If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Newser)   Wingsuiters have figured out how to land without a parachute. We're this much closer to flying   (newser.com) divider line 133
    More: Spiffy, ankle sprain  
•       •       •

11221 clicks; posted to Video » on 24 May 2012 at 9:37 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



133 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-05-24 10:55:29 AM  
Honest question for those posting in this thread that seem to know a lot about these things: does this feat represent any real development (i.e., "a step in the right direction"), or is this just the first guy who had big enough balls (and enough boxes) to do this?
 
2012-05-24 10:56:35 AM  

chuckufarlie: DammitIForgotMyLogin: Nope, he still hit the ground.

Until he learns how to miss, it's not flying.

based on your requirements, airplanes do not fly.


i.imgur.com
 
2012-05-24 10:59:14 AM  

Skwrl:
Lubejewski: slayer199: I'm still wondering if there's a design change that could be made to these wingsuits to allow the skydiver to flare on landing. It isn't like you can lower flaps on a wingsuit, but there has to be a clever way to reduce the stall speed enough so that they can land without a parachute OR a ton of empty boxes.
* * * Lift is generated by a difference in air pressure and you need a lot of speed to achieve enough of a pressure difference to work against gravity. The wing suit slows the skydiver down due to the drag caused by air resistance but as he slows the air resistance is lessened and eventually imparts a force on him that is equal to gravity. At that point the skydiver is falling at terminal velocity. * * * The only other way to act against gravity would be to have some form of thrust like in a helicopter, airplane or rocket.

Thrust works against drag, not against gravity (that's lift). Some folks believe that the best way to approach this problem is to increase wing size. The problem with that is induced drag, which means you need to have some means of keeping the wing shape in place. If we're talking something rigid, that's basically a hang glider.



You are correct that thrust works against drag but you are wrong about it not acting against gravity. A rocket uses thrust exclusively for lift while an airplane uses a combination of thrust, lift from the airfoils and angle of attack.
 
2012-05-24 11:00:56 AM  

Lubejewski: I'm not so sure about that. It takes a lot of lift to work against gravity. Lift is generated by a difference in air pressure and you need a lot of speed to achieve enough of a pressure difference to work against gravity. The wing suit slows the skydiver down due to the drag caused by air resistance but as he slows the air resistance is lessened and eventually imparts a force on him that is equal to gravity. At that point the skydiver is falling at terminal velocity. He can change his terminal velocity by changing the orientation of his body but only he can only change it so much. He would have to flatten himself out like a piece of paper to reduce his terminal velocity enough to survive the fall. This is essentially what a parachute is doing. It is spreading your weight out over the surface area of the chute so that there is enough air resistance to slow you to a safe speed. The only other way to act against gravity would be to have some form of thrust like in a helicopter, airplane or rocket.


Right. While a single-engine prop plain may have a stall speed of 50-80kph, a human in a wingsuit would not likely survive landing at that speed. The point is that rather than a parachute, perhaps something in the wingsuit that could expand the surface area and increase lift (similar to your analogy of flatting out like a piece of paper).
 
2012-05-24 11:05:13 AM  

drsewell: Should have attached a skateboard to his chest and landed on a runway.


Now THAT I would watch.
 
2012-05-24 11:07:09 AM  

muwaryer: Honest question for those posting in this thread that seem to know a lot about these things: does this feat represent any real development (i.e., "a step in the right direction"), or is this just the first guy who had big enough balls (and enough boxes) to do this?


That's the source of a lot of discussion on the wingsuit forum at dropzone.com.

Basically, a lot of people have known for a while that this was theoretically possible. We can get fall rates down to 25mph (well, some can, my skills can only get me down to 40mph at best). But those very slow fall rates are hard to hold (due to arm strain from induced drag) and hard to fly (due to the strain and due to the instability that is created when you effectively stall the wing to achieve those slow fall rates).

So if you're a trained stunt guy who knows how to land in boxes (like Gary) and you know you can hit boxes at 25 to 35mph and be OK, then in theory one should be able to safely do this. Gary proved that theory correct. However, it's not really easily repeatable (given the logistical constraints) and the fact that most wingsuiters aren't trained stunt folks and have no idea how to land in boxes safety. So to the certain extent, it's seen as "just a stunt" by some in the wingsuit community.

Having said that, it generates interest in the sport, and challenges us to think about what can be done in the future. Most people can't afford Yves Rossy's jet wing, but it similarly makes a lot of people go "wow, neat, I wonder what else we can do", including some more accessible things like Visa Parviainen's rocket boots.

We might reach a point where a skilled wingsuiter could "swoop" his wingsuit to a landing much like canopy pilots swoop today. That's going to require a radical redesign of the wing, though, to generate enough lift with enough control to allow for that, though.

So, basically, Gary's jump encourages us to explore what's possible.
 
2012-05-24 11:09:06 AM  

Lubejewski: Skwrl:
Lubejewski: slayer199: * * *

You are correct that thrust works against drag but you are wrong about it not acting against gravity. A rocket uses thrust exclusively for lift while an airplane uses a combination of thrust, lift from the airfoils and angle of attack.


You're right, of course; I over-generalized. Directed thrust. Except with a (non-powered) wingsuit, there's no thrust other than the thrust created by deflected relative wind.
 
2012-05-24 11:12:55 AM  

Skwrl: I'm a wingsuiter (see my fark profile). I founded and run a school that teaches skydivers to wingsuit.Regardless of whether you think it's a proper "landing" (he did walk away from it, after all), it's a pretty impressive feat of wingsuiting.


Can you explain why this guy was so wobbly as he fell?

I've never gotten that impression from other wing suit videos I've watched.

It sort of reminded me of those films from 100+ years ago of early aviators trying and failing and crashing. In fact, if this video weren't in color but in black and white and had the helicopter removed and a CGI mountain installed...

Regarding your later statements about the need to keep the wing rigid as a solution to flaring, how would the wing suit community feel about Yves Rossy's wings? How would jet-engine less rigid wings perform compared to a wingsuit in terms of the goals of the wing suit community?
 
2012-05-24 11:13:31 AM  

DammitIForgotMyLogin: Nope, he still hit the ground.

Until he learns how to miss, it's not flying.


You, sir, are excellent.
 
2012-05-24 11:14:16 AM  

slayer199: Lubejewski: I'm not so sure about that. It takes a lot of lift to work against gravity. Lift is generated by a difference in air pressure and you need a lot of speed to achieve enough of a pressure difference to work against gravity. The wing suit slows the skydiver down due to the drag caused by air resistance but as he slows the air resistance is lessened and eventually imparts a force on him that is equal to gravity. At that point the skydiver is falling at terminal velocity. He can change his terminal velocity by changing the orientation of his body but only he can only change it so much. He would have to flatten himself out like a piece of paper to reduce his terminal velocity enough to survive the fall. This is essentially what a parachute is doing. It is spreading your weight out over the surface area of the chute so that there is enough air resistance to slow you to a safe speed. The only other way to act against gravity would be to have some form of thrust like in a helicopter, airplane or rocket.

Right. While a single-engine prop plain may have a stall speed of 50-80kph, a human in a wingsuit would not likely survive landing at that speed. The point is that rather than a parachute, perhaps something in the wingsuit that could expand the surface area and increase lift (similar to your analogy of flatting out like a piece of paper).



It would be more correct to say you are increasing drag when you expand the surface area of the suit. Lift would come in if the suit was shaped like an airfoil. You could also get lift based on the angle of attack. Think of holding you hand flat out the car window and changing the angle so the airflow pushes it up or down. (Be careful when you try this or you may find yourself halving to explain that you were not "Nazi saluting" the Jewish neighborhood you happened to be driving through)

The problem with all of these factors is that the lift they provide decreases the more slowly you are moving. The only way to slow yourself to a safe speed to to have enough surface area to mass so that your terminal velocity is low enough to survive the landing. This is the idea behind the parachute. You need a surface area at least that big for a human of average size to safely reach the ground.
 
2012-05-24 11:16:58 AM  
Not new. There were 'batmen' back in the 30's. One did survive a parachute failure.
 
2012-05-24 11:18:56 AM  
This is being touted as the first guy to land without a parachute, but haven't several dozen people inadvertently had this honor already, thanks to chute failure? hell, Peggy Hill did it...
 
2012-05-24 11:25:23 AM  
As someone who made his living packing parachutes for 10+ years, won't someone think of the packers? Bad enough I had to knock out 100 or so $5 tandems on a Saturday without taking away the gravy Trustafarian sport rigs!
 
2012-05-24 11:27:25 AM  

Lubejewski: It would be more correct to say you are increasing drag when you expand the surface area of the suit. Lift would come in if the suit was shaped like an airfoil. You could also get lift based on the angle of attack. Think of holding you hand flat out the car window and changing the angle so the airflow pushes it up or down. (Be careful when you try this or you may find yourself halving to explain that you were not "Nazi saluting" the Jewish neighborhood you happened to be driving through)

The problem with all of these factors is that the lift they provide decreases the more slowly you are moving. The only way to slow yourself to a safe speed to to have enough surface area to mass so that your terminal velocity is low enough to survive the landing. This is the idea behind the parachute. You need a surface area at least that big for a human of average size to safely reach the ground.



Good points...but I can dream, can't I? :)
 
2012-05-24 11:30:49 AM  

Skwrl: muwaryer: Honest question for those posting in this thread that seem to know a lot about these things: does this feat represent any real development (i.e., "a step in the right direction"), or is this just the first guy who had big enough balls (and enough boxes) to do this?

That's the source of a lot of discussion on the wingsuit forum at dropzone.com.

Basically, a lot of people have known for a while that this was theoretically possible. We can get fall rates down to 25mph (well, some can, my skills can only get me down to 40mph at best). But those very slow fall rates are hard to hold (due to arm strain from induced drag) and hard to fly (due to the strain and due to the instability that is created when you effectively stall the wing to achieve those slow fall rates).

So if you're a trained stunt guy who knows how to land in boxes (like Gary) and you know you can hit boxes at 25 to 35mph and be OK, then in theory one should be able to safely do this. Gary proved that theory correct. However, it's not really easily repeatable (given the logistical constraints) and the fact that most wingsuiters aren't trained stunt folks and have no idea how to land in boxes safety. So to the certain extent, it's seen as "just a stunt" by some in the wingsuit community.

Having said that, it generates interest in the sport, and challenges us to think about what can be done in the future. Most people can't afford Yves Rossy's jet wing, but it similarly makes a lot of people go "wow, neat, I wonder what else we can do", including some more accessible things like Visa Parviainen's rocket boots.

We might reach a point where a skilled wingsuiter could "swoop" his wingsuit to a landing much like canopy pilots swoop today. That's going to require a radical redesign of the wing, though, to generate enough lift with enough control to allow for that, though.

So, basically, Gary's jump encourages us to explore what's possible.


You're too level headed to be posting F*rk, arn't you?
 
2012-05-24 11:31:57 AM  

Skwrl: muwaryer: Honest question for those posting in this thread that seem to know a lot about these things: does this feat represent any real development (i.e., "a step in the right direction"), or is this just the first guy who had big enough balls (and enough boxes) to do this?

That's the source of a lot of discussion on the wingsuit forum at dropzone.com.

Basically, a lot of people have known for a while that this was theoretically possible. We can get fall rates down to 25mph (well, some can, my skills can only get me down to 40mph at best). But those very slow fall rates are hard to hold (due to arm strain from induced drag) and hard to fly (due to the strain and due to the instability that is created when you effectively stall the wing to achieve those slow fall rates).

So if you're a trained stunt guy who knows how to land in boxes (like Gary) and you know you can hit boxes at 25 to 35mph and be OK, then in theory one should be able to safely do this. Gary proved that theory correct. However, it's not really easily repeatable (given the logistical constraints) and the fact that most wingsuiters aren't trained stunt folks and have no idea how to land in boxes safety. So to the certain extent, it's seen as "just a stunt" by some in the wingsuit community.

Having said that, it generates interest in the sport, and challenges us to think about what can be done in the future. Most people can't afford Yves Rossy's jet wing, but it similarly makes a lot of people go "wow, neat, I wonder what else we can do", including some more accessible things like Visa Parviainen's rocket boots.

We might reach a point where a skilled wingsuiter could "swoop" his wingsuit to a landing much like canopy pilots swoop today. That's going to require a radical redesign of the wing, though, to generate enough lift with enough control to allow for that, though.

So, basically, Gary's jump encourages us to explore what's possible.


Thanks for providing an honest and informed answer without a hint of sarcasm or snark. Are you new here? [Checks Skwrl profile.] Hmmmm...not new. You feeling OK?
 
2012-05-24 11:37:07 AM  

RoyBatty: Can you explain why this guy was so wobbly as he fell?

I've never gotten that impression from other wing suit videos I've watched.


Most of the videos that people watch on YouTube aren't of wingsuits trying to do "max hang time", they are of people doing cool proximity flights or trying to do "max distance".

If you are really pushing the wing to minimize your fall rate, you're basically flying the suit in a sort of controlled stall. The closer to stall it gets, the less control that the wingsuiter has on the wing, which makes it awfully wibbly-wobbly.

The people that didn't think Gary would be able to pull this off pointed to "stall flight characteristics" (a.k.a., it's hard to control) as why he might have a hard time hitting his intended target.
 
2012-05-24 11:43:47 AM  

Skwrl: RoyBatty: Can you explain why this guy was so wobbly as he fell?

I've never gotten that impression from other wing suit videos I've watched.

Most of the videos that people watch on YouTube aren't of wingsuits trying to do "max hang time", they are of people doing cool proximity flights or trying to do "max distance".

If you are really pushing the wing to minimize your fall rate, you're basically flying the suit in a sort of controlled stall. The closer to stall it gets, the less control that the wingsuiter has on the wing, which makes it awfully wibbly-wobbly.

The people that didn't think Gary would be able to pull this off pointed to "stall flight characteristics" (a.k.a., it's hard to control) as why he might have a hard time hitting his intended target.


Thanks, and thanks for your other explanations in this thread!
 
2012-05-24 11:45:34 AM  

RoyBatty: Can you explain why this guy was so wobbly as he fell?


He was nervous, and stiff. If he were more relaxed he'd fly better. Basically he was worrying so much about lining up his landing that he was overcorrecting and getting wobbly. He tried to explain it away in the post-jump interview that it was turbulence, but that's bull.
 
2012-05-24 11:46:02 AM  

chuckufarlie: DammitIForgotMyLogin: Nope, he still hit the ground.

Until he learns how to miss, it's not flying.

based on your requirements, airplanes do not fly.


What Dammit means that during your fall you have the ability to start gaining altitude before you hit the ground. A man free falling without the ability to overcome gravity is not flying..
 
2012-05-24 11:46:13 AM  

RoyBatty: Regarding your later statements about the need to keep the wing rigid as a solution to flaring, how would the wing suit community feel about Yves Rossy's wings? How would jet-engine less rigid wings perform compared to a wingsuit in terms of the goals of the wing suit community?


In the wingsuit room at Skydive City in Zephyrhills, Florida, there's a carbon fiber wing that pretty much matches the description of what you're talking about. (Picture a sled in the shape of a wing that the skydiver lays down on and exits the plane).

I've never seen it flown, but I talked to one of the guys who tried to jump it. He didn't plan on trying to land it (he deploy his main canopy and landed under that). However, the free fall flight with the wing was incredibly... interesting. Apparently, it had all sorts of weird flight characteristics, and was pretty much deemed a Really Bad Idea after a half dozen test jumps. It is now gathering dust.

Could such a wing be developed? I suppose. When we did the math before, though, we concluded it would have to be a LOT bigger than Yves wing, though, to generate the necessary lift. It starts to look a lot more like a hang glider at that point. (Nothing wrong with that, of course, but it's not a wing suit in the traditional sense.)
 
2012-05-24 11:58:31 AM  

Skwrl: Could such a wing be developed? I suppose. When we did the math before, though, we concluded it would have to be a LOT bigger than Yves wing, though, to generate the necessary lift. It starts to look a lot more like a hang glider at that point. (Nothing wrong with that, of course, but it's not a wing suit in the traditional sense.)


That's sort of why I asked about the "goals of the wing suit community", is there any community shared prioritized list of goals where landing without a parachute is high on the list, or maybe fabric suits only and never use rigid wings?

(If that makes any sense.)
 
2012-05-24 12:00:43 PM  

chopit: RoyBatty: Can you explain why this guy was so wobbly as he fell?

He was nervous, and stiff. If he were more relaxed he'd fly better. Basically he was worrying so much about lining up his landing that he was overcorrecting and getting wobbly. He tried to explain it away in the post-jump interview that it was turbulence, but that's bull.


That wobble and his general shape did remind me of ancient films of batmen like early aviators/sky divers. Shop out the helicopter, shop in a balloon....
 
2012-05-24 12:04:00 PM  

RoyBatty: Skwrl: Could such a wing be developed? I suppose. When we did the math before, though, we concluded it would have to be a LOT bigger than Yves wing, though, to generate the necessary lift. It starts to look a lot more like a hang glider at that point. (Nothing wrong with that, of course, but it's not a wing suit in the traditional sense.)

That's sort of why I asked about the "goals of the wing suit community", is there any community shared prioritized list of goals where landing without a parachute is high on the list, or maybe fabric suits only and never use rigid wings?

(If that makes any sense.)


It makes perfect sense. It's not a monolithic community, though. There are folks who love to do max hang time or max distance flights, folks who love to be part of large flocks flying in a coordinated manner, folks who like aerobatic stuff, etc.

I'd say the vast majority of wingsuiters don't spend a ton of time dreaming about landing a wingsuit. Some do, for sure, but most of us get enough of a thrill just flying (or falling, depending on your demand for semantic accuracy) with friends on a weekend.
 
2012-05-24 12:04:40 PM  
images3.wikia.nocookie.net
Flash! ah-aaahh!
 
2012-05-24 12:05:22 PM  
After watching that "landing" all I could think of was ow! ow! papercut! ow! ow! ow!
 
2012-05-24 12:09:15 PM  
Wingsuiters have figured out how to land without a parachute. We're this much closer to flying smacking into the sides of mountains.

chzheroes.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-05-24 12:13:32 PM  
I've always wondered... couldn't you just pull a very high alpha move to bleed speed while maintaining lift? Of course, the downside to that would be that if not timed properly you just fall out of the sky... or would the force against the wing surface tear your arms up?
 
2012-05-24 12:14:35 PM  
crashing into a sh*tload of boxes? that was completely disappointing.

/off to watch grinding the crack for the 17th time.
 
2012-05-24 01:06:48 PM  

Skwrl: Having said that, it generates interest in the sport, and challenges us to think about what can be done in the future. Most people can't afford Yves Rossy's jet wing, but it similarly makes a lot of people go "wow, neat, I wonder what else we can do", including some more accessible things like Visa Parviainen's rocket boots.


that is cool. but I think they are jet boots not rocket boots.
 
2012-05-24 01:22:20 PM  

Lubejewski: Lift is generated by a difference in air pressure and you need a lot of speed to achieve enough of a pressure difference to work against gravity. The wing suit slows the skydiver down due to the drag caused by air resistance but as he slows the air resistance is lessened and eventually imparts a force on him that is equal to gravity. At that point the skydiver is falling at terminal velocity. He can change his terminal velocity by changing the orientation of his body but only he can only change it so much. He would have to flatten himself out like a piece of paper to reduce his terminal velocity enough to survive the fall. This is essentially what a parachute is doing. It is spreading your weight out over the surface area of the chute so that there is enough air resistance to slow you to a safe speed. The only other way to act against gravity would be to have some form of thrust like in a helicopter, airplane or rocket angels from heaven.

 
2012-05-24 01:23:06 PM  

Lubejewski: slayer199: I'm still wondering if there's a design change that could be made to these wingsuits to allow the skydiver to flare on landing. It isn't like you can lower flaps on a wingsuit, but there has to be a clever way to reduce the stall speed enough so that they can land without a parachute OR a ton of empty boxes.

I'm not so sure about that. It takes a lot of lift to work against gravity.


There does not have to be a clever way to land safely, it might be impossible.
At least, in Earth conditions. Change enough factors, such as by being in an Earth atmosphere on the Moon, and the flying suit will be different and behave differently.
 
2012-05-24 01:23:21 PM  
18,600 boxes?

I could do it with 17,000.
 
2012-05-24 01:46:38 PM  

Click Click D'oh: chuckufarlie: DammitIForgotMyLogin: Nope, he still hit the ground.

Until he learns how to miss, it's not flying.

based on your requirements, airplanes do not fly.

But, what about the whale and the bowl of petunias?


falling is not flying.
 
2012-05-24 01:48:43 PM  

drsmith: chuckufarlie: DammitIForgotMyLogin: Nope, he still hit the ground.

Until he learns how to miss, it's not flying.

based on your requirements, airplanes do not fly.

What Dammit means that during your fall you have the ability to start gaining altitude before you hit the ground. A man free falling without the ability to overcome gravity is not flying..


are you a mind reader?
 
2012-05-24 01:51:18 PM  

rwfan: Skwrl: Having said that, it generates interest in the sport, and challenges us to think about what can be done in the future. Most people can't afford Yves Rossy's jet wing, but it similarly makes a lot of people go "wow, neat, I wonder what else we can do", including some more accessible things like Visa Parviainen's rocket boots.

that is cool. but I think they are jet boots not rocket boots.


You're 100% correct. I was being a little glib, mostly because I have jet envy. (They're about $10,000 each...)
 
2012-05-24 01:54:21 PM  
That was not nice of him to mock Todd Green like that. RIP Todd Green
 
2012-05-24 01:55:28 PM  

chuckufarlie: drsmith: chuckufarlie: DammitIForgotMyLogin: Nope, he still hit the ground.

Until he learns how to miss, it's not flying.

based on your requirements, airplanes do not fly.

What Dammit means that during your fall you have the ability to start gaining altitude before you hit the ground. A man free falling without the ability to overcome gravity is not flying..

are you a mind reader?


Are you a reader, period?
www.tildemark.com
 
2012-05-24 02:04:39 PM  

theorellior: Why boxes? It is because they're cheap (relatively speaking)? I wouldn't think they'd be very good speed arrestors, though.


because they collapse really well yet have terrific structural strength. they crumple around whatever his them and control the path through the boxes well, and distribute forces across neighboring boxes.

they use them in movie stunts involving lateral landings of stuntmen(motorcycle stuff) all the time.

Lubejewski: slayer199: I'm still wondering if there's a design change that could be made to these wingsuits to allow the skydiver to flare on landing. It isn't like you can lower flaps on a wingsuit, but there has to be a clever way to reduce the stall speed enough so that they can land without a parachute OR a ton of empty boxes.

I'm not so sure about that. It takes a lot of lift to work against gravity. Lift is generated by a difference in air pressure and you need a lot of speed to achieve enough of a pressure difference to work against gravity. The wing suit slows the skydiver down due to the drag caused by air resistance but as he slows the air resistance is lessened and eventually imparts a force on him that is equal to gravity. At that point the skydiver is falling at terminal velocity. He can change his terminal velocity by changing the orientation of his body but only he can only change it so much. He would have to flatten himself out like a piece of paper to reduce his terminal velocity enough to survive the fall. This is essentially what a parachute is doing. It is spreading your weight out over the surface area of the chute so that there is enough air resistance to slow you to a safe speed. The only other way to act against gravity would be to have some form of thrust like in a helicopter, airplane or rocket.


you wouldn't really need thrust. there's two kinds of lift, the classical air pressure lift, which you're talking about, and direct-force lift, which is what's used during flares. at a high angle of attack you have for a brief while, terrific lift but also extreme amounts of drag. it's why they use them during aircraft landings. lots of lift for soft landing, lots of drag to slow the plane way way down.


now, with the new suits going as slow as 25-30 miles an hour, if you could angle into say a 15mph headwind, you've got a really achieveable ground-speed for a runout after touchdown.

i think the biggest obstacle to a flare-landing is the sheer strength of the human body and how responsive the suit is to control inputs. you have to execute that flare in a matter of a second or two, and at enough altitude that you'd hurt yourself bad if you stalled and fell, at speeds where if your approach was too fast, you'd leave one nasty gory streak behind, and if your approach was too steep you'd crater.
 
2012-05-24 02:12:53 PM  
I'm reminded of the scene in "About Schmidt" when he discovers his soon-to-be son in law's "wall of fame."
 
2012-05-24 02:17:12 PM  

buttery_shame_cave: now, with the new suits going as slow as 25-30 miles an hour, if you could angle into say a 15mph headwind, you've got a really achieveable ground-speed for a runout after touchdown.

i think the biggest obstacle to a flare-landing is the sheer strength of the human body and how responsive the suit is to control inputs. you have to execute that flare in a matter of a second or two, and at enough altitude that you'd hurt yourself bad if you stalled and fell, at speeds where if your approach was too fast, you'd leave one nasty gory streak behind, and if your approach was too steep you'd crater.


I thought about the head wind already but while it looks good in theory in practice it would never be a practical solution. It's far too dangerous to rely on something so unpredictable. The problem you will always run into is that you loose lift and control ability the slower you go. No matter how advanced your flight charataristics are, when you slow down that much it is about the same as trying to fly a brick.
 
2012-05-24 02:26:59 PM  

Thunderboy: chuckufarlie: drsmith: chuckufarlie: DammitIForgotMyLogin: Nope, he still hit the ground.

Until he learns how to miss, it's not flying.

based on your requirements, airplanes do not fly.

What Dammit means that during your fall you have the ability to start gaining altitude before you hit the ground. A man free falling without the ability to overcome gravity is not flying..

are you a mind reader?

Are you a reader, period?
[www.tildemark.com image 300x496]


I read that book a long time ago but it still does not make you a mind reader, just another smug fark douchebag.
 
2012-05-24 02:54:08 PM  

slayer199: I'm still wondering if there's a design change that could be made to these wingsuits to allow the skydiver to flare on landing. It isn't like you can lower flaps on a wingsuit, but there has to be a clever way to reduce the stall speed enough so that they can land without a parachute OR a ton of empty boxes.


I'm modding my wing suit so it deploys 400 of these 25ft from the ground:

us.123rf.com

I'll let you know how I make out
 
2012-05-24 03:02:23 PM  

nyseattitude: slayer199: I'm still wondering if there's a design change that could be made to these wingsuits to allow the skydiver to flare on landing. It isn't like you can lower flaps on a wingsuit, but there has to be a clever way to reduce the stall speed enough so that they can land without a parachute OR a ton of empty boxes.

I'm modding my wing suit so it deploys 400 of these 25ft from the ground:

[us.123rf.com image 291x300]

I'll let you know how I make out


www.makethelist.net
Good luck, we're all counting on you.
 
2012-05-24 03:18:14 PM  

chuckufarlie: Thunderboy: chuckufarlie: drsmith: chuckufarlie: DammitIForgotMyLogin: Nope, he still hit the ground.

Until he learns how to miss, it's not flying.

based on your requirements, airplanes do not fly.

What Dammit means that during your fall you have the ability to start gaining altitude before you hit the ground. A man free falling without the ability to overcome gravity is not flying..

are you a mind reader?

Are you a reader, period?
[www.tildemark.com image 300x496]

I read that book a long time ago but it still does not make you a mind reader, just another smug fark douchebag.


I'm just going to put you out of all our misery. Douglas Adams put forward this idea that to fly one must simply fall and fail to hit the ground. If you trip and something distracts you at exactly the right moment you'll forget, "miss" the ground and ta-da - you're flying! Until you realize that you're defying gravity and then, Loony Tunes style, you fall.

Now you can go back to being the colossal douchebag you deem everyone else to be smug in the knowledge that you knew this all along and were just playing dumb to get a rise out of us. Yeah, that's it.
 
2012-05-24 03:19:59 PM  

guestguy:


Man I would just love it if there was just one thread on Fark that didn't have someone posting Family Guy screen caps.
 
2012-05-24 03:26:21 PM  
and a stack of 18,600 cardboard boxes to break his fall

Yeah, that's certainly more convenient than a parachute.
 
2012-05-24 03:29:39 PM  
Big deal. Some guy did this like 70 years ago. And he was cooler, too.
i169.photobucket.com
 
2012-05-24 03:52:45 PM  
Boxes? This guy only used pine trees and snow. Link
 
2012-05-24 04:02:04 PM  

Fubegra: [fubegra.net image 400x300]


That's entirely what I imagined
 
Displayed 50 of 133 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report