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(Sun Journal (Maine))   How complex and idiotic is the Maine tax system? Buying 5 donuts adds a 6% sales tax, but buying 6 is tax free   (sunjournal.com) divider line 24
    More: Fail, mainers, taxpayers  
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8160 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jun 2012 at 9:55 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-10 11:56:19 AM  
2 votes:
You really have to be terminally stupid to have difficulties with this.

/And I can say this with some authority, having worked for the terminally stupid before.
//Getting a kick, etc.
2012-06-10 10:42:03 AM  
2 votes:
Same deal in Ontario, though it may have changed. A single doughnut is a snack, and taxable. A dozen doughnuts are groceries, and not taxable. Makes perfect sense, right?
2012-06-10 10:33:23 AM  
2 votes:
I once bought a frozen burrito at a Circle K in Tampa. The counter guy told me to pay for it before heating it in their microwave. Frozen = groceries and not taxable. Cooked = taxable fast food.

/CSB
2012-06-10 10:16:44 AM  
2 votes:
tax codes tend to be idiotic, but that is just ridiculous, incredibly ridiculous.

candy is fine, alcohol is fine, prepared foods are fine, but otherwise food should not be taxed. no matter where it's bought. snack taxes are pure and utter bullshiat.
2012-06-10 10:12:41 AM  
2 votes:
Politicians love sales taxes, because A) They can nickel and dime consumers, and B) They can create loopholes for campaign contributors.
2012-06-10 11:28:43 PM  
1 votes:

DarkVader: Simple fix:

If can be eaten or drunk, DON'T FARKING TAX IT!

If you want to tax restaurants, tax them on their profits, not on sales.

Even better, don't tax sales at all. Tax income, and tax wealth.


Local jurisdictions have sales taxes because people come in from neighboring towns to buy things and use public services while they're there. Taxing income and wealth would give all that money to the places where people live and not to where they shop.
2012-06-10 07:37:38 PM  
1 votes:
I am proud to live in a non-sensible state of farktards.. even if taxes vary. Do you have any idea what I/we can and do get away with on a daily basis? Maine is stuck in the 50's intellectually. We still have gas stations where you pump BEFORE you pay, and various other honor systems that indicate people in Maine still believe in, well, people. That, and the state is too broke to afford things like FLIR cameras and adequate police forces. It makes it so much easier to earn untaxed income, falsify 'use tax' records (goods bought in NH) and other generally unscrupulous decisions that are policed into the ground in places like Mass.

/Whats a red light camera? never seen one....
2012-06-10 05:50:14 PM  
1 votes:
Oregon might be plumb retarded most of the time, thanks to Californication, but at least sales tax and other forms of regressive taxation are unconstitutional in that state still.
2012-06-10 12:42:01 PM  
1 votes:
Well this certainly explains the average BMI of Mainers.
2012-06-10 12:06:49 PM  
1 votes:

apoptotic: Quantum Apostrophe: Bah, try Quebec.

I don't know about Quebec specifically, but my first thought was "sounds like the GST" where if you buy a rotisserie chicken it's taxable (considered a restaurant item) if it's warm, non-taxable (grocery item) if it's cold.


I remember how that sneaky bastard Mulroney brought in the "Gouge and Screw Tax" by first saying his intention was to tax EVERYTHING with it, including food and rent, then of course when everyone started screaming how inhumane it was to the working class to tak essentials like food, he relented and made it on 'non-food" items, and the stupid people breathed a sigh of relief and thought they were getting a break.

Now it's the Horrible Sales Tax (HST).
2012-06-10 11:59:21 AM  
1 votes:

actualhuman: ajgeek: I love how they define "prepared" food. Technically, any form of bread, many boxed or canned foods, and any fruit/vegetable that has been processed more than minimally required to put on the shelf (pre-cut celery, sliced radishes/mushrooms etc) is "prepared" and thus should be taxed. Yet things like cake from the bakery, which is blatantly a prepared food isn't taxed, and anything hot is.

It gets better, that same hot chicken sometimes doesn't make it out the door at night, so the fridge it and put it on a cold shelf the next morning. It's sometimes taxed, sometimes not.

Perhaps in your jurisdiction? The Maine code applies to things prepared on premises or sold, in a single serving size, by a business which gets at least 75% of its revenue from prepared food.


Oh yeah, I forgot to include: the explanation on those cakes is that they're shipped in frozen and just thawed before being put out, at least in Maine, if they're doing any final baking or decorating in house it's a prepared product.
2012-06-10 11:54:50 AM  
1 votes:

ajgeek: I love how they define "prepared" food. Technically, any form of bread, many boxed or canned foods, and any fruit/vegetable that has been processed more than minimally required to put on the shelf (pre-cut celery, sliced radishes/mushrooms etc) is "prepared" and thus should be taxed. Yet things like cake from the bakery, which is blatantly a prepared food isn't taxed, and anything hot is.

It gets better, that same hot chicken sometimes doesn't make it out the door at night, so the fridge it and put it on a cold shelf the next morning. It's sometimes taxed, sometimes not.


Perhaps in your jurisdiction? The Maine code applies to things prepared on premises or sold, in a single serving size, by a business which gets at least 75% of its revenue from prepared food.
2012-06-10 11:40:15 AM  
1 votes:
I'm glad to see all the Canadians have already chimed in that this is how we tax bakery items as well. It makes sense, once you start buying in bulk, it's groceries.
2012-06-10 11:26:29 AM  
1 votes:
FTFA: "Although Cushman thought the snack tax was harder to deal with, Lurette thinks the current system is more difficult. Not that he would want something different.

"I'm very old. What change there is, the harder it is to adapt to it," he said. "I know what the status quo is now, so I would almost hate to see change.""


Both sides are bad so repeal the sales tax!

/farking Republican shill of a paper.
2012-06-10 11:19:03 AM  
1 votes:
FTA: "Lewiston House of Pizza's owner declined to comment, but said it was a mistake he would fix."

How? Semaphore? Telepathy? Because saying you will fix something sounds like a comment to me.
2012-06-10 11:12:29 AM  
1 votes:

aharown: tax codes tend to be idiotic, but that is just ridiculous, incredibly ridiculous.

candy is fine, alcohol is fine, prepared foods are fine, but otherwise food should not be taxed. no matter where it's bought. snack taxes are pure and utter bullshiat.


It's not a snack tax; it's the standard 'prepared food' tax in Maine - it's assumed that since you're already paying a 200%+ markup for your restaurant food that you can afford a tad bit more.
2012-06-10 10:44:08 AM  
1 votes:
Why is taxing food a moral issue but charging for it isn't?
2012-06-10 10:41:07 AM  
1 votes:

ImperialHazman: I once bought a frozen burrito at a Circle K in Tampa. The counter guy told me to pay for it before heating it in their microwave. Frozen = groceries and not taxable. Cooked = taxable fast food.

/CSB


Sounds like Ohio at one time (still maybe the case). If you bought a meal at McDonalds you should ask for it to go, no tax, then change your mind and sit down.. Order for consumption on premise and it is taxed otherwise no tax. But then if you are eating at McDonalds and the tax on your Big Mac will break you you need a better job. You are also still stuck in Ohio.
2012-06-10 10:38:37 AM  
1 votes:
It's pretty damn typical. Buying in a bulkish quantity is about buying food. Buying a few donuts is a personal snack. The point is to give a break to actual groceries. And you don't get too specific about what types of edibles count as groceries so that you exclude donuts but you need to draw a line somewhere so the half-dozen is the mark. I bet it is the same for bagels.
2012-06-10 10:30:58 AM  
1 votes:

Quantum Apostrophe: Bah, try Quebec.


I don't know about Quebec specifically, but my first thought was "sounds like the GST" where if you buy a rotisserie chicken it's taxable (considered a restaurant item) if it's warm, non-taxable (grocery item) if it's cold.
2012-06-10 10:29:37 AM  
1 votes:

leevis: Buy 5 donuts, take them to the car, buy 5 more, take them to the car...


so you can pay more sales tax?
2012-06-10 10:10:22 AM  
1 votes:
Five is a snack, six is a meal.
2012-06-10 10:03:56 AM  
1 votes:

Ed Finnerty: What an outrage! Who would ever sell baked goods in groups of six?

COME ON!


Totally! I only buy my baked goods in sets of 13!
2012-06-10 09:58:42 AM  
1 votes:
Origin of the phrase "Tax, loop, hole"
 
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