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(Click Orlando)   School nurse refuses student access to his inhaler during full-blown asthma attack. School officials took it away because they had no current form signed by a parent authorizing its use   (clickorlando.com) divider line 361
    More: Florida, school nurse, release form, asthma, refuses student, students, parents, School Administrators  
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11598 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 May 2012 at 9:19 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-22 09:34:43 PM
www.danitaschildren.org

i just got a farking big money making idea!
 
2012-05-22 09:35:06 PM
www.cafeprevention.com
We MUST keep the marijuana's out of our children. How else can we do it? It turned out ok. In the unlikely event he had died, Jesus would have welcomed this drug free child into heaven.

/grow up people. This is a serious problem!
 
2012-05-22 09:35:06 PM
If she was a trained medical professional, then logically the nurse should know what the consequences of her actions would be.

So, that's Attempted Murder. Everyone involved should be brought up on charges.
 
2012-05-22 09:35:08 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: Unfortunately, the law is the law and people who are charged with the care of children are under very strict laws. I ran residential programs for youth and the law is quite clear. If the paperwork is not in order, then the drugs are not allowed onsite, nor can they be administered. Often parents do not fill out the required paperwork and it is their laziness that puts the child in danger. Not everyone is covered by the good Sam laws. Professionals are not for example. Likewise if you are trained in CPR and !1st Aid, you must perform up to the standards of your training.

Many times we had to reject meds on site, because it was illegal for us to have them onsite or make them available. The Nurse followed the law, the parents made the drug unavailable.

That being said, if you are not a professional and want to administer a controlled drug, well you are probably free and clear. YMMV.


I understand your point and I know that sometimes a rule is a rule is a rule. But explain to me how standing there watching a child suffocate and not calling 911 is acceptable? This nurse locked the student in a room preventing him aquiring help on his own, took away his doctor perscribed life saving medication, then neglected to summon the appropriate emergency services. If the parent had not arrived very quickly this kid would be dead and it would be ~95% the fault of the nurse who didn't even do what a random stranger on a street would have.
 
2012-05-22 09:35:14 PM
If she's a nurse, presumably she's trained to understand when someone in front of her is having an asthma attack AND be competent to administer a dose of a clearly labelled medication. If she is not, why the Devil is she even called a nurse?

I understand that nearly all of the lawyers on Earth live in the United States, and everyone is afraid of doing anything lest it engender a lawsuit, but unless she's decoration, the reasonable expectation is that she's competent to do the two items listed above? If not, failure of the school board to provide competent staff. If not, I'm sorry, cowardice is not a reasonable defence.
 
2012-05-22 09:35:17 PM
Something similar happened to me when I was in high school. I started having an allergic reaction to something I had eaten at lunch and needed meds. First my teacher wouldn't let me leave the class room because she thought I was just trying to get out of doing the daily journal assignment. Then when I finally got to the office to get my meds I was already having issues breathing, which was when they told me that because they threw away all medications in the med closet at the end of the previous semester I didn't have any meds with my name on them. No notice had been sent out saying I needed a new form and new meds and that was the first time they had ever done a clean out at semester change.

By the time they decided I needed an ambulance I was incapable of swallowing without great difficulty and to the point of passing out.

My parents never sued.
 
2012-05-22 09:35:33 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: Unfortunately, the law is the law and people who are charged with the care of children are under very strict laws. I ran residential programs for youth and the law is quite clear. If the paperwork is not in order, then the drugs are not allowed onsite, nor can they be administered. Often parents do not fill out the required paperwork and it is their laziness that puts the child in danger. Not everyone is covered by the good Sam laws. Professionals are not for example. Likewise if you are trained in CPR and !1st Aid, you must perform up to the standards of your training.

Many times we had to reject meds on site, because it was illegal for us to have them onsite or make them available. The Nurse followed the law, the parents made the drug unavailable.

That being said, if you are not a professional and want to administer a controlled drug, well you are probably free and clear. YMMV.


Show me a jury in this country that would convict and I'll show you 12 people who would murder a kid just to watch him/her die.


/ Kinda like that nurse, prolly.
 
2012-05-22 09:35:39 PM

FriarReb98: ArkAngel: frito123: So the nurse couldn't give the kid the inhaler because of no signed form. The parent's real beef, from reading the article, was why didn't the idiot nurse call 911 when the kid was passing out?

This. The nurse was correct that she couldn't give him the meds, but not calling 911 is a complete mystery. If she can't think to do that, she shouldn't have any sort of medical license.

True. Not that anyone should give the parents an out for not doing something so simple and important as signing a release form for a frickin' inhaler, but still dumb. Dumb on both sides, really.


Much the same reason why medication wasn't allowed to be used. The school would then be responsible for the ambulance if it was necessary. I have a CSR at my work whose child actually died at school due to an asthma. School officials didn't call 911 initially because they didn't want to be responsible, unless the child's emergency contact says 911 they won't contact them. Her and her husband were unavailable (during the 80's with no cell phones) and when they checked back in her son had died. Swear to God, woman cries and physically shakes every time she hears about a student starting school and insisting on having 911 placed under emergency contact.
 
2012-05-22 09:35:43 PM
My daughter has an inhaler with the nurse at school. She goes to after shcool care til 4:30 when I pick her up. One day after school she had an asthma attack, and the providers couldn't get into the nurses office due to too many locked doors. They didn't call me but they did bring her inside and made her rest from the playground. She settled down some but still needed my inhaler when I picked her up. Why they didn't call me pissed me off seeing I'm 10 minutes away. They told me to put one in her backpack which would've made me liable to their policies. Can't win either way. Albuterol is not a dangerous drug just let the kid carry it all day and use it as needed.
 
2012-05-22 09:35:46 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: Unfortunately, the law is the law and people who are charged with the care of children are under very strict laws. I ran residential programs for youth and the law is quite clear. If the paperwork is not in order, then the drugs are not allowed onsite, nor can they be administered. Often parents do not fill out the required paperwork and it is their laziness that puts the child in danger. Not everyone is covered by the good Sam laws. Professionals are not for example. Likewise if you are trained in CPR and !1st Aid, you must perform up to the standards of your training.

Many times we had to reject meds on site, because it was illegal for us to have them onsite or make them available. The Nurse followed the law, the parents made the drug unavailable.

That being said, if you are not a professional and want to administer a controlled drug, well you are probably free and clear. YMMV.


Dialing 911 for a child in respiratory distress is completely different from giving medication. She failed in her position as a health care provider. What was she waiting for? For him to die?
 
2012-05-22 09:35:54 PM

Bathia_Mapes: Ambivalence: Bathia_Mapes: Same here. For the life of me I can't imagine why this idiot nurse didn't call 911. Did she plan to just stand there and watch the boy die?

No, according to the article she closed the door on him when he started to pass out. so...She was wasn't going to WATCH him die.

I missed that part, but it was probably because I was so upset that I didn't read it as thoroughly as I should have.



From TFA:

""As soon as we opened up the door, we saw my son collapsing against the wall on the floor of the nurse's office while she was standing in the window of the locked door looking down at my son, who was in full-blown asthma attack," Rudi said.

Michael Rudi said when he started to pass out from his attack, the nurse locked the door."

What I can't wrap my head around, beyond the mind-boggling stupidity of not giving the kid his inhaler, forms or not, is...why lock the door? Why. Lock. The. Door?
 
2012-05-22 09:36:52 PM

diaphoresis: I'm still confused how Florida Tag trumped Dumbass Tag...


Especially because pretty much this exact same situation happened TO ME when I was in 6th grade in in 1980s in Oklahoma. The Assistant Principal sat for 20 minutes and kept apologizing to me while I gasped for air and my father rushed to the school. After that I hid my medications and only used them well out of sight of anyone else. According to policy, even with a signed note and a valid prescription, I was to surrender my medication each day to the school nurse when I came in and receive it back when I left. Seriously. I was supposed to only have it at her discretion during the day.
 
2012-05-22 09:37:16 PM
when i went to school several students were walking drug stores. where did it all go wrong.
 
2012-05-22 09:37:42 PM

Cythraul: I'm so glad I'm not a parent. If this were my child, I'd be getting into possible prison time levels of consequence as a result of an angry, impulsive physical response.


I would suspect that if you were a parent, you'd make damned sure you dotted all your i's and crossed all your t's to make sure your kid will be safe. It may be bullshiat that it has to come to kind of tedium, but when you are a parent, making sure your kid is going to be OK is #1, biatching about tedium is further down the list.

/not intended to be a defense of the school
 
2012-05-22 09:37:55 PM
www.moviesonline.ca


"You know Billy, what worries me is how your mother is going to take this."



How many schools still have an actual nurse anymore ?
 
2012-05-22 09:38:33 PM

calbert: [media.giantbomb.com image 379x214]


You're okay with a 17-year old teen nearly dying because he was denied his inhaler during a full-blown asthma attack? You're okay with the school nurse standing there watching though the window of the locked room as he began passing out because he couldn't breath? You're okay with the fact that no one called 911, even though that was school district policy?

Seriously, WTF IS WRONG WITH YOU?
 
2012-05-22 09:38:48 PM
From the article: "He said the school dean found his inhaler during a search of his locker last Friday. The inhaler was still in its original packaging -- complete with his name and directions for its use; however, the school took it away because his mother hadn't signed the proper form for him to have it."

In other words, it was fresh in his mind that there was no authorization for him to use it, and maybe he should have told his mom to sign the form, just in case something like this happened?
 
2012-05-22 09:38:56 PM
So did the parents refuse to sign the form, or did the school fail to request the form?
In the midst of all the other form signing, I can see how one could be missed, but in any case, watching a student do the funky chicken "I can't breathe" dance on the floor would be too much to miss.
 
2012-05-22 09:39:01 PM

spyderqueen: Well, she can be gotten on the basis she didn't call 911.


Yeah, that's just farking stupid. Then again, maybe we're not getting the full story here and the emergency wasn't nearly as bad as the parent and student are making it out to be.

What I don't get is why a kid with such severe asthma wouldn't be carrying an inhaler everywhere he went.
 
2012-05-22 09:40:19 PM
Selesky said the district is looking into whether proper procedures were followed by the school, and while nurses can't give medications without the proper authorization, it is district policy to call 911 when a student cannot breath.

If this needs to be an actual policy at the school your child is in, then you need to get your child out of that school, because it is staffed by dipshiats so incompetent that they are a danger to the life of your child.
 
2012-05-22 09:40:20 PM

phrawgh: [www.cafeprevention.com image 600x600]
We MUST keep the marijuana's out of our children. How else can we do it? It turned out ok. In the unlikely event he had died, Jesus would have welcomed this drug free child into heaven.

/grow up people. This is a serious problem!


What does marijuana have to do with this??? I swear, pot smokers could turn any story into a pro pot rally cry. You support it, ok, I don't agree but this has nothing to do with it.

A mountain lion is killed Santa Monica THIS WOULDN'T HAVE HAPPENED IF POT WAS LEGAL!
 
2012-05-22 09:40:39 PM

farkityfarker: I don't understand the policy of needing a parent's permission to administer drugs prescribed by a medical professional. Is this a uniquely American thing?


How does the school know the meds were prescribed? While a pill bottle might have some information on it about who it belongs too, inhalers come in a box and that label is on the box. Once it is out of the box how do you know who it belongs to? There is a legitimate concern, the problem is the degree to which a policy designed to address a legitimate concern has been implemented as to remove all common sense actions by otherwise intelligent adults.
 
2012-05-22 09:40:48 PM

KWess: Bathia_Mapes: Ambivalence: Bathia_Mapes: Same here. For the life of me I can't imagine why this idiot nurse didn't call 911. Did she plan to just stand there and watch the boy die?

No, according to the article she closed the door on him when he started to pass out. so...She was wasn't going to WATCH him die.

I missed that part, but it was probably because I was so upset that I didn't read it as thoroughly as I should have.


From TFA:

""As soon as we opened up the door, we saw my son collapsing against the wall on the floor of the nurse's office while she was standing in the window of the locked door looking down at my son, who was in full-blown asthma attack," Rudi said.

Michael Rudi said when he started to pass out from his attack, the nurse locked the door."

What I can't wrap my head around, beyond the mind-boggling stupidity of not giving the kid his inhaler, forms or not, is...why lock the door? Why. Lock. The. Door?


...for her lolz?

Srsly, I suffered from asthma as a child, and this entire story hurts my head. Or rather, my chest.
 
2012-05-22 09:41:02 PM

diaphoresis: I'm still confused how Florida Tag trumped Dumbass Tag...

O_o

School systems are full of Fail/Dumbass


Except in very rare cases, the "Florida" tag trumps most other tags. That's why it's the only state with its own fark tag.
 
2012-05-22 09:41:45 PM

laid back w/bud light: Albuterol is not a dangerous drug just let the kid carry it all day and use it as needed.


That's a bad attitude. ALL DRUGS ARE DANGEROUS! The world is a dangerous place. We must teach our children to be constantly vigilant against all these dangers and NEVER let their guard down lest someone slip them some drugs, which is the worst possible thing that could ever happen to a child. What if a child got hooked on marijuana because they thought it was alright after they saw your child using an inhaler. TO INHALE DRUGS!!!

You have a responsibility too.
 
2012-05-22 09:41:55 PM

dahmers love zombie: She locked the door. Did she lock the door with him on the inside (kidnapping), or lock it with her on one side and him on the other (goodbye, nursing license)? I really, really want to know.

Of course, it was a Volusia County school, and the kid was somewhat brown. Nurse probably figured he had crack in the inhaler.

/fire her
//sue the school
///this is why there shouldn't be caps on damages. Teach the farkers a lesson that every district in the nation hears.


The ironic part is that the main reason schools have gone to such strict procedures is because of lawsuits. While I won't completely defend or justify the nurse's action, the bigger problem is too many people using crap lawsuits against schools as get rich schemes and the only way a school can protect themselves is by making rules that have no gray areas. Remove the judgement calls and you remove some of the liability. If the school policy specifically state that you must return a signed form for a kid to receive meds and you don't return the form then the school is free of most liability. They can't bend the rules, because all it takes is one kid to come in and say he needs something and you give it to him and he has a bad reaction and then you're screwed. I'm not saying I agree with this stuff, but unfortunately due to the fact that people will sue for any slightest misstep, this is the society you get.

/Ultimately the parents should've made sure that their kid's paperwork was in order at the school, especially if their kid has a medical condition.
//Makes me sad that our society has been reduced to this state, but that's what greed will get you.
 
2012-05-22 09:42:03 PM

gaslight: If she's a nurse, presumably she's trained to understand when someone in front of her is having an asthma attack AND be competent to administer a dose of a clearly labelled medication. If she is not, why the Devil is she even called a nurse?

I understand that nearly all of the lawyers on Earth live in the United States, and everyone is afraid of doing anything lest it engender a lawsuit, but unless she's decoration, the reasonable expectation is that she's competent to do the two items listed above? If not, failure of the school board to provide competent staff. If not, I'm sorry, cowardice is not a reasonable defence.


Devil's advocate for a second, even medical professionals may not have experienced an emergency situation before, and there is no way to predict how someone will react in one. Some people jump right in and try to help. Some people stand around wringing their hands. And some people, unfortunately, run for the hills or at least try to put whatever they're seeing far enough away from them that they won't have to deal with it. It's a very strange phenomena to me, but personally I think it explains a lot of stories we see here on Fark...
 
2012-05-22 09:42:12 PM

farkityfarker: I don't understand the policy of needing a parent's permission to administer drugs prescribed by a medical professional. Is this a uniquely American thing?


I don't understand either. Does parent permission trump a doctor's permission?
 
2012-05-22 09:43:24 PM

9beers: spyderqueen: Well, she can be gotten on the basis she didn't call 911.

Yeah, that's just farking stupid. Then again, maybe we're not getting the full story here and the emergency wasn't nearly as bad as the parent and student are making it out to be.

What I don't get is why a kid with such severe asthma wouldn't be carrying an inhaler everywhere he went.


Because Fark you that's why!
/Part of me wants to be a school administrator. No matter how much I fark up as long as I don't touch a kid I keep my job.
 
2012-05-22 09:44:23 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: Unfortunately, the law is the law and people who are charged with the care of children are under very strict laws. I ran residential programs for youth and the law is quite clear. If the paperwork is not in order, then the drugs are not allowed onsite, nor can they be administered. Often parents do not fill out the required paperwork and it is their laziness that puts the child in danger. Not everyone is covered by the good Sam laws. Professionals are not for example. Likewise if you are trained in CPR and !1st Aid, you must perform up to the standards of your training.

Many times we had to reject meds on site, because it was illegal for us to have them onsite or make them available. The Nurse followed the law, the parents made the drug unavailable.

That being said, if you are not a professional and want to administer a controlled drug, well you are probably free and clear. YMMV.


Fark that shiat

So, if the kid died of suffocation from the asthma attack, the school would have been in the clear because they followed the rules and intentionally deprived him of prescribed lifesaving medication in a medical emergency because of a goddamn paperwork oversight? What do you do, get the principal to give back the inhaler since he wasn't a healthcare professional and thus provide an out?

That scumbag, horrible nurse should have her license revoked. Find a reason, I don't give a fark, but it's clear she doesn't give one tiny care about the people in her care and is more concerned with being a lawyer than a healer.
 
2012-05-22 09:44:26 PM
Do you get the picture yet? Our beloved government has become so centralized about procedures and rules that it has forgotten its purpose. Or corrupted its purpose. It's not about serving the citizenry; it's all about serving itself, because rules, laws and procedures are all it's about. You vote for Obama OR Romney, it will be nothing but more of the same. Call Ron Paul crazy all you like, but look at where YOUR candidates have taken things, via the two-party system.
 
2012-05-22 09:44:28 PM
Could some farker with a GED in pharmacology verify if it is possible to OD on inhaler meds ?
 
2012-05-22 09:44:51 PM
Sorry thread jack.

A great way to help ease an asthma attack in the event of no inhaler is actually coffee. Just in case anyone here needs it or can help someone.
 
2012-05-22 09:45:07 PM
TFA did not say the parents did not sign the form. It said that the form could not be found. The kid had been in this school district for years and had been an athsmatic since 6. So lack of a filing system and common sense means "So sorry...you may now die" in Florida?
 
2012-05-22 09:45:11 PM

Bathia_Mapes: eriously, WTF IS WRONG WITH YOU?


Jesus tap-dancing C-h-rist, THIS.
 
2012-05-22 09:45:31 PM

factoryconnection: ArkAngel: frito123: So the nurse couldn't give the kid the inhaler because of no signed form. The parent's real beef, from reading the article, was why didn't the idiot nurse call 911 when the kid was passing out?

This. The nurse was correct that she couldn't give him the meds, but not calling 911 is a complete mystery. If she can't think to do that, she shouldn't have any sort of medical license.

Notice that we have one side of the story: the plaintiff's. The plaintiff that has been coached by her lawyer. You'd be amazed at the gulf of truth extending between some personal injury lawyers' mouths in public and the actual tale argued in court.

I'll reserve my judgment of the school just as I'll reserve my judgment of the parent that didn't sign the release for junior's meds. The paperwork to be a parent can be overwhelming at times. Not kidding.


FTA...Selesky said the district is looking into whether proper procedures were followed by the school, and while nurses can't give medications without the proper authorization, it is district policy to call 911 when a student cannot breath.

And in case you missed it in the article, Cheryl Selesky is Director of Student Health Services. 911 wasn't called for some reason. It's district policy to call 911 and there need to be some answers as to why that wasn't done.
 
2012-05-22 09:45:54 PM

great_tigers: Sorry thread jack.

A great way to help ease an asthma attack in the event of no inhaler is actually coffee. Just in case anyone here needs it or can help someone.


Really? How does that work? I don't disbelieve you, but an explanation would greatly add to my knowledge.
 
2012-05-22 09:46:07 PM

FizixJunkee: farkityfarker: I don't understand the policy of needing a parent's permission to administer drugs prescribed by a medical professional. Is this a uniquely American thing?

I don't understand either. Does parent permission trump a doctor's permission?


Guardianship trumps the doctor.
 
2012-05-22 09:47:55 PM

balancing act: Kids (and adults, for that matter) DIE from asthma attacks. Even if you suspect the kid is faking, you can't gamble like that.


Yep. My family has had many people die from asthma attacks. In fact, I'm named after my father's cousin who died from an asthma attack when she was a teenager. I have cousins who practically live attached to breathing machines, and at least two of my cousins have taken so many steroids in their lives that their growth is stunted (e.g., 17 years old but look like 11 year olds).

Asthma isn't something you mess around with.

\fortunately, I never had asthma
\\for some reason, it only seems to strike boys in my family
\\\and it strikes them big time.
 
2012-05-22 09:47:59 PM

super_grass: Better to get by on a technicality than have your life ruined by some idiot administrator or sue happy parent.


But is that better than being beaten to death by a grieving parent? The rules don't cover everything and sometimes you have to consider the unofficial ramifications.

/if I were on the jury I wouldn't vote to convict the grieving parent
 
2012-05-22 09:48:01 PM

GoodOmens: Cythraul: GAT_00: And why is nobody pissed at the parents for not signing the damn form? The kid would have been fine if the parents didn't fark up too.

I don't know what the fark is up with the nurse but she isn't the only failure here.

But we're here to bash the schools, not be objective with our hate, right?

I withhold my judgment over the parents because no information is given as to why the parents had not signed the form. There may be a good excuse. The circumstances surrounding the school's decisions seem to be pretty well laid out, however.

According to the article parents have to sign it every year. The school had a record of having previous forms. While not a excuse for the parents - it does prove the school should have done something given it was an emergency.

To be honest the forms are a joke. If you have a perscritopn with your name on it you should be able to take it, no questions asked. There is a reason your name is on the bottle.


I think Trillian already touched on this, but they toss those papers at the end of the year. Also any unredeemed meds. I havent heard of a midyear change like she describes though. Sounds like a fark up to me.
Anyway.
My kids school does keep actual medical records on the chronics in his school. But we also have a full time nurse, and I don;t think that is always the case anymore.
Thing is, there was a midpoint available between no treatment and possible death and 911. They had unopened labeled meds. They were in phone contact with mom. Why not get a verbal from her with the understanding she must be at campus in X minutes? I have verbally authorized various treatments for my kiddos over the year when they may not have been included in the boilerplate forms or they "lost" the forms.
This is maddening, but it is true, we only have one side of the story.
 
2012-05-22 09:48:41 PM
The "in texas, 17 is a legal adult" post is verrry interesting. If true, I hope the kid screws them with their pants on.
What I think is funny (not the good kind of funny) is a "nurse" sees a doctor's name on the prescription/box, and says, nope, sorry the MOMMY has to say OK before the life-saving medications is administered, even though we've had forms on this signed for years...

I hope that kid graduates tomorrow, and when he's walking up the stage, takes his diploma and beats the absolute living farking shiat out of the principal and the nurse with it.

The lesson I learn from this is I can't be charged with a crime or child endangerment if I have a cool little booklet with my "policies" in it. So if my policies say I can let kids play with fire and eat poison, nobody can arrest me, because I have a "rule" that says so.
 
2012-05-22 09:48:44 PM

One Bad Apple: Could some farker with a GED in pharmacology verify if it is possible to OD on inhaler meds ?


Albuterol is a steroid, so I think it's possible it could lead to a heart attack if a perfect storm of circumstances presented themselves and you were puffing it 50 times in a row. Most, if not all, asthma sufferers have a primary daily use medication (that they wouldn't need at the school) and use Alberterol (I use something called Xopenex) as their 'rescue' inahler for sudden symptoms or attacks. Ideally, they shouldn't need to use the rescue inhaler more than a couple times a week otherwise their primary meds aren't doing their job.

/no GED in pharmacology.
 
2012-05-22 09:49:22 PM
The "in texas, 17 is a legal adult" post is verrry interesting. If true, I hope the kid screws them with their pants on.
What I think is funny (not the good kind of funny) is a "nurse" sees a doctor's name on the prescription/box, and says, nope, sorry the MOMMY has to say OK before the life-saving medications is administered, even though we've had forms on this signed for years...

I hope that kid graduates tomorrow, and when he's walking up the stage, takes his diploma and beats the absolute living farking shiat out of the principal and the nurse with it.

The lesson I learn from this is I can't be charged with a crime or child endangerment if I have a cool little booklet with my "policies" in it. So if my policies say I can let kids play with fire and eat poison, nobody can arrest me, because I have a "rule" that says so.

/yes, have asthma.
 
2012-05-22 09:49:29 PM

Soymilk: great_tigers: Sorry thread jack.

A great way to help ease an asthma attack in the event of no inhaler is actually coffee. Just in case anyone here needs it or can help someone.

Really? How does that work? I don't disbelieve you, but an explanation would greatly add to my knowledge.


I honestly do not know. I heard it a very very long time ago when I was like 10. After playing soccer after school one day I was short of breath, couldn't find my inhaler and remembered this. I drank coffee that was left over in morning from my parents, it didn't stop everything but fifty percent is a hell of a lot better than ten percent.
 
2012-05-22 09:49:33 PM
Volusia County School officials stand by a Deltona High School nurse's decision to refuse a student his inhaler during an asthma attack, citing a lack of a parent's signature on a medical release form.

Felony child endangerment and first-degree felony failure to render aid should get each of them 10 to 15 years. Too bad he didn't have a gun and he could have shot the nurse and walked on self defense. I think the nurse should go away for sure and lose her license but really all of them as accomplices should do time.
 
2012-05-22 09:49:34 PM

diaphoresis: MrEricSir: Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach. And those who can't even do that become school administrators.

Sooooooo much THIS!


As a 25-year IT veteran and now-high school teacher, I take exception to this old saw. I am proof that I "could, and did" for 25 years and now I teach because I love it doing it and thank God I don't really need my pittance of a salary. I'm not the only teacher in my school (let alone district) like me, either. Look, there are incompetents in every field, OK? The reason public school administrators sometimes look so foolish is that they are charged with enforcing policies created by politicians. biatch all you want, but that's the truth.

In this case, the nurse should have called 911, so off with her head. But shame on the parents for not staying on top of the signature situation, with which they were presumably familiar from previous years.
 
2012-05-22 09:49:37 PM

exick: Is there a requirement that people be lobotomized or bludgeoned in the head before accepting an administrative job in a school?


No. That's part of on-the-job training.
 
2012-05-22 09:50:06 PM

Soymilk: Really? How does that work? I don't disbelieve you, but an explanation would greatly add to my knowledge.


Caffeine relaxes the airway muscles.
 
2012-05-22 09:50:09 PM
sorry for double post, mods. my bad.
 
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