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(USA Today)   Jackson, MS, schools will soon stop shackling students... well, most of them, anyway   (usatoday.com) divider line 49
    More: Sick, Jackson, MS, largest school districts, hyperactivity disorder, alternative school, Southern Poverty Law Center, U.S. Department of Education  
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7289 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 May 2012 at 12:56 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-25 11:37:30 PM  
MS Jackson if you're nasty...
 
2012-05-26 12:03:12 AM  
The ones doin' less than life sentences, anyway
 
2012-05-26 01:05:29 AM  
I think there's still about 19 or 20 states that allow hitting students with a board on the buttocks. And we're talking about students up through high school. Strikes me that they're are a lot of Humbert Humbert principals paddling cheerleaders. Some of the states allow it without parental permission. I think it's pretty unbelievable that it happens today.

And that's the South, BUT the worst school though that I've ever heard of is outside of Boston and is called the Judge Rotenberg School that makes students wear huge battery packs 24 hours a day --even while showering--and they can remotely shock the students, sometimes hundreds of times a day and as punishment will reduce their calorie intake to 400 calories a day. And it's legal. The school is named after the judge who let the school remain open. Insane.
 
2012-05-26 01:10:53 AM  
Only very recently did a judge allow a news channel to video tape a tape of the shocks. These are shocks of US children with mental illness. This has been going on for so long. And it has made me sick to my stomach as long as I've followed the cases at this school. This is considered psychiatric treatment:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtRGQRtwh2U
 
2012-05-26 01:13:12 AM  

swingerofbirches: Some of the states allow it without parental permission.


Because a parent's permission makes physical abuse or sexual assault A-OK.

I know that isn't your point, and I don't mean to pick on you personally because you're just regurgitating the common, politically-correct response. I'm just saying we probably shouldn't grant citizens special rights to hit or authorize the hitting of underage humans just because they happen to share genetic material.
 
2012-05-26 01:18:29 AM  

profplump: I know that isn't your point, and I don't mean to pick on you personally because you're just regurgitating the common, politically-correct response. I'm just saying we probably shouldn't grant citizens special rights to hit or authorize the hitting of underage humans just because they happen to share genetic material.


But how will we keep the locals in line without fear?
 
2012-05-26 01:19:17 AM  

swingerofbirches: And it's legal.


If you're a parent, or have a parent's express or implicit permission, you can do essentially anything to a child other than give them beer, have sex with them, totally withhold them from education, or create an eminent risk to their physical health and safety. There's essentially no protection for their mental health, the quality or substance of their education, or even their long-term physical health, let alone things like their physical freedom, freedom from arbitrary, capricious or even cruel punishments, etc. It's not just one judge, it's the law of the land -- children have essentially no rights.

Luckily most parents don't commit such heinous acts. But there's nothing stoping the ones who want to inflict pain on their children.
 
2012-05-26 01:21:43 AM  
One of my Spanish teachers offered the option of the paddle or detention. I don't know anyone who picked detention. Actually, it was paddle, big eraser full of chalk dust, or detention.
 
2012-05-26 01:22:53 AM  
Am I the only one turned on right now?

I'd like to put on a schoolgirl outfit and be restrained by a scholarly, older gentleman.
 
2012-05-26 01:27:45 AM  
www.moonbattery.com
Oh shut up, you know that's why you came here
 
2012-05-26 01:28:32 AM  
i4.ytimg.com
 
2012-05-26 01:28:37 AM  

James F. Campbell: profplump: I know that isn't your point, and I don't mean to pick on you personally because you're just regurgitating the common, politically-correct response. I'm just saying we probably shouldn't grant citizens special rights to hit or authorize the hitting of underage humans just because they happen to share genetic material.

But how will we keep the locals in line without fear?


"Without the fear, there is no system. Without the system there is no fear." -- Bebe Doc Duvalier
 
2012-05-26 01:29:16 AM  

profplump: swingerofbirches: Some of the states allow it without parental permission.

Because a parent's permission makes physical abuse or sexual assault A-OK.

I know that isn't your point, and I don't mean to pick on you personally because you're just regurgitating the common, politically-correct response. I'm just saying we probably shouldn't grant citizens special rights to hit or authorize the hitting of underage humans just because they happen to share genetic material.


I agree with you. Assault is assault, and the laws should apply to everyone. I guess when I wrote that it was to emphasize the powerlessness. The tragedy is that the children are subject to this, but I guess it's some consolation that children with decent parents could at least save them from it in the states where there are opt-out policies. To me this seems like a black and white issue (as does the Judge Rotenberg situation). The "paddling" of children I understand to some degree is steeped in cultural patterns and I understand some people have difficulty stepping bak and seeing it objectively. With the situation up in Boston with the Judge Rotenberg School, the calculatedness, the torture, the insidiousness-it makes me sick to my stomach. It is close to have an Auschwitz in your country and knowing that torture is going on in real time and not being able to stop it. To think of the lives ruined by that school and the torture those kids go through makes me heart sick.
 
2012-05-26 01:34:18 AM  

profplump: swingerofbirches: Some of the states allow it without parental permission.

Because a parent's permission makes physical abuse or sexual assault A-OK.

I know that isn't your point, and I don't mean to pick on you personally because you're just regurgitating the common, politically-correct response. I'm just saying we probably shouldn't grant citizens special rights to hit or authorize the hitting of underage humans just because they happen to share genetic material.


my mom was bona fide batshiat insane. you betcha every year she went out of her to way make sure anyone in the school had written permission to "do as they saw fit" when it came to doling out discipline at me. it was an outreach of her own slap-happy ways.

as long as society allows anyone and everyone with functioning genitals to produce children we are going to have a piss-poor dilution of potato heads in the populus.
 
2012-05-26 01:37:30 AM  

PerfectHotBlonde: Am I the only one turned on right now?

I'd like to put on a schoolgirl outfit and be restrained by a scholarly, older gentleman.


Would you settle for a scholarly, buff barbarian?
 
2012-05-26 01:39:49 AM  

swingerofbirches: I think there's still about 19 or 20 states that allow hitting students with a board on the buttocks. And we're talking about students up through high school. Strikes me that they're are a lot of Humbert Humbert principals paddling cheerleaders. Some of the states allow it without parental permission. I think it's pretty unbelievable that it happens today.

And that's the South, BUT the worst school though that I've ever heard of is outside of Boston and is called the Judge Rotenberg School that makes students wear huge battery packs 24 hours a day --even while showering--and they can remotely shock the students, sometimes hundreds of times a day and as punishment will reduce their calorie intake to 400 calories a day. And it's legal. The school is named after the judge who let the school remain open. Insane.


I figured that someone with your handle would know probably everything there is to know on the subject.
 
2012-05-26 01:41:29 AM  

starsrift: swingerofbirches: I think there's still about 19 or 20 states that allow hitting students with a board on the buttocks. And we're talking about students up through high school. Strikes me that they're are a lot of Humbert Humbert principals paddling cheerleaders. Some of the states allow it without parental permission. I think it's pretty unbelievable that it happens today.

And that's the South, BUT the worst school though that I've ever heard of is outside of Boston and is called the Judge Rotenberg School that makes students wear huge battery packs 24 hours a day --even while showering--and they can remotely shock the students, sometimes hundreds of times a day and as punishment will reduce their calorie intake to 400 calories a day. And it's legal. The school is named after the judge who let the school remain open. Insane.

I figured that someone with your handle would know probably everything there is to know on the subject.


Birches, by Robert Frost
 
2012-05-26 01:46:09 AM  
Since everyone here seems to hate paddling can someone please tell me one form of discipline that seems to be working today? From what I read here and other places it appears that the inmates are running the asylum.
 
2012-05-26 01:57:06 AM  

Trackball: Since everyone here seems to hate paddling can someone please tell me one form of discipline that seems to be working today? From what I read here and other places it appears that the inmates are running the asylum.


We're not talking about "paddling", we're talking about inhumane treatment of other human beings by those who couldn't get away with it if they were inflicting the same upon adults, or at least those who have parents who give a shiat.

The problem with people like you is you instill a mindset of violence in your crotch fruit by beating the shiat out of them when they look at you wrong instead of talking to them like an adult would. Then you wonder why kids do the shiat they do, and get all pussy and buy a gun and vote for morons like Rick Perry.
 
2012-05-26 02:03:34 AM  

Trackball: Since everyone here seems to hate paddling can someone please tell me one form of discipline that seems to be working today? From what I read here and other places it appears that the inmates are running the asylum.


I dunno perhaps we should ask Sweden, Norway, France and so on. They have completely outlawed corporal punishment, at home and in school, and yet somehow their violent crime numbers are much better than the US. Maybe less tough talk about "beating sense in to kids" or the like and more looking at what places that are doing well actually do.
 
2012-05-26 02:06:00 AM  

Trackball: Since everyone here seems to hate paddling can someone please tell me one form of discipline that seems to be working today? From what I read here and other places it appears that the inmates are running the asylum.


The murder rates in countries where all forms of corporal punishment are illegal are quite low compared to the United States. I was never once hit in my in life by anyone. And I am very mild-mannered, never broken any laws, fairly thoughtful, etc. I think the presumption that you need a form of discipline outside of normal human interaction to begin with starts the problem. If you establish this idea that children are somehow in need of being controlled with some sort of gimmick other than common sense, then I guess you will arrive at some of the solutions people have. To me, I think it's pretty simple. With young children, you redirect them. With older children you talk and calm them if they are upset. I've lived in countries in Western Europe where the practice of corporal punishment is both illegal and also almost non-existent, and I just don't see that there is a problem in need of fixing.

When I grew up in the United States I recall at the beginning of each school year the teachers would spend the first few days reading the student handbook out loud which outlined every possible bad thing you could do and every corresponding punishment. And even at a young age I thought that they were just defining the roles: cop and criminal. It's a complete construction. When I went to school in Sweden, I honestly don't recall any type of behavior in need of correction. It's a public building like any other, like going to a library. You talk to children. It's that simple. If they're upset, you contain their emotions. There was a big wooden wall that flanked the ice skating rink at the school I went to in Sweden, and if you wanted to let off steam they would give you a ball and you could just go kick it as hard as you wanted against the wall. But it was just so much more a normal human experience than school in the US. For example, at lunch, we ate in a dining room, not a cafeteria. The seats had backs to them. There were maybe four or five people per table, and we had real chandeliers. We ate with real knives and forks and real china. Our teachers sat with us. This was in 1st-3rd grade. In fourth grade at the school I went to in the US we were herded like cattle into a huge cafeteria with long rows of tables with tiny little seats with no backs, there were adult aides wearing whistles that flanked the walls to whistle at students like life guards. The food was just inedible. And it was so noisy. There was a stoplight on the wall and if the noise got too loud it turned red and then we had to eat in silence. Teachers never ate with students, and we got like 20 minutes to eat, versus an hour in Sweden.

It's just a completely different attitude. Are children cattle that need to be controlled? Or are they human beings? I am very influenced by my years as a child having lived in Sweden. It's pretty much impacted my thinking, as strange as it is to have a life-changing experience at such a young age.
 
2012-05-26 02:11:21 AM  
The settlement, approved by U.S. District Judge Tom Lee, says all district employees will stop handcuffing students younger than 13, and can only handcuff older students for crimes. In no case will employees shackle a student to a fixed object such as a railing, a pole, a desk or a chair.

That doesn't sound as settled as I'd like, quite frankly.

So what if it's an "alternative school"? (read: developmental center) So what if the kids get violent or unruly? They're still kids. You're adults. If you can't control them any other way than by shackling them to the wall, maybe you're doing something wrong.
 
2012-05-26 02:21:25 AM  

swingerofbirches: Trackball: Since everyone here seems to hate paddling can someone please tell me one form of discipline that seems to be working today? From what I read here and other places it appears that the inmates are running the asylum.

The murder rates in countries where all forms of corporal punishment are illegal are quite low compared to the United States. I was never once hit in my in life by anyone. And I am very mild-mannered, never broken any laws, fairly thoughtful, etc. I think the presumption that you need a form of discipline outside of normal human interaction to begin with starts the problem. If you establish this idea that children are somehow in need of being controlled with some sort of gimmick other than common sense, then I guess you will arrive at some of the solutions people have. To me, I think it's pretty simple. With young children, you redirect them. With older children you talk and calm them if they are upset. I've lived in countries in Western Europe where the practice of corporal punishment is both illegal and also almost non-existent, and I just don't see that there is a problem in need of fixing.

When I grew up in the United States I recall at the beginning of each school year the teachers would spend the first few days reading the student handbook out loud which outlined every possible bad thing you could do and every corresponding punishment. And even at a young age I thought that they were just defining the roles: cop and criminal. It's a complete construction. When I went to school in Sweden, I honestly don't recall any type of behavior in need of correction. It's a public building like any other, like going to a library. You talk to children. It's that simple. If they're upset, you contain their emotions. There was a big wooden wall that flanked the ice skating rink at the school I went to in Sweden, and if you wanted to let off steam they would give you a ball and you could just go kick it as hard as you wanted against the wall. But it ...


That sir, was very well stated. Completely agree, and I wish more schools and just other places in general would try to at least give some semblance of basic respect to students and people in general. I also was never beaten on growing up, and I like to think I turned out reasonably well. I know some will argue that this means we're wanting to treat kids like precious snowflakes, and I think that's the farthest from the truth. You don't have to coddle kids in order to guide them into becoming decent adults, just show some basic respect and keep it real on your expectations of them. I think people would be amazed by how far that goes, I use that simple philosophy in how I deal with people all the time, and even the younger ones really respond to that a lot better than my trying to talk them like they're incapable of understanding just because they're young.
 
2012-05-26 02:41:10 AM  
This lawsuit is one reason I like the Southern Poverty Law Center. Too often poor schools treat children as criminals in training and this is the first step to ensuring kids go from school to prison. The SPLC has also taken up cases against for-profit children's detention centers that are doing nothing to fix the kids and everything to ensure they'll end up in some privatized state prison later on.
 
2012-05-26 02:45:51 AM  

Ed Willy: This lawsuit is one reason I like the Southern Poverty Law Center.


Same here. Hopefully soon I'll be able to make a nice donation, they certainly earn it.
 
2012-05-26 03:02:21 AM  
When I was in a public elementary school in rural Alabama during the early 80s you could still be paddled for academic failures. Didn't bring in your homework, that's a paddling. Failed a spelling test with a score under 30 points, that's a paddling. It was up to the teacher to decide what constituted justification for being sent to the "hot chair" (it was painted red). It didn't happen all the time but often enough that all the students feared it. Sometimes when the results of a difficult test were being handed out there would be several crying kids because they thought they were going to be paddled in the hot chair. Luckily we moved to the county seat when I started fifth grade and while paddling was still allowed through high school, it was only used for things like fighting and vandalism.
 
2012-05-26 03:57:40 AM  

PerfectHotBlonde: Am I the only one turned on right now?

I'd like to put on a schoolgirl outfit and be restrained by a scholarly, older gentleman.



Another GD alt?
 
2012-05-26 03:58:14 AM  
A single spank on the backside has its place, but only from the child's parents.

Anything more than that is abuse.

If you can't control your own children without violence, you shouldn't be a parent; if you can't control other people's children without violence, you shouldn't be a teacher.
 
2012-05-26 04:40:27 AM  

swingerofbirches: Trackball: Since everyone here seems to hate paddling can someone please tell me one form of discipline that seems to be working today? From what I read here and other places it appears that the inmates are running the asylum.

The murder rates in countries where all forms of corporal punishment are illegal are quite low compared to the United States. I was never once hit in my in life by anyone. And I am very mild-mannered, never broken any laws, fairly thoughtful, etc. I think the presumption that you need a form of discipline outside of normal human interaction to begin with starts the problem. If you establish this idea that children are somehow in need of being controlled with some sort of gimmick other than common sense, then I guess you will arrive at some of the solutions people have. To me, I think it's pretty simple. With young children, you redirect them. With older children you talk and calm them if they are upset. I've lived in countries in Western Europe where the practice of corporal punishment is both illegal and also almost non-existent, and I just don't see that there is a problem in need of fixing.

When I grew up in the United States I recall at the beginning of each school year the teachers would spend the first few days reading the student handbook out loud which outlined every possible bad thing you could do and every corresponding punishment. And even at a young age I thought that they were just defining the roles: cop and criminal. It's a complete construction. When I went to school in Sweden, I honestly don't recall any type of behavior in need of correction. It's a public building like any other, like going to a library. You talk to children. It's that simple. If they're upset, you contain their emotions. There was a big wooden wall that flanked the ice skating rink at the school I went to in Sweden, and if you wanted to let off steam they would give you a ball and you could just go kick it as hard as you wanted against the wall. But it ...


The US public school system was created during the 1800's (think early industrial revolution/Victorian era) and was based off of the Prussian system (so many bad ideas from this time that just don't want to go away). This system focused on basic education and because of religious and political influence in Prussia at the system's creation, it also focused on obeying authority. Most of the basic features of the system were based off of military academies in Europe with the addition of bible reading since the system was created by a sub sect of overly devout Protestants. It was rapidly adapted across the modernizing world because it was the most effective system at the time.

Since then, education has evolved greatly, but the US is still lagging behind in updating its basic system. The cafeteria and the overlooking authority figures are very military. (so is the bad food) There is also a focus on repetition of tasks with slight variance which can be useful for drilling in some truly abstract concepts, but is often used to promote complacency. Very useful for factory workers and for soldiers and why it did well at the time.

We as a society have learned far more about public education since then, but there is a wall of tradition and ignorance against change. Most parents are happy if their child just graduates high school, even though it is meaningless for getting a job and is easy to get a G.E.D. instead. Parents have gotten by 'just fine' with their HS Diploma, so their children should be fine. There are several high schools that don't even require their students to pass basic algebra let alone some basic Euclidean geometry (yes, you can and will use this math in everyday life, the math teacher are just really bad at giving examples and want to make this harder than it is since they like having jobs). Not only have our standards fallen as far as innovation for the system, but our standards for assigning grades in classes have fallen. And from there we come to the passing of students that should not be moved to the next grade.

The system in the US does need to be changed, but unlike Europe and most other areas, public education is controlled at a local government level, so setting large standards are exactly like pulling teeth from a lion: the only solution is to shoot it first. Since most of these 'fiefs' get a large portion of their funding from the Federal level, the US congress could easily mandate new teacher training, transferable credits (why my father got his GED instead of his diploma), better lunches (Jamie Oliver pointed out the waste, we can cut it and make the lunches work without spending more), standard for grading, auditing of the system internally (internal costs nothing, it is just a culture change) and externally (might cost a little, but look at the next level), and finally a nation wide standard achievement tests at multiple levels of the system. Yes, most states have some form of mid level to final level testing to let students graduate, but they have to create these test and it the system changes dramatically it would mean spending money to rewrite every one of those tests and it would be cheaper and simpler to just make a single one for the various levels.

There is a legal way to do this and it will involve the Federal Government to cut off all funding to all non-compliant schools and any state or municipality that supports them that does not adopt the new standards and if they show that the change will cost them money, they may be paid to do so after an audit to make sure they truly need the grant. To force it more, any HS diploma or GED awarded by a non-compliant entity could make the recipient illegible for Federal Financial Aide.

Hell, tack on a requirement for colleges and universities to actually follow the credit transfer guidelines that exist (most don't recognize foreign credits and accredited degrees just so they have you take more classes) if they want students to enroll and you have a pretty nice fix to education, other than student loan reform, but that involves so much money that it would be its own can of worms.


\sorry, I forgot the SAT/ACT companies will be pissed, but their testing never even showed up to my high school and I have a college degree with a 3.2 GPA now, so they are full of wanting money and crap
\\wow, longer post than I thought, need to sleep more
 
2012-05-26 04:41:33 AM  

Isildur: PerfectHotBlonde: Am I the only one turned on right now?

I'd like to put on a schoolgirl outfit and be restrained by a scholarly, older gentleman.


Another GD alt?


Or Ghastly.
 
2012-05-26 04:46:14 AM  
This is not a repeat from before 1865?
 
2012-05-26 05:03:37 AM  

gozar_the_destroyer: Isildur: PerfectHotBlonde: Am I the only one turned on right now?

I'd like to put on a schoolgirl outfit and be restrained by a scholarly, older gentleman.


Another GD alt?

Or Ghastly.


Heh, good point.
 
2012-05-26 05:08:03 AM  

swingerofbirches: starsrift: I figured that someone with your handle would know probably everything there is to know on the subject.

Birches, by Robert Frost


Ah. Well, I'm more of a Robert Service fan, not Frost.
 
2012-05-26 05:28:31 AM  

Isildur: PerfectHotBlonde: Am I the only one turned on right now?

I'd like to put on a schoolgirl outfit and be restrained by a scholarly, older gentleman.


Another GD alt?


1. I do not have any alts. LittleBlondeJug was my only one, and I don't post as her anymore.
2. Here is a relevant picture to this thread:

www.regulationknickers.com
 
2012-05-26 06:02:55 AM  

PerfectHotBlonde: Am I the only one turned on right now?

I'd like to put on a schoolgirl outfit and be restrained by a scholarly, older gentleman.


How YOU doin?
 
2012-05-26 07:04:35 AM  
Oh, geez- another attention whore. Please stop feeding the trolls.
 
2012-05-26 07:53:02 AM  
Wait wait wait... "Nationwide, a report from the U.S. Department of Education showed tens of thousands of students, 70 percent of them disabled".

70%?! Whether physically or mentally disabled that's just... I don't even have an applicable word in my vocabulary for how reprehensible that is. Just today I witnessed a woman's interaction with her son, who was obviously mentally challenged (don't ask me how I know, it's an ugly thing to point out mental handicaps, not to acknowledge them) and I was displeased when she just yelled at him and told him to shut up. To enforce a corporal punishment like this is just unconscienable.

It would be wrong to employ it upon non-handicapped children as well, and I'm glad something is being done about it. Any further violations should be met with swift and severe punishment, though it is little consolation to previous victims of this abuse and the parents who actually cared about their children.
 
2012-05-26 09:14:14 AM  
In Vegas you pay extra for that sorta thing
 
2012-05-26 10:38:12 AM  

ShannonKW: "Without the fear, there is no system. Without the system there is no fear." -- Bebe Doc Duvalier


Oh, yes, because a lack of systems works so well in Somalia.
 
2012-05-26 10:40:08 AM  

gozar_the_destroyer: Or Ghastly.


Uncle Ghastly doesn't need alts.
 
2012-05-26 10:56:30 AM  

Gyrfalcon: The settlement, approved by U.S. District Judge Tom Lee, says all district employees will stop handcuffing students younger than 13, and can only handcuff older students for crimes. In no case will employees shackle a student to a fixed object such as a railing, a pole, a desk or a chair.

That doesn't sound as settled as I'd like, quite frankly.

So what if it's an "alternative school"? (read: developmental center) So what if the kids get violent or unruly? They're still kids. You're adults. If you can't control them any other way than by shackling them to the wall, maybe you're doing something wrong.


My daughter is developmentally disabled. She is missing part of her brain and autistic. She's been to many schools, from mainstream, to developmental schools. I prefer the developmental ones. They know how to handle her when her senses get overwhelmed. When her senses get overwhelmed, she likes to swing to calm herself. If she cannot be calmed and she goes nuts, then they take a sheet and wrap her. She is not harmed, and her limbs are not free to harm anyone either. She also wears a pressure vest off and on throughout the day as well as using a body brush to calm her when she's about to become upset. She's a very sensory child.

She has what is called split brain personality because she is missing the part of the brain that connects the left half with the right half. It forms in the first 3 months of fetal development. Link Kim Peek, the inspiration behind Rain Man, had Agenesis Of The Corpus Callosum. That is the technical name for missing that part of the brain. A lot of people assume the movie was based on Autism, actually, it was based on ACC. It's also extremely rare to have both, ACC and autism, but it is possible, my daughter is one of the few. My daughter is a medical oddity in that she has seizures in both halves on her brain, yet there's no bridge to allow the seizures to jump from one half to the other. She constantly amazes her neurologists.

You do constantly HAVE to keep up on the schools though. She's had lovely wonderful teachers who've adored her greatly, and just this past year, had teachers who've yelled at her every chance they got thinking we weren't going to find out. You really have to keep up on these teachers. Some of them do not have your child's best interests at heart. But some are the sweetest people you will ever meet.
 
2012-05-26 11:25:14 AM  

gozar_the_destroyer: I have a college degree with a 3.2 GPA


I thought your comment was very insightful and I hate to be "that guy," but 3.2 is not an impressive GPA--particularly if you went to a state school. Colleges have the same problems of handing out Bs and BAs to every idiot who walks through the doors these days in the name of student retention and high graduation rates. A bachelor's degree is quickly becoming as useless as a high school diploma.
 
2012-05-26 04:30:57 PM  
Handcuffing kids because they are hyper? Really?

And note.. they only agreed to stop doing it to the kids UNDER 13 yo.

What happens if there is a fire in that school? Teacher really going to stop from running out of the building to stop and unshackle all the kids who wouldn't stay in their seats?

That entire school needs to be defunded, the administration fired outright and the school system needs to find a new way of handing 'problem' children.
 
2012-05-26 06:39:32 PM  
They're going to have them sing De Camptown Ladies instead,
 
2012-05-26 07:11:54 PM  

Grables'Daughter: Isildur: PerfectHotBlonde: Am I the only one turned on right now?

I'd like to put on a schoolgirl outfit and be restrained by a scholarly, older gentleman.


Another GD alt?

1. I do not have any alts. LittleBlondeJug was my only one, and I don't post as her anymore.
2. Here is a relevant picture to this thread:

[www.regulationknickers.com image 320x240]



Given the similarities in both name and and post content, combined with a recent registration date, surely you can understand why I'd wonder if this was a case of LBJ:TNG. =P
 
2012-05-26 09:26:40 PM  
What burns me is... us adults have to pay for this kind of service, they get it for free!
 
2012-05-26 09:28:12 PM  

mikewadestr: They're going to have them sing De Camptown Ladies instead,


What in the Wide World of Sports is a-goin' on around here?
 
2012-05-27 12:21:15 AM  

Because People in power are Stupid: MS Jackson if you're nasty...


metro
 
2012-05-27 06:38:19 AM  

Isildur: Grables'Daughter: Isildur: PerfectHotBlonde: Am I the only one turned on right now?

I'd like to put on a schoolgirl outfit and be restrained by a scholarly, older gentleman.


Another GD alt?

1. I do not have any alts. LittleBlondeJug was my only one, and I don't post as her anymore.
2. Here is a relevant picture to this thread:

[www.regulationknickers.com image 320x240]


Given the similarities in both name and and post content, combined with a recent registration date, surely you can understand why I'd wonder if this was a case of LBJ:TNG. =P


It's somebody's alt for sure.

At least they spelled "blonde" correctly.
 
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