If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Salon)   "Waiter, I'd like to order the filet mignon transglutaminase please, medium rare"   (salon.com) divider line 266
    More: Sick, filet mignon, Bernaise sauce, meat glue, Yum!, banquet hall, Slaphappy Steakhouse, independent media, steaks  
•       •       •

17137 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Jun 2012 at 5:57 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



266 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-06-08 06:46:34 PM

KrispyKritter: Broktun: Now we know what the "cook it well done and smother in ketchup" crowd eats.

My butcher's name is Bob, and he know exactly what to cut for me when I ask for "him, hers, and kids".

well hello money bags. you probably buy brand name bologna too, huh?


There's plenty of things in life you should bargain shop for and simply go for the cheapest version in order to get quantity over quality.

Food is not one of those things.
 
2012-06-08 06:47:19 PM

James F. Campbell: meat0918: I still don't understand why, besides technophobia.

Two words: genetic homogeneity.

Our food supply plays with a very, very, very dangerous fire.


That's a valid point, and exists with or without GMOs in the picture. Even our livestock industry is getting closer and closer to monoculture with the ability to artificially fertilize hundreds of thousands of animals from a handful of males (specifically thinking of the beef industry here).

Orchards full of cloned trees are just waiting for a nasty, nasty blight. Same with our wheat varieties and Stem rust strain UG99. That is going to fark the human race and fark it hard if when it spreads to Russia, Europe and China. Ironically, GMO techniques maybe the only way to protect wheat from that rust.

I'm going to blame consumers though. They're the ones demanding completely perfect produce. I see it at the farmer's market all the time (but it is getting better at least).

Nature doesn't readily do identical without a lot of help from mankind.
 
2012-06-08 06:47:30 PM

Corvus: This text is now purple: And as to actual modification, we've been selectively breeding plants for tens of millennia.

Yes I always hate when people go "We are know genetically modifying our food" we have been doing that for what like 30,000 years now? All the food you eat even when you were a kid has no bearing what so ever to food that is "wild".

I really think people don't understand the agricultural revolution or what has been done to fruits/vegetable through the ages.


Most people don't understand food production in even the slightest sense. It's magic to them, which is why so many people fall for the organic label.
 
2012-06-08 06:47:38 PM
Yes, America, get ready for the Bacon Sundae! Topped off with caramel and chocolate syrup.

Uh, sorry BK, somebody already beat you to it.

eater.com
 
2012-06-08 06:47:43 PM

Broktun: Now we know what the "cook it well done and smother in ketchup" crowd eats.

My butcher's name is Bob, and he know exactly what to cut for me when I ask for "him, hers, and kids".


My butcher's name is Bob, too ... he's on speed-dial
 
2012-06-08 06:50:15 PM
I was just pondering doing some molecular gastronomy of my own the other day, to see if a hamburger patty could utilize tranglutaminase to help it stay together while cooking on the grill.

It's kind of amusing to me that some of the highest-end cooking uses this stuff (Blumenthal, etc), and some of the lowest end cooking.
 
2012-06-08 06:50:59 PM

James F. Campbell: meat0918: Alternet masquerading as Slate.

Yeah, who needs facts when we have Fox News, am I right?


And it's Jim Hightower, who's usually pretty reliable.
 
2012-06-08 06:52:52 PM

This text is now purple: GMO and genetic homogeneity are entirely different concepts. Both the potato famine and the Gros Michele extinction occurred prior to lab-modified crops.

And as to actual modification, we've been selectively breeding plants for tens of millennia.


And it's not the case at all that GMO crops are regularly monoculture. Nope, not at all. Not the case at all that a large part our food supply is made up of GMO monocultures, leaving us dangerously susceptible to blight, climate change, or other factors. Nope.

You think I'm stupid? You think I don't know about the "Gros Michele [sic]" or the impending doom of the Cavendish? You think I don't know about the potato famine or You think I don't know that humans have been selectively breeding plants and animals for thousands of years? OK. Please, continue quoting examples at me as if I don't know what I'm talking about. Waste your time.
 
2012-06-08 06:53:53 PM

coco ebert: meat0918: coco ebert: Ugh. My hubby is trying to export food products from the U.S. to Switzerland and is running into hurdles because of all the GMO in the food here. Good lord is there a lot of GMO- I had no idea. Of course Western Europe doesn't want any of that sh*t in their food.

I still don't understand why, besides technophobia.

Yes, Monsanto's and the other giant agribusinesses are dirty sick farks, but the technology is sound. BT in corn is one objection, I understand, but what about the "enviropig". It's engineered so the pigs can digest the phosphorus in their fodder rather than needed supplements in their feed. That phosphorus ends up in the water and fuels algae blooms and dead zones.

Yes, it is treating a symptom (millions of pigs in CAFOs), but we aren't going to kill demand for pork any time soon.

//Newest conspiracy theory I've heard is that BT crops are an attempt to kill organic farmers that rely on organic BT pesticides by selecting for BT resistant pests.

I'm not thoroughly knowledgeable on the subject, but from what I've read I understand both sides. What you say makes sense, but from the Europeans perspective, the long-term effects of industrial GMO is not known and more studies need to be held. Is there a lot of hysteria? Probably. Would it help to have non-industry influenced studies carried out? I would argue, yes.

As a consumer, I feel safer eating food in Switzerland than in the U.S. Industry interests completely dominate our food culture here. It's very difficult to make informed choices when they hide so much of what goes into our food.


There are no more studies that need to be done. None. Its safe, there is not a hint of it being not safe. It is just the addition of the a small-sized protein with a collection of the same 20 amino acids that compose all of the proteins in your body and which doesn't really interact with any human proteins (unlike say tetrodotoxin, which does but is specifically evolved to).

Its just genetics and scary sounding so people don't want to use it. The fear has no scientific basis, although the business practices of some may be a different story.
 
2012-06-08 06:55:47 PM
Mignsliminase Rare?
 
2012-06-08 06:56:29 PM
The trade of in most of Europe is that while you do get much less (if not zero) GMO crops, you get a ton of growth hormone sprayed all over everything. So you can't win them all, it's not like every farm in Europe produces organic food.
 
2012-06-08 06:56:56 PM

Shazam999: Corvus: This text is now purple: And as to actual modification, we've been selectively breeding plants for tens of millennia.

Yes I always hate when people go "We are know genetically modifying our food" we have been doing that for what like 30,000 years now? All the food you eat even when you were a kid has no bearing what so ever to food that is "wild".

I really think people don't understand the agricultural revolution or what has been done to fruits/vegetable through the ages.

Most people don't understand food production in even the slightest sense. It's magic to them, which is why so many people fall for the organic label.


It's not magic.

They imagine this.

www.paintinghere.org

When it is really this.

www.foodpoisonjournal.com

www.mcdonnallharvester.net

www.hamiltonnature.org

And when they assume "Organic" means "No Spray" well, it doesn't help consumers.

It helps organic farmers, but not the consumers
 
2012-06-08 06:57:49 PM
Ooga booga! There's a long, scary word in your $5.99 steak. Ooba booga!
 
2012-06-08 06:58:33 PM

meat0918: Ironically, GMO techniques maybe the only way to protect wheat from that rust.


Combined with keeping wild/variant strains alive, yes.
 
2012-06-08 06:58:59 PM
i1121.photobucket.com

Beef that sticks to your ribs.
 
2012-06-08 07:00:57 PM

James F. Campbell: This text is now purple: GMO and genetic homogeneity are entirely different concepts. Both the potato famine and the Gros Michele extinction occurred prior to lab-modified crops.

And as to actual modification, we've been selectively breeding plants for tens of millennia.

And it's not the case at all that GMO crops are regularly monoculture. Nope, not at all. Not the case at all that a large part our food supply is made up of GMO monocultures, leaving us dangerously susceptible to blight, climate change, or other factors. Nope.

You think I'm stupid? You think I don't know about the "Gros Michele [sic]" or the impending doom of the Cavendish? You think I don't know about the potato famine or You think I don't know that humans have been selectively breeding plants and animals for thousands of years? OK. Please, continue quoting examples at me as if I don't know what I'm talking about. Waste your time.


Oh good grief.

There are many, many, many cultivars of different plants. Get over yourself. Just because some certain cultivar is really, really popular doesn't mean the others disappear into oblivion.
 
2012-06-08 07:01:13 PM
southfloridalawblog.com

Oh noes! FOOD!
 
2012-06-08 07:01:20 PM
One of my chefs just came back from a stage in a fairly renowned place in Lyon. They were using trans-g to take the (relatively cheap) thin tail end pieces of whole filets and forming them into thicker 'chateubriands'.
Problem - steaks are fine to eat rare/blue provided that the outside is fully seared. By introducing external surface area into the centre of the steak that will never reach any kind of safe temperature you have a potential health hazard.
Yum.
 
2012-06-08 07:01:23 PM
img52.imageshack.us

This is Bob the Butcher. You people weren't nearly as sympathetic when it was labeled "Exhibits A - L"
 
2012-06-08 07:01:41 PM

Asplenium: The trade of in most of Europe is that while you do get much less (if not zero) GMO crops, you get a ton of growth hormone sprayed all over everything. So you can't win them all, it's not like every farm in Europe produces organic food.


Dude, your sentences need to hop over to the vacay thread, man.

;)
 
2012-06-08 07:04:33 PM
Um,

There are some pix below that seem to decry worrying about food.

You should worry about your food, folks.

A Hell of a lot more than you worry about terrorism, friends. Seriously.
 
2012-06-08 07:04:34 PM

ambercat: Yes, but to use one example, crops altered to have super duper pollen pollinate everything all around them, so that it's hard to grow any open pollinated crops that don't end up with GMO descended plants mixed in.


Which is a reasonable argument against GMO agriculture, but which has nothing whatever to do with importing GMO food -- there's probably more viable pollen on the box the food came in than in the product or from the field where it was grown.
 
2012-06-08 07:05:26 PM

James F. Campbell: And it's not the case at all that GMO crops are regularly monoculture. Nope, not at all. Not the case at all that a large part our food supply is made up of GMO monocultures, leaving us dangerously susceptible to blight, climate change, or other factors. Nope.


No more than it ever has been, really. Farmers have been sharing seed crop and the life for the same tens of millenia you got called out on. You've always got some just making the stuff that's popular and widespread, and a few others playing genetic games to try and improve on the basic stock. Sure, when there's a blight that hits the main strain, it's disastrous, but GMO crops are no more vulnerable than our crops have ever been, and are arguably stronger since they can be tweaked to be more resistant to said blights. We now have the capacity to see an entire crop lost to a blight, and see the GMO-modified variant resistant to said blight available on the market shortly thereafter. It won't save the crop that was hit, but it'll save the population from widespread famine.

There's always been monocultures. If anything, GMO allows for GREATER variation, not less.
 
2012-06-08 07:06:26 PM

AllUpInYa: Broktun: Now we know what the "cook it well done and smother in ketchup" crowd eats.

My butcher's name is Bob, and he know exactly what to cut for me when I ask for "him, hers, and kids".

My butcher's name is Bob, too ... he's on speed-dial


My butcher's name is Merv. His shop is 2 blocks from my house.
 
2012-06-08 07:06:45 PM

Thorak: James F. Campbell: And it's not the case at all that GMO crops are regularly monoculture. Nope, not at all. Not the case at all that a large part our food supply is made up of GMO monocultures, leaving us dangerously susceptible to blight, climate change, or other factors. Nope.

No more than it ever has been, really. Farmers have been sharing seed crop and the life for the same tens of millenia you got called out on. You've always got some just making the stuff that's popular and widespread, and a few others playing genetic games to try and improve on the basic stock. Sure, when there's a blight that hits the main strain, it's disastrous, but GMO crops are no more vulnerable than our crops have ever been, and are arguably stronger since they can be tweaked to be more resistant to said blights. We now have the capacity to see an entire crop lost to a blight, and see the GMO-modified variant resistant to said blight available on the market shortly thereafter. It won't save the crop that was hit, but it'll save the population from widespread famine.

There's always been monocultures. If anything, GMO allows for GREATER variation, not less.


But, but, but... zombies!
 
2012-06-08 07:07:52 PM

Indubitably: Um,

There are some pix below that seem to decry worrying about food.

You should worry about your food, folks.

A Hell of a lot more than you worry about terrorism, friends. Seriously.



I worry about food terrorism.
 
2012-06-08 07:08:42 PM

James F. Campbell: meat0918: Ironically, GMO techniques maybe the only way to protect wheat from that rust.

Combined with keeping wild/variant strains alive, yes.


Double yes. GMO has dick if they don't have wild and variant strains to choose from.

I'm a big proponent keeping variety as well as utilizing and leveraging our scientific know how to make sure nutritious food gets to market safely, efficiently, and in the least environmentally damaging way possible.

We have the technology, but generally lack the power to force some of the bigger operations to change their ways because it will cost them more, and some portion of that increase will be passed to consumers; which is ultimately a great way to keep things the same.
 
2012-06-08 07:11:21 PM

Shazam999: There are many, many, many cultivars of different plants. Get over yourself. Just because some certain cultivar is really, really popular doesn't mean the others disappear into oblivion.


No, you're missing the point. Please read carefully. I will use smaller words.

Let's say, hypothetically, 80% of our food supply is made up of monocultures, and a very nasty fungus sweeps through the country. Our monoculture ... oh, corn, let's say, our monoculture corn happens to lack any defenses against this fungus and, being genetically identical, all the corn falls victim. Now let's say we get really unlucky, and this fungus targets more than one type of crop, and the other monocultures are also susceptible to it. A whole of bad is going down.

Yeah, it's just hypothetical, and I can't find any solid numbers at the moment on just how reliant we are on monocultures, but I am willing to bet that over 50% of the food consumed in the United States originates from a monoculture. The point is that genetic homogeneity puts our food supply at risk of destruction by virtue of being utterly and totally susceptible to any microorganism that wins the genetic lottery.
 
2012-06-08 07:11:31 PM
re f'ing pete. tired of media scare shares, especially ones that are peted
 
2012-06-08 07:11:39 PM

Corvus: This text is now purple: And as to actual modification, we've been selectively breeding plants for tens of millennia.

Yes I always hate when people go "We are know genetically modifying our food" we have been doing that for what like 30,000 years now? All the food you eat even when you were a kid has no bearing what so ever to food that is "wild".

I really think people don't understand the agricultural revolution or what has been done to fruits/vegetable through the ages.



Selectively breeding plants / animals to enhance desired traits is not the same as splicing the genes of pigs into your cantaloupe.

Sorry.
 
2012-06-08 07:11:46 PM
ambercat:

Yes, but to use one example, crops altered to have super duper pollen pollinate everything all around them, so that it's hard to grow any open pollinated crops that don't end up with GMO descended plants mixed in. Which besides being like a kind of pollution, Monsanto sues farmers whose crops get dusted with this pollen for growing stuff that has their patented genes in it. Plus it makes it hard for those farmers to sell their product overseas, or to anyone who wants non-GMO whatever. They have to get their crops tested all the time and sometimes will lose out on being able to sell them for a higher price because their product has been contaminated, and not only do they not get compensated for this, if they complain, they get sued for having it on their land in the first place.


Oh Jesus, not this bullshiat again. The farmers in question who were sued by Monsanto were sued because they were caught using pirated Monsanto seed. Not because of cross-pollination. In every single instance, which by the way is not many (Monsanto is not a very litigious corporation), the farmers in question claimed that they were not using Monsanto seed, but were caught with copious amounts of Round-Up. If they weren't using Monsanto seed, there would have been zero reason for them to have had that much Round-Up because Round-Up would have killed all non-Monsanto plants it was sprayed it.

I wish the people who spouted this bullshiat would at least take the time to read up on it instead of reading sensationalized blogs that omit key facts in order to spread help their cause.
 
2012-06-08 07:14:13 PM

Thorak: It won't save the crop that was hit, but it'll save the population from widespread famine.


Golly, if only we hadn't grown monocultures in the first place, then perhaps some of the crops wouldn't have been hit at all.
 
2012-06-08 07:15:22 PM

meat0918: coco ebert: Ugh. My hubby is trying to export food products from the U.S. to Switzerland and is running into hurdles because of all the GMO in the food here. Good lord is there a lot of GMO- I had no idea. Of course Western Europe doesn't want any of that sh*t in their food.

I still don't understand why, besides technophobia.

Yes, Monsanto's and the other giant agribusinesses are dirty sick farks, but the technology is sound. BT in corn is one objection, I understand, but what about the "enviropig". It's engineered so the pigs can digest the phosphorus in their fodder rather than needed supplements in their feed. That phosphorus ends up in the water and fuels algae blooms and dead zones.

Yes, it is treating a symptom (millions of pigs in CAFOs), but we aren't going to kill demand for pork any time soon.

//Newest conspiracy theory I've heard is that BT crops are an attempt to kill organic farmers that rely on organic BT pesticides by selecting for BT resistant pests.


It doesn't have to be a conspiracy to further marginalize traditional methods of farming, it's just an added convenience. Big business has a vested interest in maximizing product by minimizing loss. At the volume they produce these GM crops there's no way that the larger environment isn't exposed. So... if you believe in evolution, then it will select for resistant pests in the same way antibiotic profusion selects for resistant strains of bacteria.
 
2012-06-08 07:16:37 PM
Another meat-glue thread.

Meat glue is safe, so long as the product is properly labeled/properly cooked.

If you'll excuse me, I'm going to go make a porturken roll and grill it to perfection.
 
2012-06-08 07:16:42 PM

Corvus:
And the stores in my state every few years wants them all kicked out so they can hire kids instead getting paid a little above minimum wage. Funny when they have the union negotiations people always seem to forget they are also talking about the butchers and other people who should know a lot about food handling and not just be whoever they can find to pay the least.



WTF? What about people who work at cheese counters, or real delis with the giant whirring blades, or pretty much any kind of food shop that doesn't involve slopping ten pounds of pre-made sauce out of a bag? The guy who knows the difference between ten kinds of aged prosciutto is not the same as the kid slinging microwave sandwiches.

Ethics shops would turn themselves inside-out and possibly explode.
 
2012-06-08 07:16:52 PM
I hear they use avian fetuses to hold flower together in some of our favorite deserts. Disgusting.

And they use intestinal linings to hold together some meat products.

In Haiti they eat dirt to stave of hunger. Hand me my transglutaminase.
 
2012-06-08 07:18:18 PM
Transglutaminase, schmaglutaminase.

static.neatoshop.com
 
2012-06-08 07:20:14 PM
If it tastes good still, why the fark would I care?
 
2012-06-08 07:21:21 PM

sprgrss: ambercat:
Oh Jesus, not this bullshiat again. The farmers in question who were sued by Monsanto were sued because they were caught using pirated Monsanto seed. Not because of cross-pollination. In every single instance, which by the way is not many (Monsanto is not a very litigious corporation), the farmers in question claimed that they were not using Monsanto seed, but were caught with copious amounts of Round-Up. If they weren't using Monsanto seed, there would have been zero reason for them to have had that much Round-Up because Round-Up would have killed all non-Monsanto plants it was sprayed it.

Would that not be the basis of their claim, though? That their crops were super pollinated by Monsato's strain and, therefore, would only be controlled by Round-Up?
 
2012-06-08 07:21:23 PM

James F. Campbell: Shazam999: There are many, many, many cultivars of different plants. Get over yourself. Just because some certain cultivar is really, really popular doesn't mean the others disappear into oblivion.

No, you're missing the point. Please read carefully. I will use smaller words.

Let's say, hypothetically, 80% of our food supply is made up of monocultures, and a very nasty fungus sweeps through the country. Our monoculture ... oh, corn, let's say, our monoculture corn happens to lack any defenses against this fungus and, being genetically identical, all the corn falls victim. Now let's say we get really unlucky, and this fungus targets more than one type of crop, and the other monocultures are also susceptible to it. A whole of bad is going down.

Yeah, it's just hypothetical, and I can't find any solid numbers at the moment on just how reliant we are on monocultures, but I am willing to bet that over 50% of the food consumed in the United States originates from a monoculture. The point is that genetic homogeneity puts our food supply at risk of destruction by virtue of being utterly and totally susceptible to any microorganism that wins the genetic lottery.


Just read Thorak's reply.

While you're at it, try to think about what you're saying. You already admit:

1) You don't know how reliant we are on monocultures.
2) You don't even know what that number would be.
3) You guess, out of your ass, that worst-case, that number is 50%.

So, if 50% of "the crop" died, that still leaves 50% of the crop that lived. So, next year, you could use seeds from the 50% that survived. And go from there. Presumably you'd be relying on scientists to come up with resistant cultivars as quickly as possible. Presumably that involves some form of GMO.

So, now what?
 
2012-06-08 07:21:35 PM
No, we have not been adding cod genes to tomato plants to make them cold resistant for thousands of years.
 
2012-06-08 07:23:48 PM

KrispyKritter: Broktun: Now we know what the "cook it well done and smother in ketchup" crowd eats.

My butcher's name is Bob, and he know exactly what to cut for me when I ask for "him, hers, and kids".

well hello money bags. you probably buy brand name bologna too, huh?


My baloney doesn't have a name,
it's C-H-E-A-P...
 
2012-06-08 07:24:40 PM
these molded "filet mignon" are sold through high-volume chain restaurants, hotels, cafeterias and banquet halls

If you order a steak at a cafeteria, you should know you're getting garbage.
 
2012-06-08 07:25:45 PM
I have butcher friends still for those rare occasions, but mostly I go to a restaraunt supply store and by my meat in the full vacuum bags then clean it up, cut and vacuum pack it for freezing. You end up getting boneless ribeye at 5.50 a pound (about 14lb rack). Bonus you know what you get.
 
2012-06-08 07:27:32 PM

Shazam999: Just read Thorak's reply.


Maybe you should read Thorak's reply. His reasoning is that farmers have been selectively breeding and planting monocultures for thousands of years. Then he says:

Thorak: Sure, when there's a blight that hits the main strain, it's disastrous, but GMO crops are no more vulnerable than our crops have ever been


And you find this, this planting of monocultures and simply accepting the risk of a disastrous blight, to be a better solution than simply planting variants and avoiding monocultures to begin with? You find his reasoning comforting? OK, then.
 
2012-06-08 07:27:37 PM

Amos Quito: Indubitably: Um,

There are some pix below that seem to decry worrying about food.

You should worry about your food, folks.

A Hell of a lot more than you worry about terrorism, friends. Seriously.


I worry about food terrorism.


Too late, buddy.

Those planes have already left the building.

It's about choice, demand, and dollar now.

Demand local and organic and no BS.

Buy only that, and you can change the world, folks.

Assuredly.
 
2012-06-08 07:29:06 PM
This story is aged like a fine wine
 
2012-06-08 07:32:12 PM
What's so "sick" about transglutaminase? Me thinks subby has not had the best multi-meat meal of his life with this tasteless powdered enzyme. Millions of chefs use it and you don't even know. Molecular gastronomy chefs use it all the time, including Heston Blumenthal "best" chef in the world (at least his restaurant Fat Duck is supposedly the best in the world).

My husband is into molecular gastronomy and has used transglutaminase. A few Thanksgivings ago we had chicken and ham wrapped in bacon. They all melded perfectly together into a delicious, meaty mass. You have no idea what you're missing!
 
2012-06-08 07:36:06 PM
Such a farking crock. I mean it is one thing to pass of cheap meat as filet mignon, but anyone should know that sort of labelling issue. But passing it off like this is some kind of massive health problem or whatever is complete bullshiat. If anything it allows us to take cuts of meat that otherwise might be wasted and make them more appealing, reducing food waste. Aren't we supposed to be making the most out of everything?
 
2012-06-08 07:36:58 PM

Indubitably: Amos Quito: Indubitably: Um,

There are some pix below that seem to decry worrying about food.

You should worry about your food, folks.

A Hell of a lot more than you worry about terrorism, friends. Seriously.


I worry about food terrorism.


Too late, buddy.

Those planes have already left the building.

It's about choice, demand, and dollar now.

Demand local and organic and no BS.

Buy only that, and you can change the world, folks.

Assuredly.



years ago I raised my own pigs, chickens and sheep. Had a massive garden.

Will again if I buy another ranch. Would consider cattle also.

Currently have a great little garden now. Producing waaay too much zucchini at the moment. Giving it away to friends and neighbors.


/Not long ago most people were farmers
//I have a feeling we'll be returning to that subsistence lifestyle before long
///Whether we want to or not.
 
Displayed 50 of 266 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report