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(Slate)   Ever wonder how construction cranes get up on top of skyscrapers? Or more importantly, how they get down? Here comes the engineering   (slate.com) divider line 77
    More: Interesting, concrete slab, steel frame, skyscrapers, Explainer, flatbed trucks, National Commission  
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17633 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 May 2012 at 7:19 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-23 12:31:54 PM  
I work in the construction industry for a company that builds residential skyscrapers. Farking awesome things to watch getting built.

Here's a sweet little animation showing the process: Link

/This is a repeat
 
2012-05-23 03:03:15 PM  
I watched half of that vid snuff3r, very cool. Work keeps interrupting so I can't finish it yet (light commercial construction here)
 
2012-05-23 04:28:31 PM  
You gotta gotta get up to get down.
 
2012-05-23 07:07:45 PM  

snuff3r: I work in the construction industry for a company that builds residential skyscrapers. Farking awesome things to watch getting built.

Here's a sweet little animation showing the process: Link

/This is a repeat


Yea, I'm a crane operator and I love it. Got my NCCO certification not too long ago. Mainly I run cranes like this.

i881.photobucket.com

Then I did a 3 month job and worked with a guy who ran one of these.

i881.photobucket.com

He was on that job the whole time and was in that crane for a total of 13 hours. Said he made over 150k a year. I'll be going back to school soon so I can get certified to run lattice boom cranes.

And you got to have nerves of steel flying big valves through this labyrinth of pipes. Guess all those years of gaming paid off.

i881.photobucket.com

Oh and if anyone is looking for a good trade, welding is the way to go. I was in the office today and the higher ups were calling frantically looking for pipe welders. And they needed a lot. And there is about 13 companies in the same area and every one of them had signs in the window saying "Need Pipe Welders. Hire Immediately."

/ time stamped photo is not mine but it's the same crane I was nearby. Took 3 other cranes just to put it together.
 
2012-05-23 07:25:33 PM  
Jerk! You have destroyed my child like belief in the crane elves! I will petition Santa! Coal for you this Christmas my friend!
 
2012-05-23 07:25:58 PM  
Now if we could only nail down the magnets issue
 
2012-05-23 07:27:20 PM  
alwaysjaded:
Yea, I'm a crane operator and I love it.

So... IAMA time. The guys who spend the day up in those tall cranes... do they just piss in a big milk jug all day? Also are there any technological means to help them orient and place their lift, like cameras on the boom, hook etc? Or do they just have really good depth perception?
 
2012-05-23 07:27:27 PM  
And here I always thought it was jesus.
 
2012-05-23 07:29:19 PM  

My Bologna Has A Maiden Name: And here I always thought it was jesus.


You've got it backwards, religion brings skyscrapers down, it doesn't build them.
 
2012-05-23 07:30:27 PM  
Wow, just how things work for me in the bedroom.
 
2012-05-23 07:30:34 PM  

Kali-Yuga: My Bologna Has A Maiden Name: And here I always thought it was jesus.

You've got it backwards, religion brings skyscrapers down, it doesn't build them.


Awesome.
 
2012-05-23 07:31:45 PM  
I was in NYC a couple of times earlier this year, and was marvelling at the construction process going on for World Trade Center. Very cool stuff.
 
2012-05-23 07:34:55 PM  
Is Velveeta involved?
 
2012-05-23 07:34:55 PM  
Get down and boogie (jungle boogie)
 
2012-05-23 07:35:30 PM  
Sweet, good old levers and fulcrums. Real technology.
 
2012-05-23 07:40:24 PM  
That's pretty cool.
 
2012-05-23 07:43:09 PM  

No Such Agency: alwaysjaded:
Yea, I'm a crane operator and I love it.

So... IAMA time. The guys who spend the day up in those tall cranes... do they just piss in a big milk jug all day? Also are there any technological means to help them orient and place their lift, like cameras on the boom, hook etc? Or do they just have really good depth perception?


I've never worked around the tower cranes so I can't say. However, if I know I'm lifting a load that will take a long time to assemble, I use a port-a-can before getting in and I won't drink anything. If there is a load on the hook, you CANNOT leave the crane. I have kept an empty water bottle in the cab just in case though.

And there is a rigger that guides the load through pipes and we stay in contact with a radio. You go nice and slow and be extremely careful. There is a computer in the rig but it measures wind resistance on the boom and load bearing. If it doesn't like something, it will shut itself down and you can't do anything. You really have to read the charts and know the weight of the load and the center of gravity and the further out the boom, the less it can lift. There is a manual override but you really don't want to use it cause then this happens.

i881.photobucket.comi881.photobucket.com

That was at Lyondell in Pasadena, TX. Operator did the manual override on the load and it tipped over, knocking over 2 other cranes and killing 6 people. My dad was on that job and I was on the phone with him when it happened (he could have his phone in the plant cause there was no camera on it). I heard a lop bang and then him screaming for everyone to get out of the way then a very loud boom. He dropped the phone so I heard a little of the aftermath till someone picked it up and turned it off.

/ CSB
 
2012-05-23 07:43:12 PM  

snuff3r: I work in the construction industry for a company that builds residential skyscrapers. Farking awesome things to watch getting built.

Here's a sweet little animation showing the process: Link

/This is a repeat


Obviously, it works, but the fact that everything seems to rely on those pins makes me a might nervous.
 
2012-05-23 07:45:25 PM  
cdn.geckoandfly.com

/obviously
 
2012-05-23 07:48:03 PM  
This was on an episode of Modern Marvels years ago
 
2012-05-23 07:54:35 PM  
I'm not going to say its aliens. But its aliens.
 
2012-05-23 08:05:12 PM  

buckler: Obviously, it works, but the fact that everything seems to rely on those pins makes me a might nervous.


I imagine those 'pins' are as fat as your thigh.
 
2012-05-23 08:10:55 PM  
Anybody who works up that high gets my respect.

Watched that Frontline show yesterday about dudes who work the cell towers. Yikes. Some of them do it for $10 an hour. I guess it's better than working the counter at McDonald's, but if something goes wrong at McDonald's, you don't fall 20 stories.
 
2012-05-23 08:11:50 PM  

alwaysjaded: Oh and if anyone is looking for a good trade, welding is the way to go. I was in the office today and the higher ups were calling frantically looking for pipe welders. And they needed a lot. And there is about 13 companies in the same area and every one of them had signs in the window saying "Need Pipe Welders. Hire Immediately."


LOL, yeah.

"$30k/year* w/ benefits. . . maybe. Maybe benefits."

"We can't find enough welders! We need to bring in moar immigrants!"

This is not against you per se, more against HR assholes who have no farking idea how to price labor. You maybe missed a labor wage thread a while back. A real welder was in there; half his friends are blind and/or on permanent disability and companies still steadfastly refuse to pay decent wages. Vocational schools can offer free training paid for by construction companies and no one is stupid enough to bite. These guys would rather be unemployed than cripple themselves for the meager wages welding pays.

We have high unemployment. All -- ALL -- labor shortages in this country are 100% artificial.

*$30k figure includes "some" overtime.
 
2012-05-23 08:13:05 PM  
It's really quite simple.

They build the first building up from the ground, and then they build the next building down from the top floor. They just alternate. Sometimes they get stuck for a while, but eventually somebody wants a building torn down and they are ready to go again.

This is why construction is called a cyclical industry. They just zig, and zag, zig, and zag ....
 
2012-05-23 08:15:15 PM  
Another possible solution is that sometimes they never actually finish a building. This is especially common in Hong Kong and other over-heated and over-populated places where they knock down buildings while they are building them to start on even bigger buildings. They just leave the cranes in place until they need them again.
 
2012-05-23 08:23:08 PM  

dragonchild: All -- ALL -- labor shortages in this country are 100% artificial.


Been reading Das Capital?

Any how. I was thinking about the recursive nature of cranes, seeing that the tower crane requires a mobile crane to put it together. But that mobile crane required overhead cranes to put it together in the factory. But those overhead cranes required some other form of crane to install them.

So, if all cranes are dependent on prior cranes, what was crane zero?
 
2012-05-23 08:31:10 PM  
My brain cannot comprehend these things...not only are they an engineering marvel to look at, they actually function on top of that.

Then there's the height...I get dizzy and barf on my two-story outdoor deck.

It's simply mind blowing that these things can get done in the first place, so thanks for the link subby.

Also, watching them put together a Nimitz class aircraft carrier was jaw-dropping from start to finish. They delivered it ON TIME like within the day or something and the first thing the admiral did is he took it out for a spin at FULL THROTTLE, IN REVERSE, BANKING IT AS HARD AS HE COULD.

And, IIRC, the only thing wrong with the whole thing, is there was one (1) door that wouldn't quite shut all the way. And there was an actual guy whose sole purpose on this Earth was to fix doors on aircraft carriers that wouldn't quite shut all the way.

/yet, for some reason, every non-essential part on my car that isn't the engine falls apart, breaks, comes loose or disintegrates
 
2012-05-23 08:38:00 PM  

wildcardjack: dragonchild: All -- ALL -- labor shortages in this country are 100% artificial.

Been reading Das Capital?

Any how. I was thinking about the recursive nature of cranes, seeing that the tower crane requires a mobile crane to put it together. But that mobile crane required overhead cranes to put it together in the factory. But those overhead cranes required some other form of crane to install them.

So, if all cranes are dependent on prior cranes, what was crane zero?


The video posted by snuff3r in the thread boobies shows how a crane can build itself. Mind-blowing.
 
2012-05-23 08:40:19 PM  

PlatypusPuke: Then there's the height...I get dizzy and barf on my two-story outdoor deck.


I "cured" my fear of heights by simply blocking it out. I still get just as barfy whenever I drop that mental defense and allow myself to stare at the ground. Otherwise, I hyperfocus on the task at hand, at which point the ground could be three feet or 3000 feet away. I wouldn't want to do that as a job, though. . . it's mentally exhausting. They'd better be making good money; they deserve it.

PlatypusPuke: yet, for some reason, every non-essential part on my car that isn't the engine falls apart, breaks, comes loose or disintegrates


Allow me to introduce you to the badly-kept secret world of engineering design margins.
 
2012-05-23 08:40:30 PM  

dragonchild: alwaysjaded: Oh and if anyone is looking for a good trade, welding is the way to go. I was in the office today and the higher ups were calling frantically looking for pipe welders. And they needed a lot. And there is about 13 companies in the same area and every one of them had signs in the window saying "Need Pipe Welders. Hire Immediately."

LOL, yeah.

"$30k/year* w/ benefits. . . maybe. Maybe benefits."

"We can't find enough welders! We need to bring in moar immigrants!"

This is not against you per se, more against HR assholes who have no farking idea how to price labor. You maybe missed a labor wage thread a while back. A real welder was in there; half his friends are blind and/or on permanent disability and companies still steadfastly refuse to pay decent wages. Vocational schools can offer free training paid for by construction companies and no one is stupid enough to bite. These guys would rather be unemployed than cripple themselves for the meager wages welding pays.

We have high unemployment. All -- ALL -- labor shortages in this country are 100% artificial.

*$30k figure includes "some" overtime.



I don't know where you're posting that about, but i'm a plumber/pipefitter, and the site I'm working on - which is a carbon capture project at a generating station in saskatchewan - the welders are getting paid most times upwards of $70/hr. 12 hour days, 4/4/3/3. one guy I know who's been doing it for 20years and is doing alot of the aluminum welding on site makes upwards of $200k/yr.

They have a sign out at the hiring office in town that says "Hiring welders any experience welcome, Must be willing to sign apprentice papers $40/hr to start. Hiring bonus for Real Experience"

Makes it a little difficult for us to hire entry when we can only reasonably pay $27 to start. They're getting most of the farm kids, which are the only kids these days you can actually expect to work for a living.
 
2012-05-23 08:43:39 PM  

Conqueror of Tubes: I don't know where you're posting that about, but i'm a plumber/pipefitter, and the site I'm working on - which is a carbon capture project at a generating station in saskatchewan - the welders are getting paid most times upwards of $70/hr.


Not my words, but FWIW I think the welder was in America. Things may be different up in Canada, in which case, well, good.
 
2012-05-23 08:46:10 PM  

Smelly Pirate Hooker: Anybody who works up that high gets my respect.

Watched that Frontline show yesterday about dudes who work the cell towers. Yikes. Some of them do it for $10 an hour. I guess it's better than working the counter at McDonald's, but if something goes wrong at McDonald's, you don't fall 20 stories.


yeah, but as was pointed out, some of those guys who fell to their deaths were dumbasses who ignored safety protocols, or were inexperienced employees of contractors who never bothered to teach or enforce them.
 
2012-05-23 08:52:10 PM  

dragonchild:
We have high unemployment. All -- ALL -- labor shortages in this country are 100% artificial.

*$30k figure includes "some" overtime.


Uh, no.

I've been in this business for about 10 years now and I can guarantee you no welder is making 30k a year. Hell, the hole watches make more than that. The LOWEST flyer I saw today was offering $35 an hour plus $60 a day per diem and travel pay. The average pay of the welders I work with is anywhere from $42-50 an hour. And that isn't including the 30+ hours of overtime. They make more than I do. I work shutdowns/turnarounds so that's the reason for the hours (3-6 month job, 7 12's).

And I should note that you should be both a MIG and TIG welder. I don't know what the guy was that you're talking about but you should know both. And it also matters if you're a GOOD welder. I've seen many people get run off a job cause the QC wouldn't pass a weld and it held up production while they have to go back and fix it. And if you screw up enough jobs, your name will get around and no one will hire you. When I say go be a welder, don't go to ITT Tech but a community college that's accredited and has ties in the field. Lee College and Lone Star College around here have excellent programs. I think it's 2 years though. I was going to be a welder before my company wanted me to be an operator so I don't know what it is now.

And the "immigrants" who didn't go to school to be welders are the scaffold builders or the quality control. And they are not getting in without a TWIC card.
 
2012-05-23 08:58:48 PM  

Conqueror of Tubes:

I don't know where you're posting that about, but i'm a plumber/pipefitter, and the site I'm working on - which is a carbon capture project at a generating station in saskatchewan - the welders are getting paid most times upwards of $70/hr. 12 hour days, 4/4/3/3. one guy I know who's been doing it for 20years and is doing alot of the aluminum welding on site makes upwards of $200k/yr.

They have a sign out at the hiring office in town that says "Hiring welders any experience welcome, Must be willing to sign apprentice papers $40/hr to start. Hiring bonus for Real Experience"

Makes it a little difficult for us to hire entry when we can only reasonably pay $27 to start. They're getting most of the farm kids, which are the only kids these days you can actually expect to work for a living.


Yea, really. The welders on our job sites sometimes make more than the General Foremans. I know a few that work 4 months out of the year and are set for the whole time and spend the rest of the year just goofing off. I've been sitting here trying to think what welders would make 30k a year, but I'm drawing a blank. Even the highway guys make more than that. Same as the welders who repair the ships.
 
2012-05-23 09:01:40 PM  
FTA: External climbers, however, can jack themselves all the way back down


Wuh?
 
2012-05-23 09:04:02 PM  

Conqueror of Tubes: I don't know where you're posting that about, but i'm a plumber/pipefitter, and the site I'm working on - which is a carbon capture project at a generating station in saskatchewan - the welders are getting paid most times upwards of $70/hr. 12 hour days, 4/4/3/3. one guy I know who's been doing it for 20years and is doing alot of the aluminum welding on site makes upwards of $200k/yr.

They have a sign out at the hiring office in town that says "Hiring welders any experience welcome, Must be willing to sign apprentice papers $40/hr to start. Hiring bonus for Real Experience"

Makes it a little difficult for us to hire entry when we can only reasonably pay $27 to start. They're getting most of the farm kids, which are the only kids these days you can actually expect to work for a living.


What's the cost of living like (for both of you)? I've lived in both the midwest and the coasts, and $10/hour in the midwest is about the same as $25/hour here in Boston.

No seriously. For $500/month plus about a $40K buyin, my father has a 1600 sq ft. (including basement) 3 bed, 1.5 bath coop apartment in a white suburb of Detroit with good schools. For $1800/month (combined), me and my roommate have a 300 sq ft. rat-infested Boston apartment with no A/C and no kitchen. Big difference. Seriously, at that rate per sq. ft, I could literally buy my mother's house in a year and a half.

Yeah, in Detroit, you have to have a car because there's 0 mass transit, but hey with the rent difference, you can afford to blow $5-8K on a meh used car (or before cash for clunkers, do what a lot of the high schoolers did by buying a hilariously terribad car for less than a grand and driving it for a year or two until they went off to college). And meanwhile, it doesn't take an hour and a half to go 2 miles, so kinda worth it.

/Also, um, Saskatchewan. Gonna have to pay me a LOT of money to move to Saskatchewan. No offense.
 
2012-05-23 09:04:39 PM  

alwaysjaded: snuff3r: I work in the construction industry for a company that builds residential skyscrapers. Farking awesome things to watch getting built.

Here's a sweet little animation showing the process: Link

/This is a repeat

Yea, I'm a crane operator and I love it. Got my NCCO certification not too long ago. Mainly I run cranes like this.

[i881.photobucket.com image 300x259]

Then I did a 3 month job and worked with a guy who ran one of these.

[i881.photobucket.com image 640x480]

He was on that job the whole time and was in that crane for a total of 13 hours. Said he made over 150k a year. I'll be going back to school soon so I can get certified to run lattice boom cranes.

And you got to have nerves of steel flying big valves through this labyrinth of pipes. Guess all those years of gaming paid off.

[i881.photobucket.com image 295x375]

Oh and if anyone is looking for a good trade, welding is the way to go. I was in the office today and the higher ups were calling frantically looking for pipe welders. And they needed a lot. And there is about 13 companies in the same area and every one of them had signs in the window saying "Need Pipe Welders. Hire Immediately."

/ time stamped photo is not mine but it's the same crane I was nearby. Took 3 other cranes just to put it together.


I framed houses twenty for twenty years and used many a crane about the size of yours. The huge crane I think I remember seeing before (Europe I think) doing bridge construction. Cranes are very cool things,I love to learn to operate one. I think my eyes are too bad though. We hated the operators who hurried. It doesn't sound like your one of those. I came real close to punching out a farker who liked to sling beams his way (he couldn't even see where it was going). Never used that crane service again. Do you need certification to run a boom truck? We had some real idiots sometimes with those.
 
2012-05-23 09:07:32 PM  

alwaysjaded:
Yea, really. The welders on our job sites sometimes make more than the General Foremans. I know a few that work 4 months out of the year and are set for the whole time and spend the rest of the year just goofing off. I've been sitting here trying to think what welders would make 30k a year, but I'm drawing a blank. Even the highway guys make more than that. Same as the welders who repair the ships.


I'm trying to think of the same. even the lowliest welders i know of -pipeliners for the oilfield service industry- make $45/hr. You're right about the guys who skip shutdowns, most of them break for six-eight months a year on the income they make from the first four.
 
2012-05-23 09:11:58 PM  
Video of the actuall type of climbing crane being used at the WTC.

http://www.dcmerectors.com/FEDERATED/proj4.html
 
2012-05-23 09:14:52 PM  

Conqueror of Tubes: alwaysjaded:
Yea, really. The welders on our job sites sometimes make more than the General Foremans. I know a few that work 4 months out of the year and are set for the whole time and spend the rest of the year just goofing off. I've been sitting here trying to think what welders would make 30k a year, but I'm drawing a blank. Even the highway guys make more than that. Same as the welders who repair the ships.

I'm trying to think of the same. even the lowliest welders i know of -pipeliners for the oilfield service industry- make $45/hr. You're right about the guys who skip shutdowns, most of them break for six-eight months a year on the income they make from the first four.


There is a steel plant just south of me that advertised hiring a lot of welders. I think they are only getting about $20-$25/hr. They got the welders they wanted since, well you know Flint, we all gotta eat.
 
2012-05-23 09:16:43 PM  
Cost of living is high, not boston high, but high. hotel rooms are running $120/day, rent averages $400/wk for a single suite. (yes, they charge weekly, demand is that out of control) This is in a community with a population of 12000. it's a power town, plain and simple, we used to have three 700mw stations, now we have one 800mw and one under upgrade (the project) that'll finish at 1200mw.
 
2012-05-23 09:16:57 PM  

alwaysjaded: I've been sitting here trying to think what welders would make 30k a year, but I'm drawing a blank.


Hey, if you don't know any, consider that a good thing. That probably means you work in gigs where certifications and quality matter. In which case if a construction company out there is trying to commoditize their labor, you probably won't get within a hundred miles of them.

I can't pull the guy out of the Internet to speak for himself; I'm just sayin'. If he's a troll, he sounded pretty knowledgeable. If he's an outlier, that's a good thing.
 
2012-05-23 09:21:11 PM  

alwaysjaded: snuff3r: I work in the construction industry for a company that builds residential skyscrapers. Farking awesome things to watch getting built.

Here's a sweet little animation showing the process: Link

/This is a repeat

Yea, I'm a crane operator and I love it. Got my NCCO certification not too long ago. Mainly I run cranes like this.



Then I did a 3 month job and worked with a guy who ran one of these.



He was on that job the whole time and was in that crane for a total of 13 hours. Said he made over 150k a year. I'll be going back to school soon so I can get certified to run lattice boom cranes.

And you got to have nerves of steel flying big valves through this labyrinth of pipes. Guess all those years of gaming paid off.



Oh and if anyone is looking for a good trade, welding is the way to go. I was in the office today and the higher ups were calling frantically looking for pipe welders. And they needed a lot. And there is about 13 companies in the same area and every one of them had signs in the window saying "Need Pipe Welders. Hire Immediately."

/ time stamped photo is not mine but it's the same crane I was nearby. Took 3 other cranes just to put it together.


Where I work, pipe welders are a dime a dozen and frequently get turned away. Must be dependent on geographical location.
 
2012-05-23 09:22:44 PM  

meyerkev: /Also, um, Saskatchewan. Gonna have to pay me a LOT of money to move to Saskatchewan. No offense.


What's wrong with saskatchewan. It's awesome. need to blow off steam? rip down the fields on a quad or a sled (depending on season, of course) plenty of leisure lakes, and you're guaranteed to work with at least one tool who owns a $50k boat because he needs friends.
 
2012-05-23 09:23:30 PM  
 
2012-05-23 09:24:43 PM  

meyerkev:

/Also, um, Saskatchewan. Gonna have to pay me a LOT of money to move to Saskatchewan. No offense.


I live in Houston and living isn't that bad. I'm in a 3BR/ 2 1/2 bath townhome right now for $1100 a month in a nice location. The pay is usually the same but I travel and sometimes it's higher. I just got back from San Francisco and I was getting about 20% more. Seattle was about average. I also just got back from Seadrift, TX which had a store and a bank and that was it and I was making less. But I understand what you mean about living expenses.

Intoxoman:
I framed houses twenty for twenty years and used many a crane about the size of yours. The huge crane I think I remember seeing before (Europe I think) doing bridge construction. Cranes are very cool things,I love to learn to operate one. I think my eyes are too bad though. We hated the operators who hurried. It doesn't sound like your one of those. I came real close to punching out a farker who liked to sling beams his way (he couldn't even see where it was going). Never used that crane service again. Do you need certification to run a boom truck? We had some real idiots sometimes with those.


Operators like that piss me the fark off. They're usually the "I've been doing this for 20 years and I don't need no instructions" types. Assholes like that have never seen a man get seriously hurt or killed. I've been on a few jobs where people died cause of someone not paying attention. We're working around explosive chemicals for fark sake, you'd think they would be paying attention. And yes, you need an NCCO to run a boom truck. My dad owns 2. Look around for certification classes. They're usually anywhere from a week to 3 weeks long and you learn on one of these.

i881.photobucket.com

Your final test will be one of those and a 90 ton but once you learn how to swing the load, it's easy as hell. Do what I did and get a piece of string with something mildly heavy on it and learn how to swing and catch the load.

Conqueror of Tubes:
I'm trying to think of the same. even the lowliest welders i know of -pipeliners for the oilfield service industry- make $45/hr. You're right about the guys who skip shutdowns, most of them break for six-eight months a year on the income they make from the first four.


And it's hilarious when they come back. Most of them are broke and don't remember a lot of what they did. The smart ones stay home.
 
2012-05-23 09:27:15 PM  

Conqueror of Tubes: alwaysjaded:
Yea, really. The welders on our job sites sometimes make more than the General Foremans. I know a few that work 4 months out of the year and are set for the whole time and spend the rest of the year just goofing off. I've been sitting here trying to think what welders would make 30k a year, but I'm drawing a blank. Even the highway guys make more than that. Same as the welders who repair the ships.

I'm trying to think of the same. even the lowliest welders i know of -pipeliners for the oilfield service industry- make $45/hr. You're right about the guys who skip shutdowns, most of them break for six-eight months a year on the income they make from the first four.


A pipeline welder will typically make about $40-$50 an hour, plus overtime. If they are equipped with a welding rig truck, which all pipeline welders are, that will earn them an additional $15 an hour for their truck (no overtime). They will typically see a $100-$120/day cash per diem, non taxable. Per diem is paid 6 or 7 days per week. Pipeline welders are expected to work from 7:00am-5:00pm Monday through Saturday per industry standard. Pipeline welders typically can not have more than 3 repairs requiring a cut-out before they are terminated. The work is extremely uncomfortable and can be quite dangerous. All pipeline welders are assigned their own labor hand, known as a "welder helper", to assist them. Typically the helpers travel with the welders and shadow them. A helper is generally expected to quit when their welder quits (called "dragging up" in the industry); to leave when their welder is fired, etc.

It is not unusual for a pipeline welder to bring home three to four thousand dollars per week. Their helpers will bring home around $1300-$1500.There are also some female welders out there that would knock your socks off. I've met one that painted all her pipe jacks bright pink. She never had a single repair in the time I worked with her.
 
2012-05-23 09:32:59 PM  

lack of warmth:

There is a steel plant just south of me that advertised hiring a lot of welders. I think they are only getting about $20-$25/hr. They got the welders they wanted since, well you know Flint, we all gotta eat.


Bippal:

Where I work, pipe welders are a dime a dozen and frequently get turned away. Must be dependent on geographical location.


dragonchild:

I can't pull the guy out of the Internet to speak for himself; I'm just sayin'. If he's a troll, he sounded pretty knowledgeable. If he's an outlier, that's a good thing.


Fair enough. I admit I'm spoiled living in Houston where our refineries are the size of small cities. Geography would play a role since not every city is building right now. Well, if any pipe welders or people who are willing to learn want to move to Houston, there's plenty of jobs here. And the refineries always need maintenance so there's always work. Added bonus if you're willing to travel. I've been debating a job I was offered to go to Australia for 2 years. The pay is outstanding but the rig is far from civilization. So it's go be uncomfortable for 2 years and come back and buy a house cash or stay here and get a mortgage.
 
2012-05-23 09:33:45 PM  

eatin' fetus: A pipeline welder will typically make about $40-$50 an hour, plus overtime. If they are equipped with a welding rig truck, which all pipeline welders are, that will earn them an additional $15 an hour for their truck (no overtime). They will typically see a $100-$120/day cash per diem, non taxable. Per diem is paid 6 or 7 days per week. Pipeline welders are expected to work from 7:00am-5:00pm Monday through Saturday per industry standard. Pipeline welders typically can not have more than 3 repairs requiring a cut-out before they are terminated. The work is extremely uncomfortable and can be quite dangerous. All pipeline welders are assigned their own labor hand, known as a "welder helper", to assist them. Typically the helpers travel with the welders and shadow them. A helper is generally expected to quit when their welder quits (called "dragging up" in the industry); to leave when their welder is fired, etc.

It is not unusual for a pipeline welder to bring home three to four thousand dollars per week. Their helpers will bring home around $1300-$1500.There are also some female welders out there that would knock your socks off. I've met one that painted all her pipe jacks bright pink. She never had a single repair in the time I worked with her.


That reads like a wikipedia quote. but let me clarify my own words, when I said lowliest, I was referring to actual work performed per dollar paid. pipeliners make far less than industrial welder because industrial welders will get three breaks a day, plus holdup time if the pipefitters are farking up/crane is late/it's windy/etc/etc/etc. also, unions.
 
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