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(BBC)   Confirming what we always knew, all US vodka is equally devoid of taste, with different brands being indistinguishable from others by taste   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 203
    More: Obvious, Advance Publications, blind taste test, Mintel  
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8930 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Jun 2012 at 8:44 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-11 01:46:55 AM  
Color me shocked:

Many American vodkas contribute little to the actual manufacturing - they merely purchase 95% ethyl alcohol from industrial giants like Archer Daniels Midland or Midwest Grain Processors, add water, and filter the product to varying degrees.

With little noticeable distinction in taste, vodka makers rely on sophisticated marketing and branding campaigns to win customers, analysts say

...


Distilled Resources Inc, also in Idaho, ferments, distils and bottles high-end flavoured and unflavoured vodkas for dozens of brands who contract with the company.

"They came up with the name, they selected the bottle," says Gray Ottley, the distillery's director and vice-chairman, about one of the vodkas.

"That's their brand. They filed the trade mark."




Congrats, vodka drinkers. You're drinking something utterly generic, produced on an industrial scale, differentiated only by what's on the bottle.
 
2012-06-11 02:45:18 AM  

cptjeff: Color me shocked:

Many American vodkas contribute little to the actual manufacturing - they merely purchase 95% ethyl alcohol from industrial giants like Archer Daniels Midland or Midwest Grain Processors, add water, and filter the product to varying degrees.

With little noticeable distinction in taste, vodka makers rely on sophisticated marketing and branding campaigns to win customers, analysts say

...


Distilled Resources Inc, also in Idaho, ferments, distils and bottles high-end flavoured and unflavoured vodkas for dozens of brands who contract with the company.

"They came up with the name, they selected the bottle," says Gray Ottley, the distillery's director and vice-chairman, about one of the vodkas.

"That's their brand. They filed the trade mark."




Congrats, vodka drinkers. You're drinking something utterly generic, produced on an industrial scale, differentiated only by what's on the bottle.


That's the point. Who the hell does vodak shots? It's for mixing.
 
2012-06-11 03:33:32 AM  
Good. that's how it should be. if vodka has a real taste you're doing it wrong.
 
2012-06-11 03:38:19 AM  

RobertBruce: Good. that's how it should be. if vodka has a real taste you're doing it wrong.


Yes, but there are a lot of morons who think they're getting something special with "premium" vodka. It's the same goddamn stuff you get for $10 a bottle.

As somebody who cares about how things taste, vodka claiming to be anything other than a tool for getting drunk fast simply pisses me off.
 
2012-06-11 05:13:07 AM  
I drink a pint of Skol every day to keep me alert. I'd never spend more than 5 bucks a day on the stuff though, I have a budget. Aristocrat is a bit rougher on the skull.
 
2012-06-11 08:47:07 AM  
If it has a taste, you're doing it wrong.
 
2012-06-11 08:48:45 AM  
All vodka tastes like ass to me.

*shrug*
 
2012-06-11 08:49:10 AM  
I go with Smirnoff, $16.99 for 1.5L and I like the plastic bottle, doesn't weigh so much
 
2012-06-11 08:49:46 AM  
Isnt that the point of good vodak? To have no taste?
 
2012-06-11 08:52:26 AM  
Vodak has a distinguishable flavor?
 
2012-06-11 08:52:56 AM  

Dick Gozinya: Isnt that the point of good vodak? To have no taste?


To obliterate taste buds, more accurately- near as I can tell.
 
2012-06-11 08:53:15 AM  
I can appreciate the idea that the final taste of a vodka can reflect the water used, the soil that the potatoes grew in, etc. At least to my taste buds, Snow Queen and Reyka are both very good, yet they taste different from each other.
 
2012-06-11 08:54:14 AM  

Shrinkwrap: If it has a taste, you're doing it wrong.


... or, you're doing it very right.

/have done vodak blind taste tests, can consistently detect potato vs. corn vs. white grape vodak
//Gray Goose is a waste of money
 
2012-06-11 08:54:18 AM  

Grand_Moff_Joseph: I can appreciate the idea that the final taste of a vodka can reflect the water used, the soil that the potatoes grew in, etc. At least to my taste buds, Snow Queen and Reyka are both very good, yet they taste different from each other.


Vast majority of vodkas are made from grain, not potatoes
 
2012-06-11 08:55:38 AM  
I dump the Popov I've run through a Brita filter into Chopin/belvedere bottles and nobody can tell the difference.
 
2012-06-11 08:55:54 AM  
Clear liquor is for rich women on diets.
 
2012-06-11 08:55:58 AM  
In before thread goes epic.
 
2012-06-11 08:56:15 AM  
I actually totally disagree. Vodkas definitely taste different, especially if you're drinking it on ice, or with soda. If you're mixing it, who cares what you're drinking - but that goes with all booze. If you're actually not pounding it get get drunk, then Ketel One, Tito's, Grey Goose, or Belvedere. Those who claim they all taste the same have burned out heir palates a long time ago.
 
2012-06-11 08:56:51 AM  
Wait until people find out that 90% of *all* booze out there is made by mixing grain alcohol and congener syrups much like the way a soda machine works.
 
2012-06-11 08:57:52 AM  
Waiting for the vodka snobs to start posting images of expensive vodka.
 
2012-06-11 08:57:53 AM  

Grand_Moff_Joseph: I can appreciate the idea that the final taste of a vodka can reflect the water used, the soil that the potatoes grew in, etc. At least to my taste buds, Snow Queen and Reyka are both very good, yet they taste different from each other.


Yeah, I agree - but I think the point being made is that most "premium" vodkas are just a marketing gimmick, and in reality it's just being used to put alcohol in a mixed drink. Which is fine in its own right, if that's your bag, but you might as well save some money by buying a cheaper one instead of spending your money on the packaging.
 
2012-06-11 08:57:56 AM  

cptjeff:


Congrats, vodka drinkers. You're drinking something utterly generic, produced on an industrial scale, differentiated only by what's on the bottle.


Would like a word. . .
 
2012-06-11 08:58:12 AM  
I know it's not for everyone, but I actually like potato vodka, usually the Polish brand Chopin.
 
2012-06-11 08:59:28 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: cptjeff: Color me shocked:

Many American vodkas contribute little to the actual manufacturing - they merely purchase 95% ethyl alcohol from industrial giants like Archer Daniels Midland or Midwest Grain Processors, add water, and filter the product to varying degrees.

With little noticeable distinction in taste, vodka makers rely on sophisticated marketing and branding campaigns to win customers, analysts say

...


Distilled Resources Inc, also in Idaho, ferments, distils and bottles high-end flavoured and unflavoured vodkas for dozens of brands who contract with the company.

"They came up with the name, they selected the bottle," says Gray Ottley, the distillery's director and vice-chairman, about one of the vodkas.

"That's their brand. They filed the trade mark."




Congrats, vodka drinkers. You're drinking something utterly generic, produced on an industrial scale, differentiated only by what's on the bottle.

That's the point. Who the hell does vodak shots? It's for mixing.


A good chunk of the population of Russia, I would think. I just don't see Vladimir Putin being a big fan of mixology.
 
2012-06-11 09:01:18 AM  
Didn't Mythbusters do a show on this? Old news is old.
 
2012-06-11 09:01:48 AM  

RobertBruce: if vodka has a real taste you're doing it wrong.


It's not so much that as it is that all vodka makers are "doing it wrong" and catering to sorority girls instead of making something enjoyable. Grain vodkas are certainly generally indistinguishable, but potato and rye vodkas are noticeably distinct. (There's also corn vodka out there, which is very different, but not my bag.)

Try this sometime.

pennportal.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-06-11 09:02:52 AM  
I like 4-Orange. Distilled from Florida oranges, so they say.....
 
2012-06-11 09:02:57 AM  

apeman12: Those who claim they all taste the same have burned out heir palates a long time ago.


I don't think my palate has 'burned out.' Most alcohol tastes the same to me, with a few exceptions. Vodka tastes the same to me as.. whiskey for example. When I imbibe either beverage, all my tongue senses is the overpowering chemical taste of alcohol.

Beer is the same, only with a bitter tinge to it. Wine has the same alcohol-y flavor with a slight bad-grape-juice taste.

I'm pretty sure it's genetic, since neither of my parents drink. I think my dad had champagne once at a wedding. And my mom will have a margarita every now and again while on vacation.
 
2012-06-11 09:02:58 AM  
somoene ran some popov through a brita filter 4-5 times, and said they couldn't tell the difference between the filtered popov and ketel one.

/to lazy to find it
 
2012-06-11 09:03:49 AM  
"We're telling people 'no' a lot of the time," he said. "Beyond the name, this product is trying to enter a competitive set that is crowded already. "

Why do you hate capitalism?
 
2012-06-11 09:04:03 AM  

maxheck: Wait until people find out that 90% of *all* booze out there is made by mixing grain alcohol and congener syrups much like the way a soda machine works.


Gee ya think?
shop.homebrew.com

/homebrewer
 
2012-06-11 09:04:11 AM  
http://www.scocia.com/newsite/Gin_and_Vodka.pdf.pdf

Pay special attention to pages 206 and 207. Maybe you'll learn something before you submit another herpy-derpy headline again, duhmitter.
 
2012-06-11 09:04:14 AM  
I can't even think of vodak without raging now, all because of that chick Smirnoff's using to push it's flavored crap. Her voice grates on my nerves and it's the worse voiceover work this side of the first Resident Evil game.
 
2012-06-11 09:09:15 AM  
Au contraire. The true vodka connoisseur is not assessesing taste but the lack of taste. The greatest vodkas have a subtle and elegant lack of taste that can only be appeciated by the most sophisticated palate. Any fool can say, "This vodka exhibits a lack of taste"; only the true expert can say, "This vodka exhibits a SUBLIME lack of taste."
 
2012-06-11 09:10:30 AM  

Edsel: Grand_Moff_Joseph: I can appreciate the idea that the final taste of a vodka can reflect the water used, the soil that the potatoes grew in, etc. At least to my taste buds, Snow Queen and Reyka are both very good, yet they taste different from each other.

Yeah, I agree - but I think the point being made is that most "premium" vodkas are just a marketing gimmick, and in reality it's just being used to put alcohol in a mixed drink. Which is fine in its own right, if that's your bag, but you might as well save some money by buying a cheaper one instead of spending your money on the packaging.


Agreed for sure. =) If I'm using it for mixing, I'll buy just about any of the cheaper brands. Like you said, they pretty much all taste the same.

If I'm going to drink it straight up though (or with a small twist), I'll spring for some of the truly good stuff, such as Snow Queen.
 
2012-06-11 09:12:03 AM  
Being a vodka snob is like being a white paint aficionado.
 
2012-06-11 09:13:48 AM  
You can't go wrong with Sobieski vodka (made from rye). Tastes decent and is inexpensive. I've been enjoying it in mixed drinks for years.
 
2012-06-11 09:14:46 AM  

Confabulat: Aristocrat is a bit rougher on the skull.


Of course it is. Skull-farking is part of the act. The agent loves it.
 
2012-06-11 09:15:12 AM  

cptjeff: Congrats, American brand vodka drinkers. You're drinking something utterly generic, produced on an industrial scale, differentiated only by what's on the bottle.


FTFY.

I realize this may come as a shock to some of you, but America is not the home of vodka nor the arbiter of how vodka should taste. Flaunting your opinion of vodka -- and even more so, vodka drinkers -- based on mass market US brands is about as ignorant and foolish as asserting that beer drinkers are "drinking something utterly generic, produced on an industrial scale, differentiated only by what's on the bottle" because Miller Lite and Bud Light are indistinguishable. Yes, that's exactly how silly you sound.

If you haven't actually tasted European and Russian vodka, as produced for the central and eastern European markets, your thoughts on this topic are not worth the electrons they're written on.
 
2012-06-11 09:17:44 AM  

apeman12: I actually totally disagree. Vodkas definitely taste different, especially if you're drinking it on ice, or with soda. If you're mixing it, who cares what you're drinking - but that goes with all booze. If you're actually not pounding it get get drunk, then Ketel One, Tito's, Grey Goose, or Belvedere. Those who claim they all taste the same have burned out heir palates a long time ago.


Yeah, i did a blind taste test with what i had one time. I was able to tell which was Ketel One, which was Titos and which was Stoli.

/not implying that premium is better
//just that i can taste a DIFFERENCE between brands.
 
2012-06-11 09:17:58 AM  

czetie: asserting that beer drinkers are "drinking something utterly generic, produced on an industrial scale, differentiated only by what's on the bottle" because Miller Lite and Bud Light are indistinguishable.


Pabst Blue Ribbon, the iconic and ironic beverage of moronic hipsters, is actually produced on an industrial scale by Miller.
 
2012-06-11 09:19:22 AM  
I forget which, but one of the news programs that does the more in-depth report (maybe Nightline?) did a piece on the vodka a few years ago. They rounded up several NYC clubsters who claimed they just loved the vodka, only drank Grey Goose or Ketel 1 or some such, couldn't stomach anything else, etc. Then they did a blind taste test with 5 vodaks: first round was straight, second round was in a mixed cocktail. The vodka used was Grey Goose, Smirnoff, something else middle-of-the-road, and some bargain basement generic sold in super markets that sell hooch.

Only one guy picked his beloved Grey Goose. Nobody could tell the difference. A few of them picked the cheap stuff as their favorite, mis-identifying it as the Goose. The story was on the power of brand marketing, the moral of the story was save your cash and don't ask for brand-name vodka when ordering the stuff straight or in a mixed drink. It only shows you're a chump with more money than sense.
 
2012-06-11 09:19:55 AM  

Ikam: You can't go wrong with Sobieski vodka (made from rye). Tastes decent and is inexpensive. I've been enjoying it in mixed drinks for years.


Thank you. Sobieski is an amazing vodka.
 
2012-06-11 09:20:09 AM  
No taste? That's not what the ladies tell me.
 
2012-06-11 09:22:24 AM  
Not raging the issue of taste, but of headache: I bought the Costco brand once, to escape the price tyranny of the major labels. the resultant, predictable headaches with just one martini made me swear off the cheaper brands.

/After I'd finished off the entire 5-gallon Costco bottle, of course.
 
2012-06-11 09:22:29 AM  

Theaetetus: Shrinkwrap: If it has a taste, you're doing it wrong.

... or, you're doing it very right.

/have done vodak blind taste tests, can consistently detect potato vs. corn vs. white grape vodak
//Gray Goose is a waste of money


I found Grey Goose to have a weird, apple-like aftertaste that I dont like.
 
2012-06-11 09:22:44 AM  
Of course American vodka is devoid of flavor and whatnot! Americans make a fine alcohol of their own that is far superior to ANY Vodka. It's made in Kentucky and taste great on the rocks.

/I've had ONE Vodka that I've ever really enjoyed
//Hammer + Sickle
 
2012-06-11 09:22:53 AM  

bigpeeler: Ikam: You can't go wrong with Sobieski vodka (made from rye). Tastes decent and is inexpensive. I've been enjoying it in mixed drinks for years.

Thank you. Sobieski is an amazing vodka.


Thirding this. I used Sobieski to make candy cane vodka this past winter and it has just the right base flavor to make that stuff twice as delicious.

/dump candy canes into mason jar, cover with vodka, shake, let sit overnight. Voila!
 
2012-06-11 09:23:29 AM  
"raging" = "arguing" run through the helpful spell checker. Grr.
 
2012-06-11 09:23:55 AM  

dmax: Not raging the issue of taste, but of headache: I bought the Costco brand once, to escape the price tyranny of the major labels. the resultant, predictable headaches with just one martini made me swear off the cheaper brands.

/After I'd finished off the entire 5-gallon Costco bottle, of course.


Costco's Kirkland brand is Grey Goose in a different bottle
 
2012-06-11 09:24:12 AM  
Best value for your money vodak that I have ever seen

www.thepourpro.com

/Vodka doesn't taste of anything by definition - the government is actually right in this case
//it's more of a burn
///the more expensive = less burn and turpentine flavor
 
2012-06-11 09:26:58 AM  

Aar1012: Of course American vodka is devoid of flavor and whatnot! Americans make a fine alcohol of their own that is far superior to ANY Vodka. It's made in Kentucky and taste great on the rocks.


You had me until "rocks".

/neat rye FTW
 
2012-06-11 09:27:14 AM  
All vodka tastes the same to me, same with gin, so Aristocrat is always is.
 
2012-06-11 09:27:51 AM  
Do yourself a favor...Tito's is excellent.
 
2012-06-11 09:28:05 AM  

czetie: I realize this may come as a shock to some of you, but America is not the home of vodka nor the arbiter of how vodka should taste. Flaunting your opinion of vodka


It all tastes like crap. All of it. Anywhere. Made by anyone. It's awful stuff I can only imagine people "acquire" a taste for by beating their own skulls in and lighting their own crotch on fire.

I don't discriminate. I'm no vodka snob. I hate it all equally.

I don't know who is the "rightful" arbiter of how vodka tastes, but they should be chop-punched in the babymaker repeatedly.
 
2012-06-11 09:28:06 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers:
That's the point. Who the hell does vodak shots? It's for mixing.


And degreasing engines.

www.filmsite.org
 
2012-06-11 09:29:22 AM  

TravisBickle62: dmax: Not raging the issue of taste, but of headache: I bought the Costco brand once, to escape the price tyranny of the major labels. the resultant, predictable headaches with just one martini made me swear off the cheaper brands.

/After I'd finished off the entire 5-gallon Costco bottle, of course.

Costco's Kirkland brand is Grey Goose in a different bottle


That's the rumor, but - citation needed.
 
2012-06-11 09:30:28 AM  
That doesn't mean all vodka's are exactly the same.

(food scientist who works in R&D for a large alcoholic beverages company)

By US regulation all vodkas must be flavor neutral, which usually involves distilling at a certain temperature. But impurities from non-ethyl alcohols can sneak over and make it burn more - since these other alcohols are also usually toxic at lower levels than ethanol, they also can contribute to bad hangovers.

The real goal of vodka makers is to get rid of burn, which is not a taste, but a mouthfeel. Get a vodka that is 40% abv to taste like it is 20% abv and you are golden. (I would say a vodka that tastes like water but in taste tests, most people like their spirits to be somewhat burny)

There is some debate about it but from the distillers that I have talked to they generally agree that distilling a product 2-3 times is will yield the most 'pure' vodka while still being cost effective. Filtration of the product also goes a long way in helping reduce burn, which is the essence behind whiskies, which take ethanol and put it through a form of carbon filtration in a barrel.

As for the differences between vodkas, they are all mostly similar (~99.9% ethanol/water mixture) but there will always be a slight chemical variance (and even the 0.01% level, some of the more volatile alcohols are noticeable) depending on how many times it was distilled, what temperature it was distilled at, what it was fermented from, how it was filtered.

These variances can be picked up when you are drinking it straight, on the rocks, or even in a martini - a person with very good tastebuds may be able to sense this in tonic or soda water. Almost nobody can sense it in any sort of juice base because the burn is too watered down and the taste of the juice is too distracting.

So the next time you see a person mix a high quality vodka with cranberry juice, smack 'em over the head.

Just as in any industry, packaging and marketing plays a huge role in price point, but that doesnt mean they are all exactly the same. If you enjoy vodka straight or on the rocks, I would still very much encourage you to experiment with different types of vodka's until you find one that you like.
 
2012-06-11 09:31:31 AM  
The point of this story isn't that some Vodkas are better or not than others. Maybe they are, maybe they aren't. I never liked Vodka and I only drink about 1 glass of a wine a week these days anyway.

This story is about a regulator in Idaho who probably is on the take from big producers to keep out start ups and minimize competition.

Who is this guy, Jeff Anderson of the Idaho state liquor authority, and why does he get to decide - not based on quality or health - what I buy, but rather on the name or the level of competition?

What a joke.

This, in my opinion, is why we can't have nice things.
 
2012-06-11 09:32:20 AM  
People get very emotional about alcohol. Maybe they need a drink.
 
2012-06-11 09:33:28 AM  

Abox: People get very emotional about alcohol. Maybe they need a drink.


Well if you're buying.
/vodka martini please
//2 olives
 
2012-06-11 09:35:00 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: cptjeff: Color me shocked:

"Many American vodkas contribute little to the actual manufacturing - they merely purchase 95% ethyl alcohol from industrial giants like Archer Daniels Midland or Midwest Grain Processors, add water, and filter the product to varying degrees.

With little noticeable distinction in taste, vodka makers rely on sophisticated marketing and branding campaigns to win customers, analysts say"


Congrats, vodka drinkers. You're drinking something utterly generic, produced on an industrial scale, differentiated only by what's on the bottle.

That's the point. Who the hell does vodak shots? It's for mixing.


As I've heard Russians do I keep it in the freezer and drink it with salty or pickled food. (Pickled herring is my favorite.) But I also drink it in shots at room temperate or sip it slightly chilled.

At room temperature Polish potato vodka has a slightly thicker mouth-feel and is slightly sweeter; I'm not sure how many times they distill or filter it. Of the US-made grain vodkas, re-distilling and filtering it a couple or three times makes it taste, smell and feel less like an industrial solvent. And there are very very subtle differences between them, perhaps from the grains in the mash or the water they're cut with, if you sip and savor it warm as I've done.

So the cheapest vodkas (like $6 a bottle or $11 for a 1.75L jug) are for mixing, the vodkas around $10-12 a bottle (Smirnoff, New Amsterdam, and a couple Polish potato vodkas) are for shots or sipping, and the expensive ($15 or more) stuff is for suckers.

And I've often thought of making my own local vodka (just for myself) by mixing Everclear or Golden Grain (whichever's cheaper) with our Kentucky American German tap water, or going for purity with distilled water from the supermarket. The problem is the cheapest brands still cost less than home-diluted grain alcohol, and our local water usually tastes okay and is safe enough but it's not the stuff of tap water connoisseurs.
 
2012-06-11 09:36:13 AM  
My favorite bartender loves experimenting with designer vodkas. A few weeks back, she made me a white Russian with whipped cream vodka and it was farking delicious. Vanilla vodka works well too but it's not as good as the whipped cream.
 
2012-06-11 09:37:26 AM  
i174.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-11 09:40:00 AM  

TenJed_77: Abox: People get very emotional about alcohol. Maybe they need a drink.

Well if you're buying.
/vodka martini please
//2 olives


What are you? A girl?

/A martini needs gin not Vodka
 
2012-06-11 09:41:47 AM  

SpiffyandRedhot: Didn't Mythbusters do a show on this? Old news is old.


Their taster consistently determined how many times the cheap vodka had been filtered (I think it was scale of 1-10) and which was the premium brand IIRC. I was surprised, it all tastes kinda like kerosene to me. But the well brands give me a nasty hangover, the better grades do not. But that's pretty much the case with all well brands, regardless of type.
 
2012-06-11 09:42:08 AM  
I will say though, I have found one good use for flavored vodkas:

Core some strawberries, then fill the resulting hole in the berry with Pinnacle's 'Chocolate Whipped Cream' vodka. Then pop the entire thing in your mouth.

/good stuff
 
2012-06-11 09:43:13 AM  

ZER0T0THEC0RE: That doesn't mean all vodka's are exactly the same.

(food scientist who works in R&D for a large alcoholic beverages company)

By US regulation all vodkas must be flavor neutral, which usually involves distilling at a certain temperature. But impurities from non-ethyl alcohols can sneak over and make it burn more - since these other alcohols are also usually toxic at lower levels than ethanol, they also can contribute to bad hangovers.

The real goal of vodka makers is to get rid of burn, which is not a taste, but a mouthfeel. Get a vodka that is 40% abv to taste like it is 20% abv and you are golden. (I would say a vodka that tastes like water but in taste tests, most people like their spirits to be somewhat burny)

There is some debate about it but from the distillers that I have talked to they generally agree that distilling a product 2-3 times is will yield the most 'pure' vodka while still being cost effective. Filtration of the product also goes a long way in helping reduce burn, which is the essence behind whiskies, which take ethanol and put it through a form of carbon filtration in a barrel.

As for the differences between vodkas, they are all mostly similar (~99.9% ethanol/water mixture) but there will always be a slight chemical variance (and even the 0.01% level, some of the more volatile alcohols are noticeable) depending on how many times it was distilled, what temperature it was distilled at, what it was fermented from, how it was filtered.

These variances can be picked up when you are drinking it straight, on the rocks, or even in a martini - a person with very good tastebuds may be able to sense this in tonic or soda water. Almost nobody can sense it in any sort of juice base because the burn is too watered down and the taste of the juice is too distracting.

So the next time you see a person mix a high quality vodka with cranberry juice, smack 'em over the head.

Just as in any industry, packaging and marketing plays a huge role in price poin ...

------------------------------
F - - - -
"Would not read again. Too many facts, no trolling, no snark, no snootyness, no air of superiority, no duck lips, no orange tan, no hair with product"
/ya feels me?
www.thedrunkpirate.com
 
2012-06-11 09:44:06 AM  

RobertBruce: Good. that's how it should be. if vodka has a real taste you're doing it wrong.


Ah, you might think so but, you'd be wrong (in other parts of the world)

jollyinebriate.com

Agreed that the Vodak it's self has 0 flavor, it's the grass with the Bison Poop on it that imparts the true essence. You know who else hid their essence?

2.bp.blogspot.com

C'mon it's a vodak thread why be sol seooiuwnsl booew;fa 2342 barf gak
 
2012-06-11 09:44:10 AM  
cptjeff:

RobertBruce: Good. that's how it should be. if vodka has a real taste you're doing it wrong.

Yes, but there are a lot of morons who think they're getting something special with "premium" vodka. It's the same goddamn stuff you get for $10 a bottle.

As somebody who cares about how things taste, vodka claiming to be anything other than a tool for getting drunk fast simply pisses me off.


But the absolute cheapest crap does smell ranker and gives me hangovers. And vodka from glass bottles tastes/smell better than that from plastic containers. Other than that, you're right. "Grade A" vodka is for grade A suckers: if you ant to impress dimwits just salvage a fancy empty from somebody's trash, clean it well and refill it with Smirnoff.

When I want liquor that tastes good I'll buy whiskey. 114-proof Old Grand-Dad is great stuff, as it better be for $20.
 
2012-06-11 09:45:42 AM  

dmax: Not raging the issue of taste, but of headache: I bought the Costco brand once, to escape the price tyranny of the major labels. the resultant, predictable headaches with just one martini made me swear off the cheaper brands.

/After I'd finished off the entire 5-gallon Costco bottle, of course.


I'm impressed that Costco sells vodka in 5 gallon... well I guess they'd have to be buckets.
 
2012-06-11 09:47:19 AM  

ZER0T0THEC0RE: That doesn't mean all vodka's are exactly the same.

(food scientist who works in R&D for a large alcoholic beverages company)


Pff, right... If you were really a food scientist, you'd know it was spelled "vodak".
 
2012-06-11 09:48:21 AM  
But you can tell you're drinking mostly unprocessed garbage, but you're drinking it for a reason, mostly price or trying to get the paint off the inside of your stomach walls.

Not only is most of it from Archer Daniels or Western, but then locally, I can tell you that anything not name-brand comes from the same reprocessor. In Eastern Mass, most people get their generic brand from Somerville. Kimnoff, Cossack, and your own liquor store's name brand to name a few all from the same great place with the same great taste. I always got the feeling that you're better off drinking Tolulene or TCE.
 
2012-06-11 09:49:24 AM  
bim1154:

Waiting for the vodka snobs to start posting images of expensive vodka.

Our local product. Guess what it costs?

www.mugspartystore.com
 
2012-06-11 09:51:04 AM  

PYROY: All vodka tastes the same to me, same with gin, so Aristocrat is always is.


I've noticed differences between gins. Different brands use different ratios of botanicals, so even in a gin&tonic, there is a difference between Bombay Sapphire and Brokers.

But vodak is just a means to turn nonalcoholic beverages into alcoholic beverages. Unless it's infused with bison grass or something, just buy the cheapest bucket and drown it in cranberry juice.
 
2012-06-11 09:51:06 AM  
This works out well since I'm pretty sure there is not a single American that drinks Vodka for the taste.
 
2012-06-11 09:53:43 AM  
Also, since people here are all sciency sometimes, I'd like to relate that one of my favorite Myth Busters involved a master taste tester who could distinguish between 10 drinks: a high quality vodka, and a crappy brand that was filtered 9 times - and he correctly placed the quality in correct order - the high quality was #1, the least filtered was #10, and in between.
 
2012-06-11 09:54:59 AM  
Theaetetus:


Pabst Blue Ribbon, the iconic and ironic beverage of moronic hipsters, is actually produced on an industrial scale by Miller.


From urinal drainage of kidney-filtered MGD.
 
2012-06-11 09:55:08 AM  
This stuff is pretty good too.

i174.photobucket.com

/not particularly expensive - $13-15 a fifth or so.
 
2012-06-11 09:57:38 AM  
The Myth Busters busted this in the process of testing if filtering cheap vodka could improve it. Filtering helps, but an expert can still spot the top-shelf vodkas.

But if you can't taste a difference, go cheap.
 
2012-06-11 09:58:37 AM  

The One True TheDavid: Theaetetus:


Pabst Blue Ribbon, the iconic and ironic beverage of moronic hipsters, is actually produced on an industrial scale by Miller.

From urinal drainage of kidney-filtered MGD.


...which is super hipster ironic, since Heineken is actually PBR pumped out of the kidney failure unit at a hospital somewhere in diseased Europe. I heard the bottles are initially clear before they come into contact with the beer.
 
2012-06-11 10:02:08 AM  

Aar1012: you? A girl?

/A martini needs gin not Vodka


I like both, vodka permits a doubling of the dose.
/visit Paris I'll buy the fist round
//we'll see if your liver can keep up
///1/2 shot of Noilly Prat and 2 shots of gin or 4 shots of vodka
 
2012-06-11 10:03:45 AM  

ChipNASA: maxheck: Wait until people find out that 90% of *all* booze out there is made by mixing grain alcohol and congener syrups much like the way a soda machine works.

Gee ya think?
[shop.homebrew.com image 200x150]

/homebrewer


The congeners are what makes a hangover.
 
2012-06-11 10:04:34 AM  
current "vodak" total = 19 and counting
 
2012-06-11 10:05:03 AM  

mytdawg: This stuff is pretty good too.

[i174.photobucket.com image 370x749]

/not particularly expensive - $13-15 a fifth or so.


YES. I was turned onto that stuff in college. VERY good, and very reasonably priced.
 
2012-06-11 10:05:24 AM  
I usually drink a couple of vodka martinis an evening and Smirnoff has always been fine by me. Occasionally someone gives me a bottle of what some call the "higher end" stuff and as for as my martinis are concerned..... no notable difference. I don't get headaches simply because I don't get tanked on the stuff.
 
2012-06-11 10:08:30 AM  
A buddy of mine sent me a bottle of Russian Standard he picked up in Moscow (the original, not Idaho's), and while I can't recall if it's the basic, gold, platinum, etc. flavor, I do recall that I thought it was a gag when I first tasted it. At room temperature it tasted just like water. No flavor at all, no burning in my mouth or throat, nothing. Then a slight warming in my belly. That was it.
 
2012-06-11 10:10:06 AM  

TenJed_77: Aar1012: you? A girl?

/A martini needs gin not Vodka

I like both, vodka permits a doubling of the dose.
/visit Paris I'll buy the fist round
//we'll see if your liver can keep up
///1/2 shot of Noilly Prat and 2 shots of gin or 4 shots of vodka


Even Noilly Prat tastes like hell to me. I prefer my vodka straight and my gin in grapefruit juice.

With vodka in grapefruit juice I have to measure it well or I find myself unintentionally drinking quadruples. Any vodka will give me a hangover if I guzzle a pint in half an hour.
 
2012-06-11 10:13:10 AM  
Vodka is gin for children.
 
2012-06-11 10:14:02 AM  

plong: current "vodak" total = 19 and counting


There will come a day when there aren't enough 'old school' Farkers around to continue that tradition.
 
2012-06-11 10:14:18 AM  
AngryJailhouseFistfark:

A buddy of mine sent me a bottle of Russian Standard he picked up in Moscow (the original, not Idaho's), and while I can't recall if it's the basic, gold, platinum, etc. flavor, I do recall that I thought it was a gag when I first tasted it. At room temperature it tasted just like water. No flavor at all, no burning in my mouth or throat, nothing. Then a slight warming in my belly. That was it.

That would be way too easy to guzzle too much of. I need to be able to get to the toilet and I prefer to stand while I piss. Drowning in my own puke with urine-soggy PJs is not the way I'd choose to die.
 
2012-06-11 10:14:22 AM  

The One True TheDavid: TenJed_77: Aar1012: you? A girl?

/A martini needs gin not Vodka

I like both, vodka permits a doubling of the dose.
/visit Paris I'll buy the fist round
//we'll see if your liver can keep up
///1/2 shot of Noilly Prat and 2 shots of gin or 4 shots of vodka

Even Noilly Prat tastes like hell to me. I prefer my vodka straight and my gin in grapefruit juice.

With vodka in grapefruit juice I have to measure it well or I find myself unintentionally drinking quadruples. Any vodka will give me a hangover if I guzzle a pint in half an hour.


You are using to much only takes little.
Lot friends here in france like the grapefruit and gin. Just ruins the gin for me Can't stand grapefruit or orange juice, never have.
 
2012-06-11 10:14:44 AM  
I dont know why you would drink any alcohol for any reason other than to get drunk. I drink vodka pretty much exclusively and I drink it in whatever way minimizes whatever taste there is as much as possible. Some does seem to go down smoother with less taste than others. I dont find that price is the determining factor though.

How anyone can drink gin is beyond me though. It tastes like a pine tree.
 
2012-06-11 10:16:22 AM  

Cythraul:
I don't think my palate has 'burned out.' Most alcohol tastes the same to me, with a few exceptions. Vodka tastes the same to me as.. whiskey for example. When I imbibe either beverage, all my tongue senses is the overpowering chemical taste of alcohol.


...which is why you're supposed to add some water to it. You add enough to bring it down to a level where the alcohol doesn't dominate.

/Which may be a gallon in your case, I dunno, I'm just telling you the theory.
 
2012-06-11 10:17:29 AM  

bim1154: I don't get headaches simply because I don't get tanked on the stuff.


True. If I go out and only have a couple of drinks (which, as I'm getting older, is more often the case than it is not) ordering a couple of well vodka drinks does nothing either way when it comes to hangovers because I didn't get drunk enough to have one. Now, if I am planning on having a few drinks, I tend to go a bit higher up the bar to avoid the day after headache.

That being said, I'm more of a gin person than a vodka person, and I can definitely tell the differences between varieties, with vodka, not so much. With vodka, I'd be that person probably confusing the cheap stuff with Grey Goose (which I've tried, but don't understand the fascination), but with gin, I could easily tell the difference between say, Seagram's well crap and Death's Door or Hendricks, it is like night and day, or the difference between PBR and Three Floyd's Dark Lord Imperial Stout.
 
2012-06-11 10:20:05 AM  

fonebone77: How anyone can drink gin is beyond me though. It tastes like a pine tree.


Ever had lamb with rosemary?
 
2012-06-11 10:22:35 AM  

plong: current "vodak" total = 19 and counting


freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com

/do it for them.

4.bp.blogspot.com

img13.imageshack.us

api.musweet.com
 
2012-06-11 10:25:06 AM  
www.adpulp.com

I'm sticking with Svedka.
 
2012-06-11 10:31:40 AM  

Ikam: bim1154: I don't get headaches simply because I don't get tanked on the stuff.

True. If I go out and only have a couple of drinks (which, as I'm getting older, is more often the case than it is not) ordering a couple of well vodka drinks does nothing either way when it comes to hangovers because I didn't get drunk enough to have one. Now, if I am planning on having a few drinks, I tend to go a bit higher up the bar to avoid the day after headache.

That being said, I'm more of a gin person than a vodka person, and I can definitely tell the differences between varieties, with vodka, not so much. With vodka, I'd be that person probably confusing the cheap stuff with Grey Goose (which I've tried, but don't understand the fascination), but with gin, I could easily tell the difference between say, Seagram's well crap and Death's Door or Hendricks, it is like night and day, or the difference between PBR and Three Floyd's Dark Lord Imperial Stout.


I never acquired the taste for gin. I have tried it on and off through the years to see if my tastes have changed but just don't care for it.

My two sons have over the years given me bottles of higher end vodka, whiskey and tequila. A few years back I told them they could go the extra mile with the whiskey or tequila but not the vodka. I stopped drinking in excess some 20 years ago so the middle of the road stuff is good enough for me. Having said that, I don't think I could drop down to the really cheap stuff. I think you start tasting weird sh*t in that cheap stuff.

Imperial Stouts.... when I was home brewing that's pretty much all I made. Made some that were pretty good too, but it didn't take many of them to give you a nasty headache.
 
2012-06-11 10:32:11 AM  

TenJed_77: Lot friends here in france like the grapefruit and gin.


I did not know that. I've never been to France, so their drinking habits are not too much on my radar, however, I love a bit of gin, grapefruit juice, soda water and orange bitters. It is a wonderful summer drink.
 
2012-06-11 10:33:39 AM  

SpiffyandRedhot: Didn't Mythbusters do a show on this? Old news is old.


Not exactly. They did it on filtering cheap vodka.

They also showed that an expert can tell as he ranked the 10 samples in the exact order of number of filtration.

Also, while the idea behind this study is right, it ignores that, once they buy the base alcohol, they use their own process to filter, which does vary from place to place. And the Farkers reading the story seem to be missing the part where they say that there is a difference served neat, rocks or water, but not in a mixed drink, which is obvious. And the inability to distinguish neat is not across all vodkas, but vodkas of a similar quality, which would also make sense.

The only one I can really distinguish is Tito's.
 
2012-06-11 10:36:25 AM  

vudukungfu: cptjeff: Congrats, vodka drinkers. You're drinking something utterly generic, produced on an industrial scale, differentiated only by what's on the bottle.

Would like a word. . .



Smuggler's Notch? But I hardly know 'er!
 
2012-06-11 10:37:16 AM  

dennysgod: I'm sticking with Svedka.


Show some respect. It's pronounced "Svedak."
 
2012-06-11 10:37:49 AM  
I, for one, would prefer the ethanol produced on an industrial scale by Archer Daniels Midland over some mom and pop distillate. ADM has the chemists and process engineers to produce a pure product.

This is the crux of the biscuit isn't it: Keeping the wrong components out of the final product?

//jus sayin
 
2012-06-11 10:39:03 AM  
Bad vodak is instantly recognizable, but the difference between high grade vodak and mid grade vodak is the next morning.

/works for virtually all booze
//especially tequila
 
2012-06-11 10:39:49 AM  

cptjeff: Congrats, vodka drinkers. You're drinking something utterly generic, produced on an industrial scale, differentiated only by what's on the bottle.


That's why I only drink this

farm3.static.flickr.com

Besides, if you are using it for mixed drinks, who the hell cares?
 
2012-06-11 10:48:07 AM  

WhippingBoy: Being a vodka snob is like being a white paint aficionado.


A premium white paint has titanium dioxide in it.
 
2012-06-11 10:49:45 AM  

Nakito: Au contraire. The true vodka connoisseur is not assessesing taste but the lack of taste. The greatest vodkas have a subtle and elegant lack of taste that can only be appeciated by the most sophisticated palate. Any fool can say, "This vodka exhibits a lack of taste"; only the true expert can say, "This vodka exhibits a SUBLIME lack of taste."


The difference between Fark and Total Fark.
You just invented the Fark vodak theorem
 
2012-06-11 10:50:50 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: cptjeff: Congrats, vodka drinkers. You're drinking something utterly generic, produced on an industrial scale, differentiated only by what's on the bottle.

That's why I only drink this

[farm3.static.flickr.com image 375x500]

Besides, if you are using it for mixed drinks, who the hell cares?


In a genuine plastic bottle, no less. You must be a millionaire playboy. Must.
 
2012-06-11 10:54:15 AM  
Is it good? I've no idea, but the marketing is effective.
files.coloribus.com
 
2012-06-11 10:58:41 AM  

The One True TheDavid: bim1154:

Waiting for the vodka snobs to start posting images of expensive vodka.

Our local product. Guess what it costs?

[www.mugspartystore.com image 320x500]



Tree fiddy.
 
2012-06-11 10:59:00 AM  

dennysgod: I'm sticking with Svedka.


That's a good inexpensive choice.
 
2012-06-11 11:00:13 AM  

TheMysticS: Nakito: Au contraire. The true vodka connoisseur is not assessesing taste but the lack of taste. The greatest vodkas have a subtle and elegant lack of taste that can only be appeciated by the most sophisticated palate. Any fool can say, "This vodka exhibits a lack of taste"; only the true expert can say, "This vodka exhibits a SUBLIME lack of taste."

The difference between Fark and Total Fark.
You just invented the Fark vodak theorem


Reminds me of The Emperor's New Clothes. Only the most sophisticated people can taste it.

/I, for one, will never pretend to know and at this point couldn't appreciate great hard alcohol. My drinking days are mostly behind me and it was mostly based on quantity and budget. I can, however, tell the difference between bad vodka and terrible vodka. Same with bad tequila, terrible tequila, and all the other variations of eye-rolling rookie swill.
 
2012-06-11 11:00:30 AM  

beta_plus: ///the more expensive = less burn and turpentine flavor


Read that to yourself and tell me again why drinking vodak straight makes any logical sense at all. You're paying more money for something that has less taste. WTF?
 
2012-06-11 11:03:01 AM  

mytdawg: SpiffyandRedhot: Didn't Mythbusters do a show on this? Old news is old.

Their taster consistently determined how many times the cheap vodka had been filtered (I think it was scale of 1-10) and which was the premium brand IIRC. I was surprised, it all tastes kinda like kerosene to me. But the well brands give me a nasty hangover, the better grades do not. But that's pretty much the case with all well brands, regardless of type.


This. Cheap tequila can be damn near lethal. Cheap rum, too, can be full of nasty fusile oils, and even tannin. Cheap brandy, whiskey, or cognac aren't much better.
If you must drink cheap booze, stick with vodka or gin - they are the least vile.
 
2012-06-11 11:05:21 AM  

Jubeebee: PYROY: All vodka tastes the same to me, same with gin, so Aristocrat is always is.

I've noticed differences between gins. Different brands use different ratios of botanicals, so even in a gin&tonic, there is a difference between Bombay Sapphire and Brokers.

But vodak is just a means to turn nonalcoholic beverages into alcoholic beverages. Unless it's infused with bison grass or something, just buy the cheapest bucket and drown it in cranberry juice.


Have to agree with you on gin. I've always loved Bombay Sapphire for years. My father convinced me to try a bottle of Hendrick's gin a few months ago.......my God, is that stuff smooth....
 
2012-06-11 11:05:48 AM  

Theaetetus: ZER0T0THEC0RE: That doesn't mean all vodka's are exactly the same.

(food scientist who works in R&D for a large alcoholic beverages company)

Pff, right... If you were really a food scientist, you'd know it was spelled "vodak".


As another Farker put it, revisting that thread was like watching the birth of the universe.
 
2012-06-11 11:07:21 AM  
TFA: But when Conlin applied for a licence to sell it in neighbouring Idaho, it was rejected by the state liquor authority, which decides what gets stocked in the state's stores.

I thought the USA was the land of the free? Sounds more like the old Soviet Union.
 
2012-06-11 11:09:14 AM  
I can tell the difference between cheap vodaks & expensive vodaks... not by the taste... but by the headache.
 
2012-06-11 11:13:53 AM  
I toured a (the?) distillery in Milwaukee over the weekend. According to the distiller, who would be expected to know these things, it comes down to when to make the cuts of the heads/tails, which is well understood, and to filtering. They run it through the activated charcoal filter enough times until it's right. "If you get a bad vodka, you can run it through your Brita water filter a few times and clean it right up, it's effectively the same as what we do here."
 
2012-06-11 11:15:19 AM  
So vodka and vodka drinkers have the same thing in common. They're both tasteless.
 
2012-06-11 11:16:03 AM  

chewd: I can tell the difference between cheap vodaks & expensive vodaks... not by the taste... but by the headache.


Cheap vodka in a plastic bottle = guaranteed hangover no matter how many drinks are had.
 
2012-06-11 11:20:23 AM  

Theaetetus: ZER0T0THEC0RE: That doesn't mean all vodka's are exactly the same.

(food scientist who works in R&D for a large alcoholic beverages company)

Pff, right... If you were really a food scientist, you'd know it was spelled "vodak".


You win the discussion, my friend.
 
2012-06-11 11:21:26 AM  
Many American vodkas contribute little to the actual manufacturing - they merely purchase 95% ethyl alcohol from industrial giants like Archer Daniels Midland or Midwest Grain Processors, add water, and filter the product to varying degrees.

So is it possible to buy a gallon from ADM and cut out the middleman?
 
2012-06-11 11:21:58 AM  

AbbeySomeone: Cheap vodka in a plastic bottle = guaranteed hangover no matter how many drinks are had.


Its not a hangover... its what cheap vodak gives me instead of a buzz. A few times i've tried to drink past the headache to get to a buzz... but all that happens is the headache gets worse.
 
2012-06-11 11:26:04 AM  

mytdawg: This stuff is pretty good too.

[i174.photobucket.com image 370x749]

/not particularly expensive - $13-15 a fifth or so.


This is my house vodka these days, I like it a lot. My neighbor drinks it on the rocks, I mix it.
I don't usually drink vodka straight, I prefer bourbon or gin for that.
 
2012-06-11 11:31:32 AM  

MissMechante: mytdawg: This stuff is pretty good too.

[i174.photobucket.com image 370x749]

/not particularly expensive - $13-15 a fifth or so.

This is my house vodka these days, I like it a lot. My neighbor drinks it on the rocks, I mix it.
I don't usually drink vodka straight, I prefer bourbon or gin for that.


The Ugly Dog is supposed to be good too but it's more in the $20 range and not sure how far it's distributed. My dad likes it second only to Stoli. Thinks Grey Goose is overrated as do a great many others it appears. I bought him a bottle once but would never spend $30+ on it for myself. I'm a cheap date, especially when I'm buying...
 
2012-06-11 11:44:55 AM  

chewd: I can tell the difference between cheap vodaks & expensive vodaks... not by the taste... but by the headache.


this

I look on the label for the raw ingredients / distilling process and try to avoid industrially produced ethanol + spring water. Past experience is also key.
 
2012-06-11 11:46:01 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: That's the point. Who the hell does vodak shots? It's for mixing.


Correct. Vokda is the tofu of booze.
 
2012-06-11 11:52:13 AM  

AbbeySomeone: chewd: I can tell the difference between cheap vodaks & expensive vodaks... not by the taste... but by the headache.

Cheap vodka in a plastic bottle = guaranteed hangover no matter how many drinks are had.


ha, what are you, 12? I drink a pint of Skol every night and I don't even bother clicking on Fark until it's half finished.

You get a hangover from cheap vodka, you're just weak.
 
2012-06-11 11:52:56 AM  
ugh out of Skol. Ok till tonight, Farkers.
 
2012-06-11 12:03:16 PM  
vodka is vodka, the end, except Grey Goose which sucks.
 
2012-06-11 12:05:34 PM  

TravisBickle62:
Costco's Kirkland brand is Grey Goose in a different bottle


From what I have read, it is made in the same distillery as Grey Goose, but not made by them. I lik all the Kirkland liquors, for $20+ a liter their 100% blue agave Tequila is a nice find.
 
2012-06-11 12:11:44 PM  

Snarfangel: Many American vodkas contribute little to the actual manufacturing - they merely purchase 95% ethyl alcohol from industrial giants like Archer Daniels Midland or Midwest Grain Processors, add water, and filter the product to varying degrees.

So is it possible to buy a gallon from ADM and cut out the middleman?


Now there's the real question. Some quick googling shows that you can get cheap ethyl alcohol from chemical/science supply companies but they don't want to ship to individuals. Probably specifically because they don't want to be liable when some dummy kills themselves manufacturing their own hooch. There's also apparently a difference between 95% ethyl alcohol and food grade ethyl alcohol.

But yeah, there's got to be a way to extract moonshine from the internet.
 
2012-06-11 12:17:14 PM  

freewill: RobertBruce: if vodka has a real taste you're doing it wrong.

It's not so much that as it is that all vodka makers are "doing it wrong" and catering to sorority girls instead of making something enjoyable. Grain vodkas are certainly generally indistinguishable, but potato and rye vodkas are noticeably distinct. (There's also corn vodka out there, which is very different, but not my bag.)

Try this sometime.

[pennportal.files.wordpress.com image 156x400]


Hell yes, Farker is right

Try this, too

mainebusiness.mainetoday.com

My fav
 
2012-06-11 12:19:15 PM  
I only drink vodka hand made by virgins on full moons out of the most rarest of mythical ruby potatoes, served from a diamond bottle with gold shavings imbedded in this fine nectar.
 
2012-06-11 12:34:26 PM  
I look at it this way: beer and wine are beverages, distilled liquor is medicine. As shown by the the Wikipedia article (with map) Alcohol belts of Europe (link), hard liquor caught on in the dreary, cold and dark northern lands because it treats the pain of having to live past 45 degrees north (though for me it's closer to 40 degrees N).

This might account for the "personality quirks" passed down in my British/Irish paternal lineage: we didn't get the alcoholic gene, we're raving nuts instead. There could be a link there, maybe some families developed alcoholism because in 300 AD there was no Seroquel yet. (Which is better, a snoring drunk or a fire-&-brimstone Puritan?)

My own boozing career didn't begin till my mid 40s, when I'd gotten awful damn tired of being a sober fruitcake, and while I might lose count on a particular occasion I don't seem to have it in me to lose all control like folks do in the AA "literature": a liter a week is a lot for me, two shots a night is usually enough, and I'm truly amazed that anybody can finish off a fifth of 100-proof in one calendar day. But I do love the stuff.

Keep in mind that our species evolved where it's warm and sunny and that northern Europeans have such pale skin and light eyes because once they were stuck up there it was mutate or die. Is it any wonder that so many barbarian conquerors were frigging Vikings? "I tell ya Sven, one more 9-month winter and I'll berzerk my whole damn family. Again."

For those in the vodka/whisky belt, if you can you migrate to the south of France or someplace with a similar climate -- and drink beer or wine with meals. If you can't, you dose yourself with the hard stuff and dream of better worlds. Sláinte, motherfarkers!
 
2012-06-11 12:37:03 PM  
Hangar One cltampa.com

Love the Mandarin Blossom and Spiced Pear. The others are good too.
 
2012-06-11 12:37:54 PM  
I've always laughed at the snooty vodka aficionados. They're such morons. Vodka is the drink of those who want to get drunk, but don't like liquor.

/They can have my Scotch whiskey when they pry it from my clammy passed-out hands.
 
2012-06-11 12:38:22 PM  
fonebone77:


How anyone can drink gin is beyond me though. It tastes like a pine tree.


It's supposed to. That's what it's flavored with. (link)
 
2012-06-11 12:39:55 PM  

beta_plus: Best value for your money vodak that I have ever seen

[www.thepourpro.com image 525x683]

/Vodka doesn't taste of anything by definition - the government is actually right in this case
//it's more of a burn
///the more expensive = less burn and turpentine flavor


I like Tito's. It tastes a bit like the triple distilled moonshine mother used to make.

Otherwise, vodak is supposed to be low flavor, and a base for mixed drinks. If you are getting drunk on straight vodak you're an idiot but probably quicker to recover than drinking something with a load of congeners.
 
2012-06-11 12:40:16 PM  
"I judge a vodka by how I feel the next day. Our hangovers are minimal," says Steve Conlin, vice-president of marketing for Ogden's Own Distillery, makers of Five Wives Vodka.

While I can't speak for the vodka in question, I agree with what he's saying... some vodka's have more hangover in them. Along with crappier ingredients and less filtering, I blame the plastic bottle.

Anyway, for shots or mixing, Russian Standard is pretty decent.
 
2012-06-11 12:41:31 PM  

Clemkadidlefark: My fav


Nice. That goes on the shortlist, especially if I make it up to New England. Boyd & Blair is a Pennsylvania product.

I'm waiting for someone to finally realize that a London dry gin produced from a potato spirit base has the potential to produce the ideal martini.
 
2012-06-11 12:51:33 PM  
One of the tastiest vodaks (wait for the oxymoron) I've ever had was from Breckenridge Distillery up in ski country. A little tartness from the corn and snowmelt they used, but otherwise smooth as ice.

Their bourbon was surprisingly good as well. Weird for a Colorado distillery to have quality liquors from the wrong parts of the world.

// good old relatively-cheapo Three Olives for mixing
// and doing shots, for that matter
 
2012-06-11 12:58:27 PM  

WhippingBoy: Being a vodka snob is like being a white paint aficionado.


Very good sir. These Ketel One commercials where they show it on ice...blech. I mix vodka with whatever I like, and it's just fine. Everyone knows the finest vodka comes from Kentucky, anyway.

8 bucks a liter, 12 bucks a handle, can't beat it!

www.thepartysource.com
 
2012-06-11 01:00:38 PM  
Jument:

beta_plus: ///the more expensive = less burn and turpentine flavor

Read that to yourself and tell me again why drinking vodak straight makes any logical sense at all. You're paying more money for something that has less taste. WTF?


The difference is that the stuff that gives whiskey its flavor is also the stuff that's likely to produce hangovers. At least in theory: I can't afford to get shiat-faced on Booker's very often, but I can tell you that a Fighting Cock hangover is terrible. "Purer" vodka, with the cogeners distilled away and filtered out, is much less dangerous -- unless you let the drinkability lull you into something stupid. When you're just drinking for the effect you might as well drink vodka.

Speaking of which, New Amsterdam vodka comes in a spiffy rectangular bottle and boasts that it's "five times distilled" but it's only $12 a fifth at the Rite Aid across the street. At room temperature it has very little "yuckiness" and just enough burn to remind me it's not water. Smirnoff is only distilled three times and costs a buck or two more, so I think I've found my "premium" brand. Of generic grain vodka anyway: the rye and potato stuff is a little different, though maybe if it were distilled two or three more times and filtered through 50 feet of activated charcoal it too would be just bland.
 
2012-06-11 01:03:24 PM  
Considering it costs about the same as Popov and is better than most "top" shelf vodkas, I prefer:

upload.wikimedia.org

/hot
//Made in Poland, originates from Austria technically
///The Polish invented vodka, the Russians claimed credit and the Finns became immune while the others were busy puking
 
2012-06-11 01:05:52 PM  

mytdawg: This stuff is pretty good too.

[i174.photobucket.com image 370x749]

/not particularly expensive - $13-15 a fifth or so.


Ugh, this was my vodka of choice. I could find it in the local grocery store for $13 a bottle. Sadly they no longer carry it anymore.

/Was given a half-gal of Tito's as a gift last christmas
//Just got a fifth of Kettle One as a birthday gift this weekend
///I'm set on vodka for a while
 
2012-06-11 01:06:04 PM  
By the way, which "level" of water filter were they using? The basic activated charcoal kind that really just affects the taste or the expensive kind that's supposed to make raw sewage safe to drink?
 
2012-06-11 01:07:57 PM  
In all seriousness, I suppose really really really expensive vodka is better than the local swill I purchase, but as i said, its all getting mixed, anyway. My local likka stow did have this on sale once, almost as cheap as HH, and I could tell it was of higher quality. After about three drinks, i didn't give a shiat. Try it if you can find it cheap, because it was easier on me the next day. Maybe if only for a change of pace.

www.packagingeurope.com
 
2012-06-11 01:21:14 PM  
<b><a href="http://www.fark.com/comments/7155769/77411680#c77411680" target="_blank">Snarfangel</a>:</b>

<i>Many American vodkas contribute little to the actual manufacturing - they merely purchase 95% ethyl alcohol from industrial giants like Archer Daniels Midland or Midwest Grain Processors, add water, and filter the product to varying degrees.

So is it possible to buy a gallon from ADM and cut out the middleman?</i>

There's always Everclear or Golden Grain. Where it's allowed anyway.
 
2012-06-11 01:45:45 PM  
As a daily vodak drinker, I have this to say: Given a choice, I'll pick Russian Standard every time. But, Smirnoff is good, and lately, due to excessive pricing in my new neighborhood, I've found the cheapie McCormick's more than adequate. It's not really the vodak that matters, though, but what you mix it with. If you use this stuff, you may find your new favorite drink.

www.foodservicedirect.com

/Oh yeah
 
2012-06-11 01:59:18 PM  

bigpeeler: Ikam: You can't go wrong with Sobieski vodka (made from rye). Tastes decent and is inexpensive. I've been enjoying it in mixed drinks for years.

Thank you. Sobieski is an amazing vodka.


Discovered this brand a year ago. As a pollock, I quite often enjoy vodka. This is one of the better ones out there, and the price is great.
 
2012-06-11 02:01:15 PM  

fonebone77: I dont know why you would drink any alcohol for any reason other than to get drunk. I drink vodka pretty much exclusively and I drink it in whatever way minimizes whatever taste there is as much as possible. Some does seem to go down smoother with less taste than others. I dont find that price is the determining factor though.

How anyone can drink gin is beyond me though. It tastes like a pine tree.


First alcohol I ever got drunk on (14 yrs old) was Beef Eaters gin. I can not to this day even get a whiff of it without becoming nauseous.

/But I'm still okay with pretty much anything else
 
2012-06-11 02:04:00 PM  

darcsun: Discovered this brand a year ago. As a pollock, I quite often enjoy vodka. This is one of the better ones out there, and the price is great.


A friend of mine who is Polish turned me on to it. I've been drinking it ever since, thankfully, where I live, I'm pretty sure there are more Polish people here than in Poland, so it is pretty easy to come by.

Na zdrowie!
 
2012-06-11 02:07:07 PM  
Well even between "expensive" vodka's I taste a difference. Give me Goose and Belvedere and I'll pick out which is which every time. I also can taste differences in cheaper vodka's as well. To me, it seems, generally speaking, the cheaper vodka's have more of a rubbing alcohol taste, while the more premium vodka's tend to have less of a "flavor".
 
2012-06-11 02:14:18 PM  

The One True TheDavid: Jument:

beta_plus: ///the more expensive = less burn and turpentine flavor

Read that to yourself and tell me again why drinking vodak straight makes any logical sense at all. You're paying more money for something that has less taste. WTF?

The difference is that the stuff that gives whiskey its flavor is also the stuff that's likely to produce hangovers. At least in theory: I can't afford to get shiat-faced on Booker's very often, but I can tell you that a Fighting Cock hangover is terrible. "Purer" vodka, with the cogeners distilled away and filtered out, is much less dangerous -- unless you let the drinkability lull you into something stupid. When you're just drinking for the effect you might as well drink vodka.

Speaking of which, New Amsterdam vodka comes in a spiffy rectangular bottle and boasts that it's "five times distilled" but it's only $12 a fifth at the Rite Aid across the street. At room temperature it has very little "yuckiness" and just enough burn to remind me it's not water. Smirnoff is only distilled three times and costs a buck or two more, so I think I've found my "premium" brand. Of generic grain vodka anyway: the rye and potato stuff is a little different, though maybe if it were distilled two or three more times and filtered through 50 feet of activated charcoal it too would be just bland.


That's an interesting point.

However, let me play Devil's Advocate and point out that if you choose your drink based on the quality of the hangover, maybe you're a farking alcoholic!
 
2012-06-11 02:15:37 PM  
OK, if we are now in to posting our favourites. Just finished a bottle of this :

www.thewhiskyexchange.com

Generally like potato vodkas. This one was barley and went down well - cold with ice.
 
2012-06-11 02:28:38 PM  
When a product becomes "commodified" it means that the product is essentially fungible--you can replace any brand with any other, any unit with another. This means that producers and sellers are forced to compete largely on price since there aren't any differences in quality or utility between products.

To avoid this terrible fate, producers and sellers attempt to create imperfect competition by generating factitious differences between their products in the mind of the consumer. They use "lifestyle", advertising, branding, packaging and other superficial marketing and advertising ploys to create the illusion that their product is superior, to identify consumers who are willing and able to pay more, and to create brand loyalty where simply buying the cheapest and the nearest to hand product would be the rational thing for the consumer to do.

Vodka is a perfect example as it has neither colour nor flavour unless you add these artificially. It is essentially pure alcohol from any source--grain, potatoes, etc. You can make it with almost anything fermentable and thus even production costs don't justify a higher price.

Other products which are commodified include soaps, shampoos, detergents, etc. The main distinction between an expensive shampoo you purchase in a tony hairdressers and the cheapest commercial brand that can be purchased in three quart jugs is the price. All shampoos clean your hair more or less equally well. The scents and names, bottles and other packaging and marketing create a difference in "quality" that has nothing to do with functionality or value-for-dollar. Au contraire, snob appeal multiplies the price of the same ingredients, so that even the non-functional ingredients don't really determine the price: you do but deciding you have to pay more than those slobs next door, the Jones or the Smiths.

Imperfect competition works to the benefit even of those sellers who don't compete this way as it fragments the market and identifies price-conscious consumers. The cut-price brands can then use other tricks to part the fools from their money, such as selling shampoo in bottles the size of beer barrels, by the dozen, or without the cost of advertising, thus creating even lower prices for those who have conned to the scam or who are too poor to know or care from snob appeal and luxury and imaginary dream worlds in the South Pacific.

In many industries, the product that goes into the luxury high-end packages and the product that goes into the low end packages may be essentially the same quality (because of federal regulations, or because it's cheaper to make one kind and that kind is the "good" stuff). Wine, for example is often poured into several different bottles from the same vat. This is done to ensure that the market is not flooded with win in good years. A vintner may have several different "brands" from their top vintage wines to their ordinary table wines, and may also have "special" issues for the big spenders.

If the crop is really good, the surplus wine is dumped--on the second best label or even the mass market. Since the price paid makes the wine all the more delicious and distinctive, there is little chance that consumers will catch on to this trick unless somebody tells them about it.

The same economics govern many store brands and off labels--surplus production gets dumped--but not into the garbage--they get dumped into the store brand or the off label. Thus, many times you get a product that is just as good as the big national brand, if a bit off-standard in some respects, since old stock and other problematic product may be dumped in the same way.

It is a good idea if you are a heavy drinker of fine wines to keep an eye on the vintage each year and buy some of the second best labels from first rate vintners. You may be getting a real bargain if you can actually tell the difference between a first rate wine in a second rate bottle and a second rate wine in a first rate bottle--many experts have difficulty with this, but fortunately prices and fancy branding impresses even experts, so they are seldom disappointed and often pleasantly surprised by wines from the great wine firms and the great vintners.

The same is true of knock-off clothing sometimes. You may be getting the same shirt minus the label for one tenth of the price because over-production is being sold off-label. The same slaves may have made your $250 Hugo Boss shirt and the $15 knock-off in the same factory in Indonesia or the Philappines or wherever.

Caveat emptor.

If you are a thrifty snob, you can cut the labels off of the real thing and sew them on the knock-offs, which need them more. Then you can honestly say that half of your shirts are brand x, while the other half have the brand x label and are indistinguishable from brand x except to the trained eye of a few textile manufacturers and super-snobs. If anybody catches you removing the labels, you can always play the anti-snob card and say you like the quality but hate the commercialization of a fine old brand that is now, alas, a bit déclassé. Your little pile of labels will fool no one who has heard of this trick--but most of them practice it.

Make sure you can sew really well or have a good seamstress who will be discrete enough to keep her eyes down to the sewing and her mouth shut. Use the right thread or something virtually indistinguishable.

Like half of the ostensible "rich" in this world, half of their luxury goods are fakes. But it is better to wear a fake and be solvent than to be in precarious debt and still wear a lot of fakes because you can't afford the real thing, even if begged, borrowed, or rented.

If caught wearing fake jewels (of really good quality only), you can claim the real ones are in a safe somewhere. Nobody can afford the insurance for really good jewels and it's a hassel having to lug guards around for your jewels. You need the space for guards to protect you. Don't wear cheap fakes except as open and honest costume jewelery. Cheap fakes do not substitute for real jewels. They substitute for the lack of real jewels. That's why it is OK to wear them to luncheon when you can't, by custom, wear your evening baubles.
 
2012-06-11 02:31:23 PM  
Jument:


However, let me play Devil's Advocate and point out that if you choose your drink based on the quality of the hangover, maybe you're a farking alcoholic!


Really?

You think being tipsy by 2 PM might also indicate something?
 
2012-06-11 02:32:57 PM  
Sobieski tastes like vodka made from something "unusual." New Amsterdam tastes like slightly burning water.
 
2012-06-11 02:40:31 PM  
A friend of mine who really likes vodka once told me that he read an article in a magazine where they hired a taste tester to see if he could tell the difference between vodka samples. They put before him 9 different samples - a cheap vodka, that same cheap vodka ran through a charcoal filter 1-7 times, and Grey Goose. The tester successfully identified all samples correctly, noting that the filtered vodka 5-7x were pretty good, but was different than Grey Goose.

I don't know which magazine, and I don't even know if this is true. I don't care. I hate vodka.
 
2012-06-11 02:41:21 PM  

cptjeff: Congrats, vodka drinkers. You're drinking something utterly generic, produced on an industrial scale, differentiated only by what's on the bottle.


Yeah well they don't make birthday cake flavored rum, so whattaya gonna do.
 
2012-06-11 02:43:04 PM  
I drank a gallon and a half a week of Kamchatka, Fleishcmanns, Popov, Potters, anything you can get a half gallon for $10-$12, with a healthy smattering of Gray Goose, Skyy, Absolut etc, types thrown in along the way, straight up vodkaholic. Vodka took out significant kidney function by 24. I'm not a connoisseur, but Ive had all the commercial shiat, in spades, and Ill have to agree with the people who believe that the more expensive vodka gets more "tasteless" and the alcohol burn becomes slightly milder. The alcohol burn from my usual cheap vodka was pretty significant, and the "aftertaste-burn" on these vodkas was pretty foul, always cringe inducing, sticking on your pallet until you chase or brush your teeth. Good vodka can be drunk straight, with just the initial brief alcohol burn, with that mild alcoholy aftertaste. Nothing much lingering on the pallet.

Tasty beer is infinitely more useful though.

/No alcohol burn, you can drink more without adverse affects, and you're much less likely to blackout and act like an idiot
 
2012-06-11 02:45:49 PM  
palate*

/ I work in a warehouse
 
2012-06-11 02:49:09 PM  

Jument: The One True TheDavid: Jument:

beta_plus: ///the more expensive = less burn and turpentine flavor

Read that to yourself and tell me again why drinking vodak straight makes any logical sense at all. You're paying more money for something that has less taste. WTF?

The difference is that the stuff that gives whiskey its flavor is also the stuff that's likely to produce hangovers. At least in theory: I can't afford to get shiat-faced on Booker's very often, but I can tell you that a Fighting Cock hangover is terrible. "Purer" vodka, with the cogeners distilled away and filtered out, is much less dangerous -- unless you let the drinkability lull you into something stupid. When you're just drinking for the effect you might as well drink vodka.

Speaking of which, New Amsterdam vodka comes in a spiffy rectangular bottle and boasts that it's "five times distilled" but it's only $12 a fifth at the Rite Aid across the street. At room temperature it has very little "yuckiness" and just enough burn to remind me it's not water. Smirnoff is only distilled three times and costs a buck or two more, so I think I've found my "premium" brand. Of generic grain vodka anyway: the rye and potato stuff is a little different, though maybe if it were distilled two or three more times and filtered through 50 feet of activated charcoal it too would be just bland.

That's an interesting point.

However, let me play Devil's Advocate and point out that if you choose your drink based on the quality of the hangover, maybe you're a farking alcoholic!


You say that like being alcoholic is a bad thing. This may not be the website for you.

/and yes, the main advantage of extremely pure vodak as opposed to other hard liquors is that the risk of hangover is significantly reduced
 
2012-06-11 03:01:39 PM  
This is why I basically buy vodka for the interesting bottles, then refill them once I'm done with bulk from Costco. I'd rather look at a snazzy bottle than generic old Absolut or Skyy, it makes me feel ever so slightly better about drinking too much of it.

/Took over two years to break the woman of her Grey Goose habit. What's the point of posing when you live in freaking Fresno?
 
2012-06-11 03:04:16 PM  
I agree with this sentiment as far as mainstream American liquor store vodkas go, at least from Smirnoff and up. I've drank plenty in my time and Popov is just bad. They must not do a very good job of filtering out the junk.
 
2012-06-11 03:04:31 PM  

knightofargh: Considering it costs about the same as Popov and is better than most "top" shelf vodkas, I prefer:

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x293]

/hot
//Made in Poland, originates from Austria technically
///The Polish invented vodka, the Russians claimed credit and the Finns became immune while the others were busy puking



Even if Popov cost a dollar a gallon, it would still be overpriced.

/Had a bad experience with it when I was a freshman in college.
//Didn't get hammered on it, but we were doing shots and it gave me a horrible case of heart burn.
 
2012-06-11 03:06:25 PM  

foxyshadis: This is why I basically buy vodka for the interesting bottles, then refill them once I'm done with bulk from Costco. I'd rather look at a snazzy bottle than generic old Absolut or Skyy, it makes me feel ever so slightly better about drinking too much of it.

/Took over two years to break the woman of her Grey Goose habit. What's the point of posing when you live in freaking Fresno?



Ha! My Dad once told me that his uber-cheap Ukrainian father used to take empty bourbon bottles and fill them with cheap Canadian whiskey, and then serve it to company.

Speaking of Costco, Grey Goose, and your woman.....

What does she think of the Kirkland Signature vodka?
 
2012-06-11 03:08:41 PM  
Also:

Chopin is awesome, Grey Goose is for guidos who want to show off.
 
2012-06-11 03:14:03 PM  

findthefish: Do yourself a favor...Tito's is excellent.


The thing about Tito's is that it's almost too smooth, like drinking warm water.

For me I only care about how I feel the next day, which is generally not good if I go with any of the cheaps other than Smirnoff.
 
2012-06-11 03:20:37 PM  

The_Sponge: Even if Popov cost a dollar a gallon, it would still be overpriced.


I wasn't recommending Popov. It's just priced similarly to the much superior Monopolowa.

I cringe at the idea of drinking Popov, it's better suited to cleaning up oil based paints or possibly as a fuel.
 
2012-06-11 03:57:33 PM  

brantgoose: When a product becomes "commodified" it means that the product is essentially fungible--you can replace any brand with any other, any unit with another. This means that producers and sellers are forced to compete largely on price since there aren't any differences in quality or utility between products.

To avoid this terrible fate, producers and sellers attempt to create imperfect competition by generating factitious differences between their products in the mind of the consumer. They use "lifestyle", advertising, branding, packaging and other superficial marketing and advertising ploys to create the illusion that their product is superior, to identify consumers who are willing and able to pay more, and to create brand loyalty where simply buying the cheapest and the nearest to hand product would be the rational thing for the consumer to do.

Vodka is a perfect example as it has neither colour nor flavour unless you add these artificially. It is essentially pure alcohol from any source--grain, potatoes, etc. You can make it with almost anything fermentable and thus even production costs don't justify a higher price.

Other products which are commodified include soaps, shampoos, detergents, etc. The main distinction between an expensive shampoo you purchase in a tony hairdressers and the cheapest commercial brand that can be purchased in three quart jugs is the price. All shampoos clean your hair more or less equally well. The scents and names, bottles and other packaging and marketing create a difference in "quality" that has nothing to do with functionality or value-for-dollar. Au contraire, snob appeal multiplies the price of the same ingredients, so that even the non-functional ingredients don't really determine the price: you do but deciding you have to pay more than those slobs next door, the Jones or the Smiths.

Imperfect competition works to the benefit even of those sellers who don't compete this way as it fragments the market and identifies price-conscious consumers. The cut-price brands can then use other tricks to part the fools from their money, such as selling shampoo in bottles the size of beer barrels, by the dozen, or without the cost of advertising, thus creating even lower prices for those who have conned to the scam or who are too poor to know or care from snob appeal and luxury and imaginary dream worlds in the South Pacific.

In many industries, the product that goes into the luxury high-end packages and the product that goes into the low end packages may be essentially the same quality (because of federal regulations, or because it's cheaper to make one kind and that kind is the "good" stuff). Wine, for example is often poured into several different bottles from the same vat. This is done to ensure that the market is not flooded with win in good years. A vintner may have several different "brands" from their top vintage wines to their ordinary table wines, and may also have "special" issues for the big spenders.

If the crop is really good, the surplus wine is dumped--on the second best label or even the mass market. Since the price paid makes the wine all the more delicious and distinctive, there is little chance that consumers will catch on to this trick unless somebody tells them about it.

The same economics govern many store brands and off labels--surplus production gets dumped--but not into the garbage--they get dumped into the store brand or the off label. Thus, many times you get a product that is just as good as the big national brand, if a bit off-standard in some respects, since old stock and other problematic product may be dumped in the same way.

It is a good idea if you are a heavy drinker of fine wines to keep an eye on the vintage each year and buy some of the second best labels from first rate vintners. You may be getting a real bargain if you can actually tell the difference between a first rate wine in a second rate bottle and a second rate wine in a first rate bottle--many experts have difficulty with this, but fortunately prices and fancy branding impresses even experts, so they are seldom disappointed and often pleasantly surprised by wines from the great wine firms and the great vintners.

The same is true of knock-off clothing sometimes. You may be getting the same shirt minus the label for one tenth of the price because over-production is being sold off-label. The same slaves may have made your $250 Hugo Boss shirt and the $15 knock-off in the same factory in Indonesia or the Philappines or wherever.

Caveat emptor.

If you are a thrifty snob, you can cut the labels off of the real thing and sew them on the knock-offs, which need them more. Then you can honestly say that half of your shirts are brand x, while the other half have the brand x label and are indistinguishable from brand x except to the trained eye of a few textile manufacturers and super-snobs. If anybody catches you removing the labels, you can always play the anti-snob card and say you like the quality but hate the commercialization of a fine old brand that is now, alas, a bit déclassé. Your little pile of labels will fool no one who has heard of this trick--but most of them practice it.

Make sure you can sew really well or have a good seamstress who will be discrete enough to keep her eyes down to the sewing and her mouth shut. Use the right thread or something virtually indistinguishable.

Like half of the ostensible "rich" in this world, half of their luxury goods are fakes. But it is better to wear a fake and be solvent than to be in precarious debt and still wear a lot of fakes because you can't afford the real thing, even if begged, borrowed, or rented.

If caught wearing fake jewels (of really good quality only), you can claim the real ones are in a safe somewhere. Nobody can afford the insurance for really good jewels and it's a hassel having to lug guards around for your jewels. You need the space for guards to protect you. Don't wear cheap fakes except as open and honest costume jewelery. Cheap fakes do not substitute for real jewels. They substitute for the lack of real jewels. That's why it is OK to wear them to luncheon when you can't, by custom, wear your evening baubles.




Ha-ha, you misspelled "discreet."

Seriously, what's with the Econ 101 windbaggery?

I realize the subject is snobbery, which has a huge overlap with hypocrisy, but what kind of insecure hole spends so much time "fixing" labels for themselves? Sure, prepping counterfeit merchandise for shallow saps, I can understand. But that?

And if anyone cares, my opinion on the ostensible thread subject echoes what some others have said: vodak is alcohol for people who don't like liquor, gin is superior, and ice is anathema to good bourbon.

/also "Philippines" and "hassle."
 
2012-06-11 04:01:28 PM  

freewill: Clemkadidlefark: My fav

Nice. That goes on the shortlist, especially if I make it up to New England. Boyd & Blair is a Pennsylvania product.

I'm waiting for someone to finally realize that a London dry gin produced from a potato spirit base has the potential to produce the ideal martini.


Here Here
 
2012-06-11 04:07:44 PM  

knightofargh: The_Sponge: Even if Popov cost a dollar a gallon, it would still be overpriced.

I wasn't recommending Popov. It's just priced similarly to the much superior Monopolowa.

I cringe at the idea of drinking Popov, it's better suited to cleaning up oil based paints or possibly as a fuel.



Oh no....I knew you weren't....it's just the fact that you mentioned it brought back a bad memory.
 
2012-06-11 04:13:37 PM  
D_Evans45:

[...]

Tasty beer is infinitely more useful though.

/No alcohol burn, you can drink more without adverse affects, and you're much less likely to blackout and act like an idiot


I've never needed alcohol or any drug to act like an idiot, nor have I ever blacked out: indeed my memory for a lot of the stupid crap I did years ago is too damn good.

I read that to black out you drink a lot very fast on an empty stomach. I haven't tried it yet, something tells me I'd need a tolerant, loyal and trustworthy friend to keep me out of trouble (and for a weirdo like me those are scarce), but my hunch is I'd be more likely to puke all over everything and soil my trousers instead -- and remember every last wretched second of it.

Maybe one or more of my fellow Lexingtonian Farkers (including but not necessarily Drew Curtis) would like to sit with me and hold my hand while I test out my theory? I'll even buy my own damn vodka, and I'll sign a Youtube release beforehand while I'm sober. Just think, I'll be 0.000001% as famous as Wil Wheaton.


/*crickets*
 
2012-06-11 04:15:48 PM  
whippedcreamvodka.net

I'm telling you, it's awesome.
 
2012-06-11 04:17:29 PM  

The_Sponge: Oh no....I knew you weren't....it's just the fact that you mentioned it brought back a bad memory.


As it should. Many bad memories start with Popov.

Also many bad hockey performances by Russian players in the NHL.
 
2012-06-11 04:42:18 PM  

9beers: [whippedcreamvodka.net image 400x266]

I'm telling you, it's awesome.


I loooooove making White Russians with this stuff in lieu of normal vodak.
 
2012-06-11 04:47:54 PM  

9beers: [whippedcreamvodka.net image 400x266]

I'm telling you, it's awesome.


Dangerous....goes down like candy...sweet, sweet candy
 
2012-06-11 04:55:52 PM  
2.bp.blogspot.comand any vodka.
 
2012-06-11 04:58:34 PM  

TenJed_77: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 500x291]and any vodka.


Oh yeah. 12 year old gilrs love that shi-- -
who me?
over there?
Ok.
 
2012-06-11 05:02:25 PM  

Phaeon: I loooooove making White Russians with this stuff in lieu of normal vodak.


Yep, that's what I was saying earlier in the thread.
 
2012-06-11 05:24:34 PM  

beta_plus: Jument: The One True TheDavid: Jument:

beta_plus: ///the more expensive = less burn and turpentine flavor

Read that to yourself and tell me again why drinking vodak straight makes any logical sense at all. You're paying more money for something that has less taste. WTF?

The difference is that the stuff that gives whiskey its flavor is also the stuff that's likely to produce hangovers. At least in theory: I can't afford to get shiat-faced on Booker's very often, but I can tell you that a Fighting Cock hangover is terrible. "Purer" vodka, with the cogeners distilled away and filtered out, is much less dangerous -- unless you let the drinkability lull you into something stupid. When you're just drinking for the effect you might as well drink vodka.

Speaking of which, New Amsterdam vodka comes in a spiffy rectangular bottle and boasts that it's "five times distilled" but it's only $12 a fifth at the Rite Aid across the street. At room temperature it has very little "yuckiness" and just enough burn to remind me it's not water. Smirnoff is only distilled three times and costs a buck or two more, so I think I've found my "premium" brand. Of generic grain vodka anyway: the rye and potato stuff is a little different, though maybe if it were distilled two or three more times and filtered through 50 feet of activated charcoal it too would be just bland.

That's an interesting point.

However, let me play Devil's Advocate and point out that if you choose your drink based on the quality of the hangover, maybe you're a farking alcoholic!

You say that like being alcoholic is a bad thing. This may not be the website for you.

/and yes, the main advantage of extremely pure vodak as opposed to other hard liquors is that the risk of hangover is significantly reduced


Well that's a good point. This thread has actually taught me a valid reason for drinking expensive vodka. I still won't do it but "the more you know".

For the record: I drink 1-2 drinks a day pretty consistently plus social drinking (which honestly isn't very often). Beer, wine and scotch. Whatever I'm in the mood for mostly. I don't worry about hangovers because I rarely drink enough to really get drunk. And they ibuprophen will fix the worst hangover inside of 20 minutes. Plus copious amounts of water and juice.
 
2012-06-11 06:18:07 PM  

The_Sponge: Speaking of Costco, Grey Goose, and your woman.....

What does she think of the Kirkland Signature vodka?


No idea, though we considered picking it up yesterday. It's fairly expensive, so I can't see the justification. She's moved on to adding a packet of stevia to drinks to make up for the slight loss in sweetness, and combined with cranberry any alcohol is completely lost. (I imagine you'd need a bit of grenadine to cover up turpentine like Popov, though.) I sip it straight but so cold you can't tell the difference anyway, and neither of us has the palate to discern things like hints of olive.

I might pick it up next time, just because it's the only one I haven't tried yet, but I've never noticed any difference in anything from medium-low to top shelf unless it actually comes from northeastern Europe. It's no surprise that all of the money in vodka comes from packaging and advertising.

The One True TheDavid: I read that to black out you drink a lot very fast on an empty stomach.


Nah, all you need to black out is head trauma. Fall into something or knock something into yourself, and you'll forget all of your stupidity.

/Woke up with a bright red L on my forehead after knocking over my speakers coming home. Only night I can't remember in my life.
 
2012-06-11 06:28:16 PM  

Bruxellensis: A friend of mine who really likes vodka once told me that he read an article in a magazine where they hired a taste tester to see if he could tell the difference between vodka samples. They put before him 9 different samples - a cheap vodka, that same cheap vodka ran through a charcoal filter 1-7 times, and Grey Goose. The tester successfully identified all samples correctly, noting that the filtered vodka 5-7x were pretty good, but was different than Grey Goose.

I don't know which magazine, and I don't even know if this is true. I don't care. I hate vodka.


That's because Grey has a faint sweetener in it, or the water they use is just a bit sweeter. It was one of the first to do that, but now there are a lot of mid-shelf brands that use a bit of sweet to mild out the burn.
 
2012-06-11 07:23:52 PM  

The One True TheDavid: Speaking of which, New Amsterdam vodka comes in a spiffy rectangular bottle and boasts that it's "five times distilled" but it's only $12 a fifth at the Rite Aid across the street. At room temperature it has very little "yuckiness" and just enough burn to remind me it's not water. Smirnoff is only distilled three times and costs a buck or two more, so I think I've found my "premium" brand. Of generic grain vodka anyway: the rye and potato stuff is a little different, though maybe if it were distilled two or three more times and filtered through 50 feet of activated charcoal it too would be just bland.


New Amsterdam is one of the more interesting brands to come along in a while - being cut rate yet very good. The gin and vodka are both more on the mellow side, good for easy drinking. I'm interested to find out what else they release - maybe a fortified sake?

That reminds me that I also want to try Van Gogh gin, supposedly one of the spiciest dry varieties.
 
2012-06-11 07:35:12 PM  
Sippin' on some 3 olives now.

/said that with my W.C voice
 
2012-06-11 08:06:10 PM  

WhippingBoy: Being a vodka snob is like being a white paint aficionado.


Pfft, I bet you think anything from Benjamin Moore is "fancy".

/ ;)
 
2012-06-11 08:35:56 PM  
The best Vodka I have had was in Russia. My temporary house-mate (a local co-worker for a short time while I did some consulting back in the late 90's in St. Petersburg) had an "in" with some company who's label I still don't know. I think I did know it for a time, I think I could probably butcher the name of it well enough but I'm positive I can't spell it. It never came in a real bottle anyhow.

Basically he'd go down and visit one of his friends or relatives who worked at the distillation facility and for the equivalent of like three bucks (bring your own jug) you'd get a about a gallon or maybe a half in your own jug or bottle. I have no idea if the size of the bottle mattered, they always came back full and, now that I think about it, I don't ever recall cleaning said bottle.

Anyhow, it had almost no taste and very little burn until after you drank it. There might have been a hint of peasant sweat and potato, a slight taste of despair, but mostly it had that truly neutral taste. It was delightful in that I could drink it like, well, water... *sighs* It was an experience. The architecture was great, the vodak was wonderful, the food was edible - mostly, but the people were distant and, when closer, just plain strange. Also, they were drunk... A very emotional people once you got drunk with them a few times.
 
2012-06-11 08:45:27 PM  
I like my vodka infused with new charred oak for several years...
 
2012-06-11 09:50:15 PM  
Gin tastes like isopropyl alcohol mixed with celery juice. I like Ketel one on the rocks with a lemon twist occasionally.
 
2012-06-11 10:15:02 PM  
If you've used the word "vodak" in this thread, you're an ignorant douchebag.
 
2012-06-11 10:24:43 PM  

Your Average Witty Fark User: If you've used the word "vodak" in this thread, you're an ignorant douchebag.


You sir,are an ignorant douchebag.
 
2012-06-11 10:49:52 PM  
Hey Fark friends, I need your help. I bought a bottle of Tito's because of this thread, so now I hope this thread can give back. I have a friend who is competing for cheese monger of the year and she needs internet support so she can win A HUGE wheel of cheese. A quick click and a like/vote would help so much. Pass along the good word too....
Go here please! : http://www.cheesemongerinvitational.com/gourmet-library/
 
2012-06-11 11:11:20 PM  

Argus Prescott: Hey Fark friends, I need your help. I bought a bottle of Tito's because of this thread, so now I hope this thread can give back. I have a friend who is competing for cheese monger of the year and she needs internet support so she can win A HUGE wheel of cheese. A quick click and a like/vote would help so much. Pass along the good word too....
Go here please! : http:

 
2012-06-11 11:27:01 PM  

Theaetetus: ZER0T0THEC0RE: That doesn't mean all vodka's are exactly the same.

(food scientist who works in R&D for a large alcoholic beverages company)

Pff, right... If you were really a food scientist, you'd know it was spelled "vodak".


I cannot believe that thread is from 2006. I've wasted my life here.
 
2012-06-12 01:50:24 AM  

W.C.fields forever: Your Average Witty Fark User: If you've used the word "vodak" in this thread, you're an ignorant douchebag.

You sir,are an ignorant douchebag.


No, I'm not a hipster douche. I'm also not retarded. Maybe you should've been hugged as a child.
 
2012-06-12 02:08:13 AM  
Appears they are using an old Garden City Bottling image as their logo.

p2.la-img.com
 
2012-06-12 07:49:14 AM  
Tito's
Boomerang
42 Below
Russian Standard
Ketel is OK, but charcoaly

Vanilla vodak and ginger ale, squirt of lime juice (fresh)

/Not a vodak fan
 
2012-06-12 11:27:28 AM  
Alright, someone snobbily correct me. I don't understand. The general premise is that vodka should have no flavor, except true premium vodkas, which have subtle flavors. Grey Goose is for wanna-be's, because it has a subtle flavor some people can distinguish, and other people don't seem to like. I've always been a vodka drinker, and have on multiple occasion sorted multiple shots of vodka into the order of my preference, which for me is the reverse order of how "metallic" I think they taste.

Why, precisely is Grey Goose for posers because it has a flavor I like, and can identify and enjoy?

//How on earth does Fark get off insisting on completely pristine flavorless vodka and still ramble on about what level of burnt grain flavor makes beer palatable
///Hint: Hops are disgusting
 
2012-06-12 12:35:00 PM  

Your Average Witty Fark User: W.C.fields forever: Your Average Witty Fark User: If you've used the word "vodak" in this thread, you're an ignorant douchebag.

You sir,are an ignorant douchebag.

No, I'm not a hipster douche. I'm also not retarded. Maybe you should've been hugged as a child.


you said vodak.i didnt
 
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