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5559 clicks; posted to Business » on 04 Jun 2012 at 6:28 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-04 03:27:00 PM  
We probably will have another recession ... and more until we fix the structural issues of low taxes, low regulations, banks running the joint and Congress having its head up its ass. I'm sure that little issue in Europe isn't impacting any of this. Are India and China still growing like crazy?
 
2012-06-04 04:09:31 PM  
I may be ignorant of how such things work, but aren't the summer months typically the slow season for business all over? (tourism and HVAC repair aside)
 
2012-06-04 04:20:44 PM  
Businesses have a lot of extra inventory from the last couple of quarters, and got in a lot of durable goods orders late 2011 to get tax breaks. Once they burn through that, orders will pick up again.
 
2012-06-04 04:32:15 PM  

Nadie_AZ: We probably will have another recession ... and more until we fix the structural issues of low taxes, low regulations, banks running the joint and Congress having its head up its ass. I'm sure that little issue in Europe isn't impacting any of this. Are India and China still growing like crazy?


These aren't low; even if they were, they don't cause recessions. Artificially low interest rates and credit expansion brought about by bad regulation? Absolutely. Low taxes and low regulations that aren't really low? Not at all.
 
2012-06-04 04:39:56 PM  
New orders for U.S. factory goods fell in April for the third time in four months as demand slipped for everything from cars and machinery to computers, the latest worrisome sign for the economic recovery.

Wasn't there just an unofficial report last week that car prices are up? (pops)

Not only is summer the slow season, but I think people are selling off investments and dipping into savings to buy some nice things for themselves.

Hell, this is cause for celebration, not panic. And it looks like the pros are not panicking. (pops)
 
2012-06-04 05:20:14 PM  

Hydra: Nadie_AZ: We probably will have another recession ... and more until we fix the structural issues of low taxes, low regulations, banks running the joint and Congress having its head up its ass. I'm sure that little issue in Europe isn't impacting any of this. Are India and China still growing like crazy?

These aren't low; even if they were, they don't cause recessions. Artificially low interest rates and credit expansion brought about by bad regulation? Absolutely. Low taxes and low regulations that aren't really low? Not at all.


Taxes are so low we cannot pay for infrastructure upkeep. Do you think the stuff that builds bridges, roads, and puts up all the electrical and telecommunications wires just poofs into being without someone ordering it, and building it? Or that materials magically appear from the ether? Or that governments don't contract out to private businesses to actually do the building?

Regulations come and go. The more I look into things, the more it seems many regulations are only enforced when some local, state, or federal agency is notified, i.e. someone tattles. Beyond that, our regulatory agencies are so buddy buddy with industry it's ridiculous.
 
2012-06-04 05:20:28 PM  

FishyFred: Wasn't there just an unofficial report last week that car prices are up? (pops)


It's possible to have slowing demand and rising prices. Everything here reeks of stagflation.

Hell, this is cause for celebration, not panic. And it looks like the pros are not panicking. (pops)

Frogs in the pot don't panic, either. Meanwhile, the temperature rises.
 
2012-06-04 05:21:56 PM  

Hydra: Nadie_AZ: We probably will have another recession ... and more until we fix the structural issues of low taxes, low regulations, banks running the joint and Congress having its head up its ass. I'm sure that little issue in Europe isn't impacting any of this. Are India and China still growing like crazy?

These aren't low; even if they were, they don't cause recessions. Artificially low interest rates and credit expansion brought about by bad regulation? Absolutely. Low taxes and low regulations that aren't really low? Not at all.


Quiet you.

The rich have all the money and all the growth. The other 99 percent don't have much money or growth right now.

We need to fix the economy by adding regulations and restoring old tax rates to force the rich to act responsibly again.
 
2012-06-04 05:25:37 PM  
So MORE tax cuts then?
 
2012-06-04 06:33:19 PM  
Pretty shocking .... when govt spending declines during a period of slackness in the economy, short run macroeconomic output declines.

Who would have ever thought this to be possible? I mean besides John Maynard Keynes, and pretty much every other competent economist?
 
2012-06-04 06:38:05 PM  

bronyaur1: Pretty shocking .... when govt spending declines during a period of slackness in the economy, short run macroeconomic output declines.

Who would have ever thought this to be possible? I mean besides John Maynard Keynes, and pretty much every other competent economist?


No.

People are holding back realizing how farked government debt has gotten us.
 
2012-06-04 06:38:41 PM  

doglover: Hydra: Nadie_AZ: We probably will have another recession ... and more until we fix the structural issues of low taxes, low regulations, banks running the joint and Congress having its head up its ass. I'm sure that little issue in Europe isn't impacting any of this. Are India and China still growing like crazy?

These aren't low; even if they were, they don't cause recessions. Artificially low interest rates and credit expansion brought about by bad regulation? Absolutely. Low taxes and low regulations that aren't really low? Not at all.

Quiet you.

The rich have all the money and all the growth. The other 99 percent don't have much money or growth right now.

We need to fix the economy by adding regulations and restoring old tax rates to force the rich to act responsibly again.


I think you are trolling, maybe, but that is actually true.

/US fed tax rates are at historic lows.
//if you seem over taxed it's probably your state/county
 
2012-06-04 06:39:16 PM  
"Unexpected" and "surprised" must be the new normal.
 
2012-06-04 06:44:46 PM  
It's bizarre to me the the idea of 'Job Creators', that people with money are supposed to operate factories and therefore employ people out of altruism, just throwing away the products produced because there's no consumer demand from the average guy because the average guy has no money. It's more akin to what happened in the Soviet Union, factories just running because there's nothing else to do, than in any capitalist nation.

We're headed into some really interesting times because there will have to be a fundamental shift in thinking if we are to not fall into ruin which many people just won't be able to do.
 
2012-06-04 06:51:04 PM  

NowhereMon: So MORE tax cuts then?


Only for the wealthiest. Everyone else needs their taxes raised so they have skin in the game. Oh, and we should start more wars and spend more on defense.

This combination of sound fiscal policies will have America humming along in minutes, and we will have a budget surplus within a year.
 
2012-06-04 06:53:12 PM  

Befuddled: It's bizarre to me the the idea of 'Job Creators', that people with money are supposed to operate factories and therefore employ people out of altruism, just throwing away the products produced because there's no consumer demand from the average guy because the average guy has no money. It's more akin to what happened in the Soviet Union, factories just running because there's nothing else to do, than in any capitalist nation.

We're headed into some really interesting times because there will have to be a fundamental shift in thinking if we are to not fall into ruin which many people just won't be able to do.


It's the same group of people who think that evolution isn't true. Ignoring the entirety of a relatively recent field of study like economics is a cinch when you can claim that all of biology is made up.
 
2012-06-04 06:57:46 PM  

whither_apophis: I think you are trolling, maybe, but that is actually true.

/US fed tax rates are at historic lows.




This is why we need to UP taxes on the people who have the most money. Also regulate business. I grew up with Clinton just about to erase the deficit. Along comes Bush, removes the regulations and lowers taxes, and now we're still in the worst economy I've seen in the US personally.

The only solution, to me anyway, is to go back to the regulations that kept the economy whole and healthy last time.
 
2012-06-04 07:03:45 PM  
Clearly the answer is to impose austerity measures focusing on removing middle-class public sector jobs and cutting social services to the poor, and then giving huge tax breaks to the rich for not creating a single job.

Surely this is the only logical path to increasing consumer spending and driving demand.
 
2012-06-04 07:17:19 PM  

doglover: Quiet you.

The rich have all the money and all the growth. The other 99 percent don't have much money or growth right now.


No.

It's all the regulations and taxes imposed that are keeping smaller businesses from being able to compete with larger ones that have the economies of scale to afford their added cost as well as to afford buying the politicians who put them in place - politicians elected by progressives like you who fail to recognize the connection between cause and effect.

People like you are directly responsible for giving the government more power by voting for politicians who give feel-good speeches about "fairness" and enact a bunch of well-intended legislation - forgetting that the road to hell is paved with good intentions - that eventually backfires spectacularly. What happens when politicians are given a bunch of power? They use it to secure their own re-elections. Big businesses don't like free markets, so they bribe the politicians to give them favors using the very powers that YOU have given them.

All you're screwing with high taxes and regulations are smaller companies that can't afford them - businesses that are usually owned by the middle class and employ the middle class. Congratulations - you're part of the problem that you claimed to have solved.
 
2012-06-04 07:18:08 PM  

RobertBruce: People are holding back realizing how farked government debt has gotten us.


The debt hasn't farked us. And if people hadn't been dicking people over the last 30 years there'd be a lot less of it.
 
2012-06-04 07:19:27 PM  

Hydra: It's all the regulations


Care to point out some of these regulations?
 
2012-06-04 07:27:34 PM  
Problem solved
ponderingsfrompluto.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-06-04 07:33:58 PM  

WhyteRaven74: Hydra: It's all the regulations

Care to point out some of these regulations?


The regulation that says you can't get favorable legislation without briefcases of 100 dollar bills for Congressmen.
 
2012-06-04 07:39:33 PM  

Elephantman: Problem solved
[ponderingsfrompluto.files.wordpress.com image 600x360]


Let's not.
 
2012-06-04 07:44:46 PM  

doglover: whither_apophis: I think you are trolling, maybe, but that is actually true.

/US fed tax rates are at historic lows.



This is why we need to UP taxes on the people who have the most money. Also regulate business. I grew up with Clinton just about to erase the deficit. Along comes Bush, removes the regulations and lowers taxes, and now we're still in the worst economy I've seen in the US personally.

The only solution, to me anyway, is to go back to the regulations that kept the economy whole and healthy last time.


OK, hard to tell sarcasm from legit at times.

/Worst economy since the 30's
 
2012-06-04 07:46:42 PM  

Hydra: doglover: Quiet you.

The rich have all the money and all the growth. The other 99 percent don't have much money or growth right now.

No.

It's all the regulations and taxes imposed that are keeping smaller businesses from being able to compete with larger ones that have the economies of scale to afford their added cost as well as to afford buying the politicians who put them in place - politicians elected by progressives like you who fail to recognize the connection between cause and effect.

People like you are directly responsible for giving the government more power by voting for politicians who give feel-good speeches about "fairness" and enact a bunch of well-intended legislation - forgetting that the road to hell is paved with good intentions - that eventually backfires spectacularly. What happens when politicians are given a bunch of power? They use it to secure their own re-elections. Big businesses don't like free markets, so they bribe the politicians to give them favors using the very powers that YOU have given them.

All you're screwing with high taxes and regulations are smaller companies that can't afford them - businesses that are usually owned by the middle class and employ the middle class. Congratulations - you're part of the problem that you claimed to have solved.


From a purely social studies standpoint would you mind confirming with me if this is something you actually believe or if your one of these types that just gets a kick out of saying shiat on the internet.

If you don't want to publicly declare it you can email me.
 
2012-06-04 07:53:40 PM  

dj_spanmaster: FishyFred: Wasn't there just an unofficial report last week that car prices are up? (pops)

It's possible to have slowing demand and rising prices. Everything here reeks of stagflation.


Um, auto sales are up, rather dramatically in fact.

I love being an alarmist as much as the next guy but let's not completely ignore the facts..
 
2012-06-04 08:02:46 PM  

Hydra: People like you are directly responsible for giving the government more power by voting for politicians who give feel-good speeches about "fairness" and enact a bunch of well-intended legislation - forgetting that the road to hell is paved with good intentions - that eventually backfires spectacularly.


So... vote for bad intentions?
 
2012-06-04 08:25:00 PM  
Well, whether you blame Obama, bush or wall street, the fact is we as a country are really hurting. We don't have the population to backup the consumer growth tht was projected. It ant be compensated for by debt based overspending. It's simple contraction. And like any contraction...it hurts.
 
2012-06-04 08:27:10 PM  
After many, many years in the same business, the biggest problem, IMHO, is the idea (requirement) of constant growth, be it in sales or profit.

If you made a profit every month for the last 10 years, it just doesn't matter. You must increase the % in profit by X each month vs. previous months/years. You could surely get by with one less person on your staff, right? No? Well maybe you are the one that we could get by without. I mean, fark, you've been here for several years, built this thing from shiat to shinola, but you're getting a little older and costly. I mean, Jesus!, you expect two weeks off over the course of a calendar year! I could probably get someone 15 years younger to do your job for 20% less, they'd never take time off and they'd shiat-can one of the existing staff to show a better number on the books.

That line of thinking is prevalent everywhere now.
 
2012-06-04 08:33:31 PM  

doglover: This is why we need to UP taxes on the people who have the most money. Also regulate business. I grew up with Clinton just about to erase the deficit. Along comes Bush, removes the regulations and lowers taxes, and now we're still in the worst economy I've seen in the US personally.

The only solution, to me anyway, is to go back to the regulations that kept the economy whole and healthy last time.


A typical Republican: "We need to get back to the proven fundamentals that brought our Nation unequalled prosperity"

Liberal reply: "Like the policies of the 1950's, when the country's GDP was skyrocketing?"

Republican: "Absolutely!"

Liberal: "Including the top marginal tax rate?"

Republican: **crickets**
 
2012-06-04 08:43:40 PM  
So in over and hour and a half, I don't get an answer to my question. Interesting.
 
2012-06-04 08:49:16 PM  
We need more change! Seriously can anyone spare some?
 
2012-06-04 09:03:50 PM  
What crap, the economy looks fine, right? Well, it looks fine on the surface, doesn't it?

Just ignore the stuff behind the official facade.

farm8.staticflickr.com
 
2012-06-04 09:04:20 PM  

bronyaur1: Pretty shocking .... when govt spending declines during a period of slackness in the economy, short run macroeconomic output declines.

Who would have ever thought this to be possible? I mean besides John Maynard Keynes, and pretty much every other competent economist?


Anyone who thinks government spending has declined isn't living in an alternate reality, they're living in an alternate alternate reality.
 
2012-06-04 09:09:53 PM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: Clearly the answer is to impose austerity measures focusing on removing middle-class public sector jobs and cutting social services to the poor, and then giving huge tax breaks to the rich for not creating a single job.

Surely this is the only logical path to increasing consumer spending and driving demand.


There's always the approach of throwing "stimulus" money at companies owned by your campaign contributors and ideological fellow travelers and then watching as they go belly up and stick the taxpayers with the bill. I think it's called public/pirate partnership.
 
2012-06-04 09:11:30 PM  

Nadie_AZ: We probably will have another recession ... and more until we fix the structural issues of low taxes, low regulations, banks running the joint and Congress having its head up its ass. I'm sure that little issue in Europe isn't impacting any of this. Are India and China still growing like crazy?


China isn't. Inflation is 13% over there, or at least that is all they'll admit to. I'm with Chinese operations at my company and most of us are pretty damn sure it is higher.

You can see the signs that things aren't great. Some of the government's subsidies on things like fuel are starting to slip. You know the subsidies that made it possible to get by on a low wage. A lot of government maintenance is also slipping. China has a solid cash reserve, income via the payments we make on our debt, and you can see where they're redirecting upkeep money to keep the subsidies afloat and inflate the GDP with construction projects. They're slowing down even if the average guy in the street hasn't grasped it. It's just little things like instead of upping the fuel subsidies due to gas prices, the government makes a one time support payment (translation: we can't afford to do this every month).

The average guy might also never grasp it if the West recovers and starts buying crap again. Then the government will get the income and can act like this never happened. If we double dip and the Chinese reserve fund runs dry, then change would happen over there.

Honestly as poor as the econ is over here, we're handling the whole market dip fairly well. There are industrialized countries that took it up the ass a lot harder than we did and have much more serious problems.
 
2012-06-04 09:32:59 PM  
ha-ha-guy

"I'm with Chinese operations at my company and most of us are pretty damn sure it is higher."

I've always been fascinated with Chinese business dealings. That was my undergrad focus but I never went into it. Did you just "fall into" it by luck?
 
2012-06-04 09:36:20 PM  

doglover: Hydra: Nadie_AZ: We probably will have another recession ... and more until we fix the structural issues of low taxes, low regulations, banks running the joint and Congress having its head up its ass. I'm sure that little issue in Europe isn't impacting any of this. Are India and China still growing like crazy?

These aren't low; even if they were, they don't cause recessions. Artificially low interest rates and credit expansion brought about by bad regulation? Absolutely. Low taxes and low regulations that aren't really low? Not at all.

Quiet you.

The rich have all the money and all the growth. The other 99 percent don't have much money or growth right now.

We need to fix the economy by adding regulations and restoring old tax rates to force the rich to act responsibly again.


This is what farklibs actually believe.
 
2012-06-04 09:44:13 PM  

Proteios1: Well, whether you blame Obama, bush or wall street, the fact is we as a country are really hurting. We don't have the population to backup the consumer growth tht was projected. It ant be compensated for by debt based overspending. It's simple contraction. And like any contraction...it hurts.


Correct. We're simply not as wealthy as we thought we were 5 years ago. It was a debt and bubble fueled economy that created an illusion of prosperity that wasn't supported by underlying fundamentals.

And neither Obama nor Romney nor closing your eyes, crossing your fingers and wishing REALLY REALLY HARD is going to make reality match that illusion. We're just going to have to suck it up.
 
2012-06-04 09:44:19 PM  

Debeo Summa Credo: doglover: Hydra: Nadie_AZ: We probably will have another recession ... and more until we fix the structural issues of low taxes, low regulations, banks running the joint and Congress having its head up its ass. I'm sure that little issue in Europe isn't impacting any of this. Are India and China still growing like crazy?

These aren't low; even if they were, they don't cause recessions. Artificially low interest rates and credit expansion brought about by bad regulation? Absolutely. Low taxes and low regulations that aren't really low? Not at all.

Quiet you.

The rich have all the money and all the growth. The other 99 percent don't have much money or growth right now.

We need to fix the economy by adding regulations and restoring old tax rates to force the rich to act responsibly again.

This is what farklibs actually believe.


So what do YOU propose? More tax cuts for the rich? Increased defense spending? Abolishing the minimum wage? Let's hear it.
 
2012-06-04 10:05:51 PM  

MBA Whore: ha-ha-guy

"I'm with Chinese operations at my company and most of us are pretty damn sure it is higher."

I've always been fascinated with Chinese business dealings. That was my undergrad focus but I never went into it. Did you just "fall into" it by luck?


Pretty much. I work for a company chock full of white male engineers, well it was back when we started dabbling with China. We needed to send someone and my boss picked me because my wife is Vietnamese-American. I was deemed the most qualified because I interacted with Asians on a daily basis, something a lot of the rest of the team didn't do.

I benefited from "first there" and got some official training later. It's mostly I know the basics of business (I'm an engineer by trade) and since I was there first I know where the bodies are buried and I have contacts.

Right now I'd suggest having a fall back plan if you do opt to exercise your undergrad degree. If China falls apart (inflation, their housing bubble blows, etc) then business chances will be severely limited. They represent a huge market and sooner or later they'll get their house in order, but you need something to do if China goes through something like the 1980s in America. Alternatively if they have great success they're going to try to strength domestic brands and reduce the role of foreign business. China's domestic market is growing, but they'd rather the West gets a small piece of that growth.
 
2012-06-04 11:17:21 PM  
I've found the best solutions to debt and money problems is to find a nice weak country / city state and loot it/raze it to the ground.

Hey Canada, how YOU doin?
 
2012-06-05 12:27:03 AM  

WhyteRaven74: So in over and hour and a half, I don't get an answer to my question. Interesting.


I've told you these in the past, and excuse me for being busy with other things aside from posting on Fark.

But just to throw you a few bones here, let's stick with banking because A) many industries have very industry-specific regulations, and B) this is one of the FarkProgs' favorite industries to cite as being totally without regulations. We'll also stick with federal regulations since each state has its own bevy of regulations they foist upon banks.

Here's a wiki article on the subject as a primer. Here's also a short list from the FDIC's website (a tad outdated - go figure - since it still lists the now-defunct Office of Thrift Supervision as an agency; you'll see from the OTS wiki that its operations were rolled into other agencies).

And now starts a list of various agencies that regulate banks that is by no means at all exhaustive:
Federal Reserve regulations
FDIC regulations
Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (bonus quote from this government agency's own website: "National banks are among the most highly regulated institutions in the country, with a large number of laws and regulations that govern their activities.")
National Credit Union Administration regulations
Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council
Bureau of the Public Debt (their regulations pertain directly to the buying and selling of government securities, which is a major activity performed by banks)

The FDIC itself also has a decently long (yet, again, by no means exhaustive) list of important banking legislation that empowers the above-listed agencies to make the regulations they do.

And I haven't even touched on even wider-sweeping agencies and legislation like Sarbanes-Oxley, the Securities Exchange Commission, the Federal Trade Commission, Obamacare, and the tax code.

And now we have Dodd-Frank on top of all that (much of which remains to be written since the law delegates many of the specifics to the discretion of the agencies it empowers). And nearly every single one of those laws are amended and every single one of those agencies pass new regulations every year that can be drastically different from the year before.


Now, do I really have to explain to you how immensely expensive it is for a small-shop to comply with all of these regulations as they exist today - let alone retool to comply with the changes that come down every year? Do you think any of this might have something to do with the fact that last year was the first year in decades when there were NO new banks started up AT ALL? (Fark wouldn't let me link the FT article on the subject, so here's the URL: http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/df4c2dd8-63af-11e1-b85b-00144feabdc0.ht ml#axzz1wtApOCvM)

Now, I know that this isn't the first time you've been given similar lists in the past, WhyteRaven74. Regardless of political bias, no one in their right mind can honestly think that there aren't already rules and regulations currently in place.

It's similar to the debate on federal spending - it's a foregone FACT that the government spends more than it takes in through the tax code; the debate is over whether it needs to increase, remain the same, or decrease, but not whether it exists.

Our debate here is over whether these regulations need to be changed, increased, or decreased. Whether they exist is NOT up for debate. I never knew what was so hard to understand about this. If you really are confused, no one will judge you for asking for clarification - we're just a bunch of strangers on the internet, after all.
 
2012-06-05 02:02:31 AM  
I think that before any meaningful changes are made to improve the overall health of this nation, there need to some basic understandings about the nature of the market and regulatory constructs. They're so fundamental that I don't refer to them as assumptions.

1) The market is separate from government. There should be rules that protect the integrity of the market from government and to protect the integrity of government from the market. These rules should involve transparency where these two spheres interract.

2) All parties in the market have an interest in maintaining a level playing field and mechanisms to protect the market from cheating. Cheating is defined as artificial advantages in the market brought about by tilted rules, selective enforcement, force, or fraud.

3) In a free market, there will be winners and losers. It is not government's role to influence who wins and loses, simply to maintain the integrity of the market.

4) Profit is in and of itself morally neutral. It is simply the desired outcome of one's participation in the market. If the market is to have integrity, it must have freedom and a vigorous and speedy erradication of players that operate through force or fraud.

5) Currency is a basic tool of the market. It is in the best interest of the market and government to maintain a stable currency.

If we cannot agree on these basic principles, we cannot have a free market. If we can agree, then any regulatory framework must take these principles into account. This means that any regulation must be universal and designed to protect the market, not to affect outcomes or protect individual players.

What is the point new and more stringent regulation if that regulation is manipulated by particular players in the market? What good is it to have regulatory oversight of the market if that regulation is corrupt or incompetent?

We need to rethink how we look at the market and regulation or dispossess ourselves of the illusion that we value freedom.
 
2012-06-05 03:20:45 AM  

majestic: After many, many years in the same business, the biggest problem, IMHO, is the idea (requirement) of constant growth, be it in sales or profit.

If you made a profit every month for the last 10 years, it just doesn't matter. You must increase the % in profit by X each month vs. previous months/years. You could surely get by with one less person on your staff, right? No? Well maybe you are the one that we could get by without. I mean, fark, you've been here for several years, built this thing from shiat to shinola, but you're getting a little older and costly. I mean, Jesus!, you expect two weeks off over the course of a calendar year! I could probably get someone 15 years younger to do your job for 20% less, they'd never take time off and they'd shiat-can one of the existing staff to show a better number on the books.

That line of thinking is prevalent everywhere now.


It really dawned on me how badly a lot of factory workers get screwed, from 18 year olds to my own 75 year old grandmother. Right now I am reworking $1.25 parts from Korea. Since the plant that bought them didn't bother to check them out, they dump all 70,000 of them on my lap to check and make sure they are the right size. Since the vast majority of the latest shipments are good to go, I can gage enough parts each night to put together about 1600-2000 transmissions for various Ford and GM vehicles.

I get paid minimum wage to do high precision gaging and to sometimes run a very expensive CNC lathe. When all is said and done, tens of thousands of nice, new vehicles will be on the road because of my efforts, and yet I won't even be able to come close to affording payments for one.

Same story at the factory in the shear volume of parts they make every night, but at least most of the hired folks on the line there make a buck or two more than me.

/Trying to get on the maintenance crew there. The contracted company that does it is not stingy with money and deserves a big bro-fist.
 
2012-06-05 05:37:27 AM  

Hydra: Here's also a short list from the FDIC's website (


All the banking regulations you listed apply to all banks equally and many are so entrenched that no one at any bank even needs to think about them. And also they do nothing to keep small banks from growing. As for Sarbanes-Oxley, remember what brought it on? And it only applies to public corporations, plus despite all the whining it amounts to little more than signing off on financial statements as a means to say they are accurate. And SEC regulations chiefly exist to keep people from doing things that would be very bad if they did. If you do the right thing, you never have to worry about them and complying costs nothing. So, got any regulations that hurt business growth? Cause you haven't listed one yet.
 
2012-06-05 05:38:45 AM  

Stibium: and yet I won't even be able to come close to affording payments for one.


Henry Ford would beat the crap out of whoever you work for.
 
2012-06-05 06:47:38 AM  

Nadie_AZ: We probably will have another recession ... and more until we fix the structural issues of low taxes, low regulations, banks running the joint and Congress having its head up its ass. I'm sure that little issue in Europe isn't impacting any of this. Are India and China still growing like crazy?


What low regulations might (not) look like:

wordsofthesentient.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-06-05 07:24:27 AM  

Elephantman: Problem solved
[ponderingsfrompluto.files.wordpress.com image 600x360]


Which would actually be a fairly good thing. 5% inflation for a couple years would force cash heavy companies to invest or face serious losses and get a lot of money moving to where it is needed. Help people with a significant COLA to go with it and it would really be a great option.

Too bad so many people think a single new dollar is the equivalent of the Weimer Republic.
 
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