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(Fox News)   Eight modern astronomy mysteries scientists cannot explain. I'm not saying it's aliens, but. . . it's aliens   (foxnews.com) divider line 5
    More: Obvious, astronomy, baryon, observational astronomy, dark matter, dark energy, dwarf galaxies, supernovas, Hubble Space Telescope  
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9670 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Jun 2012 at 3:24 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-06-02 03:44:30 PM
4 votes:
I cannot bring myself to open a Fox News link for science news.
2012-06-02 04:10:03 PM
2 votes:
It's actually a pretty interesting article that seems to have come via space.com from sciencemag

http://www.sciencemag.org/site/special/astro2012/index.xhtml

But you can't view that link without a subscription.

So all in all, I guess I found the article an interesting read, even if it was on a fox news page.

Same article at MSNBC

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/47637714/ns/technology_and_science-space/ # .T8pyv5JjHsE

And at HuffPo

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/01/modern-astronomy-mysteries-s c ience-slideshow_n_1561452.html

And at space.com

http://www.space.com/15942-modern-astronomy-mysteries-baffling-scient i sts.html
2012-06-02 06:26:31 PM
1 votes:
9. Why would I trust science reporting from Fox News even if it is a useless fluff piece?
2012-06-02 06:25:22 PM
1 votes:
If it makes up only 5%, and something else is 95%, why do we call it "regular matter"?
2012-06-02 04:59:56 PM
1 votes:
Nothing quite like a science article that displays a fundamental lack of comprehension in its headline. Hasn't Explained /= Can't Explain. If you haven't looked in your neighbor's fridge, you can't say what's in there, but it doesn't mean it's the farking Ark of the Covenant, filled with ineffable mysteries.


1) What is dark energy?

A hypothetical placeholder for something. Frankly, I don't find this one that interesting, myself, until there's a useful consumer product related to it.


2) How hot is dark matter?

Kinda hot.


3) Where are the missing baryons?

Missing. Probably this question is more about the question than about the baryons.


4) How do stars explode?

KA-BLAMMMM!


5) What re-ionized the universe?

It would be weirder if it had ended up non-ionized.


6) What's the source of the most energetic cosmic rays?

Blue-shift, maybe.


7) Why is the solar system so bizarre?

It's not. It's just a question of perspective.


8) Why is the sun's corona so hot?

There are several possible explanations, including magnetic compression, and probably we'd know by now if we'd spent more money on investigating this, but probably the money would have been better spent elsewhere. Although not necessarily where we did spend it.
 
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