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(National Geographic)   Radiation detected in Japanese trees...from cosmic event 1200 years ago   (news.nationalgeographic.com) divider line 17
    More: Cool, radiation, Japanese, core sample, Venus transit, lagers, light-years, cosmic rays, supernovas  
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2882 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Jun 2012 at 10:30 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-08 05:57:38 PM
Cosmic rays?

i1250.photobucket.com
 
2012-06-08 08:57:57 PM
So, even then Japan couldn't rein in their imperialistic ways?
 
2012-06-08 10:39:29 PM
various astronomical events, including supernovae and "superflies"

Dig it.
 
2012-06-08 10:44:20 PM
Aku?
 
2012-06-09 04:05:37 AM
Lord Akira!
 
2012-06-09 05:17:09 AM
This is quite cool. I checked out the Anglo Saxon Chronicle to see if it mentioned anything around this time.

A.D. 793. This year came dreadful fore-warnings over the land of
the Northumbrians, terrifying the people most woefully: these
were immense sheets of light rushing through the air, and
whirlwinds, and fiery, dragons flying across the firmament.
These tremendous tokens were soon followed by a great famine: and
not long after, on the sixth day before the ides of January in
the same year, the harrowing inroads of heathen men made
lamentable havoc in the church of God in Holy-island, by rapine
and slaughter.


Giant solar flare maybe?
 
2012-06-09 06:21:13 AM

skodabunny: This is quite cool. I checked out the Anglo Saxon Chronicle to see if it mentioned anything around this time.


Hey, that is pretty nifty.
 
2012-06-09 08:37:59 AM
I guess I'll be the one to ask the question or rather, re-state the headline:

Japanese find trees that are 1238 years old?

But in a recent study of annual growth rings in two cedar trees from Yaku Island in southern Japan, researchers were surprised to discover a 1.2 percent spike in the amount of carbon-14 between the years A.D. 774 and 775.

Hmmm....
 
2012-06-09 09:05:31 AM
Apologies, was that 774AD? I read this in New Scientist the other day and didn't click on the article. Getting my years confused. ASC for 774 reads:

A.D. 774. This year the Northumbrians banished their king,
Alred, from York at Easter-tide; and chose Ethelred, the son of
Mull, for their lord, who reigned four winters. This year also
appeared in the heavens a red crucifix, after sunset; the
Mercians and the men of Kent fought at Otford; and wonderful
serpents were seen in the land of the South-Saxons.


Red crucifix, eh? WTF could that be? Then again, when they're recording dragons and here, wonderful serpents, interpretation is... tricky at best.

Does anyone know of any other historical chronicles covering the 8th Century, similar to the ASC?
 
2012-06-09 09:10:49 AM
Second coming of Christ?
 
2012-06-09 10:23:30 AM
Red crucifix, eh? WTF could that be? Then again, when they're recording dragons and here, wonderful serpents, interpretation is... tricky at best.

Aurora Borealis.

If they can look at the stars and make up the signs of the zodiac, then the aurora would conjur up all sorts of "supernatural" ideas.

It's still awesome today, too.
 
2012-06-09 10:26:31 AM

Archie Goodwin: Aurora Borealis


Yeah, I suppose so - I've only ever thought of it as being green and like a wavy curtain but, yeah maybe.
 
2012-06-09 12:13:21 PM

skodabunny: This is quite cool. I checked out the Anglo Saxon Chronicle to see if it mentioned anything around this time.

A.D. 793. This year came dreadful fore-warnings over the land of
the Northumbrians, terrifying the people most woefully: these
were immense sheets of light rushing through the air, and
whirlwinds, and fiery, dragons flying across the firmament.
These tremendous tokens were soon followed by a great famine: and
not long after, on the sixth day before the ides of January in
the same year, the harrowing inroads of heathen men made
lamentable havoc in the church of God in Holy-island, by rapine
and slaughter.

Giant solar flare maybe?


You rock. I've never seen that before. Thank you.
 
2012-06-09 01:43:47 PM

JustinCase: You rock. I've never seen that before. Thank you.


Ha thanks! My degree was in late Anglo-Saxon/Early Norman history so it's nice to revisit parts from time to time trivia-wise (seeing as it has no other practical uses for me!).
 
2012-06-09 02:49:59 PM
farm8.staticflickr.com
 
2012-06-09 05:47:12 PM

skodabunny: This is quite cool. I checked out the Anglo Saxon Chronicle to see if it mentioned anything around this time.

A.D. 793. This year came dreadful fore-warnings over the land of
the Northumbrians, terrifying the people most woefully: these
were immense sheets of light rushing through the air, and
whirlwinds, and fiery, dragons flying across the firmament.
These tremendous tokens were soon followed by a great famine: and
not long after, on the sixth day before the ides of January in
the same year, the harrowing inroads of heathen men made
lamentable havoc in the church of God in Holy-island, by rapine
and slaughter.

Giant solar flare maybe?


Dang...I remember reading this years and years ago, except the conclusion that those researchers came to was that a small comet had exploded somewhere over the arctic. The problem is that I have no idea where I read that and now the search engines are all this story and claptrap from the regular gang of pseudoastroarchaeology dickheads.

Though we should all keep in mind that ancient people weren't dummies and could use metaphors, while we ourselves DO seem to be less mentally dexterous and avoid them resulting in whacked out interpretations of ancient writing which favour overt readings. Of course the second part refers to the Vikings at Lindisfarne, the first part could easily be fluff.
 
2012-06-10 11:47:30 AM
That is a very interesting point, Dorothy. I concur- it is very alarming that people on the internet are making $6883 a day with a computer. I totally felt that way after reading this article.
 
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