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(Physics World)   Quantum teleportation record broken... again. This is everything all at once while being nothing at the same time as something else is other than the thing it is while being in the exact same space as another without touching. Makes sense   (physicsworld.com) divider line 39
    More: Obvious, quantum teleportation, Institute of Physics, Quantum teleportation record, quantum states, Tenerife, University of Vienna, teleportation, arXiv  
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1976 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 May 2012 at 12:04 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-23 12:36:17 AM
There is a high probability that I am still right here on my toilet posting this

//when confused I always revert to feces
 
2012-05-23 12:42:50 AM
Can someone explain the real-world, practical benefits of this? Aside from human travel sometime in the distant future, I mean. I know there have to be some, but I'm farked if I can think of them.
 
2012-05-23 12:45:25 AM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Can someone explain the real-world, practical benefits of this? Aside from human travel sometime in the distant future, I mean. I know there have to be some, but I'm farked if I can think of them.


I would assume you could use it for high speed communication if they could truly figure out how to control quantum entanglement.

/Political Science major
//There's a reason it's a BS.
///Also maybe I've played Mass Effect 2 a few times.
 
2012-05-23 12:47:34 AM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Can someone explain the real-world, practical benefits of this? Aside from human travel sometime in the distant future, I mean. I know there have to be some, but I'm farked if I can think of them.


So far all they can do is send information (i.e. quantum states) not actual matter.
 
2012-05-23 12:49:53 AM
So vote Romney?
 
2012-05-23 12:59:07 AM
OK, I have an English degree,so I'm certain I don't really understand what is going on here... but can someone explain why atmospheric interference is even an issue with this? I thought the whole point was that the information wasn't traveling through space (at least as we typically understand it.)
 
2012-05-23 06:41:59 AM
They have tapped into the RomneyForce.

Be afraid TaxBongo.

Be very afraid...
 
2012-05-23 07:00:39 AM

skinnycatullus: OK, I have an English degree,so I'm certain I don't really understand what is going on here... but can someone explain why atmospheric interference is even an issue with this? I thought the whole point was that the information wasn't traveling through space (at least as we typically understand it.)


I ..... think its because you have to send one of the entangled photons to the far end before is can be instantaneously manipulated and the more interference on this trip the more likely the entanglement is to fail. Or something.
 
2012-05-23 07:30:02 AM
Obama is ruining this country!!! socialist!!1!!


/entangled with politics tab
 
2012-05-23 07:35:33 AM

ourbigdumbmouth: Obama is ruining this country!!! socialist!!1!!


/entangled with politics tab


Well that's and interesting spin.
 
2012-05-23 08:43:13 AM
I'm actually getting messages from the future. It says: "Dump F_ceb__k Sto_k."

The underscores represent unreadable characters, I can't understand what this means. Who could possibly want to send me a message from the future and what good will it do me?
 
2012-05-23 08:52:31 AM

Because People in power are Stupid: I'm actually getting messages from the future. It says: "Dump F_ceb__k Sto_k."

The underscores represent unreadable characters, I can't understand what this means. Who could possibly want to send me a message from the future and what good will it do me?


Dump: From the latin, meaning to take a large farking shiat.
Fac: From the Greek, meaning to look like.
ebooks: Something pioneered by Amazon.
took: the past tense of take.

So, it looks to me like you messed up your spacing, but soon you will find out that you took a picture of a crap that looks like an Amazon Kindle.
 
2012-05-23 08:58:36 AM

Damnaged: Because People in power are Stupid: I'm actually getting messages from the future. It says: "Dump F_ceb__k Sto_k."

The underscores represent unreadable characters, I can't understand what this means. Who could possibly want to send me a message from the future and what good will it do me?

Dump: From the latin, meaning to take a large farking shiat.
Fac: From the Greek, meaning to look like.
ebooks: Something pioneered by Amazon.
took: the past tense of take.

So, it looks to me like you messed up your spacing, but soon you will find out that you took a picture of a crap that looks like an Amazon Kindle.


And you'll be very, very happy that the corners are rounded
 
2012-05-23 10:14:10 AM
That headline gave me a headache.
 
2012-05-23 11:48:04 AM
Can some genius (not using the invective here) please explain -- in undergrad-level physics -- how a successful, quantum teleportation transmission is detected and is distinguishable from error/environment/etc...
 
2012-05-23 12:09:06 PM
Anton is a bad-ass when it comes to the world of quantum.

I'm glad I work at an institute dedicated to everything quantum, these people are paving the way for a new technological revolution and I get to watch it all unfold!
 
2012-05-23 12:11:54 PM
Even cooler is that some of the people named in the paper are people I work for!
 
2012-05-23 12:19:45 PM

Cooper420: Anton is a bad-ass when it comes to the world of quantum.

I'm glad I work at an institute dedicated to everything quantum, these people are paving the way for a new technological revolution and I get to watch it all unfold!


You forgot to empty the wastebasket in lab 4.

/kidding
 
2012-05-23 12:26:16 PM

gameshowhost: Can some genius (not using the invective here) please explain -- in undergrad-level physics -- how a successful, quantum teleportation transmission is detected and is distinguishable from error/environment/etc...


I'd like to add the following questions:
- How do you know two protons are quantum entangled?
- How do you transport a proton from one place to the other? Do you shoot it? Put it in a very small box and ship it?
- How can you tell which protons are which? I'm given to understand that in any given space, there are quite a few.
 
2012-05-23 12:43:48 PM
Not trying to start an argument, but it's not really teleportation is it? Nothing is destroyed and nothing is created.
 
2012-05-23 12:45:47 PM

deffuse: ourbigdumbmouth: Obama is ruining this country!!! socialist!!1!!


/entangled with politics tab

Well that's and interesting spin.


More likely a Charm quark.
 
2012-05-23 12:50:18 PM
But, according to the article a regular communications channel is required:

"Also required is a conventional communication channel, through which Alice can send Bob information about a measurement that she has made on a particle in the quantum state that she wants to teleport to Bob. Bob then uses this information to manipulate his entangled photon so that it is in the teleported state."

So I use the regular channel to tell the person at the other end what I'm trying to say over the entangled system?
Alice: "I made my letters spell 'CAT'".
Bob: "Hey, when I did that, my letters spelled 'CAT' too! Eureka!"

Sounds useful.
 
2012-05-23 12:52:07 PM

indarwinsshadow: Not trying to start an argument, but it's not really teleportation is it? Nothing is destroyed and nothing is created.


Teleportation of information.

Personally I think this whole thing is just a rather cleaver parlor trick. The purpose of it all seems moot to me.
 
2012-05-23 01:04:16 PM
Has anyone really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like?
 
2012-05-23 01:07:14 PM
The point is that the quantum state contains more information than what's sent over the conventional channel. Since you can't completely measure a single quantum state, what with Heisenberg and all, Alice can't use a classical communication channel to tell Bob how to create a particle in the same state as hers. Quantum teleportation allows the entire state to be sent, complete and unmolested. This is important for quantum cryptography (which is already commercially useful, but only over short distances).
 
2012-05-23 01:10:33 PM

resnet_pimp: Has anyone really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like?


yes
 
2012-05-23 01:46:30 PM

Galloping Galoshes: But, according to the article a regular communications channel is required:

"Also required is a conventional communication channel, through which Alice can send Bob information about a measurement that she has made on a particle in the quantum state that she wants to teleport to Bob. Bob then uses this information to manipulate his entangled photon so that it is in the teleported state."

So I use the regular channel to tell the person at the other end what I'm trying to say over the entangled system?
Alice: "I made my letters spell 'CAT'".
Bob: "Hey, when I did that, my letters spelled 'CAT' too! Eureka!"

Sounds useful.


Not a quantum physicist but...

I think they need to communicate (in the normal channel) what the current state of the entangled photon is - easier for me to think of it in terms of spin or whatever - say I communicate my photon is currently "up"

If I flip my photon to down the entangled photon should instantaneously also register as "down".

Assuming entanglement can be maintained for a given time interval I could send you a message down down up up down.... or whatever, instantly - not just speed of light fast but truly instantly.

Assuming we ever had people on Mars it would take a speed of light message at least 4 minutes to reach Earth to Mars (and on average much longer) so you couldnt actually communicate in real time. A long lived quantum entanglement would allow instantaneous communication (open a subspace channel Mr. Worf)...
 
2012-05-23 01:55:41 PM

SuperChuck: Cooper420: Anton is a bad-ass when it comes to the world of quantum.

I'm glad I work at an institute dedicated to everything quantum, these people are paving the way for a new technological revolution and I get to watch it all unfold!

You forgot to empty the wastebasket in lab 4.

/kidding


lol yeah, I build, setup and fix their 'traditional' computers... the ones they don't know how to use too well. :P
 
2012-05-23 02:37:53 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Can someone explain the real-world, practical benefits of this? Aside from human travel sometime in the distant future, I mean. I know there have to be some, but I'm farked if I can think of them.


The big thing is zero-latency communication.

When we talk about "network speed," we can be talking about one of two things. Everybody knows about bandwidth: how much data you can push through the pipe at once. But there's another measure called latency: how long it takes a bit of data to get from Point A to Point B. Gamers call it "ping time," and it means a lot to them because you need low latency to keep everyone up to date on what everyone else is doing.

Between points on Earth, the latency of electronic communication is normally quite low: far less than a second. Moon-bounce radio communications take a couple of seconds. But if we extend this between Earth and, say, a point on Mars, the latency becomes a full eight minutes. If you wanted to radio someone on Mars, you'd have to wait 16 minutes before hearing any response (8 minutes for your signal to travel there, and another 8 for the other guy's signal to come back). There is no way to make this faster with anything like radio, because nothing can travel through space faster than the speed of light.

But what if you don't have to travel through space? That's where teleportation comes in. If you can teleport a signal, you can get around the problem of the speed of light by not dealing with speed at all. This would let you talk to Mars with no latency at all; it would be like talking to someone right next to you. For a more, shall we say, terrestrial use, I'm sure gamers would drool over ping times so low that they're no longer a factor in making realtime gaming work. High-speed securities traders would no doubt like it too.
 
2012-05-23 02:48:46 PM

Millennium:

But what if you don't have to travel through space? That's where teleportation comes in. If you can teleport a signal, you can get around the problem of the speed of light by not dealing with speed at all. This would let you talk to Mars with no latency at all; it would be like talking to someone right next to you. For a more, shall we say, terrestrial use, I'm sure gamers would drool over ping times so low that they're no longer a factor in making realtime gaming work. High-speed securities traders would no doubt like it too.


It would be the downfall of noobs everywhere. They could no longer complain about how their ping is making them lose.
 
2012-05-23 02:54:51 PM
teleporting quantum states across the stretch of sea
poptimal.com
separating two of the Canary Islands.

"No, Daniel, time travel is wacky enough for this show. No teleporting."
/hot
 
2012-05-23 03:03:08 PM

Fizpez: If I flip my photon to down the entangled photon should instantaneously also register as "down".


No.

Millennium: That's where teleportation comes in. If you can teleport a signal, you can get around the problem of the speed of light by not dealing with speed at all. This would let you talk to Mars with no latency at all; it would be like talking to someone right next to you.


And no.

Entanglement does not permit instantaneous transmission of information. It can allow the creation of the same completely random information in two places at once (which can be very useful, just ask a cryptographer), but you can't send messages with it. Quantum teleportation doesn't allow instant communication either, since classical communication is part of the process (and is what allows it to transfer information, rather than just creating random information).
 
2012-05-23 03:07:15 PM

Millennium: The big thing is zero-latency communication.


But that's not really a possibility. While quantum entanglement effects can propagate faster than the speed of light, you can't really use them to communicate.

Here's how this works. A qubit (a quantum particle, like a photon, electron, or anything else governed by quantum mechanics), can have one of two spins- "up" or "down". I can also put it into an indeterminate state- updown. If I have a particle in an indeterminate state, and check "which way are you spinning?" it will randomly decide whether or not it's up or down. That's the Schrodinger's cat thing- I can have a quantum state that's undetermined until I do something to collapse the wave function and force it into a determined state.

So let's start over. I put particle A into an unknown state. Then I take particle B and perform a "controlled NOT" operation- I say, "Take on the opposite spin of particle A." If A is spinning up, spin down, and vice versa. Now, A currently spins both ways, so B also spins both ways (like a drunk college student). But when I check the state of A, it's going to pick one, up or down. And at that instant, B also picks a state- and it's the opposite of A.

Information has traveled between these two particles faster than the speed of light would allow. But I can't use that for communication. Let's say Alice takes particle A and Bob takes particle B. Alice wants to send Bob a message, so she collapses the wave function of her particle. It's spinning Down. So she knows Bob's particle is spinning up, and if Bob were to check the particle, he'd see that it's spinning up. But how does he know that it's time to check? Alice has to tell him. And that has to happen over a casual channel.

Entanglement works much like Wiley E. Coyote and cliff-faces. Two particles can remain entangled so long as you don't look at them. The instant you do, you break the entanglement. And that's what the value of quantum teleportation is- the longer we can go without looking at a pair of particles, the better tools we have to perform quantum computations.
 
2012-05-23 03:13:12 PM

Professor Science: which can be very useful, just ask a cryptographer


And this too. Quantum key exchanges give you a provably safe way that allows the creation of truly random keys that cannot be snooped on by external parties. That's hugely powerful.
 
2012-05-23 03:28:46 PM

t3knomanser: But when I check the state of A, it's going to pick one, up or down. And at that instant, B also picks a state- and it's the opposite of A.


And of course, it also works if I measure B before you measure A. The real mindfark is that there's no way to know which one was the cause and which was the effect, and there can't be. If we're far enough apart, and time our measurements closely enough, then there are some reference frames in which you measured first, and some in which I measured first, and they're all equally valid. If you could send information this way, it would allow you to send it back in time, and we have some pretty strong evidence that the universe doesn't let you get away with that sort of crap.
 
2012-05-23 05:07:21 PM
kwout.com

Inna One Seen a Beagle?
 
2012-05-23 08:38:42 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: So vote Romney?


came here for that
 
2012-05-23 09:46:28 PM

t3knomanser: Millennium: The big thing is zero-latency communication.

But that's not really a possibility. While quantum entanglement effects can propagate faster than the speed of light, you can't really use them to communicate.

Here's how this works. A qubit (a quantum particle, like a photon, electron, or anything else governed by quantum mechanics), can have one of two spins- "up" or "down". I can also put it into an indeterminate state- updown. If I have a particle in an indeterminate state, and check "which way are you spinning?" it will randomly decide whether or not it's up or down. That's the Schrodinger's cat thing- I can have a quantum state that's undetermined until I do something to collapse the wave function and force it into a determined state.

So let's start over. I put particle A into an unknown state. Then I take particle B and perform a "controlled NOT" operation- I say, "Take on the opposite spin of particle A." If A is spinning up, spin down, and vice versa. Now, A currently spins both ways, so B also spins both ways (like a drunk college student). But when I check the state of A, it's going to pick one, up or down. And at that instant, B also picks a state- and it's the opposite of A.

Information has traveled between these two particles faster than the speed of light would allow. But I can't use that for communication. Let's say Alice takes particle A and Bob takes particle B. Alice wants to send Bob a message, so she collapses the wave function of her particle. It's spinning Down. So she knows Bob's particle is spinning up, and if Bob were to check the particle, he'd see that it's spinning up. But how does he know that it's time to check? Alice has to tell him. And that has to happen over a casual channel.

Entanglement works much like Wiley E. Coyote and cliff-faces. Two particles can remain entangled so long as you don't look at them. The instant you do, you break the entanglement. And that's what the value of quantum teleportation is- the longer we ...


Thankyou, that is how I understand it. The analogy I like is an opaque tube with a red marble and a black marble. I separate the two and later observe one. It is red, so I instantly know the other is black regardless of distance. Not that impressive. Now the undetermined quantum state adds some to the uncertainty, but I fail to see how any information is transmitted.
 
2012-05-23 10:15:44 PM

Fizpez: Galloping Galoshes: But, according to the article a regular communications channel is required:

"Also required is a conventional communication channel, through which Alice can send Bob information about a measurement that she has made on a particle in the quantum state that she wants to teleport to Bob. Bob then uses this information to manipulate his entangled photon so that it is in the teleported state."

So I use the regular channel to tell the person at the other end what I'm trying to say over the entangled system?
Alice: "I made my letters spell 'CAT'".
Bob: "Hey, when I did that, my letters spelled 'CAT' too! Eureka!"

Sounds useful.

Not a quantum physicist but...

I think they need to communicate (in the normal channel) what the current state of the entangled photon is - easier for me to think of it in terms of spin or whatever - say I communicate my photon is currently "up"

If I flip my photon to down the entangled photon should instantaneously also register as "down".

Assuming entanglement can be maintained for a given time interval I could send you a message down down up up down.... or whatever, instantly - not just speed of light fast but truly instantly.

Assuming we ever had people on Mars it would take a speed of light message at least 4 minutes to reach Earth to Mars (and on average much longer) so you couldnt actually communicate in real time. A long lived quantum entanglement would allow instantaneous communication (open a subspace channel Mr. Worf)...


Doesn't QT require a physical medium for you to "shove" your entangled particle into so they immediately get a copy on the other end? So more along the lines of, "Mr. Warf, how did the enemy find our position? I'm not sure captain, but star fleet believes it may be due to the several light years of cable and repeaters we're towing behind our ship."
 
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