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(RamblingBeachCat.com)   You're welcome, Class of 2012: Top 10 things no one tells high school graduates   (ramblingbeachcat.com) divider line 246
    More: Amusing, high schools  
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28171 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 May 2012 at 9:23 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-27 03:08:27 PM  
I see they skipped the useful ones, like:

11. Don't go unless you want to end up in the same place you started, except now you're unable to get a job shoveling fries because you're "overqualified," and you also have usurious loans to pay off tagging along for the ride
 
2012-05-27 03:09:24 PM  

ExperianScaresCthulhu: Dr_Gene:
Well, thanks to you, now the Farkosphere knows I didn't take English in College, not so much as a single credit.
/But I graduated and got a job in spite of the deficiency.


How is that possible, unless you tested out of the required courses? or you didn't go to school in the US?


I went to college in the olden days, when students were able to bypass the English requirement by taking some other Humanities class, in my case Philosophy. Hated that, too.
 
2012-05-27 03:10:01 PM  

FizixJunkee: Kit Fister: Sudlow: 9. University parking police Many people you will meet in the course of your working life are soulless, terrible people that will do everything in their power to make your life miserable.

Amen. I work with a guy who makes it his job to tattle to the boss whenever he doesn't think i'm working on something important, or taking a break or make a mistake. Its funny because he's the same one who doesn't do the work we're asked to do if it involves leaving the building, I do all of that.

Is he Mormon, by chance?

\sounds a lot like a Mormon guy I had the displeasure of having to work alongside
\\the guy was as selfish, sneaky, and dishonest as the day as long


Not that I know of, but the guy I work with is an infuriating little snot. Oh well.
 
2012-05-27 03:10:45 PM  

Dr_Gene: I went to college in the olden days, when students were able to bypass the English requirement by taking some other Humanities class, in my case Philosophy. Hated that, too.


I was able to dodge economics by taking philosophy instead.
 
2012-05-27 03:19:45 PM  
Because of massive unemployment prospects, the state senate is now working to strengthen our "No Loitering" laws.
 
2012-05-27 03:28:40 PM  

indarwinsshadow: You will not start a job at 75k a year plus benefits.


i did. 10 years ago.
 
2012-05-27 03:37:16 PM  

fluffy2097: I see you know the secret.


Know it? It's my art. It's amazing how accessible the VP of whatever is, so long as you know what seminars or discussion groups they typically attend, or what bar they blow off steam at on Friday, or even where the people who work for them hang out on Friday.

/I know you know that
//Posting it for the young'ins to see
///Screw the website applications, phone switchboards, HR departments, etc.
 
2012-05-27 03:52:12 PM  
10 is false. Networking > what you're studying. Learning good social skills, ability to sell/convince people goes a LOT further than all A's on the planet. If you can manage to squeak in a skill set too that's a bonus.
 
2012-05-27 04:03:52 PM  

ExperianScaresCthulhu: Military. He doesn't need school, he needs military. It'll be the best decision of his life.


They won't accept him, he can't meet entrance physical requirements and probably won't take the ASVAB.

/I could be wrong, but I hear the military recruiters these days are getting pickier...no more using the military as the dumping grounds for the lazy or the stupid, with a drill instructor slapping sense into them
 
2012-05-27 04:04:22 PM  

Don't Troll Me Bro!: Duke Phillips' Singing Bears: Wart. You'll probably get a WART on your dick. If you get a war on your dick. You've got other problems.

Heh, I thought you were talking about the man-hating power-dike club that will at some point accuse you of being a rapist, at the top of their lungs, in public, even though you're just walking between classes and you've never met any of them.


That doesn't exist.

And even if it did, plenty of you guys would be grateful for the attention from girls.
 
2012-05-27 04:08:00 PM  
As a community college English prof., let me offer these tidbits of advice

NEVER cry in your instructor's office unless you have a bone hanging out of your body or are on fire

NEVER say that you are too busy, have other classes, have a long commute, or have children--on this last one--do not assume that because I am a woman with 2 kids that I will in any way sympathize with you and grant you an extension.

NEVER ask, after returning from an absence, "Did we do anything important?" From me, you will get "No. Once we realized you were absent, we lit candles, wept, and sat in a circle singing 'kum by yah'."

NEVER ask "Why do you want me to fail?" "You do not like me do you?" "What can we do about my failing grade?" I do not.. I do, most of the time. "We" nothing, "you" everything when you take the class next semester.

DO: Care about your grade on the first day of class
DO: Go to your instructor's office during office hours and ask for help (that is, ask questions that you have created ahead of time)
DO: Take advantage of all extra help on campus--writing center, math tutoring
DO: Make friends with many people in your class--but choose them carefully.
 
2012-05-27 04:12:00 PM  

Dr_Gene: Salt Lick Steady: Dr_Gene: /But I graduated and got a job in spite of the deficiency.

I don't know what it is, I see grammar and syntax in pictures in my head rather than words, like a neat little puzzle. Sorry if I came across as an ass.

No, you didn't... you were firm but gentle. Kinda like...


Sucks that you hated philosophy. Hopefully that can be chalked up to a bad... teacher.

/come meet me in Pie Town!
 
2012-05-27 04:41:02 PM  

Rockstone: Earpj: Rockstone: As someone who just graduated highschool, I'm really getting a kick...

Congrats!

What do you wanna do with your life?

For one, get a degree in Computer Science xD


Heh. So I'm about to graduate in CS, and here's what I've learned.

1) School matters.

The big difference seems to be between "National Job Fair" and "Local Job Fair". I went to Michigan, one of my buddies went to Lawrence Tech. I got a Microsoft internship after sophomore year, and made $30K that year (which is more than either of my parents). He flips burgers. Because Microsoft has never heard of Lawrence Tech.

Especially if you're not in a region with a big tech presence, you need to go to a college with National Job Fairs. (And for obvious reasons, this is less valid if the local company IS Microsoft/Google/etc).

2) Grades matter a little bit.

At least at Michigan, the two magic numbers are 3.0 and 3.6. If you don't have a 3.0, you probably won't have a job after graduating. If you don't have a 3.6, you probably can't go to grad school (And there are certain jobs that discriminate at 3.5-3.6 region). Since there is a curve that sets the median to a B- for almost every class, this means that half of the student body is basically unemployable (Personally, I'd say the number is ~a quarter).

3) Extracurriculars matter a lot (but you can BS quite a bit).

Especially early, every single person in your major is taking the exact same classes, so you need a way to make yourself stand out. You also need a way to fill your resume without putting your dorm cafeteria job. Extracurriculars (and certain project classes) are a great way to do both.

So 2nd semester of freshman year, I joined every single CS programming club there was. As the clueless freshman, I did almost nothing, but when I went into interviews, I knew just enough about what we were doing and the buzzwords for the code structure to impress interviewers. Turned that into a part-time programming job through the school for $8/hour, and then turned all of those into the Microsoft internship, which pretty much opened up any door I want to open that isn't Google.

Also, a great fantastic way to get something on your resume is to join the University undergraduate research program (if you have one), and get into something moderately Computer Sciencey. Even if you're just entering into an Excel spreadsheet, you're still a step up from "Dorm cafeteria", especially if you're working for (for example) a major AI initiative, and you know how to sell that to interviewers.

3b) Starting ~Junior year, you won't have time for extracurriculars.

So sophomore year, I had 8 credits of 200 level CS, 4 credits of random required Math, 2 job totalling ~20 hours/week, 2 jobs, a couple extracurriculars, and a bullshiat class I never showed up for beyond the midterm and final and still made a B+. Even then, I was still pulling between 2-3 allnighters every week.

Junior year, I had 16 credits of 400 level CS. Each class runs between 20-50 hours a week. I quit both my jobs and all the extracurriculars because I didn't have time. Only advice i can give is: About once a week, sleep until you are no longer tired. If that means you don't wake up Saturday, it means you don't wake up Saturday. Otherwise, you will fall down the death spiral* very very quickly.

*Death spiral = "You have work, so you don't get enough sleep, which makes work take longer, which means even less sleep, (repeat until you sleep through an alarm, fail all your classes, and/or go on a sleep-murder spree)"

4) Making money will utterly fark you. Your parent's making money will also fark you, but to a lesser degree.

I know this one sounds weird, but here's how it works. For every $100 you "make", the government takes about $25-30 in one form or another. The college then expects you to pay about $55 in tuition. Every time you make money, the college stops giving you grants/ subsidized loans. So by the time you graduate, the interest eats up most of the other $15-20. Of every dollar you make, you get to keep maybe 10c. You will be poor, because there is absolutely no way to escape the math. What you should be doing instead is getting the best resume possible. If that means "shiat unpaid research assistant who's actually writing production code", that's what it means.

Also, they take about 35-40% of your parent's pre-tax income, and add that to the bill as well, so expect to get utterly farked by middle-class parents.

5) Midterms will screw you out of a week

Midterms take about a week. During midterms, you will get effectively 0 work done on your projects for classes. So you can either work very hard, and be a week ahead jumping into the midterms, or you can be a week behind just as every class doubles their courseload once the pass/fail deadline goes by. Choose wisely.

(And in a related topic, all of your classes will make all of your big final projects due on the exact same day right at the end of the semester. That will also utterly screw you)

6) Buy a reasonably powerful laptop with decent battery life now. Buy the uber-desktop 2 years from now.

So freshman and sophomore year, it is highly unlikely that you will be running major, major project code that takes several days to run. Get the laptop that you can take to class now. Make sure it has decent battery life because the old classrooms will have 200 seats and 4 plugs. Probably about a grand is the sweet spot. Depends on what you want to do, but I think the longest a course project ever ran was 15 minutes on my Core 2 Duo laptop, and that was a really oddball exception because of a bug that I had introduced.

Junior and Senior year, I had multiple times where I would run code for 2 or 3 days at a time. I'd fire it up on my i7-2600K at 4.5 GHz desktop with 16 GB of RAM and 2 days later it would finish. Take about $2-3K from your sophomore internship, and dump it into a really nice desktop. Go nuts, and watch as your programs take your nuttiness and beat it into the dirt. (Also, in a related topic, you cannot give Linux too much swap space. I think my personal record is 16 GB of RAM, and 27 GB of swap space used by one program.)

7) Your first internship is (more) likely to be an absolute disaster.

So there's a huge difference between "CS student who's taken a couple of datas structures courses", and "CS student with 40 credits worth of project courses and 7 languages in his toolkit". If you get a job after sophomore year (and you won't get a job freshman year, unless you had significantly more programming experience going in than I did), you're much more likely to be in the first boat than the second, If that's the case, despite your best efforts, there's a non-zero chance that you'll be an incompetent farkup (especially if you've never worked in industry before). In the event that there's no real way to pull out of it, stop working weekends and use them to enjoy the area, and in the meantime, take the money and run and go find another internship next year.

8) If you're from the midwest, take those awesome salary offers and cut them in half.

High-end CS makes a TON of money. Like between 60 and 95 THOUSAND dollars a year pre-tax plus benefits straight out of college (depending on how many hours you want to work). The problem is that all of these awesome jobs are on the coasts. My (heavily subsidized) 600 sq ft. 2 bed, 1 bath, and a kitchen Seattle apartment normally cost $2500/month. My 300 sq. ft. rat-infested Boston apartment costs $1800/month (Yes, I have a apartment-mate). My father's 1500 sq. ft. (actually 1,000 plus basement) 3 bed, 1.5 bath apartment in Michigan costs $550/month. He's making about half what I am, and living a much, much better life.

I'd love to make $40K in Michigan, and be near family and friends, and cheap housing that I can actually afford on my salary (and Cedar Point. I must admit that being able to make day trips to Cedar Point or equivalent parks is a way too large factor on my thinking). The problem is that no one wants to offer that. They want to offer $80K, so that I can go split a shoebox in Boston.
 
2012-05-27 04:43:11 PM  
THERE'S NO SEX IN THE CHAMPAGNE ROOM.
 
2012-05-27 04:45:23 PM  

willyfreddy: The vast majority of attractive college girls are going to want to have A LOT of sex, and will probably be quite willing to experiment. You can have threesomes, anal sex, whatever you want...

[img600.imageshack.us image 604x453]

However, contrary to popular TV/movies, they DO NOT care about how sensitive, philosophical, and [insert compliment here]-once-you-get-to-know-me you are. "Just be yourself" is the advice that people who got nothing in college will tell you. I knew a million introverts like this at University and the vast majority of them spent their time complaining about how the girls they liked considered them just a 'friend'. Movies teach you that you needn't worry about statements like this because there is something SPECIAL about you that all the hot girls will spend weeks learning about and will then find you irresistible (e.g., She's Out of My League). Because of this, you think that this pattern won't apply to you. You're wrong. Movies are bullshiat.

If you want to have a TONNE of incredible sex at college, do these things:

1) Be outgoing. Develop an artistic talent that can be SHARED with other people (e.g., guitar, not water colors). You won't have any money, so this is important.
2) Be funny. Wit is a dying art. It takes women's pants off faster than anything else (Mad Men is an easy example for instances of wit).
3) Be CONFIDENT. Understand the differences between confidence, arrogance, and perfection. You needn't be perfect, just confident. But don't be arrogant.
4) Have male friends that are the same way. The attractive girls are found in packs, and if their friends can't hook up with your friends, you're in serious trouble.
5) Be ready to strikeout. It takes a lot of practice, and most guys are too scared to try in the first place. That's the only way to truly fail. Get ready to be rejected a lot, but don't get angry, take it in stride (see #2). NEVER burn a bridge with a hot chick (see #2 and #3). Treat them saying 'no' to sex the same a ...


No way man, just send that chick a pic of your junk.

blog.nj.com
 
2012-05-27 05:08:05 PM  

Cheez_Wit: My own two cents:

College is the best place to let go of high school. I mean, let's face it: High school is bullshiat. It's petty power games and insecurity and drama and hormones and obsessing over what other people think.

But college is a whole different game. No one cares about what you do or what you wear or who you date. Take advantage of that to find the person you really are. Take the classes that sound interesting to you. Listen to different music. Do stuff you wouldn't do in high school because you were worried about what your peers would think.

In fact, screw the people you went to high school with. They don't matter anymore.


THIS!!!! The best part of college for me was just being able to be myself without judgement for the first time in my life!
 
2012-05-27 05:21:53 PM  

TheGreatGazoo: Are they still pushy about the credit cards? I thought mommy and daddy had to co sign until you were 21?

.


Nope. Even though you can't go out and legally purchase/enjoy a beer, you are technically an adult, with all the ridiculous assumptions of responsibility that comes with the title.
 
2012-05-27 05:27:55 PM  

Earpj: Rockstone:

For one, get a degree in Computer Science xD

Nice. What comes after?

My son graduates next week. He's going to a 2 yr program for the art side (not programming, cause he sucks at math) for 3D animation.


/I was waiting for "I wanna ROCK!"


My husband could give you the better version of this but...

Stay the fark away from those "3D animation" college degrees until you talk to head hunters/recruiters in your area. (Since your first several years will almost certainly be contract gigs).

The head hunters/recruiters will tell you what the employers are actually hiring (in terms of skill sets and quality) and can tell you which schools are actually producing students with those skills.

School reputation in the work force can change in just a couple years, so you want current information. (A school's history means *nothing*.)

After your son sees what the "hiring bar" is set at, in terms of quality (and actually manages to find a school that can get him there) he needs to keep up with it while he's in school. This is because by the time he is out, it will be even higher. If his school doesn't keep up, he will need to study on his own and do it himself.

If you get out of school and don't meet industry standard for you work, you don't get hired until you do.

/good luck!!! :)
 
2012-05-27 05:31:35 PM  
Good luck getting a job you vacuous, self-absorbed douchebags.

Click this.

In five years, after you've stewed a bit, maybe ten, you will rock our world...

;)
 
2012-05-27 05:34:57 PM  

willyfreddy: The vast majority of attractive college girls are going to want to have A LOT of sex, and will probably be quite willing to experiment. You can have threesomes, anal sex, whatever you want...


Did you actually go to the school attended by those girls in the photo?

I did.

You don't want to be farking them. Everyone else already has. Same for ladies--go to a place like FSU, and all the "hot" guys are in an insular little socially-inbred pool. Everyone's from South Florida (or whatever designated upper-middle-class area your state school draws from), and will head to college pre-loaded with attitude baggage and std's.

You have no IDEA of the bullshiat you'll get embroiled in. The average person, appearances and money aside, will get burned in ways that will mess them up for years to come.

Instead, aim for the not-so-plastic yet ready-to-party girls and guys from the semi-rural areas, or the curious exchange students. You might actually have to, I dunno, see them more than once--cutting down on your time for relentless belt-notching. And you might actually have to make some effort to please them too, not just play on their insecurities to gather pleasure for yourself.

But you'll learn more, have more fun quantity-wise, and be better prepared for the compromises post-college relationships call for. And not get gonorrhea.
 
2012-05-27 06:00:01 PM  

RembrandtQEinstein: "Your future depends on your ability and willingness to work hard along with networking and a little luck."

Bollox, 85% of your future depends on the family you were born in to. 10% depends on luck. Maybe 5% is your own hard work and initiative.


And believing that is why you're going to stay poor forever.
 
2012-05-27 06:03:03 PM  

Yankees Team Gynecologist: If you need to consciously adhere to that list [...].


Conscious attention is a requirement when learning anything that's new, although with time it becomes automatic (easy example: riding a bike). Obviously you will be more successful in the latter phase than the former... but there's only one way to get there.
 
2012-05-27 06:06:58 PM  

supageil: Did you actually go to the school attended by those girls in the photo?


Picked the picture at random c/o google images. Nevertheless, as with everything else in life, there will obviously be extremes at both ends of a given spectrum.
 
2012-05-27 06:17:24 PM  

NeoCortex42: If you're an undergrad and do bad on a test or get a bad grade in a course, do not allow your parents to complain to the prof on your behalf. It does not help you. It only works to annoy the instructor and make them go from probably not knowing who you are to actively disliking you.


THIS, a million times THIS. As a TA, I thank you for reminding people.

I make it very clear to my students that I intend to treat them like grown-ups, and that the responsibility for their success is completely theirs. After eight semesters of teaching, so far so good.
 
2012-05-27 06:27:32 PM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: fluffy2097: Companies will hire you without a college degree if you can prove you are worth it.

Every thread that discusses HR hiring practices appears to disagree with this.


BS..never finished college....got into Systems Operations for a major Real-estate company, worked there for 4 years...then got a job off Wall Street....did that for 4 years...now self-employed for the last 6 years.

Couldn't be HAPPIER! College was a waste of time and money.

Enjoy your cubical world...suckers!

/For the vast majority...you never get rich working for someone else.
 
2012-05-27 07:17:37 PM  

farkplug: If you can't RTFA, at least glance at the headline. It's about graduating high school, not entering it.


Fair enough. As I highlighted, "just be yourself" is a common alternative. Personally, I believe our motivations are antithetical.
 
2012-05-27 07:49:32 PM  
11. You just spent 13 years in a government funded daycare.
 
2012-05-27 10:08:17 PM  

meyerkev: My (heavily subsidized) 600 sq ft. 2 bed, 1 bath, and a kitchen Seattle apartment normally cost $2500/month.


You're paying too much. If you are willing to take a 10 minute bus ride into work you can rent a 2200 sq. ft, 3 bed, 3 bath, attached garaged, detached single-family house for less than that. And I've got a buddy that's got a 600 sq. ft. in a decent building in Belltown for $1800.
 
2012-05-27 10:34:11 PM  

profplump: meyerkev: My (heavily subsidized) 600 sq ft. 2 bed, 1 bath, and a kitchen Seattle apartment normally cost $2500/month.

You're paying too much. If you are willing to take a 10 minute bus ride into work you can rent a 2200 sq. ft, 3 bed, 3 bath, attached garaged, detached single-family house for less than that. And I've got a buddy that's got a 600 sq. ft. in a decent building in Belltown for $1800.


It was the (much nicer than I will ever need, with 2 TV's, free cable and internet, free parking, free utilities, and freaking bi-weekly maid service) subsidized apartment that Microsoft provided in downtown Redmond, and anywhere between a 4 and 45 minute commute to work (Traffic sucks). I was paying $700 a month (and so was my roommate).

/And looking online, it seems I was remembering that wrong. They don't post prices online, but it seems like it's more like $1900-$2200 from other reviews, which is still way too much.
 
2012-05-27 11:01:32 PM  
And as a followup, the point still stands. Kid from the Midwest (or any low-cost of living area) hears sixty or seventy THOUSAND dollars, has a minor heart attack from the shocking wealth, and then reality sets in.

70K -> 45-50K after taxes.

Rent is ~$1000/month on a lowish end, if you get a roommate. You now have ~35K, and you're living in a shoebox with a roommate.

If you want a car, renting a spot is another $350/month (Boston). Plus tolls (which don't exist in Michigan other than ways to Canada or the UP, and are EVERYWHERE on the coasts). So just parking, we're out another $4K, and the tolls will add up to be let's say $1000 more than the midwest (and given that it currently takes $10/day to cross the 520 bridge to and from work, this is a minimum). ~30K. Once the other, normal expenses of a car are added in, you're probably out a minimum of $6-7K (though since i've never owned a car, that's a best guess). $23K.

Also, if you're not buying a car, you're probably going to burn nearly as much money (or time. If it takes an hour and a half to go 3 miles, and you make $30/hour...) not being able to (purely for example) go to Costco and buy a giant bag of chicken for ~$30, and use it as dinner for a month. You'll instead have to burn tons of money going to all these little stores, and buying whatever you can carry in your arms (or those rolly basket things. Rolly basket things rock).

So you have $23K to play with. It's actually quite a bit of money, but this all assumes that want to split a shoebox, and you still need to get food, clothing, and all the other necessities. You're by no means poor, but you're barely middle class. And if you want to start a family and get a house (or even larger apartment. Watch $12K a year turn into $30K, once you need more space, and can't have a roommate) on that income that doesn't involve an hour+ commute, good luck.
 
2012-05-27 11:04:30 PM  
More than likely it's all downhill from here.
 
2012-05-27 11:20:31 PM  
Clean up after yourself and pay your share of the bills.

Don't use all my shampoo and leave your spawn in the shower.

PS, I fecked your girlfriend Carl. So did everyone else. Salve Regina?

Nope. Sloppy Vagina.

You're welcome for the porn and sex toys I sent to your mother too. On your credit card. and she paid for you momma's boy.

I had a great time!
 
2012-05-27 11:47:52 PM  

NeoCortex42: indarwinsshadow:

There seems to be this stigma that trade work is not the sign of a "successful" career, or that only people who couldn't handle college go to trade school.


I was charged $950 by a plumber for emergency work which consisted of tearing a hole in my ceiling, use $12 worth of materials, spend 45 minutes... Now who has the successful career? and he was paid to go through the apprentice system.
 
2012-05-28 12:01:21 AM  

meyerkev: And as a followup, the point still stands. Kid from the Midwest (or any low-cost of living area) hears sixty or seventy THOUSAND dollars, has a minor heart attack from the shocking wealth, and then reality sets in.

70K -> 45-50K after taxes.

Rent is ~$1000/month on a lowish end, if you get a roommate. You now have ~35K, and you're living in a shoebox with a roommate.

If you want a car, renting a spot is another $350/month (Boston). Plus tolls (which don't exist in Michigan other than ways to Canada or the UP, and are EVERYWHERE on the coasts). So just parking, we're out another $4K, and the tolls will add up to be let's say $1000 more than the midwest (and given that it currently takes $10/day to cross the 520 bridge to and from work, this is a minimum). ~30K. Once the other, normal expenses of a car are added in, you're probably out a minimum of $6-7K (though since i've never owned a car, that's a best guess). $23K.

Also, if you're not buying a car, you're probably going to burn nearly as much money (or time. If it takes an hour and a half to go 3 miles, and you make $30/hour...) not being able to (purely for example) go to Costco and buy a giant bag of chicken for ~$30, and use it as dinner for a month. You'll instead have to burn tons of money going to all these little stores, and buying whatever you can carry in your arms (or those rolly basket things. Rolly basket things rock).

So you have $23K to play with. It's actually quite a bit of money, but this all assumes that want to split a shoebox, and you still need to get food, clothing, and all the other necessities. You're by no means poor, but you're barely middle class. And if you want to start a family and get a house (or even larger apartment. Watch $12K a year turn into $30K, once you need more space, and can't have a roommate) on that income that doesn't involve an hour+ commute, good luck.


Are you commuting into Redmond, or Seattle?

(renting a decent place in Bellevue close enough to walk to work in the downtown area for a good chunk less with dedicated parking).

/520 toll blows - just say no
//former kid from Michigan
///making way more too
 
2012-05-28 12:11:11 AM  

flypusher713: eas81: Your dorm is going to suck:

I've seen far, far worse than that!


My daughter's dorm had no heat, no lights in the long narrow hallways, no electricity from 10pm to 6am, hot water for only a few hours twice a week, and toilets on the first floor only (all the other bathrooms had squat trenches that flushed a few times a day).

But university tuition in western China was very affordable.
 
2012-05-28 12:16:43 AM  

ExperianScaresCthulhu: Earpj: SomeCallMeTim: #11. Not all of you are "college material" and will wind up wearing a paper hat and name tag asking people if they want fries with that.

My son is graduating next week. He has chosen a 2 year technical school. He isn't cut out for traditional college.

He's got a friend, they've been friends since 6th grade. The boy sucks at school. At the beginning of this year, he was (credit wise) a Junior. He dropped out after missing soo much school that he was never going to catch up.
The boy is currently staying with us, as his Mom is having some personal trouble. (He's been here a week)
My kid and the Boy got into a fight last night, b/c my son was telling him that he needs to go back and graduate.
I guess the Boy said that no one is going to f-in make him f-in go back to f-in high school.

He's going to work at McDonalds (if, indeed, he works anywhere). He's already over 300 lbs.

I see him, at 40, being on tv for having died in his Mom's house of a massive heart attack, and the police having to tear down a wall to get him out.

Sad really.

Military. He doesn't need school, he needs military. It'll be the best decision of his life.


The military will not take you unless you graduate high school. So no, that kid is farked.
 
2012-05-28 12:21:39 AM  

Spaceman Spiffed: Are you commuting into Redmond, or Seattle?

(renting a decent place in Bellevue close enough to walk to work in the downtown area for a good chunk less with dedicated parking).

/520 toll blows - just say no
//former kid from Michigan
///making way more too


At this point, I'm in Boston for the summer. Had a summer internship at Microsoft (who pay a lot more than $70K, but in return you're working 12-14 hours/day plus weekends. Fark that noise. Seriously, my roommate was giving me a call about every other night at 1 AM because the buses stopped running and he needed a ride home. Eventually, he said "Screw it" and just started sleeping in the office).

At the moment, I'm blowing $900/month + utilities in my rat-infested Back Bay apartment (w/ roommate). Now Somerville is only $700/month, but turns my ~hour commute into a ~2 hour commute because I don't have a car, and is not connected to any T lines, so it takes forever to get anywhere. Having to work an extra 10 hours/month to make rent is worth it.

/$30/hour, but in exchange, I'm only working 43-ish hours a week instead of the 60-90 I was working at Microsoft, so I'm happy.
//Honestly, if we could just catch those stupid rats and blew a bit of money getting someone to seriously clean the place because there are stains that bleach won't touch, and the kitchen indent was knocked out and turned into some counter space*, it'd actually be a pretty good apartment for a single guy just starting out (or college housing, which is what it actually is during the school year). As it is, it's a ripoff, albeit a ripoff in a great location.

*The kitchen is squarish, except that one of the corners is knocked in pretty far. The side effect of this is that the kitchen is literally a sink and an oven, with 0 counter space to speak of.
 
2012-05-28 12:48:50 AM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: fluffy2097: Companies will hire you without a college degree if you can prove you are worth it.

Every thread that discusses HR hiring practices appears to disagree with this.


If you have to go in through HR, you've already lost.
 
2012-05-28 03:07:50 AM  

Man On Pink Corner: LouDobbsAwaaaay: fluffy2097: Companies will hire you without a college degree if you can prove you are worth it.

Every thread that discusses HR hiring practices appears to disagree with this.

If you have to go in through HR, you've already lost.


THIS, for any job.
 
2012-05-28 03:17:40 AM  

Ishidan: Man On Pink Corner: LouDobbsAwaaaay: fluffy2097: Companies will hire you without a college degree if you can prove you are worth it.

Every thread that discusses HR hiring practices appears to disagree with this.

If you have to go in through HR, you've already lost.

THIS, for any job.


Pretty much. If you don't already know people in upper management, might as well kill yourself.

/unemployed
//bitter
 
2012-05-28 04:24:53 AM  

LadyBelgara: Thanks for the Meme-ries: [i291.photobucket.com image 550x550]

I farking hated that "song".


Mah - you hate it because you're jealous that you didn't get to hear "the advice" before *you* went to college.
 
2012-05-28 04:36:19 AM  

supageil: willyfreddy: The vast majority of attractive college girls are going to want to have A LOT of sex, and will probably be quite willing to experiment. You can have threesomes, anal sex, whatever you want...

Did you actually go to the school attended by those girls in the photo?

I did.

You don't want to be farking them. Everyone else already has. Same for ladies--go to a place like FSU, and all the "hot" guys are in an insular little socially-inbred pool. Everyone's from South Florida (or whatever designated upper-middle-class area your state school draws from), and will head to college pre-loaded with attitude baggage and std's.

You have no IDEA of the bullshiat you'll get embroiled in. The average person, appearances and money aside, will get burned in ways that will mess them up for years to come.

Instead, aim for the not-so-plastic yet ready-to-party girls and guys from the semi-rural areas, or the curious exchange students. You might actually have to, I dunno, see them more than once--cutting down on your time for relentless belt-notching. And you might actually have to make some effort to please them too, not just play on their insecurities to gather pleasure for yourself.

But you'll learn more, have more fun quantity-wise, and be better prepared for the compromises post-college relationships call for. And not get gonorrhea.


I hope you don't take this wrong... but I put you in the same category as GD. You are both sweet, smart, and wise beyond your years. I wish the two of you were in spitting distance of me so that I could hug you on a regular basis.

/No response expected
 
2012-05-28 08:01:36 AM  
I have better rules of thumb:

#11: Don't think for one minute graduating from college makes you better than anyone. After all many of your new police officers are college grads as well, and they ARE better.
#12: Just because you have a Bachelor's degree, doesn't mean you'll get a job. After all there's not much of a call for underwater basket-weaving.
#13: Better figure out if your job desire requires college, tech/trade school, or military before you go. Most jobs don't hire college grads without RL experience in the field, but will hire straight from tech/trade school, and sometimes even military.
 
2012-05-28 09:19:26 AM  
cuzsis:

He's kinda been doing that. He's had the 3D animation dual credit class for the last 2 years. The school that he has picked will teach him all of the programs used. He's been using Lightwave (something like that, anyway) at school.
We also have a friend who's cousin works for a company in Austin. So, she's been giving him some advice along the way.

Thanks for the advice. I'll tell him.
 
2012-05-29 01:59:43 PM  

WhippingBoy: Brontes: Rockstone: Earpj: Rockstone: As someone who just graduated highschool, I'm really getting a kick...

Congrats!

What do you wanna do with your life?

For one, get a degree in Computer Science xD

No offense to CS, but it seems like if you wanted to head down a programming route, go into Computer Engineering. It mixes EE with CS and have an engineering degree to boot.

However, if you don't love math, this probably isn't the best route to go.


Yeah, that's my main reason.
 
2012-05-29 02:00:22 PM  

meyerkev: Rockstone: Earpj: Rockstone: As someone who just graduated highschool, I'm really getting a kick...

Congrats!

What do you wanna do with your life?

For one, get a degree in Computer Science xD

Heh. So I'm about to graduate in CS, and here's what I've learned.

1) School matters.

The big difference seems to be between "National Job Fair" and "Local Job Fair". I went to Michigan, one of my buddies went to Lawrence Tech. I got a Microsoft internship after sophomore year, and made $30K that year (which is more than either of my parents). He flips burgers. Because Microsoft has never heard of Lawrence Tech.

Especially if you're not in a region with a big tech presence, you need to go to a college with National Job Fairs. (And for obvious reasons, this is less valid if the local company IS Microsoft/Google/etc).

2) Grades matter a little bit.

At least at Michigan, the two magic numbers are 3.0 and 3.6. If you don't have a 3.0, you probably won't have a job after graduating. If you don't have a 3.6, you probably can't go to grad school (And there are certain jobs that discriminate at 3.5-3.6 region). Since there is a curve that sets the median to a B- for almost every class, this means that half of the student body is basically unemployable (Personally, I'd say the number is ~a quarter).

3) Extracurriculars matter a lot (but you can BS quite a bit).

Especially early, every single person in your major is taking the exact same classes, so you need a way to make yourself stand out. You also need a way to fill your resume without putting your dorm cafeteria job. Extracurriculars (and certain project classes) are a great way to do both.

So 2nd semester of freshman year, I joined every single CS programming club there was. As the clueless freshman, I did almost nothing, but when I went into interviews, I knew just enough about what we were doing and the buzzwords for the code structure to impress interviewers. Turned that into a part-time programming job t ...


You are awesome dude!!! Thank you so much for this, lots of great ideas and great points!
 
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