at being women.

/ dont hate me cause I'm efficient, ladies.
 
2012-06-12 06:50:30 AM
Gah, staying home with the kids, breast feeding every two hours all day and night, doing the chores while your brain doesn't really work anymore - no word recall, really really bad memory retention, forgetting the basics,like turning off the stove or putting on pants before going to the car. All the new child routine business, is it supposed to cry like that? Is gas like that normal? Remembering to feed yourself and barely having the time to do so, not even knowing the last time you were able to shower. The house is never clean anymore. Ever. I just washed that, I don't care that you need to eat. I just put that awful pile of useless books away, I don't care that your thesis is due next week, I've got kids on the floor so we're not keeping the books on the floor anymore. Did you have to wear your shoes on the carpet? Plus the general dark depression / hormone weirdness of giving birth. Yet you're expected to do even more with a god damned farking smile on your face and say "I'm so happy to be a mother!" fark you, I hated being a mother, but you're never allowed to say it or show it.

Being a stay at home mom. at least that first year. is horrifically undervalued. I'm glad my husband took it over, really, I would've quit and gotten a real job just to have adult conversation for more than those two and a half hours between him coming home and me falling out.
 
2012-06-12 08:50:59 AM

gadian: Gah, staying home with the kids, breast feeding every two hours all day and night, doing the chores while your brain doesn't really work anymore - no word recall, really really bad memory retention, forgetting the basics,like turning off the stove or putting on pants before going to the car. All the new child routine business, is it supposed to cry like that? Is gas like that normal? Remembering to feed yourself and barely having the time to do so, not even knowing the last time you were able to shower. The house is never clean anymore. Ever. I just washed that, I don't care that you need to eat. I just put that awful pile of useless books away, I don't care that your thesis is due next week, I've got kids on the floor so we're not keeping the books on the floor anymore. Did you have to wear your shoes on the carpet? Plus the general dark depression / hormone weirdness of giving birth. Yet you're expected to do even more with a god damned farking smile on your face and say "I'm so happy to be a mother!" fark you, I hated being a mother, but you're never allowed to say it or show it.

Being a stay at home mom. at least that first year. is horrifically undervalued. I'm glad my husband took it over, really, I would've quit and gotten a real job just to have adult conversation for more than those two and a half hours between him coming home and me falling out.


Yeah I hate it too when there are adverse consequences for the personal choices I make.


No one deserves to be paid for being a parent, and you really don't even deserve to quantify the "work" in terms of money.

What's really blowing my mind though is that families with two working parents have the same amount of things to do around the house as those with a SAH parent. Both my parents worked when I was a kid. My brother and sister-in-law both work a lot. The house stays clean doesn't implode, no one starves, the kids have friends and play dates. So I'm still trying to figure out exactly what a SAH parent does differently other than not work.
 
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