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(TC Palm)   The bar for spelling has never been lowre   (tcpalm.com) divider line 83
    More: Obvious, National Spelling Bee, Little League World Series, spelling, John Steinbeck, triple crown, Huckleberry Finn  
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10108 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Jun 2012 at 4:05 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-04 08:18:25 AM

dahmers love zombie: Kymry: Spelling: Teach it, but don't freak out over it.

That's my motto.

Spell checkers have been invented. Welcome to the digital age.

Fumbling fingers are one thing, but if I have to grade one more paper in which the word "ludicrous" is spelled "ludacris", or in which the adjective "prejudiced" is repeatedly (though consistently -- I'll give them that) spelled without the -ed suffix, I'm going to go on some sort of very low-energy, couch-based rampage.


I hate 'rediculous'. I see it in Fark all the time.
 
2012-06-04 08:19:46 AM
What do cigarette butts, undeliverable mail, and cutting down trees have to do with spelling?

Am I the only one who found the sudden topic change jarring? The guy's spelling seems okay, but his writing leaves much to be desired.
 
2012-06-04 08:23:21 AM

dittybopper: Yes, and no. There are times, for example, when I use similar written affectations for affect, in order to effect the reader in unexpectorated ways.


imgs.xkcd.com
 
2012-06-04 08:26:10 AM

dahmers love zombie: Kymry: Spelling: Teach it, but don't freak out over it.

That's my motto.

Spell checkers have been invented. Welcome to the digital age.

Fumbling fingers are one thing, but if I have to grade one more paper in which the word "ludicrous" is spelled "ludacris", or in which the adjective "prejudiced" is repeatedly (though consistently -- I'll give them that) spelled without the -ed suffix, I'm going to go on some sort of very low-energy, couch-based rampage.


I can imagine the frustration. My wife teaches grade 6 english. She had the kids do an assignment where they would write a paper as if it were coming from a charity/school requesting donations. They included a draft and final paper. It's so hard not to laugh at some of them, though I do feel a bit bad about laughing.
So many of the mistakes are simple, if the kid was paying attention, or took their time. Hell if they asked their parents to proof read it. (Though, I'm sure some did, and received a blank stare as a response)

I don't know how you teachers do it without going crazy. My wife gets frustrated, but she tells me of those moments you get now and then, when a kid finally gets it. So there is that.
 
2012-06-04 08:27:44 AM
I kant speel, butt chek owt my awsum taattoo!?!?!?!!?!!!!@!@!@
 
2012-06-04 08:33:57 AM

RobSeace: dahmers love zombie: Fumbling fingers are one thing, but if I have to grade one more paper in which the word "ludicrous" is spelled "ludacris", or in which the adjective "prejudiced" is repeatedly (though consistently -- I'll give them that) spelled without the -ed suffix, I'm going to go on some sort of very low-energy, couch-based rampage.

Exactly... Everyone makes mistakes even when they know the proper spelling of a word... Sometimes, they might even have a brain-fart and swap in the wrong "there", "their", or "they're" while typing... All these things are forgivable...

But, what is not forgivable is shiat that clearly indicates the person writing/typing has no clue about the words they're using, and doesn't even realize how wrong they are... Stuff like "for all intensive purposes", "would of" or "should of", "per say", "walla", and other such horrid abominations... People using those nonsense phrases didn't just make a simple typo or even a thinko; they are simply totally ignorant... They misheard something once, and then tried to use it themselves without bothering to actually understand it first...


Says the person who uses ellipses in place of periods.

/I understand the difference
//just wanted to be a dick
 
2012-06-04 08:35:35 AM

Nemo's Brother: dahmers love zombie: Kymry: Spelling: Teach it, but don't freak out over it.

That's my motto.

Spell checkers have been invented. Welcome to the digital age.

Fumbling fingers are one thing, but if I have to grade one more paper in which the word "ludicrous" is spelled "ludacris", or in which the adjective "prejudiced" is repeatedly (though consistently -- I'll give them that) spelled without the -ed suffix, I'm going to go on some sort of very low-energy, couch-based rampage.

I hate 'rediculous'. I see it in Fark all the time.


Heh...Another common one is substituting 'then' for 'than' and vice versa.

Example: "I'd rather see him retire then stay in the race."


Makes me wince every time.
 
2012-06-04 08:37:40 AM

RobSeace: dahmers love zombie: Fumbling fingers are one thing, but if I have to grade one more paper in which the word "ludicrous" is spelled "ludacris", or in which the adjective "prejudiced" is repeatedly (though consistently -- I'll give them that) spelled without the -ed suffix, I'm going to go on some sort of very low-energy, couch-based rampage.

Exactly... Everyone makes mistakes even when they know the proper spelling of a word... Sometimes, they might even have a brain-fart and swap in the wrong "there", "their", or "they're" while typing... All these things are forgivable...

But, what is not forgivable is shiat that clearly indicates the person writing/typing has no clue about the words they're using, and doesn't even realize how wrong they are... Stuff like "for all intensive purposes", "would of" or "should of", "per say", "walla", and other such horrid abominations... People using those nonsense phrases didn't just make a simple typo or even a thinko; they are simply totally ignorant... They misheard something once, and then tried to use it themselves without bothering to actually understand it first...


"Conversate". Misuse of "I" and "me" as in "Here is a picture of Madison and I at the Twilight premiere."
 
2012-06-04 08:39:31 AM
Lose and loose are not the same word.
Stop using "loose" to mean lose, ya farking losers.
 
2012-06-04 08:39:49 AM

Gyrfalcon: Hey, when presidential candidates' aides spell their country's name "Amercia" and nobody seems to care, why should anyone else worry?


I know right? It's like when a President thinks we have 52 states.

//Those humans are so...well human.
 
2012-06-04 08:51:48 AM

Coffee Snob: Says the person who uses ellipses in place of periods.


Heh. I know, it's a bad, ancient habit of mine, and I'm just too damn old and set in my ways to even try to change now... But, at least I know it's wrong! If I thought any of these fools using "would of" understood it was wrong and were only doing it out of irony or something, I'd not want to strangle them quite as much...
 
2012-06-04 08:52:43 AM
How will we know who to look up to if we don't measure their ability to do utterly meaningless, worthless tasks under fake pressure? It is crucial that people who actually do all the work and build all the stuff realize that they are inferior and deserve their lowly status. This can only be done by a regular showing of how good a few bozos are at performing worthless tasks no sane person would waste their time or patience on.
 
2012-06-04 08:53:53 AM
I think it's silly to "protect the children" as the article proposes.

But I'll still put in my 2 cents. I think spelling is very important because who wants to read a bunch of misspelled crap. OTOH, while we might lose some character to our writing, i think adding difficult and archaic words just for the sake of fluffing the material for douchiness is not needed.

Who really needs to know what ingluvies means when crop (of a bird) does just fine?

/I'm also getting a kick out of the word "ingluvies" tripping up the spelling checker right now.
 
2012-06-04 09:02:05 AM
If people continue to use Tapatalk from their mobile devices, we will eventually lose the ability to communicate altogether.
 
2012-06-04 09:11:17 AM

teylix: I think it's silly to "protect the children" as the article proposes.

But I'll still put in my 2 cents. I think spelling is very important because who wants to read a bunch of misspelled crap. OTOH, while we might lose some character to our writing, i think adding difficult and archaic words just for the sake of fluffing the material for douchiness is not needed.

Who really needs to know what ingluvies means when crop (of a bird) does just fine?

/I'm also getting a kick out of the word "ingluvies" tripping up the spelling checker right now.


Words come into and go out of style frequently. Language is organic and it changes according to the needs of the people using it. As much as I hate Textspeek, it exists for a functional purpose.

As to the matter of "outdated" words, what was once considered archaic can wind up being the new trendy word in the coming decade. Turns of phrase don't really have a shelf life.
 
2012-06-04 09:17:23 AM

SkunkWerks: Words come into and go out of style frequently.


Quoz'ed for truth.

/What a shocking bad post.
 
2012-06-04 09:18:22 AM
Its easy to learn to spell if you read a lot. That's mostly how I learned. I easily notice spelling and grammatical errors when reading.

Grammatical errors are more difficult to spot though because I read mostly fiction; sci-fi, fantasy, Fark Politics Tab.
Shakespeare might have written some awesome plays, but trying to read that garbage is less exciting than taking out the trash and less useful.
 
2012-06-04 09:30:38 AM
lh3.ggpht.com

There is no feeling quite like the first time you scroll down to a Youtube comments section and see wall after wall of text with no punctuation, capitalization, or even basic grammar and spelling.
 
2012-06-04 09:36:30 AM

bingethinker: kevinatilusa: We don't need two worry so much about correct spelling anymore, since we have auto-correct and spell-check too fix everything for us.

Eye sea watt ewe did their.


Funny insight into linguistic processing, at least for me... that took more brain cycles to read than simple misspellings.

And I'm the kind of person who can't -not- see mistakes in things -- misspellings throw me completely out of the novel I'm reading, I compulsively reach for a red pen when flipping through a horribly-edited magazine, I collect examples of terrible-but-entertaining mistakes, etc. (I just wish there was some way to use that freakish skill to earn a living, alas.)

However, "I cee waht yu did ther." seems much quicker to read (though, of course, that doesn't make the point).

Odd... and fascinating.

/ spelling is important, and words have meanings
// yeah, typo in your resume / proposal / marketing brochure / etc? /dev/null for you!
 
2012-06-04 09:57:32 AM
Things like confusing then and than, mixing up I vs. me, and words that are obviously spelled incorrectly make me lose all context of what I'm reading. Self-published works can be bad enough to make me all twitchy, but the big publishing houses make their fair share.

I was recently tasked with reviewing dozens of applications and resumes for a communications/PR position. OMG. What a train wreck! (Protip: If you are applying for a position that requires good communication skills and you hope to be writing press releases and ads, take care to spell things like your former company's name and your home state correctly. Out of about 30 applications, there may have been 4 that didn't have obvious errors.

Spell checkers aren't foolproof. You still have to know which word you need.

Eye halve a spelling chequer. It came with my pea sea.
It plainly marques four my revue miss steaks eye kin knot sea.

Eye strike a key and type a word and weight four it two say
Weather eye am wrong oar write. It shows me strait a weigh.

As soon as a mist ache is maid, it nose bee fore two long
And eye can put the error rite. Its rarely ever wrong.

Eye have run this poem threw it, I am shore your pleased two no.
Its letter perfect in it's weigh. My chequer tolled me sew.
 
2012-06-04 09:58:28 AM
The great irony of the article in the link is that nearly every comment after it contains at least one-- if not multiple-- spelling errors.

I find it simultaneously sad and hilarious that a group of adults who don't seem to be very good at grammar or spelling are arguing over the quality of education for kids these days. "The education system is failing our children!" they say. "Programs are being cut back!" they say.

From the looks of it, the education system failed the adults doing the complaining, too.

Equally as sad in a hilarious way is the one comment that states that texting like a Prince fan and relying on lazy grammar/spelling is fine because it accomplishes what communication is meant to do and gets the message across.

Well, sure, I can get the message across by saying "I h8 ur stoopid face." but I could equally get that message across by punching you in the face and laughing menacingly. However, neither method of communication would make a good novel.

I admit it: I weep a little (inside) when I see YouTube or Facebook comments.

But then, I'm an author. I cringe when people send me texts that are comprised of txting shorthand. If you can type "ur" then you can type "you're" or "your" (depending on your intentions). I don't care that it saves time. All I care about is that I'm not hanging around with idiots.

Don't get me wrong-- A truncated, badly-spelled text message every once in a while when you're in a hurry is acceptable. Whole conversations like that, though... That sort of thing makes me want to scream.

Ultimately, I guess the point is that the kids are only as dumb as the adults allow them to be.
 
2012-06-04 10:00:05 AM
And yes, I spelled "txting shorthand" that way intentionally.
 
2012-06-04 10:01:43 AM

linker3000: Now thats just teasing the grammer nazi's


Grammar Nazi's what?

/I got trolled
 
2012-06-04 10:37:51 AM
i blame e.e. cummings
 
2012-06-04 11:19:04 AM

ZeroCorpse: The great irony of the article in the link is that nearly every comment after it contains at least one-- if not multiple-- spelling errors.

I find it simultaneously sad and hilarious that a group of adults who don't seem to be very good at grammar or spelling are arguing over the quality of education for kids these days. "The education system is failing our children!" they say. "Programs are being cut back!" they say.

From the looks of it, the education system failed the adults doing the complaining, too.

Equally as sad in a hilarious way is the one comment that states that texting like a Prince fan and relying on lazy grammar/spelling is fine because it accomplishes what communication is meant to do and gets the message across.

Well, sure, I can get the message across by saying "I h8 ur stoopid face." but I could equally get that message across by punching you in the face and laughing menacingly. However, neither method of communication would make a good novel.

I admit it: I weep a little (inside) when I see YouTube or Facebook comments.

But then, I'm an author. I cringe when people send me texts that are comprised of txting shorthand. If you can type "ur" then you can type "you're" or "your" (depending on your intentions). I don't care that it saves time. All I care about is that I'm not hanging around with idiots.

Don't get me wrong-- A truncated, badly-spelled text message every once in a while when you're in a hurry is acceptable. Whole conversations like that, though... That sort of thing makes me want to scream.

Ultimately, I guess the point is that the kids are only as dumb as the adults allow them to be.


Think YouTube and Facebook comments are bad? Read the comments on ESPN articles some time. Terrifying these people are allowed to breed.
 
2012-06-04 11:45:46 AM
Jeezis Crist, this maeks me sad... tiem to finde soem vodak.
 
2012-06-04 01:00:22 PM
www.pleasanthillgrain.com

/obscure?
 
2012-06-04 01:29:49 PM

hitlersbrain: How will we know who to look up to if we don't measure their ability to do utterly meaningless, worthless tasks under fake pressure?


Clearly it is the best way to prepare them for the real working world where they will be forced to do utterly meaningless, worthless tasks under fake pressure.
 
2012-06-04 01:33:18 PM

ZeroCorpse: But then, I'm an author. I cringe when people send me texts that are comprised of txting shorthand. If you can type "ur" then you can type "you're" or "your" (depending on your intentions). I don't care that it saves time. All I care about is that I'm not hanging around with idiots.


See the problem is that you've bought into the romantic idea that what you do is important. It's not really, at least not any more important than what any other schlub does. It's (hopefully) interesting to you, so that's great and you should continue pursuing what you enjoy, just don't pretend like anyone else should give a crap about you, or your work, or any other work that you admire.
 
2012-06-04 01:47:54 PM

the_geek: See the problem is that you've bought into the romantic idea that what you do is important.


What no one does is important. Ever. To anyone.
 
2012-06-04 02:01:01 PM

ZeroCorpse: I find it simultaneously sad and hilarious that a group of adults who don't seem to be very good at grammar or spelling are arguing over the quality of education for kids these days. "The education system is failing our children!" they say. "Programs are being cut back!" they say.

From the looks of it, the education system failed the adults doing the complaining, too.


Maybe the adults are lamenting what they thought would be a better educational environment for their kids. Neither of my parents attended college. My grandfather quit school in his teens to run his family's corner store. But there was an expectation that we would take every opportunity to become educated. My grandparents asked me a few times if I thought I would be better off going to a private school - they would help my parents with the cost. If my sister and I wanted to attend college, then that was in the cards, too. My great-grandfather never turned on a computer in his life, but he made sure we had one at the house.

It helped that we were in one of the wealthier towns in the state, hence one of the better-regarded school districts. We weren't wealthy by any means! But my parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents were interested in giving us every opportunity they could provide. If they thought something was in our best interest - a teacher they wanted us to have, or one they wanted us to avoid - they did what they could to make it happen.

So I can only imagine the frustrations of today's parents. Some, like my parents, don't have a college education but still want the best for their kids; others are educated and have that past experience to draw from. But for either side, it must be frustrating to see constant reports of substandard achievement, when they know the whole point is to educate the current cohort of children to do better than the last. (And I'll admit that I question a teacher's intellect when she replies to my "thanks" with "your welcome.")
 
2012-06-04 08:33:24 PM

SFSailor: bingethinker: kevinatilusa: We don't need two worry so much about correct spelling anymore, since we have auto-correct and spell-check too fix everything for us.

Eye sea watt ewe did their.

Funny insight into linguistic processing, at least for me... that took more brain cycles to read than simple misspellings.

And I'm the kind of person who can't -not- see mistakes in things -- misspellings throw me completely out of the novel I'm reading, I compulsively reach for a red pen when flipping through a horribly-edited magazine, I collect examples of terrible-but-entertaining mistakes, etc. (I just wish there was some way to use that freakish skill to earn a living, alas.)

However, "I cee waht yu did ther." seems much quicker to read (though, of course, that doesn't make the point).

Odd... and fascinating.

/ spelling is important, and words have meanings
// yeah, typo in your resume / proposal / marketing brochure / etc? /dev/null for you!


Yeah, it hurt my brain to write that sentence. I really had to concentrate to get the wrong words spelled correctly.
 
2012-06-04 08:53:07 PM
I make plenty of typographical errors. I proofread as I type, then again before I submit/send the message.
Original: "Origilan: I make pletny of typographical errors. I proofread as Itype, then again before I sumbit/send the message."

I never get auto-correct errors, because I check to see what I have written before I finish. I type quite rapidly, and so tend to lose little time.
 
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