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(Forbes)   Hahaha Jump you F$cker   (forbes.com) divider line 54
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6371 clicks; posted to Business » on 30 May 2012 at 8:24 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-30 05:54:05 PM
Well it would clear the bad sectors
 
2012-05-30 05:59:58 PM
I know little about the whole thing, so please correct me. Did they basically bet that it would fail? Isn't that what it seemed like was going on? I can't imagine that Facebook is a company nobody wants to invest in.
 
2012-05-30 06:16:06 PM

Nadie_AZ: I know little about the whole thing, so please correct me. Did they basically bet that it would fail? Isn't that what it seemed like was going on? I can't imagine that Facebook is a company nobody wants to invest in.


I'm not really following it either, but roughly speaking Zuckerburg is already being sued by shareholders for not being completely honest about Facebook's net worth and financial outlook, while Morgan Stanley may have shared some of the "true" knowledge with only preferred clients, so they're being investigated by the SEC. This article is basically how Morgan Stanley is now blaming Nasdaq for all the problems.
 
2012-05-30 06:23:55 PM

Nadie_AZ: I know little about the whole thing, so please correct me. Did they basically bet that it would fail? Isn't that what it seemed like was going on? I can't imagine that Facebook is a company nobody wants to invest in.


It would be a great investment at a 20:1 price earnings ratio. Unfortunately they priced it at a 100:1 price earnings ratio.
 
2012-05-30 06:43:09 PM
So, this guy thinks that 10 days later, as the share price continues to fall, the reason the stock has fallen 25% since its IPO is that trading was delayed 30 minutes on Day 1? You gotta come up with something better than that, buddy.
 
2012-05-30 06:59:01 PM

Three Crooked Squirrels: So, this guy thinks that 10 days later, as the share price continues to fall, the reason the stock has fallen 25% since its IPO is that trading was delayed 30 minutes on Day 1? You gotta come up with something better than that, buddy.


That's like cooking your shareholders a crab bisque that makes them violently sick for days, and then blaming it on the waiter for bringing it to their table 1 minute late.
 
2012-05-30 07:02:19 PM
They knew it was going to be low. MS was warning their people before hand. Overhype was going to damage the price no matter what, and it was probably intentionally overpriced.

Probably all done to enrich a few people who planned it who will buy in low now without attention. Worst thing is, I doubt there is anything illegal about it. The price was known, can't really call insider trading.

Of course, a proper free market should only encourage this.
 
2012-05-30 07:06:26 PM
The dead cat never had a chance to bounce.
 
2012-05-30 07:12:26 PM

2wolves: The dead cat never had a chance to bounce.


It hasn't hit the ground yet. I'd buy it at $8 a share.
 
2012-05-30 07:31:23 PM
I'm saving my money for the Fark IPO.
 
2012-05-30 07:38:48 PM

I_Am_Weasel: I'm saving my money for the Fark IPO.


Still won't get you dates with the Mods.
 
2012-05-30 08:39:27 PM

DeltaPunch: I'm not really following it either, but roughly speaking Zuckerburg is already being sued by shareholders for not being completely honest about Facebook's net worth and financial outlook, while Morgan Stanley may have shared some of the "true" knowledge with only preferred clients, so they're being investigated by the SEC. This article is basically how Morgan Stanley is now blaming Nasdaq for all the problems.


I knew this was going to happen, and I know nothing about investing.

The problem is there was no reason for Facebook to become a joint-stock company. Companies usually go IPO to amass a large amount of capital to expand operations or meet expenses. Facebook is not in this position. It has no problem securing financing to continue operations, its product is free, its support network (ie: users) is cheap and its expenses are all services: A gaggle of programmers, developers and designers to keep the API running.

The real reason Facebook went IPO is because its initial investors want to cash out. Almost all of the IPO is not going toward expansion of operations or hiring new divisions but directly into investors pockets. There's no dividends coming.

Facebook reached critical mass as a market idea three years ago and it has nowhere to go so it is stagnant. Everyone who knew anything about the company was well aware that this was going to happen. But Wall Street is full of short-sighted narcissists driven by greed and fear.
 
2012-05-30 08:40:18 PM
What's a F$cker?
 
2012-05-30 08:46:03 PM
Lying cocksuckers. Oh wait............. you knew that, right?
 
2012-05-30 08:49:55 PM
Forget jumping. This guy has made himself accountable by claiming his company acted properly.

When the shiat hits the fan, throw him in jail.
 
2012-05-30 09:00:32 PM

Ishkur: The real reason Facebook went IPO is because its initial investors want to cash out.


greenobles.com

Who? Wha? Me?
 
2012-05-30 09:01:29 PM

Nadie_AZ: I know little about the whole thing, so please correct me. Did they basically bet that it would fail? Isn't that what it seemed like was going on? I can't imagine that Facebook is a company nobody wants to invest in.


For almost every investment type that some people want to succeed, there are people betting that it will fail. Corporations like Goldman-Sachs made bets against the same mortgage-backed securities they were selling to their investors, in case they failed. They made $50 billion in revenue in 2009.

It's like selling someone a house on a flood plain, insuring that house, then betting there will be lots of thunderstorms.
 
2012-05-30 09:02:24 PM
Jump on my lap, Halah.
 
2012-05-30 09:10:52 PM

Atomic Spunk: What's a F$cker?


Someone who fscks for money.
 
2012-05-30 09:27:21 PM
When the price gets low enough, Google should attempt a hostile take-over. For the lulz.

/It would be like the time RJ Fletcher bought U62 in order to shut it down
//except Google wouldn't fail so hard
///always time for UHF references
 
2012-05-30 09:31:26 PM
Pumping and dumping was once illegal, before the SEC became a hollowed out pussified shell.
 
2012-05-30 09:40:09 PM

Three Crooked Squirrels: So, this guy thinks that 10 days later, as the share price continues to fall, the reason the stock has fallen 25% since its IPO is that trading was delayed 30 minutes on Day 1? You gotta come up with something better than that, buddy.


No shiat. The market corrected for the delay about 30 seconds after trading was opened. They're gonna need a bigger scapegoat than NASDAQ.

Ishkur: The problem is there was no reason for Facebook to become a joint-stock company.


My understanding was that Zuckerberg was forced to go public because FB had too many investors.
 
2012-05-30 10:07:21 PM
Gorman confirmed that regulators have been in touch over the allegations that it shared information about Facebook with some clients ahead of the IPO, Dow Jones reports.

Ha ha ha ha...don't drop the soap

Who am I kidding. Fines, no prison.
 
2012-05-30 10:09:40 PM

Nadie_AZ: I know little about the whole thing, so please correct me. Did they basically bet that it would fail? Isn't that what it seemed like was going on? I can't imagine that Facebook is a company nobody wants to invest in.


You should imagine it, because it's true. Just like Twitter, just because everyone knows about it doesn't mean it'll make you rich.

They were "valued" by the bank at something like 100x their annual revenue. If you want to compare that, if you add up the market caps of companies like Google and Apple you'll see they're at about 13x annual revenue. So if something is significantly overvalued, it's got nowhere to go but down.

Also, the writing has been on the wall for quite some time that Facebook has no real plan to generate revenue into the future. All they can do is sell ads, and their ads don't do squat. So who invests in a company with no plan to make money?

As was said, this wasn't a real IPO in the sense of "raise money, get bigger, do bigger things." This was, "all these venture capitalists are antsy and want to cash out, so the banks are going to lie so they can get even more money." The average investor had no shot at profiting from the Facebook IPO, there's no business advantage to doing it, and a bank or two essentially helped them defraud the public. Hence, lawsuits.
 
2012-05-30 10:23:16 PM
Poppycock. They knew exactly what they were doing. The P/E for the IPO was in the neighborhood of 100/1........100/1. They knew half-wits out there would buy into the IPO just because they liked Facebook, not caring about any of the underlying fundamentals, or how wildly overpriced the offering was. Zuck sold over 1 billion dollars worth of stock on day one because he (and Morgan Stanley) knew the stock was going to fall towards a more reasonable price given FBs actual book value.

Facebook and Morgan Stanley did the math and knew the billions made in the IPO would outweigh the millions in fines that will likely be paid to "regulatory" agencies.
 
2012-05-30 10:39:04 PM
Oh noes, it failed to soar stratospheric into AAPL/GOOG territory.

Shrug.
 
2012-05-30 10:39:46 PM

Ishkur: DeltaPunch: I'm not really following it either, but roughly speaking Zuckerburg is already being sued by shareholders for not being completely honest about Facebook's net worth and financial outlook, while Morgan Stanley may have shared some of the "true" knowledge with only preferred clients, so they're being investigated by the SEC. This article is basically how Morgan Stanley is now blaming Nasdaq for all the problems.

I knew this was going to happen, and I know nothing about investing.

The problem is there was no reason for Facebook to become a joint-stock company. Companies usually go IPO to amass a large amount of capital to expand operations or meet expenses. Facebook is not in this position. It has no problem securing financing to continue operations, its product is free, its support network (ie: users) is cheap and its expenses are all services: A gaggle of programmers, developers and designers to keep the API running.

The real reason Facebook went IPO is because its initial investors want to cash out. Almost all of the IPO is not going toward expansion of operations or hiring new divisions but directly into investors pockets. There's no dividends coming.

Facebook reached critical mass as a market idea three years ago and it has nowhere to go so it is stagnant. Everyone who knew anything about the company was well aware that this was going to happen. But Wall Street is full of short-sighted narcissists driven by greed and fear.


This is damn near perfect expression of what i was thinking about this and why I had zero interest in this IPO. They should have done this when they were expanding a couple of years ago, and they could have done a google. google's big moneymaking products now didn't exist for the most part when they went public. It seems obvious to me, but then I'm not a business type or investor.
 
2012-05-30 10:41:14 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMjlBN1ZDX4
 
2012-05-30 10:44:44 PM

Pumpernickel bread: Poppycock. They knew exactly what they were doing. The P/E for the IPO was in the neighborhood of 100/1........100/1. They knew half-wits out there would buy into the IPO just because they liked Facebook, not caring about any of the underlying fundamentals, or how wildly overpriced the offering was. Zuck sold over 1 billion dollars worth of stock on day one because he (and Morgan Stanley) knew the stock was going to fall towards a more reasonable price given FBs actual book value.

Facebook and Morgan Stanley did the math and knew the billions made in the IPO would outweigh the millions in fines that will likely be paid to "regulatory" agencies.


This may be a bigger lawsuit than they were expecting, if a jury can be convinced that this was all about pocketing money from gullible investors. I don't really think that Zuckerberg wanted to just cash out. I think he's probsbly not happy about what this is going to do to the company's plans. Silly to blame NASDAQ though.
 
2012-05-30 10:52:57 PM

Pumpernickel bread: Poppycock. They knew exactly what they were doing. The P/E for the IPO was in the neighborhood of 100/1........100/1. They knew half-wits out there would buy into the IPO just because they liked Facebook, not caring about any of the underlying fundamentals, or how wildly overpriced the offering was. Zuck sold over 1 billion dollars worth of stock on day one because he (and Morgan Stanley) knew the stock was going to fall towards a more reasonable price given FBs actual book value.

Facebook and Morgan Stanley did the math and knew the billions made in the IPO would outweigh the millions in fines that will likely be paid to "regulatory" agencies.


Nailed it on the head. The cost of playing by the rules is huge compared to the fraction you pay for cheating them.
 
2012-05-30 11:08:08 PM
FTA: trading of Facebook shares were delayed by about 30 minutes. Gorman is among the crowd pointing the finger at Nasdaq. He said in the meeting today that the issues resulted in "unprecedented confusion and disarray."

This sounds like Obama blaming Bush. It's been nearly two weeks and Gorman still blames the initial THIRTY MINUTES. Elmer Fudd makes more sense.
 
2012-05-30 11:35:23 PM
The IPO was not a disaster, it was a huge success for Morgan Stanley.

They work for facebook and what they did was get the maximum amount of money from facebook.

If people were stupid enough to buy stock, that is their problem.

It would have been far worse for facebook if they sold stock at the IPO for 38 and the market believed the stock was really worth 45. that means the company left $7/share on the table.
 
2012-05-30 11:37:22 PM
ack, meant they go the maximum amount "for facebook" not "from Facebook."
 
2012-05-30 11:55:21 PM
It's amazing how much of that "reporting" was culled from other news sources.

People get paid for this?
 
2012-05-31 12:14:03 AM
Facebook should go private when it hits a bottom anywhere below 20.
 
2012-05-31 12:20:50 AM

I_Am_Weasel: I'm saving my money for the Fark IPO.


HUSH your mouth.
 
2012-05-31 12:45:43 AM

I_Am_Weasel: I'm saving my money for the Fark IPO.


img.fark.net
You've already invested.
 
2012-05-31 01:24:10 AM

I_Am_Weasel: I'm saving my money for the Fark IPO.


That IPO would have to be 4.69 right. What is Fark's current value in cats only? What are the future forecasts of FNB posting pony pics? Will there be a stock dip after the hockey playoffs?
 
2012-05-31 01:33:22 AM

TheManofPA: I_Am_Weasel: I'm saving my money for the Fark IPO.

That IPO would have to be 4.69 right. What is Fark's current value in cats only? What are the future forecasts of FNB posting pony pics? Will there be a stock dip after the hockey playoffs?


I want my dividends in either handjobs from TFettes or beer from admins

/Maybe a handjob from admins, just to diversify the portfolio
 
2012-05-31 01:47:14 AM
Put Facebook Stock into a box with a small bottle of poop that opens due to the decay of an enclosed radioactive isotope. Close the box. At any given time, is the stock covered in shiat?

/trick question, it was covered in shiat to begin with.
 
2012-05-31 02:04:52 AM
The Icelandic Revolution. I have watched the world rise up nation by nation, then city by city, then town by town. I have seen a police state mentality in response. I have waited for the success of one nation out of 196 to succeed. That it happened, I am not surprised, that it happened peacefully, I am profoundly surprised and elated. That it is not the topic of every teacher, preacher, anchor and activist is mind boggling.

The television media, intent on serving up its daily dose of celebrity gossip, shows only snippets of world events and their citizenry revolutions. Most coverage lacks real in-depth discussions on the reasons behind such malcontent. Much of the coverage is a one dimensional viewpoint, with multi-angle shots of police brutality, acting as a subliminal warning to would-be demonstrators, and not meant to enlighten viewers.

The beauty of the Icelandic Revolution is that it made right the many wrongs perpetrated on the citizens of Iceland. The same wrongs perpetrated here and abroad.

What they achieved is remarkable.

• They forced the country's ENTIRE corrupt government to resign.
• Held new elections.
• They created a referendum that allowed the people to determine their own economic system. 93% of the voters refused to pay back debt to Great Britain and Holland.
• They nationalized their bank.
• They held accountable and incarcerated those responsible for the economic meltdown.
• To protect themselves from the same ill fated leadership, they are rewriting the Iceland Constitution by people of their own choosing.
• They refused to pay the bad debt of their bankers, placing the biggest lenders in receivership.
• They forced Prime Minister Geir H. Haarde to resign.
• They tried Geir H. Haarde, and he was found guilty of negligence, in relation to the financial crisis. He is the only political leader in the world to face prosecution over the crisis in the world economy.
• Many top executives and bankers are arrested and Implicated parties are told to leave Iceland by Interpol.
• They removed their money from the banks, forcing them to liquidate, borrow and pay their customers.
• They demanded the forgiveness of debt by banks, and since 2008m banks have forgiven 13% of the nation's gross domestic product in loans.

In 2008, the Kroner lost 85% of its value, compared to the Euro. At the end of the year Iceland declared bankruptcy. By 2011 the harsh austerity measures taken, helped the country's economy. It is now showing signs of health. However, the current global economic crisis has Greece verging on default. Many other euro-zone states are under pressure.

The US and Ireland injected billions of dollars of capital into their financial institutions to keep them afloat, and the taxpayers are left holding the bag. All the while, our government has acted as if the economy was turning the corner with rosy predictions that fly in the face of our reality. As a super power it has influenced or at least attempted to influence the beleaguered world to follow suit.
 
2012-05-31 02:08:47 AM

germ78: When the price gets low enough, Google should attempt a hostile take-over. For the lulz.

/It would be like the time RJ Fletcher bought U62 in order to shut it down
//except Google wouldn't fail so hard
///always time for UHF references


I was out shopping thrift stores for books today and I overheard this guy going on and on about this leather sofa that was on sale for $140. Should he buy it, can he move it, will it match his other furniture. He just went on and on.

He was so annoying I was tempted to slap out the plastic, buy the damned sofa, and taking it to a different thrift store to dump it there. Now imagine applying that sort of spite in the business world. For the lulz.
 
2012-05-31 02:12:43 AM
With a bonus quote by Mary Meeker.

Yes, THAT Mary Meeker.

And THIS.

If there's any reason to trust Wall Street as a place to invest, it's NOT because of Mary Meeker.
 
2012-05-31 02:21:14 AM

some_beer_drinker: The Icelandic Revolution. I have watched the world rise up nation by nation, then city by city, then town by town. I have seen a police state mentality in response. I have waited for the success of one nation out of 196 to succeed. That it happened, I am not surprised, that it happened peacefully, I am profoundly surprised and elated. That it is not the topic of every teacher, preacher, anchor and activist is mind boggling.

The television media, intent on serving up its daily dose of celebrity gossip, shows only snippets of world events and their citizenry revolutions. Most coverage lacks real in-depth discussions on the reasons behind such malcontent. Much of the coverage is a one dimensional viewpoint, with multi-angle shots of police brutality, acting as a subliminal warning to would-be demonstrators, and not meant to enlighten viewers.

The beauty of the Icelandic Revolution is that it made right the many wrongs perpetrated on the citizens of Iceland. The same wrongs perpetrated here and abroad.

What they achieved is remarkable.

• They forced the country's ENTIRE corrupt government to resign.
• Held new elections.
• They created a referendum that allowed the people to determine their own economic system. 93% of the voters refused to pay back debt to Great Britain and Holland.
• They nationalized their bank.
• They held accountable and incarcerated those responsible for the economic meltdown.
• To protect themselves from the same ill fated leadership, they are rewriting the Iceland Constitution by people of their own choosing.
• They refused to pay the bad debt of their bankers, placing the biggest lenders in receivership.
• They forced Prime Minister Geir H. Haarde to resign.
• They tried Geir H. Haarde, and he was found guilty of negligence, in relation to the financial crisis. He is the only political leader in the world to face prosecution over the crisis in the world economy.
• Many top executives and bankers are arrested ...


Never even heard of this. How true is it? I was also thinking the other day that the reason our country doesn't have the awesome protests that European countries have is partially due to laziness, but also our nation is huge. I'd go to Wall Street to protest if it wasn't a 7 hour flight.
 
2012-05-31 02:24:22 AM
buying FB stock ain't no job for a man. i told 'em, "shove that shiat!"
 
2012-05-31 03:11:34 AM
analysts at the particular underwriting firms are NOT allowed to comment on the IPOs.

unfortunately the SEC is terrible, so when the press fury has died down the SEC will fine them for a couple million, and MS will admit no wrongdoing.
 
2012-05-31 06:27:38 AM

RibbyK: FTA: trading of Facebook shares were delayed by about 30 minutes. Gorman is among the crowd pointing the finger at Nasdaq. He said in the meeting today that the issues resulted in "unprecedented confusion and disarray."

This sounds like Obama blaming Bush. It's been nearly two weeks and Gorman still blames the initial THIRTY MINUTES. Elmer Fudd makes more sense.


Bush will be blamed for generations, and rightly so.
 
2012-05-31 07:55:48 AM

RibbyK: FTA: trading of Facebook shares were delayed by about 30 minutes. Gorman is among the crowd pointing the finger at Nasdaq. He said in the meeting today that the issues resulted in "unprecedented confusion and disarray."

This sounds like Obama blaming Bush. It's been nearly two weeks and Gorman still blames the initial THIRTY MINUTES. Elmer Fudd makes more sense.


I think this guy gave the interview:
i.imgur.com
 
2012-05-31 09:21:32 AM

hoihoi8: some_beer_drinker: The Icelandic Revolution. I have watched the world rise up nation by nation, then city by city, then town by town. I have seen a police state mentality in response. I have waited for the success of one nation out of 196 to succeed. That it happened, I am not surprised, that it happened peacefully, I am profoundly surprised and elated. That it is not the topic of every teacher, preacher, anchor and activist is mind boggling.

The television media, intent on serving up its daily dose of celebrity gossip, shows only snippets of world events and their citizenry revolutions. Most coverage lacks real in-depth discussions on the reasons behind such malcontent. Much of the coverage is a one dimensional viewpoint, with multi-angle shots of police brutality, acting as a subliminal warning to would-be demonstrators, and not meant to enlighten viewers.

The beauty of the Icelandic Revolution is that it made right the many wrongs perpetrated on the citizens of Iceland. The same wrongs perpetrated here and abroad.

What they achieved is remarkable.

• They forced the country's ENTIRE corrupt government to resign.
• Held new elections.
• They created a referendum that allowed the people to determine their own economic system. 93% of the voters refused to pay back debt to Great Britain and Holland.
• They nationalized their bank.
• They held accountable and incarcerated those responsible for the economic meltdown.
• To protect themselves from the same ill fated leadership, they are rewriting the Iceland Constitution by people of their own choosing.
• They refused to pay the bad debt of their bankers, placing the biggest lenders in receivership.
• They forced Prime Minister Geir H. Haarde to resign.
• They tried Geir H. Haarde, and he was found guilty of negligence, in relation to the financial crisis. He is the only political leader in the world to face prosecution over the crisis in the world economy.
• Many top executives and b ...


it's totally true and amazing. google it. we can win. we really can.
 
2012-05-31 09:44:02 AM

TheShavingofOccam123: Who am I kidding. Fines, no prison.


Plus the fines will be a fraction of what they made on the deal. But I'm sure they've learned their lesson this time, and won't ever do it again.
 
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