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(WTSP)   News: Giant pet cougar escapes his cage and makes a tasty snack out of a beagle named Fester. Fark: Owner says it was the dog's fault   ( wtsp.com) divider line
    More: Florida, Uncle Fester, news, bottle cage, cougars, Brooksville, pets, Ron Gard, Mickey Milano  
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4767 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Jun 2012 at 9:07 AM (5 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



42 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2012-06-05 08:55:24 AM  
Just in time for Caturday?
 
2012-06-05 09:09:46 AM  
As a catlover, I agree that it was the dog's fault. If only it hadn't been a dog. Then maybe it might have survived.
 
2012-06-05 09:09:52 AM  
Beagle trifecta in play?
 
2012-06-05 09:11:24 AM  
Dog didn't know enough to stay the fark away from a Cougar?
 
2012-06-05 09:12:44 AM  
What I want to know is why the cage is named Hernando.
 
2012-06-05 09:14:05 AM  
Annoying hound eye-balling your food ?

Well played cougar.....
 
2012-06-05 09:17:57 AM  
Can't say I disagree with the owner here. Keep your farking dog on your own property and shiat like this doesn't happen. Especially when you know your neighbor legally houses dangerous animals that would love to make a snack out of your precious friend.
 
2012-06-05 09:20:33 AM  

Trawg: Can't say I disagree with the owner here. Keep your farking dog on your own property and shiat like this doesn't happen. Especially when you know your neighbor legally houses dangerous animals that would love to make a snack out of your precious friend.


I have to agree with you

Both the dog and the cougar were loose and not where they were supposed to be, the cougar's only sin was that it just happened to win.
 
2012-06-05 09:21:53 AM  
The dog obviously wanted it, since it was cougar bait and all.

I was attacked by a cougar once. The experiance left me shattered and smelling like denture creme.

Q. What does old lady crotch taste like?
A. Depends.
 
2012-06-05 09:22:58 AM  
Gard has since reinforced Charlie's cage and state wildlife officials say the cage and Gard's license to keep a cougar are in order.

So how do you ask for that? "Yes, I'd like a COUGAR license, please." Really, Florida? Anything goes? How about a license to keep piranhas in my swimming pool? How does that sound? "I'd like a license to keep a polar bear and feed him nothing but PCP and crack." Florida: "Sounds good to us!"
 
2012-06-05 09:27:15 AM  
Owner is obviously Republican.

/blame the victim
 
2012-06-05 09:27:24 AM  
Poor dog. This asshat's license to keep the cat should be revoked. In fact, he shouldn't be allowed to keep a 275 lb cougar in a residential area to begin with.
 
2012-06-05 09:27:52 AM  

casual disregard: As a catlover, I agree that it was the dog's fault. If only it hadn't been a dog. Then maybe it might have survived.


www.schulzmuseum.org
 
2012-06-05 09:29:33 AM  
allieiswired.com

Mmmm...... pet cougar.......
 
2012-06-05 09:32:04 AM  
At least he went back an reinforced the cage with some nice little pink Ty Wraps.
 
2012-06-05 09:44:27 AM  
He got out of the inner cage, but couldn't get off of the property. That's why the owner didn't get into trouble. The news article is deliberately vague in order to obfuscate that fact and make this non-event sound scary. The dog would have been fine if his owners had been responsible and hadn't let him wander onto someone else's property.
 
2012-06-05 09:57:28 AM  

Nasal_Avenger: He got out of the inner cage, but couldn't get off of the property. That's why the owner didn't get into trouble. The news article is deliberately vague in order to obfuscate that fact and make this non-event sound scary. The dog would have been fine if his owners had been responsible and hadn't let him wander onto someone else's property.


Does the guy have some kind of new one-way fence that lets animals get inside but not out? Maybe it's kind of like a giant lobster trap?
 
2012-06-05 10:00:57 AM  
I have a cat that feels the same way about dogs, and if he was that size, the neighborhood would be a much nicer place.
 
2012-06-05 10:01:00 AM  
I hate to say this, but it was probably the dogs fault. Well fed large cats get a long just fine with dogs that aren't trying to corner them, and a territorial cougar protecting it's food is pretty much always going to beat a beagle confronting it.

Large predators are rarely aggressive toward each other, except dogs are too dumb and pack oriented to realize they need to back down.
 
2012-06-05 10:04:24 AM  
People that blame pit bulls cougars and believe they are vicious have never even met a pit bull cougar. if they did, they wouldn't have their hearsay educated opinions. I really hate when people have no education or experience in something, but think hey are experts. What do they really know, and it is a reflection on how smart they reall aren't. Pretty much every canine feline expert worldwide say it i the owners; no the dogs cougars, that are he real issues, but people are ignorant about that also. This is no the firs breed species to be vilified, and it isn't the last, because humans are too lazy and stupid to get the real facts. Also, people that buy into hat pit bulls cougars are inherently vicious spread fear and cause more harm. This fear makes these dogs cats very popular to the people that use them in the wrong way. the fear mongers are the major contributors to the issue, but they don't know that either.

/fixed
 
2012-06-05 10:06:05 AM  

JackieRabbit: Poor dog. This asshat's license to keep the cat should be revoked. In fact, he shouldn't be allowed to keep a 275 lb cougar in a residential area to begin with.


He's on 5 acres, which is 2.5 more acres than the state requires to keep a cougar.

Yeah, stupid law, but it's Florida.
 
2012-06-05 10:07:20 AM  
Keep your damn dog on your property.

My neighbor's father, who lives in a rural subdivision, frequently lets his dogs out to run. Three weeks ago he got a call from a nearby farmer. The farmer told him that he shot his dogs, but not before they killed a sow and two piglets. He suggested he come right over to pick up the dead dogs and not to forget to bring his checkbook. I had to listen to a full hour of this guys whining over Memorial Day weekend - and he is a retired cop and should have farking known better.
 
2012-06-05 10:07:55 AM  
www.davepye.com
 
2012-06-05 10:08:31 AM  

beefoe: Nasal_Avenger: He got out of the inner cage, but couldn't get off of the property. That's why the owner didn't get into trouble. The news article is deliberately vague in order to obfuscate that fact and make this non-event sound scary. The dog would have been fine if his owners had been responsible and hadn't let him wander onto someone else's property.

Does the guy have some kind of new one-way fence that lets animals get inside but not out? Maybe it's kind of like a giant lobster trap?


Or maybe there was just something climbable on the other side of the fence.
 
2012-06-05 10:08:34 AM  
Stupid cougar.

ITG time: My .308 says you stay away from me and my beloved little beagle.

/love them beagles
 
2012-06-05 10:14:31 AM  

Trawg: Can't say I disagree with the owner here. Keep your farking dog on your own property and shiat like this doesn't happen. Especially when you know your neighbor legally houses dangerous animals that would love to make a snack out of your precious friend.


I have a small arsenal in my house and if the neighbor's kid wanders onto my yard to fetch a stray baseball, I'm gonna pop a cap in his ass and it's his own damn fault for not knowing what a menace I am. I'm completely absolved of guilt in this situation.
 
2012-06-05 10:21:18 AM  
Fester is a great name for a beagle. Poor little guy.

My dog is part beagle (the nose part) and I don't let her out unless she's on a leash, I am right there or she's in an enclosed area. Even when I am standing right next to her, if she sees a skwerl, she's gone.

/If she sees a cute little kitty, she comes running to me whining.
//I don't think she would try to tangle with a big kitty
 
2012-06-05 10:29:53 AM  

Mr Guy: I hate to say this, but it was probably the dogs fault. Well fed large cats get a long just fine with dogs that aren't trying to corner them, and a territorial cougar protecting it's food is pretty much always going to beat a beagle confronting it.

Large predators are rarely aggressive toward each other, except dogs are too dumb and pack oriented to realize they need to back down.


Fark you.

Beagles are hounds....we have bred them to chase down other animals (most typically rabbits and squirrels) for us to kill (or they just do it themselves). The dog was doing what it is innately knows to do. Unfortunately for the hound, the cougar did what it knows to do.

The difference here is, after the chase, the beagle will happily keep you company throughout the evening. They are our companions and pets. Cougars are neither companions or pets, and it is farking stupid to try to treat them as such.

If this took place in the middle of the everglades, one might have a reasonable expectation of cougars. Residential area outside of its current range? Not really.

Blame here is with the asshat that artificially housed wild animal, not with the creature killed by the cougar.
 
2012-06-05 10:32:11 AM  

Salem Witch: Fester is a great name for a beagle. Poor little guy.

My dog is part beagle (the nose part) and I don't let her out unless she's on a leash, I am right there or she's in an enclosed area. Even when I am standing right next to her, if she sees a skwerl, she's gone.

/If she sees a cute little kitty, she comes running to me whining.
//I don't think she would try to tangle with a big kitty


My little pup will dutifully scent down rabbits with a howl....arthritis and all. Excellent little home occupiers....
 
2012-06-05 10:51:49 AM  
Hernando County officials also tell 10 News that Gard's property is not zoned for a big cat

In other news; there is a zoning ordinance for cats.
 
2012-06-05 12:10:32 PM  
I have to agree with the cougar guy. Much as I love beagles (I raised a beagle puppy who had been abandoned at a week old for my local shelter last summer,) they can be very food-aggressive if not carefully trained out of it, and cats are even worse.

I trained my own cats most of the way out of it, but we still get a hiss or a paw-swipe here and there. I managed to train the beagle puppy by letting him eat WITH my cats, one of whom is maternal and smart enough to pick whatever little critter I'm fostering up by the scruff and redirect them to their own bowl. To be fair, the beagle puppy did get bowled across the kitchen floor a few times by the bigger cats when he went for their food, and since my cats are not 250-pound cougars but a collection of miscellaneous rescued domestic shorthairs, the puppy learned his lesson with no harm except to his dignity, which beagles that age don't really have anyway.

Looking at the picture in TFA of the late beagle in question, it honestly and truly looks to me as if poor Fester did exactly what Mosby-puppy tried with my cats and Charlie the cougar did exactly what one of my kitties would do in that situation. The only difference is that my cats are 5 to 25 pounds at most and have their nails carefully trimmed weekly, whereas Charlie is 250 pounds, has enormous claws it'd take a Dremel and a tranquilizer to render blunt and was NOT used to beagles up in his dish. My cats have learned to be gentler with little interlopers at food time because they know Momcat will scruff them if they play too rough with the fosterlings. Unless Bruce Banner does volunteer work locally, there's really nobody who COULD scruff Charlie and say 'Stop! Bad cat!' before he gave Fester a good whack with a huge, lethally-clawed paw.

And no, you never pick a cat up by the scruff. Grabbing them by it and applying a gentle squeeze, though, it breaks them out of a bad behavior much quicker than a watergun and can be used to restrain them if they're about to be violent towards another pet. That said, had someone seen Fester heading for Charlie's dish, a watergun or an air horn might have saved the dog's life...but then, so would a responsible pet owner NOT letting him out, regardless of what kind of cat lived next door.

My mother's cat, a perfectly ordinary tuxedo tabby called Boots, once beat the bejesus out of a little old lady's Yorkie because the stupid woman let the dog off its' leash. She followed my Dad into the house and went for Boots' dish. As far as old Boots knew, this was a rival suddenly appearing in HIS territory and trying to take HIS food. The Yorkie wasn't killed, but she was dazed after Boots paw-slapped her into the wall, and, being a good cat, Boots promptly picked up the Yorkie (who was only a puppy at the time,) and carried her in his mouth to my mother, who never quite got over the shock. Of course, NOW Boots and the Yorkie (who has such a ridiculously undignified name I shan't repeat it here,) know one another well, due to Mom's looking after the Yorkie while her owner was in the hospital with a broken hip and then keeping her when the original owner went into a nursing home. They share a dish quite peaceably now, even though they aren't supposed to (different diets,) and they play-fight happily like long-lost littermates, even sharing a bed. It's nauseatingly cute, and probably works because terriers and cats are both rodent-killers, so they must have some common ground.

See, if I knew there was an enormous 250-pound cat next door, to say nothing of the alligators, I would have asked the keeper if there were some way to safely let the pets get to know each other, say, with bars between the two, so the big cat would recognize the beagle as "Oh, it's you again," as opposed to "Interloper! DIE!"

Having offered an informed opinion, now we reach the 'let me tell you about my cats' portion of this Fark post.

I do a little volunteering with a small zoo that keeps a serval and a tiger, among other wonderous rare creatures, and I take my pet-behavior and responsible-ownership advice from the keeper there. As per his advice and that of local wildlife authorities, our cats have a fenced, translucent-roofed enclosure (the cat patio or 'catio,') with a tunnel through a window so they can go outside as they please, but the only birds or rodents they can kill are those stupid enough to enter their domain, so my dear little mousers are only doing Darwin's good work when they bring us 'murder presents.'

I built it out of a dog kennel meant for Dobermans and will probably triple the size next year with a second one, as the chain-link kennels, eight feet high and ten feet square, are modular, so I could just unbolt one wall to make a C-shape with a double-length wall and connect the next one to make a three-panel-long, one-panel-wide rectangle. (Thirty by ten feet.) This first, 'little' version only cost a bit over $200 for the kennel itself and the corrugated-plastic roof was $11 for a 12-by-2-foot panel and went on securely and easily with a drill and some zip ties. I made the tunnel myself out of scrap wood, an old cat-litter bucket and, again, more zip ties. It impressed the hell out of my husband, especially given that the cats no longer do their leavings indoors, which makes things a lot nicer for us humans.

Our biggest cat is a 25-lb ex-feral tabby that two vets and our zookeeper think had a wildcat great-grandparent, going by his body size, ear tufts, bigger teeth and the fact that he is the finest mouser in the county, as verified by a game warden and the ladies who gave him a little medal at the fair after killing 58 mice and rats in one evening and saving a local charity a significant sum on exterminator bills. I take him around to elderly neighbors and local businesses who have rodent problems, but can't use poison lest their other pets be harmed or because of allergies, or who couldn't get around to check traps before something started to really stink. He does a very, VERY good job and is usually paid, quite sensibly, in canned tuna or cat food, a portion of which he turns over to the less fortunate kitties at the municipal shelter, because even cats have such a thing as the income tax. When he's at his little cat job, he's all business and gleefully lines up the dead rodents, but at home or in my lap, he's quite snuggly and you'd almost never know he and his adopted siblings are highly efficient serial killers.

That's the thing most people forget about cats. All the soppy crazy-cat-ladies talking about their precious fuzzy woogums in the world doesn't change the fact that every cat, from the cuddly baby housecat foster-kittens in my incubator box to the 300-pound tiger at the zoo is a magnificent predator. The closest thing to a common housecat, provided he isn't spoiled with the wrong food or too much of it, insufficient exercise and poor training in house manners, would probably be a 1:5 scale velociraptor, at least in terms of pure killing efficiency. They are built to kill. Their instincts are programmed to kill. The little kitten, smaller than a pop can, who is happily batting a jingly ball? She is practicing her murder skills, and within less time than it takes the average geek to play through Diablo III, she will be capable of bringing her first kills to Mama Cat for approval.

Dog owners have a loyal friend who was probably bred for some working or companion purpose, and who will generally love you unconditionally. Cat owners, though? That's an apex farking predator sitting on their laps. The guy who marries a crazy cat lady is acknowledging a willingness to keep at least one viciously dangerous creature, on whom five out of six ends are pointy, at a rather alarming proximity to his junk.

That 'crazy' in crazy cat lady? It's completely earned, and only a crazy cat moron would ever forget that Mr. Fuzzypaws is anything but a murderer. An ADORABLE murderer, to be fair, but still, they are a much more badass pet than people give them credit for.
 
2012-06-05 12:16:53 PM  

Sasquach: Mr Guy: I hate to say this, but it was probably the dogs fault. Well fed large cats get a long just fine with dogs that aren't trying to corner them, and a territorial cougar protecting it's food is pretty much always going to beat a beagle confronting it.

Large predators are rarely aggressive toward each other, except dogs are too dumb and pack oriented to realize they need to back down.

Fark you.

Beagles are hounds....we have bred them to chase down other animals (most typically rabbits and squirrels) for us to kill (or they just do it themselves). The dog was doing what it is innately knows to do. Unfortunately for the hound, the cougar did what it knows to do.

The difference here is, after the chase, the beagle will happily keep you company throughout the evening. They are our companions and pets. Cougars are neither companions or pets, and it is farking stupid to try to treat them as such.

If this took place in the middle of the everglades, one might have a reasonable expectation of cougars. Residential area outside of its current range? Not really.

Blame here is with the asshat that artificially housed wild animal, not with the creature killed by the cougar.


Know how I know you didn't RTFA? Look at it this way: As soon as the dog was killed, the cougar left it alone and retreated to its cage. If it were angry, looking for a meal, etc., there'd be nothing left of the dog except for bones. Retarded noisemaking beagle is retarded, like its absentee owner. 275 lbs vs 20 lbs. Pretty simple to figure out the odds of that fight. How would all of the rabbit owners feel about what your beagle did to their pet? Beagles may have been bred to do what they do, but in the last few decades, Americans have been led to belive that they don't have to be held responsible for their carelessness. All they have to do is whine about hjow unfair it is and that it's not their fault, and then someone will knee-jerk reaction-like change the law making things worse.
 
2012-06-05 12:33:08 PM  
I have a (mostly) beagle, and as much as I love him I can kind of see the guys point. Dexter once put the run on a big 10 point buck at the conservation area for a good 30-40 minutes before I could catch up. If that thing had turned on him, he'd have been toast. Same thing with a big porcupine. Wouldn't leave it alone until he got a paw full of quills. He's a bright dog, until he catches the scent of something. Then it's: brain off; chase & harass on, regardless of any other factors.

So yeah, the guy with the cougar should be responsible for making sure it can't get out of its cage, but the owner of the dog bred to put the chase on anything even if it's 5x its size should probably keep a better handle on the dog. If the cougar had roamed over to the dogs property and killed it I'd have a different opinion, but the dog went onto the property of a big cat that was minding its own business and then didn't have enough brains to GTFO.
 
2012-06-05 01:31:46 PM  
The dog shouldn't have been so tasty.
 
2012-06-05 01:40:39 PM  
Jument
The dog shouldn't have been so tasty.

I came in here to say exactly this. Damn you!
 
2012-06-05 02:32:04 PM  
But if a big dog or domesticated wolf killed a cat that wandered onto it's property, it'd be totally cool.
 
2012-06-05 02:34:11 PM  

WarszawaScream: But if a big dog or domesticated wolf killed a cat that wandered onto it's property, it'd be totally cool.


ITS.
 
2012-06-05 03:10:23 PM  

Sasquach: Salem Witch: Fester is a great name for a beagle. Poor little guy.

My dog is part beagle (the nose part) and I don't let her out unless she's on a leash, I am right there or she's in an enclosed area. Even when I am standing right next to her, if she sees a skwerl, she's gone.

/If she sees a cute little kitty, she comes running to me whining.
//I don't think she would try to tangle with a big kitty

My little pup will dutifully scent down rabbits with a howl....arthritis and all. Excellent little home occupiers....


Serious lack of beagle pics in here.

img171.imageshack.us

Nose is 100% beagle.

The rest of her brain, her voice and her faithfulness all come from the heeler part.
 
2012-06-05 03:37:33 PM  
If a neighbor had a escaped large animal that killed my dog it would get a case of lead poisoning.
 
2012-06-05 04:18:30 PM  

SpiderQueenDemon: The closest thing to a common housecat, provided he isn't spoiled with the wrong food or too much of it, insufficient exercise and poor training in house manners, would probably be a 1:5 scale velociraptor, at least in terms of pure killing efficiency.


Cat person? Check. (+1 for understanding feline behavior.)
Intelligent? Check.
Compared cats to velociraptors? Bonus check. +8 because raptors.

You've surpassed the benchmark for "awesome" in just one post. And your Mouse-Destroyer 3000 sounds like one heck of a cat... mine are just lazy ungrateful good-for-nothings.

I kid, mine are all indoors-only; never really had a chance to go after a live mouse. (But my lord, want to talk about efficient insect killers? One of ours went mostly blind over the past few years, but he can still chase and smack flies out of the air. ...of course there's always a few wrong turns and an occasional wall involved in the chase... my poor fat, blind baby.)

On another note, when my brother's girlfriend moved in with her teacup poodle, not one of the cats batted an eyelash. None of them had ever seen a dog before. They're all bigger than her, two of them are about twice her size, and yet as long as she leaves their food alone they pretty much ignore her except for the occasional friendly head-bump. The only hissing or scuffling happened when she used to try and steal their food during meal time, or the first time she tried to go for the water bowl that the Big Boss Cat lords over. He made it clear that this was not acceptable in the usual cat growl-hiss-swipe-growl method, and all it took was that one time to teach her to stay away. (Kefka has water aggression when it comes to other animals. No problems with food - just water. He gets his "own" water bowl so that he doesn't sit sentry next to the main one, though in his old age the "big lion waiting for challengers next to the watering hole " behavior has become less and less common.)

I feel bad for the dog in TFA (and I love beagles especially) but in the end it's a case of a small dog doing what any dog does and a big cat doing what any cat does. Even being a cat person, if I knew my neighbor had a cougar or even just a large dog, you're darn skippy I'd take crazy extra precautions to make sure my dog/cat/small child/pet muskrat didn't make its way over to their yard.
 
2012-06-05 10:08:53 PM  
Maybe he was just lonesome.
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-06-06 01:11:45 PM  
Back when I was a meter reader, I once ran into a back yard that had a tall fence and a sign out front that said, "Caution. Dangerous Wild Animal On Premises," or something to that effect. I figured it was just somebody being cute about their dog, so I took all of the standard precautions and went in the yard. Lo and behold, I get to where the electrical meter is, and there's a big old mountain lion in a chain link fence cage right next to it. I never bothered going inside that yard again.

/Got the reading while I was there, though.
//Cool story bro off
 
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