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(GPB News)   Win-Win: Vidalia onion farmers don't need illegal aliens to pick crops in Georgia, prison inmates are working out just fine   (gpb.org) divider line 264
    More: Spiffy, workamping, farmers, crops  
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5492 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jun 2012 at 2:08 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-09 02:15:54 PM  
FTA: "Short of reforming the federal H2A program, he said there's no silver bullet to solving Georgia's labor shortage."

So reform the farking H2A program.

Or is prisoner slave-labor going to be teh new kewl?
 
2012-06-09 02:17:07 PM  
 
2012-06-09 02:17:24 PM  
This is our future, folks. When they bring back debt crime ( hey, the USA has to pay back that debt somehow ) everyone in America will be guilty of something. When you can go to prison for ten years for downloading music, you know this is the way it will be.

/ shackled
 
2012-06-09 02:17:49 PM  

Nabb1: violentsalvation: AbbeySomeone: FTFA"part of the check goes toward defraying the cost of their incarceration", or something.
Yeah, clever how that worked out. How many 'favors' is this judge involved in?

That shiat bothers me. If the state decides I am guilty of a crime then they can foot the bill for my incarceration, I'm not going to work off my supposed dues slaving away in an onion field.

The state doesn't decide you are guilty. A jury does.



Most "convictions" never went to trial. They are the result of plea bargains.
 
2012-06-09 02:19:26 PM  

GAT_00: The My Little Pony Killer: which is why REHABILITATION is so important.

Working in a field is rehabilitation? How about getting them to learn an actual skill? Prisons used to do this, before we became a police state. What part of farming onions rehabilitates you? This doesn't actually help anyone except Vidalia.


It is important they get hand-on training on yanking plants out of the ground, the interactive simulator commonly known as "Super Mario Bros. 2" can only teach so much. Or something.
 
2012-06-09 02:20:35 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: Convicted felons aren't allowed to vote once they've been released, would you like to try turning that into civil rights wharrgarble?


Speak for your own freaking self and state.

Nationally, only two states allow incarcerated felons to vote. Fourteen other states, including Michigan, allow both parolees and probationers to vote.

This definitely doesn't add any incentive to throw people in jail, no.
 
2012-06-09 02:21:14 PM  

AbbeySomeone: FTFA"part of the check goes toward defraying the cost of their incarceration", or something.
Yeah, clever how that worked out. How many 'favors' is this judge involved in?


Nah. That's a statewide mandate. Been that way for a long time.

And this lend/lease program really isn't anything new. It's been available off and on for at least 150 years.
 
2012-06-09 02:21:53 PM  
This is something that should remain the choice of the convict. Personally, I feel worthless if I cannot work. I want to be spending a lot of my effort towards work because that is what helps me learn and grow and be productive. Those are the things which make me happy. But not everyone else agrees with me, which is why this should always remain an option rather than a requirement.
 
2012-06-09 02:22:22 PM  

Amos Quito: Nabb1: violentsalvation: AbbeySomeone: FTFA"part of the check goes toward defraying the cost of their incarceration", or something.
Yeah, clever how that worked out. How many 'favors' is this judge involved in?

That shiat bothers me. If the state decides I am guilty of a crime then they can foot the bill for my incarceration, I'm not going to work off my supposed dues slaving away in an onion field.

The state doesn't decide you are guilty. A jury does.


Most "convictions" never went to trial. They are the result of plea bargains.


Hey # 33479, made it out huh
 
2012-06-09 02:22:35 PM  

violentsalvation: GAT_00: The My Little Pony Killer: which is why REHABILITATION is so important.

Working in a field is rehabilitation? How about getting them to learn an actual skill? Prisons used to do this, before we became a police state. What part of farming onions rehabilitates you? This doesn't actually help anyone except Vidalia.

It is important they get hand-on training on yanking plants out of the ground, the interactive simulator commonly known as "Super Mario Bros. 2" can only teach so much. Or something.


farm2.staticflickr.com
 
2012-06-09 02:23:29 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Nothing beats slave labor provided by the government. Just ask the Nazis.



Nazis my ass.

Try the Soviets.

The farkin' Nazis were amateurs.
 
2012-06-09 02:23:44 PM  

MisterLoki: 1015s for life!


They are a bit sharper than Vidalias, with a bit more sulfur content. They work great in Mexican dishes, though.
 
2012-06-09 02:25:39 PM  

rev. dave: This is something that should remain the choice of the convict. Personally, I feel worthless if I cannot work. I want to be spending a lot of my effort towards work because that is what helps me learn and grow and be productive. Those are the things which make me happy. But not everyone else agrees with me, which is why this should always remain an option rather than a requirement.


This is mindless and unskilled work. If you are trying to make a better life for yourself and saving the (pathetic apparently) money you get from it, that's one thing. If you're growing food and doing the labor to feed your family, that's one thing. Repeatedly pulling onions to defray the cost of your incarceration, that's different.

You aren't learning any type of skill that's gonna help you on the way out; quite frankly, if you could manage on sub-minimum-wage pay you have to figure out how to get out to the farms which is a bit easier if you're from the rural areas or have relatives working there who can set you up in a trailer on the farmer's land...

Etc.
 
2012-06-09 02:25:48 PM  
About the only problem I have with this is the For Proffit Prison system making money off of it instead of it being ran by the state.

I don't have a problem with chain gangs doing manual labor. Having to work at a shiatier job than most people do(as well as the prison ass rape) is a bigger deterant to reoffending than 3 hots and a cot with cable TV where the anal rape is the only downside.
 
2012-06-09 02:26:28 PM  
Aw screw all that nonsense

Chef John makes Black Onion relish

Think Vidalia and you have onion-y goodness

Fire & Onions
 
2012-06-09 02:27:40 PM  
THIS IS NOT A GOOD IDEA

If prisoners become a profit center then judges will be pressured to send everyone to prison. Money hungry legislators will more pass laws with mandatory long-term sentences for trivial crimes.
 
2012-06-09 02:28:17 PM  
So this will still allow fat-ass couch potatoes to collect disability right?

Well then it's definitely patriotic!
 
2012-06-09 02:28:59 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: rev. dave: This is something that should remain the choice of the convict. Personally, I feel worthless if I cannot work. I want to be spending a lot of my effort towards work because that is what helps me learn and grow and be productive. Those are the things which make me happy. But not everyone else agrees with me, which is why this should always remain an option rather than a requirement.

This is mindless and unskilled work. If you are trying to make a better life for yourself and saving the (pathetic apparently) money you get from it, that's one thing. If you're growing food and doing the labor to feed your family, that's one thing. Repeatedly pulling onions to defray the cost of your incarceration, that's different.

You aren't learning any type of skill that's gonna help you on the way out; quite frankly, if you could manage on sub-minimum-wage pay you have to figure out how to get out to the farms which is a bit easier if you're from the rural areas or have relatives working there who can set you up in a trailer on the farmer's land...

Etc.


Yeah, we should start these guys out as vice presidents of international conglomerates...

That'll teach them about hard work!
 
2012-06-09 02:30:00 PM  

Chariset: GAT_00: How do you know it's voluntary? It doesn't say anywhere in there they volunteered.

As cynical as I can be sometimes, I'd say these probably are volunteer laborers, if only because coercing work out of unwilling workers would be too much trouble and counter-productive. If someone were out there who didn't want to be there, wouldn't he just smash up the onions, pick fights with other prisoners, or play in the dirt all day?


Maybe, if he wanted to spend the rest of his sentence in a sweat box. Let's not kid ourselves: this is forced labor. And it's probably the only way to get Americans to pick onions.

www.tshirthell.com
 
2012-06-09 02:30:21 PM  
'Luke, what are your onions doing in Boss Keanes garden?'
 
2012-06-09 02:32:53 PM  
I'm sure some of those convicts would be willing to go back to work in the fields after they've finished their sentences. Unfortunately, they won't be able to compete against the cheap prison labor.
 
2012-06-09 02:34:26 PM  

cabbyman: StreetlightInTheGhetto: rev. dave: This is something that should remain the choice of the convict. Personally, I feel worthless if I cannot work. I want to be spending a lot of my effort towards work because that is what helps me learn and grow and be productive. Those are the things which make me happy. But not everyone else agrees with me, which is why this should always remain an option rather than a requirement.

This is mindless and unskilled work. If you are trying to make a better life for yourself and saving the (pathetic apparently) money you get from it, that's one thing. If you're growing food and doing the labor to feed your family, that's one thing. Repeatedly pulling onions to defray the cost of your incarceration, that's different.

You aren't learning any type of skill that's gonna help you on the way out; quite frankly, if you could manage on sub-minimum-wage pay you have to figure out how to get out to the farms which is a bit easier if you're from the rural areas or have relatives working there who can set you up in a trailer on the farmer's land...

Etc.

Yeah, we should start these guys out as vice presidents of international conglomerates...

That'll teach them about hard work!


Why couldn't they have a prison garden and defray the cost of their incarceration by defraying food costs in the cafeteria? So they could actually learn skills (like the entirety of growing) and enjoy the fruits of their labor? See that hard work can lead to good results?

[crickets]
 
2012-06-09 02:34:50 PM  
I have been saying this for 20 years. Inmates=cheap/free labor.
 
2012-06-09 02:36:46 PM  
i3.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-06-09 02:36:56 PM  
As long as they are getting paid at least minimum wage, and it is voluntary, I don't have a big problem with this. On the other hand, if they don't have a choice, and they are making below minimum wage, it is just helping to drive down wages in general.
 
2012-06-09 02:37:03 PM  
cretinbob: Then quit biatching about unemployment being high and human rights in China.

AbbeySomeone: FTFA"part of the check goes toward defraying the cost of their incarceration", or something.
Yeah, clever how that worked out. How many 'favors' is this judge involved in?


Yeah. Because setting them in an 8x10 cell all day with a cable TV, AC, and three squares a day is REALLY going to discourage them from coming back.
 
2012-06-09 02:39:25 PM  
I hear that prisoners have usable organs if you shoot them in the head.

We really should stop allowing usable organs to go to waste.

/Just a modest proposal.
 
2012-06-09 02:39:35 PM  

Mildot: [i3.kym-cdn.com image 500x499]


Yup, just like in Best Korea.
 
2012-06-09 02:40:48 PM  

Amos Quito: Nabb1: violentsalvation: AbbeySomeone: FTFA"part of the check goes toward defraying the cost of their incarceration", or something.
Yeah, clever how that worked out. How many 'favors' is this judge involved in?

That shiat bothers me. If the state decides I am guilty of a crime then they can foot the bill for my incarceration, I'm not going to work off my supposed dues slaving away in an onion field.

The state doesn't decide you are guilty. A jury does.


Most "convictions" never went to trial. They are the result of plea bargains.


This is true. And the defendant enters into that of his own free will.
 
2012-06-09 02:41:46 PM  

Corporate Self: THIS IS NOT A GOOD IDEA

If prisoners become a profit center then judges will be pressured to send everyone to prison. Money hungry legislators will more pass laws with mandatory long-term sentences for trivial crimes.


i can't agree. prisons became for-profit when privatization took place. what you fear has already happened.

that said, prisoners should be put to work, whenever possible. picking onions under the sun is still better than sitting in a dank dim tiny cement & steel cell.

years ago prisoners could volunteer to be in tests and studies but the farking civil liberties arseholes had to do away with that. you have to be a sick twist to see innocent bunnies have chemicals injected in their eyes and skin when these tests could and should be performed on humans.

if our government had prisons run efficiently the USA taxpayer wouldn't have to flip the bill. put those cons to work. it helps them too, everyone likes to feel like they are needed and wanted.
 
2012-06-09 02:41:56 PM  
Point is: it should be illegal to get these prisoners to provide free labor to a private business. They are prisoners...not slaves.

Not everyone in jail is a hardcore offender either.
 
2012-06-09 02:42:04 PM  
Unemployment or prison, this may be the new economic choice.
 
2012-06-09 02:42:08 PM  

kidsizedcoffin: As long as they are getting paid at least minimum wage, and it is voluntary, I don't have a big problem with this. On the other hand, if they don't have a choice, and they are making below minimum wage, it is just helping to drive down wages in general.


Inmates should be paid minimum wage but half of that money should go to the expense of their incarceration and the other half put away for their release, to give them a fighting chance when they get out.
 
2012-06-09 02:42:53 PM  
Oh, good. I'm here before the "child rapists and murderers have jobs while decent Americans can't get employment" crowd.
 
2012-06-09 02:44:23 PM  
How appropriate that they are being used for agricultural forced labor, since half of them were arrested for plants in the first place. Yeah, this nation officially sucks.
 
2012-06-09 02:45:19 PM  
My friend's incarcerated husband has had two jobs in prison - salvaging old computers, and refurbishing wheelchairs. He makes approximately a quarter per hour doing this.

Now I don't expect an inmate to be paid handsomely for making use of his time in a constructive manner, but the company that contracts with the prison for labor is making a killing on this deal. They can easily outprice their competition because they have access to a source of ridiclously cheap labor that not everyone has access to. That shiat ain't right.
 
2012-06-09 02:46:02 PM  

Amos Quito: Marcus Aurelius: Nothing beats slave labor provided by the government. Just ask the Nazis.


Nazis my ass.

Try the Soviets.

The farkin' Nazis were amateurs.


Try Republicans. If they had their way, we'd all owe our souls to the company store
 
2012-06-09 02:46:52 PM  
Now, I know that when I wash my produce that it removes all traces of Illegal Immigrant, but does it also remove all traces of Convict?
 
2012-06-09 02:47:08 PM  

titwrench: I have been saying this for 20 years. Inmates=cheap/free labor.


Until it's you or a family member caught in the slave labor web.

/It's just a routine traffic stop on a bad day away.
 
2012-06-09 02:47:15 PM  
AND They are darn happy about doing it!

I guess Mr. Serious Black thinks they should be kept chained in the dungeon.
I bet he does not know that this is voluntarily given and that prisoner's hold jobs in high regard and one that takes you outside is a super bonus!
 
2012-06-09 02:47:15 PM  

Corporate Self: THIS IS NOT A GOOD IDEA

If prisoners become a profit center then judges will be pressured to send everyone to prison. Money hungry legislators will more pass laws with mandatory long-term sentences for trivial crimes.


This.

We already have cases where judges get kickbacks from private prisons for sending people (well, kids) there. What happens when Vidalia starts requesting more labor?
 
2012-06-09 02:47:22 PM  
"Some of them even said when they get out, they may come back and work for me"
No. They said when they get out, they'll come back for you. You know, maybe "renegotiate" their back wages.
 
2012-06-09 02:48:41 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: Chariset: GAT_00: How do you know it's voluntary? It doesn't say anywhere in there they volunteered.

As cynical as I can be sometimes, I'd say these probably are volunteer laborers, if only because coercing work out of unwilling workers would be too much trouble and counter-productive. If someone were out there who didn't want to be there, wouldn't he just smash up the onions, pick fights with other prisoners, or play in the dirt all day?

Maybe, if he wanted to spend the rest of his sentence in a sweat box. Let's not kid ourselves: this is forced labor. And it's probably the only way to get Americans to pick onions.

[www.tshirthell.com image 515x320]


The Pyramids were built by hired labor, not slaves.
 
2012-06-09 02:51:03 PM  
StreetlightInTheGhetto: Why couldn't they have a prison garden and defray the cost of their incarceration by defraying food costs in the cafeteria? So they could actually learn skills (like the entirety of growing) and enjoy the fruits of their labor? See that hard work can lead to good results?

They used to do this. They used to be called Penal Farms for a reason, you know.
The inmates would grow a large amount of their own food, so that very little had to be supplemented from the outside. Some facilities even raised their own livestock.

The way I see it, give inmates two options when they go to jail for an offense that isn't going to put them in for the rest of their lives.

Option 1) Give Inmates high quality job training so that when they are released, they have a marketable skill to gain employment with. Something like electronics, mechanics, welding, or construction, or some other form of skilled manual labor. You don't necessarily have to provide anyone with a college education, but some form of job training.

Option 2) Put them to work on public works projects and improvements to the grounds which do not require skilled labor. Let them assist the local community in farming and harvesting. Let them do groundskeeping.
 
2012-06-09 02:51:30 PM  

AbbeySomeone: FTFA"part of the check goes toward defraying the cost of their incarceration", or something.
Yeah, clever how that worked out. How many 'favors' is this judge involved in?


So you would rather pay in your tax money the cost of keeping them in prison plus the cost of illegals being here and their cost too?

Instead of taking the jobs from said illegals making them go home saving billions and saving millions on the cost coming out of your taxes housing these prisoner?

//can't fix stupid
 
2012-06-09 02:53:07 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: titwrench: I have been saying this for 20 years. Inmates=cheap/free labor.

Until it's you or a family member caught in the slave labor web.

/It's just a routine traffic stop on a bad day away.


I've been locked up a couple of times and would have had no problem spending that time working for little pay just to keep busy and it would have been a much smaller burden on the taxpayers.
 
2012-06-09 02:54:03 PM  
It's stories like this that make me this Alex Jones may be on to something.

/not really, but kinda
 
2012-06-09 02:54:41 PM  
BronyMedic,
Yeah. Because setting them in an 8x10 cell all day with a cable TV, AC, and three squares a day is REALLY going to discourage them from coming back.


Alternatively, by creating for for profit privately run prisons that provide profit for corporations through contracts, (call centers, picking onions, ect), we are encouraging more people to be sent to prison.

Prisoners are becoming commodities used to make money. Relative to other countries, what percentage of the US is locked up?

Remember when that judge was sending 'problem juveniles' presented in his court to a for profit youth offender program. Turns out he was taking payoffs to send them there.

/We are getting all corporationy as a nation.
 
2012-06-09 02:54:54 PM  

Corporate Self: THIS IS NOT A GOOD IDEA

If prisoners become a profit center then judges will be pressured to send everyone to prison. Money hungry legislators will more were createdpass laws with mandatory long-term sentences for trivial crimes.


I hope you realize that this has been happening, one way or another, since for profit prisons were created. Irony font?
 
2012-06-09 02:55:49 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: You know who else made a fortune off prison labor?


i283.photobucket.com
 
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