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(Twitter)   Amazing Spider-Man writer Dan Slott pulls into the lead for best comic book joke of the year   (twitter.com) divider line 90
    More: Amusing, Dan Slott  
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14460 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Jun 2012 at 5:54 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-09 10:41:07 PM
digitaldailyfix.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-06-09 10:42:12 PM
BroVinny: I wasn't arguing otherwise, but you were trying to base the credibility of what Spider-Man gets by with in the comic book off of what he gets by with in a video game. If you're aware that both video games and comics play fast and loose with the rules, then using one to defend the other is bullshiat. It's more honest just to say, "Yeah, I know the physics is bullshiat, but I enjoy the story anyway."

This is a classic case of the contract of the suspension of disbelief.

Basically, we're able to accept that spider man is a super strong guy that shoots webs out of his hands and swings/leaps from buildings, on order to move the story along (no matter how implausible it might be).

BUT

Gwen Stacey, being a human, should be subjected to the normal laws of physics, which makes it highly improbable that her neck would have broken in that manner.
 
2012-06-09 10:46:04 PM
Spider Man has always sucked.

No amount of high-dollar movies, cute actors, or "retro" comic books can make that idea cool.

/Green Goblin is way cooler and should be in the "super friends" posse.
 
2012-06-09 11:23:39 PM
That's the oldest farking joke in censorship. Plagiarist.
 
2012-06-09 11:54:39 PM

FirstNationalBastard: ZeroCorpse: FirstNationalBastard: Nickster79: FirstNationalBastard: Give this man a new She Hulk book!

I didn't read it the first time around; still kicking myself for not picking it up in singles.

I loved Slott's work on D-List books... She Hulk, GLA... Fun comic books. What a concept.

Haven't read much of his Spider-Man, though.

Of course you haven't. That's because you were probably convinced to ignore Spider-Man after One More Day, because raging fanboys made out like it ruined the character (when actually, it saved him).

Dan Slott took over after that, and his work has been brilliant. The past few years have been awesome for Amazing Spider-Man. Slott gets Spider-Man, and he gets Peter Parker. He has really come through to make ASM a great comic again.

So yeah, the way they got to this point might have been a little awful, but what Slott has done with the material since then has been Amazing.

Wrong!

I kept up with it through issue #600, but Slott was only writer on a quarter of the issues, and to be honest, the art was generally so farking horrible that I didn't find it worthwhile to keep up with the book.


Hes wrong about OMD 'saving the character' But hes not wrong about Slott's run kicking ass. The quality increased drastically when he took over as the solo writer.
 
2012-06-09 11:58:15 PM

JosephFinn: Trocadero: Spider Island started off w/ so much promise. What the hell happened?

It stuck the landing and was pretty damn awesome?


Agreed!

Whats this guy going on about?
 
2012-06-10 12:00:27 AM

lordargent: BroVinny: I wasn't arguing otherwise, but you were trying to base the credibility of what Spider-Man gets by with in the comic book off of what he gets by with in a video game. If you're aware that both video games and comics play fast and loose with the rules, then using one to defend the other is bullshiat. It's more honest just to say, "Yeah, I know the physics is bullshiat, but I enjoy the story anyway."

This is a classic case of the contract of the suspension of disbelief.

Basically, we're able to accept that spider man is a super strong guy that shoots webs out of his hands and swings/leaps from buildings, on order to move the story along (no matter how implausible it might be).

BUT

Gwen Stacey, being a human, should be subjected to the normal laws of physics, which makes it highly improbable that her neck would have broken in that manner.


Been a while since I read it that issue but seemed to me it was always an open question as to whether she died from the catch, or if Norman Osborn had already killed her when he through her over the bridge.
 
2012-06-10 12:19:52 AM

ronin7:

Hes wrong about OMD 'saving the character' But hes not wrong about Slott's run kicking ass. The quality increased drastically when he took over as the solo writer.


You misunderstand me... he was wrong about me not giving it a chance because of OMD. I gave it until Single Hour In Time (issue #621-ish?), and the stories were decent enough. But the art was just completely horrible by the time I stopped reading, and was a big factor in me dropping the book.

Spider-Man should be a big, colorful, dynamic character drawn in the traditional superhero way. Whoever they had on the book at that time (Marcos Martin? Marin?) had this ugly, scratchy style that would have worked perfectly on the Bendis indie book of the month, but was ugly and horrible for Spider-Man. And it was like that for the last 30 or 40 issues I read... ugly, scratchy art and dull, dark coloring.

I mean, to me, this is ugly art...

x.annihil.us

It reminds me of the horribly stylized John Romita Jr. stuff where everyone has a square chin that could cut glass.

I mean, damn, Marvel, pay for an artist people have heard of (and isn't Rob Liefeld).
 
2012-06-10 12:22:05 AM
I think we all understand that her neck would snap if she reached the end of a shock-cord or steel cable, but spider silk is stretchy, really really stretchy. So, if he can fling a line that isn't under a tensile load until it grabs what's the delta-v? What about the webbiness of the line?

It makes for good plot to have a hero distraught that his success turned out a failure, but lousy engineering.

/It's a freaking bungee jump
 
2012-06-10 12:33:11 AM
blogs.westword.com

/so ashamed.
 
2012-06-10 12:46:23 AM
[i_have_the_weirdest_boner_right_now.jpg]
 
2012-06-10 01:43:17 AM

ronin7: lordargent: BroVinny: I wasn't arguing otherwise, but you were trying to base the credibility of what Spider-Man gets by with in the comic book off of what he gets by with in a video game. If you're aware that both video games and comics play fast and loose with the rules, then using one to defend the other is bullshiat. It's more honest just to say, "Yeah, I know the physics is bullshiat, but I enjoy the story anyway."

This is a classic case of the contract of the suspension of disbelief.

Basically, we're able to accept that spider man is a super strong guy that shoots webs out of his hands and swings/leaps from buildings, on order to move the story along (no matter how implausible it might be).

BUT

Gwen Stacey, being a human, should be subjected to the normal laws of physics, which makes it highly improbable that her neck would have broken in that manner.

Been a while since I read it that issue but seemed to me it was always an open question as to whether she died from the catch, or if Norman Osborn had already killed her when he through her over the bridge.


Her neck says, "Snap!" when he webs her. How is that vague?
 
2012-06-10 01:49:45 AM

Nickster79: brap: With full knowledge that what little geek-cred I have will probably plummet further into the abyss, I have to admit, I don't get it.

DECADES OLD SPOILER ALERT

Peter Parker (Spider-Man) and Gwen Stacey were dating and truly in love. But one day the Green Goblin kidnapped her and threw her off of the George Washington Bridge. Spider-Man attempted to save her, but her neck snapped and she died.

Please leave your Geek Card at the door. You should be ashamed for making me just do that.


Yes but thank you for doing so. You were miles more helpful than dugitman who just posted a link to a wall of words wikipidea page.
 
2012-06-10 01:57:45 AM
When I was a little kid, Costco used to sell big packs (duh) or shrink-wrapped comics a month or two old. I wish they still did that. My comic store is pretty good about prices for bundled singles, they're almost as good a price as TPB. Doesn't help that Diamond are jerks (the animated DVDs are cheaper to buy at a big box retailer than wholesale from a comics distributor. WTF is that?)
 
2012-06-10 02:55:11 AM

Crudbucket: ronin7: lordargent: BroVinny: I wasn't arguing otherwise, but you were trying to base the credibility of what Spider-Man gets by with in the comic book off of what he gets by with in a video game. If you're aware that both video games and comics play fast and loose with the rules, then using one to defend the other is bullshiat. It's more honest just to say, "Yeah, I know the physics is bullshiat, but I enjoy the story anyway."

This is a classic case of the contract of the suspension of disbelief.

Basically, we're able to accept that spider man is a super strong guy that shoots webs out of his hands and swings/leaps from buildings, on order to move the story along (no matter how implausible it might be).

BUT

Gwen Stacey, being a human, should be subjected to the normal laws of physics, which makes it highly improbable that her neck would have broken in that manner.

Been a while since I read it that issue but seemed to me it was always an open question as to whether she died from the catch, or if Norman Osborn had already killed her when he through her over the bridge.

Her neck says, "Snap!" when he webs her. How is that vague?


Isn't that the at least the second time she dies in the comics? I thought the first time she died Green Goblin said that she "died from the fright" or something like that. So later they did the bit where it shows it more explicitly that Spiderman is responsible.

/May be wrong on this
 
2012-06-10 04:01:10 AM
Spider man, spider man,
Does whatever a spider can,
Can he snap his girlfriend's neck,
Yes he can, what the heck look out,
He is a spider man!
 
2012-06-10 05:17:49 AM
i.imgur.com
 
2012-06-10 06:08:36 AM

lordargent: BroVinny: I wasn't arguing otherwise, but you were trying to base the credibility of what Spider-Man gets by with in the comic book off of what he gets by with in a video game. If you're aware that both video games and comics play fast and loose with the rules, then using one to defend the other is bullshiat. It's more honest just to say, "Yeah, I know the physics is bullshiat, but I enjoy the story anyway."

This is a classic case of the contract of the suspension of disbelief.

Basically, we're able to accept that spider man is a super strong guy that shoots webs out of his hands and swings/leaps from buildings, on order to move the story along (no matter how implausible it might be).

BUT

Gwen Stacey, being a human, should be subjected to the normal laws of physics, which makes it highly improbable that her neck would have broken in that manner.


Web fluid is not spider silk. It has the tensile strength of steel cable and is not shown to have much elasticity at all. Were it very elastic, web swinging would be more like web bouncing.
 
2012-06-10 06:19:34 AM
Can he swing
from a thread?

Well he tried,
Now he's dead.
 
2012-06-10 07:48:07 AM

Crudbucket: ronin7: lordargent: BroVinny: I wasn't arguing otherwise, but you were trying to base the credibility of what Spider-Man gets by with in the comic book off of what he gets by with in a video game. If you're aware that both video games and comics play fast and loose with the rules, then using one to defend the other is bullshiat. It's more honest just to say, "Yeah, I know the physics is bullshiat, but I enjoy the story anyway."

This is a classic case of the contract of the suspension of disbelief.

Basically, we're able to accept that spider man is a super strong guy that shoots webs out of his hands and swings/leaps from buildings, on order to move the story along (no matter how implausible it might be).

BUT

Gwen Stacey, being a human, should be subjected to the normal laws of physics, which makes it highly improbable that her neck would have broken in that manner.

Been a while since I read it that issue but seemed to me it was always an open question as to whether she died from the catch, or if Norman Osborn had already killed her when he through her over the bridge.

Her neck says, "Snap!" when he webs her. How is that vague?


A dead blonde's neck snaps just as easily as a live one's. Probably easier. What is vague is whether she was alive or not when Spidey broke her neck.
 
2012-06-10 09:29:23 AM

studebaker hoch: Spider Man has always sucked.

No amount of high-dollar movies, cute actors, or "retro" comic books can make that idea cool.

/Green Goblin is way cooler and should be in the "super friends" posse.


I know you're just trolling and all, but...green goblin is a psychotic murderer. He flat out kills people. That precludes joining the carebear army 99% of the time. You can be crazy. You can kill people a little, or off camera, but never kill a lot of people on camera.
 
2012-06-10 10:27:53 AM
"Hey Goku! What's the opposite of Christopher Walken?"

"Huh?"

"CHRISTOPHER REEVES!" *crushes legs*

"Owwwwwwww.... that was in horrible taste...."
 
2012-06-10 06:49:51 PM

Crudbucket: ronin7: lordargent: BroVinny: I wasn't arguing otherwise, but you were trying to base the credibility of what Spider-Man gets by with in the comic book off of what he gets by with in a video game. If you're aware that both video games and comics play fast and loose with the rules, then using one to defend the other is bullshiat. It's more honest just to say, "Yeah, I know the physics is bullshiat, but I enjoy the story anyway."

This is a classic case of the contract of the suspension of disbelief.

Basically, we're able to accept that spider man is a super strong guy that shoots webs out of his hands and swings/leaps from buildings, on order to move the story along (no matter how implausible it might be).

BUT

Gwen Stacey, being a human, should be subjected to the normal laws of physics, which makes it highly improbable that her neck would have broken in that manner.

Been a while since I read it that issue but seemed to me it was always an open question as to whether she died from the catch, or if Norman Osborn had already killed her when he through her over the bridge.

Her neck says, "Snap!" when he webs her. How is that vague?


Eh, snapping sound effect doesn't really mean her neck snapped and broke killing her.

But Spider-Man usually blames himself anyways. So either-way.
 
2012-06-10 06:54:04 PM

FirstNationalBastard: ronin7:

Hes wrong about OMD 'saving the character' But hes not wrong about Slott's run kicking ass. The quality increased drastically when he took over as the solo writer.

You misunderstand me... he was wrong about me not giving it a chance because of OMD. I gave it until Single Hour In Time (issue #621-ish?), and the stories were decent enough. But the art was just completely horrible by the time I stopped reading, and was a big factor in me dropping the book.

Spider-Man should be a big, colorful, dynamic character drawn in the traditional superhero way. Whoever they had on the book at that time (Marcos Martin? Marin?) had this ugly, scratchy style that would have worked perfectly on the Bendis indie book of the month, but was ugly and horrible for Spider-Man. And it was like that for the last 30 or 40 issues I read... ugly, scratchy art and dull, dark coloring.

I mean, to me, this is ugly art...

[x.annihil.us image 550x835]

It reminds me of the horribly stylized John Romita Jr. stuff where everyone has a square chin that could cut glass.

I mean, damn, Marvel, pay for an artist people have heard of (and isn't Rob Liefeld).


I don't mind this artist, but yeah, it was all over the place. I like the current art on the series though, its all a bit stylized. Not JR jr though (who I am no a fan of).

And to clarify what I meant. I found the "Brand New Day" era to be... all over the place quality wise in the writing. by "Big Time" Slott was the sole writer on the book and the stories clicked with me a lot more. I'd call them 'better' but thats really just my opinion.
 
2012-06-10 07:31:46 PM
ryarger : Web fluid is not spider silk. It has the tensile strength of steel cable and is not shown to have much elasticity at all. Were it very elastic, web swinging would be more like web bouncing.

Doesn't matter what the web is made out of, some of us question if her neck could have snapped at all if she were falling headfirst.

Summon the mythbusters.
 
2012-06-10 09:39:37 PM

ryarger: lordargent: BroVinny: I wasn't arguing otherwise, but you were trying to base the credibility of what Spider-Man gets by with in the comic book off of what he gets by with in a video game. If you're aware that both video games and comics play fast and loose with the rules, then using one to defend the other is bullshiat. It's more honest just to say, "Yeah, I know the physics is bullshiat, but I enjoy the story anyway."

This is a classic case of the contract of the suspension of disbelief.

Basically, we're able to accept that spider man is a super strong guy that shoots webs out of his hands and swings/leaps from buildings, on order to move the story along (no matter how implausible it might be).

BUT

Gwen Stacey, being a human, should be subjected to the normal laws of physics, which makes it highly improbable that her neck would have broken in that manner.

Web fluid is not spider silk. It has the tensile strength of steel cable and is not shown to have much elasticity at all. Were it very elastic, web swinging would be more like web bouncing.



Real, actual spiders have a bazillion different kinds of silk. They have strong silk, stretchy silk, and sticky silk, among others. Whether Spiderman has different kinds, I admit I am not comics scholar enough to remember. However, by comics logic, Spidey could use whatever kind he needed at the time, and thus, bungee silk is plausible. By comics logic.
 
2012-06-10 10:00:39 PM

SomeTexan: ryarger: lordargent: BroVinny: I wasn't arguing otherwise, but you were trying to base the credibility of what Spider-Man gets by with in the comic book off of what he gets by with in a video game. If you're aware that both video games and comics play fast and loose with the rules, then using one to defend the other is bullshiat. It's more honest just to say, "Yeah, I know the physics is bullshiat, but I enjoy the story anyway."

This is a classic case of the contract of the suspension of disbelief.

Basically, we're able to accept that spider man is a super strong guy that shoots webs out of his hands and swings/leaps from buildings, on order to move the story along (no matter how implausible it might be).

BUT

Gwen Stacey, being a human, should be subjected to the normal laws of physics, which makes it highly improbable that her neck would have broken in that manner.

Web fluid is not spider silk. It has the tensile strength of steel cable and is not shown to have much elasticity at all. Were it very elastic, web swinging would be more like web bouncing.


Real, actual spiders have a bazillion different kinds of silk. They have strong silk, stretchy silk, and sticky silk, among others. Whether Spiderman has different kinds, I admit I am not comics scholar enough to remember. However, by comics logic, Spidey could use whatever kind he needed at the time, and thus, bungee silk is plausible. By comics logic.


Only in Spider-Movie world. In the comics, Peter can't generate his own webbing (out of his ass), rather he created his own web fluid and mechanical shooters.
 
2012-06-10 10:33:35 PM
Too soon, man.

Too soon.

encrypted-tbn0.google.com
 
2012-06-10 11:26:32 PM

ryarger: SomeTexan: ryarger: lordargent: BroVinny: I wasn't arguing otherwise, but you were trying to base the credibility of what Spider-Man gets by with in the comic book off of what he gets by with in a video game. If you're aware that both video games and comics play fast and loose with the rules, then using one to defend the other is bullshiat. It's more honest just to say, "Yeah, I know the physics is bullshiat, but I enjoy the story anyway."

This is a classic case of the contract of the suspension of disbelief.

Basically, we're able to accept that spider man is a super strong guy that shoots webs out of his hands and swings/leaps from buildings, on order to move the story along (no matter how implausible it might be).

BUT

Gwen Stacey, being a human, should be subjected to the normal laws of physics, which makes it highly improbable that her neck would have broken in that manner.

Web fluid is not spider silk. It has the tensile strength of steel cable and is not shown to have much elasticity at all. Were it very elastic, web swinging would be more like web bouncing.


Real, actual spiders have a bazillion different kinds of silk. They have strong silk, stretchy silk, and sticky silk, among others. Whether Spiderman has different kinds, I admit I am not comics scholar enough to remember. However, by comics logic, Spidey could use whatever kind he needed at the time, and thus, bungee silk is plausible. By comics logic.

Only in Spider-Movie world. In the comics, Peter can't generate his own webbing (out of his ass), rather he created his own web fluid and mechanical shooters.


JMS explained it that while Peter is a talented chemist, the web-shooters and web fluid was Tony Stark-level engineering, and Peter wasn't that smart, especially not back when he was a high school freshman. That required knowledge that he just plain didn't have access to.

Rather, when the spider bit him, the spider nature that got transferred into him could not use the usual arachnid means of generating webbing (spinnerets around his rear end), so instead used what humans have: intellect. Thus, Peter's brain was effectively programmed by the radioactive spider genes to "invent" web fluid and the web-shooters.
 
2012-06-11 09:33:23 AM

COMALite J:
JMS explained it that while Peter is a talented chemist, the web-shooters and web fluid was Tony Stark-level engineering, and Peter wasn't that smart, especially not back when he was a high school freshman. That required knowledge that he just plain didn't have access to.

Rather, when the spider bit him, the spider nature that got transferred into him could not use the usual arachnid ...


WTF? That makes even less sense than a 14 year old being smart enough to invent web shooters on his own.
 
2012-06-11 12:28:30 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Birds of Prey #8, just so the "BAGS AND BOARDS OR THEY'RE WORTHLESS" crowd can have a heart attack watching a book worth 100 bucks get ripped up.


Why on earth would it ve worth that much?

/going to chack and see if I own that one.
//Swamp Thing #1, signed by Lein Wein isn't even worht that.
 
2012-06-11 02:13:04 PM

BojanglesPaladin: FirstNationalBastard: Birds of Prey #8, just so the "BAGS AND BOARDS OR THEY'RE WORTHLESS" crowd can have a heart attack watching a book worth 100 bucks get ripped up.

Why on earth would it ve worth that much?

/going to chack and see if I own that one.
//Swamp Thing #1, signed by Lein Wein isn't even worht that.


It was early in BoP's run, it was the first Dick and Babs go on a date issue, and it was never reprinted because DC are morons. So, the issue became kind of rare, and dealers and fanboys jacked up the price to stupid levels.
 
2012-06-11 02:22:54 PM

ryarger: Web fluid is not spider silk. It has the tensile strength of steel cable and is not shown to have much elasticity at all. Were it very elastic, web swinging would be more like web bouncing.


Actually, in a really early issue (I think ASM #2), they do a comparison of how his webbing stacks up to the Fantastic Four.

They note that it's super elastic, super strong, incredibly resistent to flame, and disappears after 1 hour.
 
2012-06-11 03:56:32 PM

FirstNationalBastard: It was early in BoP's run, it was the first Dick and Babs go on a date issue, and it was never reprinted because DC are morons. So, the issue became kind of rare, and dealers and fanboys jacked up the price to stupid levels.


Ah. So no real reason then. Worth $100 today, .10 cents a year from now.

Tulip values.
 
2012-06-11 03:59:53 PM

BojanglesPaladin: FirstNationalBastard: It was early in BoP's run, it was the first Dick and Babs go on a date issue, and it was never reprinted because DC are morons. So, the issue became kind of rare, and dealers and fanboys jacked up the price to stupid levels.

Ah. So no real reason then. Worth $100 today, .10 cents a year from now.

Tulip values.


No, worth between 50 and 100 bucks for nearly a decade now.
 
2012-06-11 04:45:31 PM

FirstNationalBastard: No, worth between 50 and 100 bucks for nearly a decade now.


So were any number of comics barely worth cover price now. Value bloats during the heyday, then fades as that title falls out of fashion. (See reference to Swamp Thing #1).

Would you like to buy my X-Force run?
 
2012-06-11 04:51:49 PM

GoodHomer: [digitaldailyfix.files.wordpress.com image 300x265]


I still find this mindset amusing.

When a comicbook or scifi fan dresses up in silly colorful costumes in public, spends hundreds of dollars going to a different part of the country to be with fellow fans, and memorizes every little fact about their favorite personality, they're labeled nerds. When jocks do the exact same thing, they're labeled as football fans.

I mean, really. Is that guy's Spock costume any dorkier than your Greenbay cheesehead? Is their D&D character any more of a waste of time than your fantasy football team? If they go to a convention and get the autograph of that guy off of Heroes, is it any lamer than you going to an out of state game or gushing when you get an autographed ball?

Football fans are bigger nerds than the nerds will ever be. There is no super-nerd you can find that I can't top with an even more over the top football fan.
 
2012-06-11 04:52:36 PM

BojanglesPaladin: FirstNationalBastard: No, worth between 50 and 100 bucks for nearly a decade now.

So were any number of comics barely worth cover price now. Value bloats during the heyday, then fades as that title falls out of fashion. (See reference to Swamp Thing #1).

Would you like to buy my X-Force run?


Hey, I'm not going by guide price, I'm going by what people are trying (and succeeding in) selling it for on ebay.I know that most books are worthless. But there will always be some books that are expensive. To deny that is stupidity.
 
2012-06-11 05:40:41 PM

FirstNationalBastard: But there will always be some books that are expensive. To deny that is stupidity.


Good thing I'm not denying that some books are expensive.

Just that books without singular events or first appearances, etc. have transient high value. And even with these things, when the characters fade in popularity, the value drops. Like tulips.

I use Swamp Thing on purpose. I bought it new. Since then it has spiked and plummetted in value as the other green monster's popularity has risen (when it first came out and again under Alan Moore) and fallen (as the readership wandered away when the stories became less compelling.

Comico Primer #2 is another example. First appearance of Grendel. I've watched it go from cover price to a few hundred dollars to a few dozen dollars.

Or how about TMNT? Or Teen Titans or Justice League over the years?

/Keep in mind, I am looking at the long view, with decadeS of experience and track record.
// I am a reader, not a bag and boarder.
///Well, I read them, then bag them, then pull them out and read them again.
//// Never bought books based on 'collectibility'. I buy what looks like a good read. Collectable value is not a purchase consideration.
 
2012-06-11 05:50:29 PM

Edymnion: Football fans are bigger nerds than the nerds will ever be. There is no super-nerd you can find that I can't top with an even more over the top football fan.


The difference is that the overwhelming majority of Americans are to some degree football fans. They've watched games, they know the teams, they probably played some as kids. Yes, some take it to the extreme, but they are taking a widely popular and nearly universal activity to extreme. Every Sunday, millions and millions of Americans participate in football. You cannot find someone in America who cn;t name a t least a few proffessional sports teams.

LARPers, CosPlayers, etc. take a small subset activity that the majority of Americans do NOT know, and do not have any direct experience with and take it to extremes. Even with very popular subject like Lord of the Rings and Star Trek, it is still a relatively small subset. You can easily find people who could not name a single character fro, Lord of the Rings, and maybe know Kirk and Spock from Star Trek.

That's what makes nerds 'outcasts'- they deviate from the norm, they are outside the majority.

Which, by the way, is cool. While I have never had the desire to put a foam block of cheese on my head or paint myself blue and silver OR dress like a Cylon Centurion, I like it when people do.

Nothing wrong with letting your freak flag fly.
 
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