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(Soccerly)   17% of Americans now consider themselves tech geeks, have the wedgie scars to prove it   (technolog.msnbc.msn.com) divider line 85
    More: Interesting, Americans, geeks, TechNewsDaily  
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796 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 May 2012 at 12:39 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-25 09:43:18 AM  
Most Americans think they're a tech geek if they have a new iPhone or new Android phone. What they think has little or no bearing on whether they are or not.
 
2012-05-25 10:07:06 AM  
Is this one of those "We're the most wired in generation in history even though my iPhone is a complete black box to me seriously how does this thing work it's magic" articles?
 
2012-05-25 10:18:47 AM  
I'd be surprised if 17% of Americans were simply computer literate.

I don't hold myself out as a geek, and I can set up a wireless network, install a fresh copy of Windows, replace a video card, install an extra fan, and force Windows 7 to not use that godawful font on sticky notes. Which is a damn sight more than most people can do.
 
2012-05-25 10:18:50 AM  

RexTalionis: Most Americans think they're a tech geek if they have a new iPhone or new Android phone. What they think has little or no bearing on whether they are or not.


Mentat: Is this one of those "We're the most wired in generation in history even though my iPhone is a complete black box to me seriously how does this thing work it's magic" articles?


It's only going to get worse from here. We're putting up one of our top products into a cloud. For developers who don't want to understand how the product lets them do what they want to do.

Sure, I won't get service requests for installation issues from them. But they're going to be "those" kinds of customers who will need elementary things explained to them.

Basically, they'll be my mom.
 
2012-05-25 10:36:57 AM  
Yeah, well, I took apart my iPhone and rebuilt it as an Android.
 
2012-05-25 11:01:03 AM  
Yea, and 60% of girls these days consider themselves geeks cause they wear glasses and can quote that scene from Star Battles where Major Picard tells Luke that he's his father.


i881.photobucket.com

True nerd girls are awesome.
 
2012-05-25 11:42:38 AM  
CSB: One time my main computer was having DNS resolving issues. So I made a program to intercept the gethostbyname(...) function calls that programs were making into the winsock.dll, sent the request it to another computer inside my function, and returned the response to the programs. That was just to troubleshoot the problem.
 
2012-05-25 12:48:27 PM  
I'm a tech geek because I can post pictures from my phone to facebook from anywhere! I share in the cloud!
 
2012-05-25 12:48:49 PM  
i601.photobucket.com
 
2012-05-25 12:49:18 PM  

Diogenes: It's only going to get worse from here. We're putting up one of our top products into a cloud. For developers who don't want to understand how the product lets them do what they want to do.


All I thought of when reading that was today's Dilbert:

www.dilbert.com
 
2012-05-25 12:53:42 PM  
Armed with less than $10 of new capacitors from an electronic store, and a soldering iron, i recently repaired my Samsung 46" HDTV myself after being told by the service rep that they'd have to swap out a board or 2 for several hundred dollars.

Its the most techie thing i've done since building a Win98 (FAT32) / Windows Workstation 4.0 (NTFS) dual boot machine on a 133mHz Pentium, back in the 90's.
 
2012-05-25 12:56:50 PM  

RexTalionis: Most Americans think they're a tech geek if they have a new iPhone or new Android phone. What they think has little or no bearing on whether they are or not.


Done in one. If I went round to every single person I work with, which is about 100 people, I know for a fact that less than 5 have enough knowledge to be considered tech geeks. I actually suspect it's probably only 2 or 3 at most.

I've had countless conversations about technology with most people I work with and it amazes me that the simplest things are a complete mystery to them. I'm by no means an expert but I have a moderate level of computer knowledge and most people seem to look at me as if I'm some sort of god of machines. Just because I can do something like install a new hard drive. Not to mention how many of them don't even know what the hell a hard drive is anyway.
 
2012-05-25 12:59:48 PM  
msnbcmedia2.msn.com

I don't like it when they have leading zeroes.
 
2012-05-25 01:04:54 PM  
Not till you've bled building a PC
 
2012-05-25 01:08:31 PM  

T.rex: Armed with less than $10 of new capacitors from an electronic store, and a soldering iron, i recently repaired my Samsung 46" HDTV myself after being told by the service rep that they'd have to swap out a board or 2 for several hundred dollars.

Its the most techie thing i've done since building a Win98 (FAT32) / Windows Workstation 4.0 (NTFS) dual boot machine on a 133mHz Pentium, back in the 90's.


Was your TV failing to turn on? You could hear the relays switch on, then switch back off again?
 
2012-05-25 01:10:22 PM  
I find it funny that we biatch and moan about how many people operate computers and smartphones with little to no knowledge of how they work inside, but jumping into a 5000 lb car and hurtling down the highway is completely normal.

I'm willing to bet Sebastien Vettel doesn't know how to change the oil on his racecar, but that doesn't mean he's not good at operating it.
 
2012-05-25 01:12:30 PM  
Once my first books from mycomputercareer.com get here, I'm going to be making $80k a year and drive a convertible on a beachside highway and I'll be able to hack into any system there is!
 
2012-05-25 01:13:33 PM  

The sound of one hand clapping: RexTalionis: Most Americans think they're a tech geek if they have a new iPhone or new Android phone. What they think has little or no bearing on whether they are or not.

Done in one. If I went round to every single person I work with, which is about 100 people, I know for a fact that less than 5 have enough knowledge to be considered tech geeks. I actually suspect it's probably only 2 or 3 at most.

I've had countless conversations about technology with most people I work with and it amazes me that the simplest things are a complete mystery to them. I'm by no means an expert but I have a moderate level of computer knowledge and most people seem to look at me as if I'm some sort of god of machines. Just because I can do something like install a new hard drive. Not to mention how many of them don't even know what the hell a hard drive is anyway.


Same. I'm not a hardcore computer nerd, but I know enough to be able to go online and buy the right parts to put together a pretty good computer and do it myself. I can figure out most minor problems people are having when their computer acts up and I can usually fix them. I know only the barebones basics of networking and next to nothing about servers.

The people I work with at the small business I'm employed by occasionally use me as an IT guy since we're too small to really warrant a full time IT person.
 
2012-05-25 01:18:39 PM  

Diogenes: Sure, I won't get service requests for installation issues from them. But they're going to be "those" kinds of customers who will need elementary things explained to them.


Repeatedly, at that. I'm constantly amazed at the fact that nobody has put two very simple things together:

1. If your customer requires complex software
2. Your customer is going to have to understand how it works

otherwise

3. You'll have to walk them through the same damn thing over and over and over because they'll never make the connection between what you're telling them and the actual functionality.

I shouldn't complain too much, I guess. Although it makes my job more mundane, it's also easier and ensure a level of job security.

impaler: CSB: One time my main computer was having DNS resolving issues. So I made a program to intercept the gethostbyname(...) function calls that programs were making into the winsock.dll, sent the request it to another computer inside my function, and returned the response to the programs. That was just to troubleshoot the problem.


I'd be interested to know what the problem turned out to be, because I'm having a hard time envisioning a scenario other than a corrupted library where nslookup and certain switches to ping wouldn't suffice.
 
2012-05-25 01:21:35 PM  

animal900: I find it funny that we biatch and moan about how many people operate computers and smartphones with little to no knowledge of how they work inside, but jumping into a 5000 lb car and hurtling down the highway is completely normal.

I'm willing to bet Sebastien Vettel doesn't know how to change the oil on his racecar, but that doesn't mean he's not good at operating it.


If Sebastien Vettle claimed he was an expert mechanic, your analogy would make sense.

Lots of people know how to use computers and smartphones. What separates them from the same users we've had since the 70s is that when it breaks,they can fix it, or at least try. Just because you can text your BFF Jill at 86 wpm on your iPhone doesn't mean you're a tech geek. Not when you have to call me every time your wireless connection drops or you can't figure out what to put in the different fields to connect it to the Exchange server at work.
 
2012-05-25 01:24:32 PM  
I programmed (in .NET Compact Framework tbh) an application on an iPaq that could wireless query a remote database of my DVD collection and then send the commands to play a particular DVD to a Sony 400 DVD jukebox. It was better than using the built in catalog function, or using a printout.

I've got the equipment - four SPA504s, an SPA9000 and a PoE switch - to set up a housewide VOIP system when I purchase a house in a few months. (A colleague has about 600 feet of cat 6 he's gonna give me)

I run a computer as a Domain Controller in my apartment.

I named my first born, a son, Tiberius.

And I don't even consider myself hardcore.
 
2012-05-25 01:26:02 PM  

animal900: I find it funny that we biatch and moan about how many people operate computers and smartphones with little to no knowledge of how they work inside, but jumping into a 5000 lb car and hurtling down the highway is completely normal.

I'm willing to bet Sebastien Vettel doesn't know how to change the oil on his racecar, but that doesn't mean he's not good at operating it.


Right but we don't call ourselves gearheads.
 
2012-05-25 01:33:26 PM  

Nexzus: I programmed (in .NET Compact Framework tbh) an application on an iPaq that could wireless query a remote database of my DVD collection and then send the commands to play a particular DVD to a Sony 400 DVD jukebox. It was better than using the built in catalog function, or using a printout.

I've got the equipment - four SPA504s, an SPA9000 and a PoE switch - to set up a housewide VOIP system when I purchase a house in a few months. (A colleague has about 600 feet of cat 6 he's gonna give me)

I run a computer as a Domain Controller in my apartment.

I named my first born, a son, Tiberius.

And I don't even consider myself hardcore.


Just a heads up. You will not be able to get full Gigbit Ethernet speeds using Cat6 cable if you are also using PoE.
 
2012-05-25 01:37:25 PM  

impaler: T.rex: Armed with less than $10 of new capacitors from an electronic store, and a soldering iron, i recently repaired my Samsung 46" HDTV myself after being told by the service rep that they'd have to swap out a board or 2 for several hundred dollars.

Its the most techie thing i've done since building a Win98 (FAT32) / Windows Workstation 4.0 (NTFS) dual boot machine on a 133mHz Pentium, back in the 90's.

Was your TV failing to turn on? You could hear the relays switch on, then switch back off again?


No... the faulty capacitors WERE on the power board, but they hadn't quite burst yet... They were bulging though, at the top, which resulting in the video picture kinda shimmering/flickering, like there was interference.

Failing to turn on, like you say, would've been a surefire symptom as well, as is notorious in Samsung displays.
 
2012-05-25 01:38:00 PM  
Nerdy girls heart me.

that's a fact.

I have the teeth marks on my heinie to prove it.
 
2012-05-25 01:38:35 PM  

animal900: I'm willing to bet Sebastien Vettel doesn't know how to change the oil on his racecar, but that doesn't mean he's not good at operating it.


I bet he does. Vettel was cart racing when he was like 5 years old. He has mechanics do it because he's not paid to change oil.

YOU sound like someone who doesn't know how to change their oil. It's a plug, a screw filter, and a cap. Not rocket science.
 
2012-05-25 01:38:53 PM  
Some of my friends consider themselves geeks since watch BSG and GoT and can download an app onto their phone.
 
2012-05-25 01:47:11 PM  

The sound of one hand clapping: RexTalionis: Most Americans think they're a tech geek if they have a new iPhone or new Android phone. What they think has little or no bearing on whether they are or not.

Done in one. If I went round to every single person I work with, which is about 100 people, I know for a fact that less than 5 have enough knowledge to be considered tech geeks. I actually suspect it's probably only 2 or 3 at most.

I've had countless conversations about technology with most people I work with and it amazes me that the simplest things are a complete mystery to them. I'm by no means an expert but I have a moderate level of computer knowledge and most people seem to look at me as if I'm some sort of god of machines. Just because I can do something like install a new hard drive. Not to mention how many of them don't even know what the hell a hard drive is anyway.


It's that box you plug the screen into.
 
2012-05-25 01:52:34 PM  

T.rex: No... the faulty capacitors WERE on the power board, but they hadn't quite burst yet... They were bulging though, at the top, which resulting in the video picture kinda shimmering/flickering, like there was interference.

Failing to turn on, like you say, would've been a surefire symptom as well, as is notorious in Samsung displays.


Because what I described happened to my 46" Samsung. They had a tech guy come out and replace some caps free of charge - problem solved. I guess Samsung bought a hube batch of bad caps or something years ago.
 
2012-05-25 01:54:58 PM  

Splinshints: I'd be interested to know what the problem turned out to be, because I'm having a hard time envisioning a scenario other than a corrupted library where nslookup and certain switches to ping wouldn't suffice.


Not sure what the problem ultimately was. No program that used winsock on that machine could resolve a domain name, including ping.
 
2012-05-25 01:56:55 PM  

RexTalionis: Most Americans think they're a tech geek if they have a new iPhone or new Android phone. What they think has little or no bearing on whether they are or not.


Most Farkers think they're a tech geek if they've written a PHP script or built their own computer. What they think has little or no bearing on whether they are or not.

To paraphrase Einstein, "whatever your criteria for being a geek is, I assure you that mine is much greater."
 
2012-05-25 01:57:49 PM  

animal900: [msnbcmedia2.msn.com image 320x223]

I don't like it when they have leading zeroes.


Why not? They're bytes in groups of 8 bits. Half the time, they'll end up starting with 0.
 
2012-05-25 01:58:56 PM  

animal900: I'm willing to bet Sebastien Vettel doesn't know how to change the oil on his racecar, but that doesn't mean he's not good at operating it.


Don't most racing car drivers pay close attention to the behaviour of their vehicles and - using intimate knowledge of how they operate at a detailed level - request slight modifications such as tire pressure, tensions, etc. - doesn't that all come from the driver?

I am a software engineer and I can handle any PC-related issue I encounter, having gone as far as to lap my heatsinks and cpus with sand paper when setting up water cooling (and peltier enhanced) rings. I don't consider myself hardcore, because I just acquired all that knowledge from people who are. But as it was said already, I work for a dark fruit coloured company that makes tech devices and most people in R&D wouldn't even bother opening a PC up to do some basic work. There's a few that certainly do, but I work with highly paid professional engineers who were shocked, actually shocked, that I was "brave" enough to buy my own motherboard, CPU and RAM. With your car analogy, I can change my oil (but it's more convenient to have someone do it for me), do my own brakes... understanding, mechanically, how it works? Easy. Read the manual. Having the tools/space to do it is another issue.

I can't help but feel that there's a type of person who is just inherently good at taking any give thing, seeing its constituent parts and how they interoperate with each other, and working with it. They're what I'll call a natural engineer. Then there are learned engineers who have a specific set of rehearsed behaviours they acquired in school. They're not bad engineers, but I don't think they drive innovation. I think I'm somewhere between the two, as I don't have a blog, and if I did, it wouldn't be popular, but I seem to walk circles around "peers" when it comes to technical prowess, but even other things like home repair. I am not a craftsman, and a professional carpenter will walk circles around me, but I still understand everything that goes in to the construction of a house. Or most importantly, I *can* understand it. I think what we're talking about here is that people just seem completely incapable of understanding things in a manner of detail. Push button >>> desired outcome. If you introduce an intermediary step, or try to explain that it doesn't work if... the network is down... people, more often than not, seem to just go limp and can't handle it.
 
2012-05-25 02:00:11 PM  

ryarger: Most Farkers think they're a tech geek if they've written a PHP script or built their own computer. What they think has little or no bearing on whether they are or not.


I built my own computer. But I'm not a geek.

Nerd.
 
2012-05-25 02:01:17 PM  

impaler: Because what I described happened to my 46" Samsung. They had a tech guy come out and replace some caps free of charge - problem solved. I guess Samsung bought a hube batch of bad caps or something years ago.


Dell had a big problem with that too.

Their GX260 and 270 desktops about 5 or 6 years ago were filled with bad caps. I was doing dell tech support then and I'd go to places that would have stacks of 20-50 machines with dead motherboards with bad caps. A few times I spent 8 hours straight at a place just replacing one motherboard after another.

Turns out it wasn't even Dell's fault. They had bought a batch of capacitors from a Chinese company who had incorrectly stolen the formula for capacitors from another company. Nobody who bought the caps knew anything was wrong until the caps were in production machines leaking yellow crap. Dell was actually really good about replacing the failed machines under warranty.

/geek cred.
 
2012-05-25 02:03:23 PM  

ManOfTeal: Nexzus: I programmed (in .NET Compact Framework tbh) an application on an iPaq that could wireless query a remote database of my DVD collection and then send the commands to play a particular DVD to a Sony 400 DVD jukebox. It was better than using the built in catalog function, or using a printout.

I've got the equipment - four SPA504s, an SPA9000 and a PoE switch - to set up a housewide VOIP system when I purchase a house in a few months. (A colleague has about 600 feet of cat 6 he's gonna give me)

I run a computer as a Domain Controller in my apartment.

I named my first born, a son, Tiberius.

And I don't even consider myself hardcore.

Just a heads up. You will not be able to get full Gigbit Ethernet speeds using Cat6 cable if you are also using PoE.


the passthrough on the phones is only 10/100 anyway, unless he's got extra ports for GigE on the wallplates.
 
2012-05-25 02:06:25 PM  

fluffy2097: impaler: Because what I described happened to my 46" Samsung. They had a tech guy come out and replace some caps free of charge - problem solved. I guess Samsung bought a hube batch of bad caps or something years ago.

Dell had a big problem with that too.

Their GX260 and 270 desktops about 5 or 6 years ago were filled with bad caps. I was doing dell tech support then and I'd go to places that would have stacks of 20-50 machines with dead motherboards with bad caps. A few times I spent 8 hours straight at a place just replacing one motherboard after another.

Turns out it wasn't even Dell's fault. They had bought a batch of capacitors from a Chinese company who had incorrectly stolen the formula for capacitors from another company. Nobody who bought the caps knew anything was wrong until the caps were in production machines leaking yellow crap. Dell was actually really good about replacing the failed machines under warranty.

/geek cred.


This happened for a while, I think even father back then 5-6 years, as I was definitely not in my 20s: I had a motherboard that suffered the problem. I wanted to toss it, my dad took it (he was the 'piles of computer parts in his apartment' kind of person). Replaced the caps on it like it was no big deal. He drives Taxi for a living... more hardcore than me. Did the same thing by following traces on an old board that had died and soldering new resistors in.
 
2012-05-25 02:06:31 PM  

daveinsurgent: I can't help but feel that there's a type of person who is just inherently good at taking any give thing, seeing its constituent parts and how they interoperate with each other, and working with it. They're what I'll call a natural engineer.


*Raises his hand*

Mechanical things are just obvious to me. From assembling computers to car transmissions.

Machine logic is completely lost on me, which is why I've always been a horrible completely incompetent programmer. Also why I don't bother with Linux. (I am too old to be farking with .conf files for hours to beg xorg into displaying images like all other OS's have been able to do just fine for 20+ years.)
 
2012-05-25 02:09:56 PM  

fluffy2097: impaler: Because what I described happened to my 46" Samsung. They had a tech guy come out and replace some caps free of charge - problem solved. I guess Samsung bought a hube batch of bad caps or something years ago.

Dell had a big problem with that too.

Their GX260 and 270 desktops about 5 or 6 years ago were filled with bad caps. I was doing dell tech support then and I'd go to places that would have stacks of 20-50 machines with dead motherboards with bad caps. A few times I spent 8 hours straight at a place just replacing one motherboard after another.

Turns out it wasn't even Dell's fault. They had bought a batch of capacitors from a Chinese company who had incorrectly stolen the formula for capacitors from another company. Nobody who bought the caps knew anything was wrong until the caps were in production machines leaking yellow crap. Dell was actually really good about replacing the failed machines under warranty.

/geek cred.


The GX260/270's gave me a stack of P4's in my desk, the company never did care to repair them as they were already getting evergreened out of service. As each one died, would strip it for parts.
 
2012-05-25 02:10:23 PM  

impaler: T.rex: No... the faulty capacitors WERE on the power board, but they hadn't quite burst yet... They were bulging though, at the top, which resulting in the video picture kinda shimmering/flickering, like there was interference.

Failing to turn on, like you say, would've been a surefire symptom as well, as is notorious in Samsung displays.

Because what I described happened to my 46" Samsung. They had a tech guy come out and replace some caps free of charge - problem solved. I guess Samsung bought a hube batch of bad caps or something years ago.


Yes sir... The issue you describe, i've seen all over the message boards. Caps from China. Lots of people complaining that right after the warranty expired, the caps would go bad, and set wouldn't turn on, and you'd hear a clicking sound.

I'm glad they did the fix for you, free of charge... They were unwilling to help me out because i was out of warranty, which kinda upset me, because i've been a loyal Samsung customer with other products as well. I've kinda relegated myself to that fact that i like their products, but that i shouldn't expect the corporation to bend over backwards for me.
 
2012-05-25 02:12:04 PM  
If you "built" your own computer without melting solder or etching copper, you didn't build it. You just assembled some Lego bricks.

If you own a smartphone but have never made a call by sending Hayes "AT" commands directly to its onboard modem, you are not a tech geek.

If you have ever programmed an EPROM byte-by-byte using jumper wires on a solderless breadboard, you might be a tech geek.
 
2012-05-25 02:16:03 PM  

fluffy2097: impaler: Because what I described happened to my 46" Samsung. They had a tech guy come out and replace some caps free of charge - problem solved. I guess Samsung bought a hube batch of bad caps or something years ago.

Dell had a big problem with that too.

Their GX260 and 270 desktops about 5 or 6 years ago were filled with bad caps. I was doing dell tech support then and I'd go to places that would have stacks of 20-50 machines with dead motherboards with bad caps. A few times I spent 8 hours straight at a place just replacing one motherboard after another.

Turns out it wasn't even Dell's fault. They had bought a batch of capacitors from a Chinese company who had incorrectly stolen the formula for capacitors from another company. Nobody who bought the caps knew anything was wrong until the caps were in production machines leaking yellow crap. Dell was actually really good about replacing the failed machines under warranty.

/geek cred.


I was working IT for the USMC when that happened. "The system has shut down due to a thermal event", then nothing. Dell replaced 300 of them on our base.
 
2012-05-25 02:17:07 PM  

Ivo Shandor: If you "built" your own computer without melting solder or etching copper, you didn't build it. You just assembled some Lego bricks.

If you own a smartphone but have never made a call by sending Hayes "AT" commands directly to its onboard modem, you are not a tech geek.

If you have ever programmed an EPROM byte-by-byte using jumper wires on a solderless breadboard, you might be a tech geek.


Get off your analog lawn?
 
2012-05-25 02:21:24 PM  

Splinshints: I shouldn't complain too much, I guess. Although it makes my job more mundane, it's also easier and ensure a level of job security


My problem is we get the whole spectrum. We don't do "tiered" support. Now not only do me and my engineers support 6 different products, we have to support roughly three different "flavors" of those products.

It's amazing my head doesn't start spinning and fly off into space.
 
2012-05-25 02:23:22 PM  
I get real tired of guys at work throwing around buzzwords. I call them out on it all the time.

// Computer Science degree from late 80's. 25 years in the biz.
 
2012-05-25 02:23:43 PM  
I can install a home theater system.
I can install a fresh copy of Windows XP or Windows 7.
I can go through and disable all the "services" that are not useful and hog memory.
I can install a wireless network with wpa2 encryption and a network drive.
Hell, I can even replace a burnt-out resistor on simpler electronics.

I am not a "tech geek". I am "moderately useful with electronics".

A tech geek buys an internet appliance to see if he can hack it and install his favorite flavor of Linux. Not because it's useful, but to see how it would work.
 
2012-05-25 02:24:27 PM  

fluffy2097: Turns out it wasn't even Dell's fault. They had bought a batch of capacitors from a Chinese company who had incorrectly stolen the formula for capacitors from another company. Nobody who bought the caps knew anything was wrong until the caps were in production machines leaking yellow crap. Dell was actually really good about replacing the failed machines under warranty.


That was a very widespread problem throughout the industry. There's a whole wikipedia article on it called "the capacitor plague". I lost a very nice motherboard to it.
 
2012-05-25 02:26:57 PM  

SultanofSchwing: ManOfTeal: Nexzus: I programmed (in .NET Compact Framework tbh) an application on an iPaq that could wireless query a remote database of my DVD collection and then send the commands to play a particular DVD to a Sony 400 DVD jukebox. It was better than using the built in catalog function, or using a printout.

I've got the equipment - four SPA504s, an SPA9000 and a PoE switch - to set up a housewide VOIP system when I purchase a house in a few months. (A colleague has about 600 feet of cat 6 he's gonna give me)

I run a computer as a Domain Controller in my apartment.

I named my first born, a son, Tiberius.

And I don't even consider myself hardcore.

Just a heads up. You will not be able to get full Gigbit Ethernet speeds using Cat6 cable if you are also using PoE.

the passthrough on the phones is only 10/100 anyway, unless he's got extra ports for GigE on the wallplates.


Yeah, I have a dedicated 10/100 PoE switch for the phone system, and I'll be running separate runs for a gig switch that I have for general connectivity. PS3s and PS3 Mediaserver especially like gigabit much more.
 
2012-05-25 02:31:48 PM  

Ivo Shandor: If you "built" your own computer without melting solder or etching copper, you didn't build it. You just assembled some Lego bricks.

If you own a smartphone but have never made a call by sending Hayes "AT" commands directly to its onboard modem, you are not a tech geek.

If you have ever programmed an EPROM byte-by-byte using jumper wires on a solderless breadboard, you might be a tech geek.


Please. You're just setting some values on something someone else already made. you Might as well get a bank of 100 light switches, turn them on and off in a pattern and call yourself a geek.

Come back when you've sucked the air out of your hand blown vacuum tubes.
 
2012-05-25 02:33:34 PM  

LincolnLogolas: A tech geek buys an internet appliance to see if he can hack it and install his favorite flavor of Linux. Not because it's useful, but to see how it would work.


A tech geek could do that. He doesn't have to do that. A tech geek can also say "I'm leaving this alone till some dork cracks it and makes it easier."
 
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