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(Cracked)   Seven famous musicians who stole some of their biggest hits. Difficulty: they consider Green Day to be "famous" and "musicians"   (cracked.com) divider line 34
    More: Fail, Green Day, American Idiot, popular songs, Debbie Downer, T-Rex, Stevie Wonder, musical group, Beatles  
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14169 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 31 May 2012 at 1:28 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2012-05-30 09:32:08 PM
4 votes:
65 million albums sold worldwide and 5 Grammys. I'd say they are famous musicians.
2012-05-31 03:19:54 AM
2 votes:
They left out another for Green Day:

The opening drum solo for Give Me Novocaine

Sounds an aful lot like U2's Bullet the Blue Sky

(and kinda sorta like When the Levee Breaks)

In short - lots of music sounds alike.
2012-05-31 02:08:59 AM
2 votes:

Beerguy: Godscrack: [img593.imageshack.us image 520x427]

Exactly.

Exhibit "A"

"Blinded by the Light" is a song written and originally recorded by Bruce Springsteen, although it is mostly known by its 1976 #1 hit version recorded by Manfred Mann's Earth Band.

Source



Why are people having such trouble distinguishing between doing a cover version, and stealing a song and claiming it as your original work?
2012-05-31 01:38:19 AM
2 votes:
2 of John Cougar Mellencamp's big hits were swiped from other musicians:

For "Jack and Diane", he stole from Steve Miller's "Take the Money and Run"

Same story telling lyrics, same hand clapping, and an eerily similar opening line:

"This is the story of Jack and Diane, two American kids doing the best they can" vs.

""This is the story of Bobby Joe and Billy Sue, two young lovers with nothing better to do""

And Mellencamp also swiped "The Authority Song" from Bobby Fuller's "I fought the Law"
2012-05-31 12:15:15 AM
2 votes:
I like Cracked links and I read them, but before I read the rest of this one I want to point out this line:

lot of people accuse hip-hop artists of stealing their best music. You can't get through a rap song nowadays without hearing bits and snippets of other popular songs that have been "sampled" in.

Not nowadays. Most rap songs nowadays are combining a singer and original albeit simple beats and harmony phrases.

Maybe you were thinking about 25 years ago.
2012-05-30 10:21:47 PM
2 votes:
Author clearly isnt very knowledgeable because this list could have been a lot better...

The Rolling Stones
Led Zeppelin
Van Halen

The biggest names have all ripped off someone else. And so what?

Next: did you know that comedian stole that joke from someone else?
2012-05-31 07:20:56 PM
1 votes:
Fark Timburglar.

It's one thing to steal songwriting credit and royalties for a song written by somebody far more obscure, but it takes a special kind of sh*ttiness to call the person who wrote your hit song an "idiot" and a "freakin' jerk", and attack them for daring to "step to a king."

It was a huge disappointment to me when the lawsuit filed on behalf of the true authors of "Acidjazzed Evening" was ultimately dismissed on procedural grounds.

(Their attorneys, perhaps unfamiliar with the intricacies of US law, filed in Florida, but the defendants successfully argued lack of jurisdiction because neither Timbaland nor Nelly Furtado had conducted business in the state; the record sales that had taken place there were found not to qualify.)
2012-05-31 03:30:45 PM
1 votes:

Brother_Mouzone: pwn3d781: Hopefully, Beyonce's handlers didn't have too much of a beef with Kelly.

/srsly, good on her for having a little integrity

I read it in an article from the New Yorker. all the big time singers all have the same producer. thats why beyonce, rihanna, kelly clarkson, Katy perry, Britney Spears, etc.. have songs that sound alike. Pretty interesting article.

interesting read


That's been a trend for a LONG time. I was reading up recently on Stock/Aitken/Waterman, the British "hit machine" that popped out songs for Kylie Minogue, Jason Donovan, Bananarama and Rick Astley, among a host of other '80s pop stars. (Yes, that means that if someone interrupts your attempted pursuit of a lady with a Rickroll, you've been Stock-blocked.)

I think a really good example of that was Daughtry's first album. From the outside, you could say it's a good demonstration of the depth of a musician's ability, in terms of not just repeating the same song (a la AC/DC). But then if you listen closely, it feels almost like each song was written for someone else. "Crashed" has the kind of "yeah, yeah" that would be appropriate for Kelly Clarkson (though I can't find common writing credits). "What About Now" caught my attention because it reminded me of an Evanescence song, only with a male vocalist. If you had Amy Lee sing the song and added a little metal flair, it'd be an Evanescence song. And sure enough, the writing credits went to Ben Moody and David Hodges, two of Evanescence's founding members. Those are the two shining examples that come to mind.

Of course, wasn't Kelly Clarkson's big breakout hit "Miss Independent" originally written for Christina Aguilera?
2012-05-31 10:43:50 AM
1 votes:
Green Day: Commodified punk for frat boys.
2012-05-31 10:38:09 AM
1 votes:

Angry Buddha: bungle_jr: drongozone: The Clash easily had 4 or 5 songs that did The Who's "I Can't Explain" thing

no they didn't. they had only 2 songs. "rock the casbah" and "london calling".

at least according to the radio

seriously, have you heard any other clash song on regular radio stations?

Pretty much, though I did hear "Train in Vain" the other day.

/oh, and "Should I Stay" once in a blue moon


oh yeah...i actually hear "should i stay" far more than "london calling"
2012-05-31 10:26:38 AM
1 votes:
The Clash easily had 4 or 5 songs that did The Who's "I Can't Explain" thing
2012-05-31 10:02:09 AM
1 votes:
Isn't Fark a rip off of Slashdot?


/I think so
2012-05-31 09:17:47 AM
1 votes:

DeaH: Is Green Day really considered punk?


Yes, no, and at the end of the day it doesn't really much matter. Arguing whether or not something is punk is pretty much the least punk thing ever. People call the Ramones punk, though they had no problem sounding all nice and sugary at times.
2012-05-31 09:17:25 AM
1 votes:

FirstNationalBastard: List fails horribly without Elvis.

I mean, come on... the whole reason Rock and Roll gained mainstream acceptance was because an attractive white man covered all the black rock and roll songs and made them palatable for mass consumption in the '50s.


No, that was Pat Boone's job.
2012-05-31 09:07:39 AM
1 votes:

Ihaveanevilparrot: ZeroCorpse: And no matter how much they stole, they aren't anywhere near as bad as Timbaland, who not only steals licks, but steals WHOLE SONGS and then just adds drums, or a vocal track

That's pretty much Coolio's whole career...

Which is what makes it even more assinine that so he got so pissed about Weird Al parodying Gangsta's Paradise, since all the music and chorus, were ripped off from Stevie Wonder's Pastime Paradise, though he at least admits to it by giving him a writing credit; and I think there was a performance that included Stevie Wonder at some point.
Not that his version isn't a decent change, but what an ego based on a composition that is mostly not even his.


That wasn't the issue. Coolio's agent decided to speak for him, so he never knew about it until the song came out. That's actually pretty understandable from my POV. They've long since made up.

www.weirdal.com
/Ironically hotlinked from weirdal.com
2012-05-31 08:52:56 AM
1 votes:
Some of that list was a bit iffy. Not a Green Day hater at all, but their cover of "I Fought the Law" is one of the worst covers of all time. Talk about sucking the energy out of a classic piece of music.

The Clash > The Bobby Fuller Four > Sonny Curtis of The Crickets > Tebow > Green Day
2012-05-31 08:16:11 AM
1 votes:

Skr: FTA "one of the last great punk bands to walk the earth or a total slap in the face to everything punk music stands for" they were neither. They were/are an alt rock band that borrowed heavily from the music around them. Nothing wrong with that and they had their place. Even with the pioneers, the artist ends up an amalgam of their influences to various degrees and sometimes something vaguely recognizable slips out.

There is Vanilla Ice level riff stealing, but most of the theft seems minimal or at least unintentional. In the most simple terms -Only so many ways to strum E♭ B♭ G♭together.


/lightning crashes, a new mother cries.


If you were going to bring up chords, you could've at least picked chords that shared a major key, or a common progression.

//lightning crashes is F C G or IV I V. Try I IV V.
2012-05-31 03:55:15 AM
1 votes:

The English Major: The Verve/The Rolling Stones


I actually think The Verve got screwed on that. They paid for and got permission for the sample.

Then, once the song became a massive hit, the Rolling Stones' lawyers said, "oh you used that sample too much, uh...that means we get all royalties."
2012-05-31 03:11:21 AM
1 votes:

BSABSVR: I'm not a huge green day fan, but your lawn sucks submitter.


Dude, I'm old enough to remember when Dookie came out and I went "meh, punks did it already."
2012-05-31 02:49:30 AM
1 votes:

Snapper Carr: They left out one for Green Day


25 or 6 to 4



ripped off the end of...

Babe, I'm Gonna Leave You
mjg
2012-05-31 02:44:12 AM
1 votes:
List fails without mention of Coldplay ripping off Joe Satriani.
2012-05-31 02:23:29 AM
1 votes:

Snapper Carr: They left out one for Green Day

Brain Stew

25 or 6 to 4

Similar lyrical themes (mind numbed after a long night of drug abuse), main riff is almost identical.


Huh. Never noticed that and I love 25 or 6 to 4. Green Day not so much.
2012-05-31 02:12:17 AM
1 votes:
Good article but I think the whole idea of limited musical variety in pop music is far more aptly summed up with the song "Four Chords" by Axis of Awesome

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOlDewpCfZQ
2012-05-31 01:54:54 AM
1 votes:
I'm not a huge green day fan, but your lawn sucks submitter.
2012-05-31 01:54:02 AM
1 votes:

fusillade762: No Nirvana vs Killing Joke?

Killing Joke also sued Nirvana during this phase, alleging that the riff for the latter's song "Come as You Are" was copied from the riff for their song "Eighties".[10][11] The lawsuit was dropped after the sudden death of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain.[27]


Its a wonder Tom Scholz never sued them for how much "Smells Like Teen Spirit" sounds like "More Than A Feeling".
Then again, Boston ripped off "Louie Louie" for that, so maybe not such a wonder.
2012-05-31 01:43:23 AM
1 votes:
2012-05-31 01:41:22 AM
1 votes:

Gunderson: Same story telling lyrics, same hand clapping, and an eerily similar opening line:


The songs are vaguely similar, doesn't mean Mellencamp swiped anything.
2012-05-31 01:35:54 AM
1 votes:
Yeah subby, Green Day are quite famous and also they're very good musicians.
2012-05-31 01:35:52 AM
1 votes:

nekom: I'm not fan of green day at all, but hey subby, how many albums have you released? How many copies have you sold? Just sayin.


Green Day has also sold farkloads of t-shirts to teenagers. I bet subby has only sold several t-shirts to teenagers.
2012-05-31 01:12:54 AM
1 votes:

ecmoRandomNumbers: An ascending half step is hardly copyright-worthy. Otherwise, the "two bits" part of "shave and a haircut" would also be an egregious copy.


Not to mention that Dvorak died in 1904, so Williams could have ripped entire passages and shoved it into his music if he wanted and had it be legal, acceptable and really, it's part of the point of having a public domain.

It's not all about being able to freely distribute copyrighted works. You build on top of the public domain.
2012-05-30 11:58:10 PM
1 votes:
List fails horribly without Elvis.

I mean, come on... the whole reason Rock and Roll gained mainstream acceptance was because an attractive white man covered all the black rock and roll songs and made them palatable for mass consumption in the '50s.
2012-05-30 11:17:37 PM
1 votes:
img593.imageshack.us
2012-05-30 09:45:00 PM
1 votes:
I'm not fan of green day at all, but hey subby, how many albums have you released? How many copies have you sold? Just sayin.
2012-05-30 09:43:14 PM
1 votes:
On John Williams: Check out John Williams' theme back to back with Dvorak's Symphony No. 9:

An ascending half step is hardly copyright-worthy. Otherwise, the "two bits" part of "shave and a haircut" would also be an egregious copy.
 
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