Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Soccerly)   Are Amazon reviewers replacing professional critics? I give this article 3 stars, because they wouldn't let me give it 2.5 stars   (technolog.msnbc.msn.com) divider line 56
    More: Interesting, King Lear, Harvard Business School, stars  
•       •       •

1502 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 May 2012 at 7:51 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



56 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-05-19 07:53:42 AM  
Eh, professional critics are farking worthless, anyway.
 
2012-05-19 07:59:36 AM  
They do a good job of replacing comedians whenever they get a hold of a ridiculously overpriced product as well.
 
2012-05-19 08:03:14 AM  
No. I will check Amazon reviews, but I will usually go with what the professional industry and pro reviewers suggest. That's because there are a fair amount of idiots who put one star on something because they can't figure out how it works, or a third party shipper took too long to send, or they expected it to be a different shade of red.
 
2012-05-19 08:05:22 AM  
All critics are farking worthless.

Proffessional critics review stuff from a point so far removed from the realities of watching that they're not on the same plane of existance any more. It's to the point where a movie has glaringly obvious 'review bait' written all over it. And they're about 70% likely to have been paid for the review in some fashion.

Non proffessional reviewers are usually preliterate farktards who either give the thing 11/10 because it's the bestest ever, or -1/10 because it raped thier dog, and no in between. And they're still likely to be compensated somehow.

Generally I just look at the aggregate numbers on Amazon or gamerankings etc. Thousands of people give a much more broad review range than 1 critic, who only rates highly films which are emotionally charged dramatic oscar bait (when was the last time ANY film critic of renown reviewed a comedy movie as good?)
 
2012-05-19 08:09:22 AM  
No.

There, that was easy.
 
2012-05-19 08:12:10 AM  
For movies I go straight to IMDB forums for said movie instead of their reviews.
/Too many paid assholes in the reviews
 
2012-05-19 08:12:37 AM  

whizbangthedirtfarmer: No. I will check Amazon reviews, but I will usually go with what the professional industry and pro reviewers suggest. That's because there are a fair amount of idiots who put one star on something because they can't figure out how it works, or a third party shipper took too long to send, or they expected it to be a different shade of red.


True, but then you have the other end of the spectrum, where someone bought something yesterday, loves it because it's all shiny and new, and gives it 5 stars across the board because it makes them feel even better about their purchase. I never read 5-star or 1-star reviews, because they tend to be bullshiat.
 
2012-05-19 08:16:51 AM  
The value in Amazon reviews isn't any individual review, but the sheer number.

50 people giving a product 4 or 5 stars means more than any professional review could. Wisdom of the crowd and all that.
 
2012-05-19 08:25:53 AM  
I'm not a big book reader, but I do check reviews on Amazon when I make purchases on other products, even if I'm not buying it from Amazon. I trust what the man on the street has to say over some professional reviewer. The problem with pro reviews is that you never know if they were paid/compensated for their endorsement.

As far as the morons who give an item a bad reviews because the shipping was to slow or some other trivial shiat, once you've read enough of them you get a feel for who's giving it a bad review for stupid reasons like that and simply ignore those.
 
2012-05-19 08:29:27 AM  

Bungles: The value in Amazon reviews isn't any individual review, but the sheer number.

50 people giving a product 4 or 5 stars means more than any professional review could. Wisdom of the crowd and all that.


I check using this but small sample size means I look elsewhere. Taking the advice of one or two professionals is kind of useless because of their biases. It just depends on the product.
 
2012-05-19 08:29:28 AM  

Bungles: The value in Amazon reviews isn't any individual review, but the sheer number.

50 people giving a product 4 or 5 stars means more than any professional review could. Wisdom of the crowd and all that.


Ditto.
 
2012-05-19 08:29:50 AM  

oh_please: whizbangthedirtfarmer: No. I will check Amazon reviews, but I will usually go with what the professional industry and pro reviewers suggest. That's because there are a fair amount of idiots who put one star on something because they can't figure out how it works, or a third party shipper took too long to send, or they expected it to be a different shade of red.

True, but then you have the other end of the spectrum, where someone bought something yesterday, loves it because it's all shiny and new, and gives it 5 stars across the board because it makes them feel even better about their purchase. I never read 5-star or 1-star reviews, because they tend to be bullshiat.


That's why I only read reviews that are more than a sentence or two long. If someone gives something 1 star and spends three paragraphs detailing why, chances are they had valid reasons for giving it that rating.
 
2012-05-19 08:49:18 AM  
What's really happening is media wants content for free. Instead of paying a professional writer to craft readable and informative reviews based on thorough testing and unbiased reflection, they simply copy and paste what some jamoke on Amazon has spewed out after 10 minutes of diddling with an item just out of the box.

My rule for Amazon reviews is to remove one star simply to eliminate the "oh boy what did I get, what did I get I can't wait to open this box OMG that's so cool" inflationary effect.
 
2012-05-19 08:53:37 AM  

kroonermanblack: Proffessional critics review stuff from a point so far removed from the realities of watching that they're not on the same plane of existance any more. It's to the point where a movie has glaringly obvious 'review bait' written all over it. And they're about 70% likely to have been paid for the review in some fashion.


That's because most "professional critics" (which I suppose we can use as synonym for "critics with visibility or the means of attracting visibility") either aren't very good at their jobs, are on a deadline (leaving any shot of substantive criticism in the dark), or sitting on a deadline and need to get something to print before the RottenTomatoes/Metacritic launch day interest subsides. Most of the critics who get visibility are just bad at their jobs. This is the way it works with game reviews, probably works with movies and television as well. (If there's good long-form criticism out there on movies or television, I don't mind anyone dropping links.) Good criticism is intensely valuable because it allows you to see a product or work in a different light and then use that good criticism to build upon your own body of knowledge. Even if you disagree with the criticism, it should at least provoke or prod. Now, there are some cases where amateur reviews are valuable, particularly when used as an agglomerate, and that's usually when the reviews end up being a measure of the product's physical quality (i.e. "whether it works, whether or not it broke"). That said, that agglomerate is absolutely and fantastically useless when it comes to an entertainment medium. And that's where a good reviewer or critic comes in. And if that critic or reviewer is good at their job (writes eloquently and substantively), "Proffessional critics review stuff from a point so far removed from the realities of watching" is no longer a valid talking point, because one's failure to comprehend a complex, intelligent, and well-written analysis of a work or product is not the critic's fault. It's the user's fault.

Bungles: 50 people giving a product 4 or 5 stars means more than any professional review could. Wisdom of the crowd and all that.


As stated above, amateur reviewers appear to be effective when they are a measure of the physical product's quality. When it comes to an entertainment medium, amateur reviews are so functionally useless that it hurts.
 
2012-05-19 08:54:13 AM  

oh_please: True, but then you have the other end of the spectrum, where someone bought something yesterday, loves it because it's all shiny and new, and gives it 5 stars across the board because it makes them feel even better about their purchase. I never read 5-star or 1-star reviews, because they tend to be bullshiat.

Yeah, and sometimes those glowing reviews have nothing to do with the product at all. This past semester I was stuck using the worst mathematics textbook I've ever seen in a class of mine. Useless for teaching or reference, full of errors, etc. Out of curiosity, I went to Amazon to check the reviews there, and it had seven reviews with an average 4/5 star rating. I was surprised at first but then saw that all but two of the reviews were 5/5's with "oh thanks this book arrived quickly and in good condition I would buy from this seller again". The other two reviews that actually addressed the content of the book gave it 1 star.
 
2012-05-19 08:55:33 AM  

Mike_LowELL: are on a deadline (leaving any shot of substantive criticism in the dark), or sitting on a deadline and need to get something to print before the RottenTomatoes/Metacritic launch day interest subsides.


Whoops. It's early.
 
2012-05-19 08:58:16 AM  

Bungles: Wisdom of the crowd and all that.


There are many ways to describe masses of people, blathering on about something on the Internet, but wisdom wouldn't even have been the last thing on my mind, it wouldn't even be on the list.
 
2012-05-19 09:12:53 AM  
There are plenty of great professional reviewers. Read Ars or Anand or [H] etc for high quality computer component reviews. There are plenty of crap ones, too (I'm looking at you Tom's). The great thing about professionals is that they have much more time and money (and, theoretically, experience) to review things right. That said, I'm not going to buy something based only on professional reviews. After reading the aforementioned pros, I'm going to read Amazon, the Egg, [H] forum, etc, for user reviews. Both are useful, but for different reasons.
 
2012-05-19 09:28:13 AM  
The best reviews to look at are the 1 star reviews. When there is something wrong, people will complain. Of course, the sheer number isn't always a good sign as silly reasons like "took too long to arrive" are reasons to give it a 1 star for some people, but if there's six people complaining that a modem doesn't work with Comcast, then its likely that that particular modem may not work with Comcast.
 
2012-05-19 09:55:48 AM  
Armond White is irreplaceable.
 
2012-05-19 09:59:26 AM  

Bungles: 50 people giving a product 4 or 5 stars means more than any professional review could. Wisdom of the crowd and all that.


"The 'wisdom of the crowds' is the most ridiculous statement I've heard in my life. Crowds are dumb. It takes people to move crowds in the right direction, crowds by themselves just stand around and mutter."
-Drew Curtis
 
2012-05-19 10:00:46 AM  

Zimmy: The best reviews to look at are the 1 star reviews. When there is something wrong, people will complain. Of course, the sheer number isn't always a good sign as silly reasons like "took too long to arrive" are reasons to give it a 1 star for some people, but if there's six people complaining that a modem doesn't work with Comcast, then its likely that that particular modem may not work with Comcast.


And yet the majority of 1 star reviews I've read on Amazon have nothing to do with the product. Its usually biatching about bad shipping, the vendor, or something else unrelated.
 
2012-05-19 10:08:00 AM  
I've been very happy with my Tuscan Whole Milk and Three Wolves Shirt, after all.
 
2012-05-19 10:09:32 AM  

Mike_LowELL: "Proffessional critics review stuff from a point so far removed from the realities of watching" is no longer a valid talking point, because one's failure to comprehend a complex, intelligent, and well-written analysis of a work or product is not the critic's fault. It's the user's fault.


Jubal Harshaw had some very harsh words for Ben Caxton regarding this line of thought.
 
2012-05-19 10:20:10 AM  
Depends on what I'm buying, but I prefer customer reviews to professional ones. Video games especially I avoid 'top names in entertainment'; too many cheesy 9/10, 10/10 on such mediocre or functionally broken games leads me right away from there, and I usually look to see what amazon reviewers say. The score isn't usually valid, but at least amazon reviewers will talk about game-breaking bugs, or if the story was crap, or if the DRM makes a game darn near unplayable. If there's a cloud of people all experiencing the same problem, chances are I will too.

I don't even remember the last time I read an honest negative professional review on a game that needs to be called out on. Sure, they'll throw in the token Japanese gameboy game that no one has heard of and rip that apart, but that's not relevant and is more of a red herring for the rest.

For example, had Dragon Age II or Civilization V (amongst a dozen from the year I can think of) been launched by any other publisher and had a different name attached (can't fall back on Civilization lineage), they would have gotten more mediocre reviews to match their lack of depth and functionality. They've been patched up to a better state now, but obviously paid to pad their scores on such a terrible functioning product at launch.
 
2012-05-19 10:20:37 AM  

Bungles: The value in Amazon reviews isn't any individual review, but the sheer number.

50 people giving a product 4 or 5 stars means more than any professional review could. Wisdom of the crowd and all that.


You need to see what's on those reviews. Companies are paying people to post positive reviews of their products now.
 
2012-05-19 11:22:01 AM  
When I go to amazon, I look at the lowest rating reviews.

I ignore the one-off complaints (figuring either user-error of unique defect that can happen to any product), but if there are several repeated complaints or issues from multiple reviewers, i take it under advisement.
 
2012-05-19 11:22:05 AM  
Amazon/Yelp/whatever other crowdsourced review bullshiat are almost always the most unhelpful, worthless shiat out there.

Also, hasn't this article been written one million times over the last decade?
 
2012-05-19 11:35:32 AM  

gingerjet: Zimmy: The best reviews to look at are the 1 star reviews. When there is something wrong, people will complain. Of course, the sheer number isn't always a good sign as silly reasons like "took too long to arrive" are reasons to give it a 1 star for some people, but if there's six people complaining that a modem doesn't work with Comcast, then its likely that that particular modem may not work with Comcast.

And yet the majority of 1 star reviews I've read on Amazon have nothing to do with the product. Its usually biatching about bad shipping, the vendor, or something else unrelated.


Right, so you ignore those.

Amazon reviews are pretty good for things that are unlikely to get in-depth reviews elsewhere, like a hardline phone (to cite an example from my recent Amazon review investigation). You might find a Consumer Reports review of something like that, but (a) it's expensive and (b) without ay further explanation, you're left wondering why they gave it a half-filled red dot rather than a half filled black dot.
 
2012-05-19 11:38:05 AM  
The individual reviews aren't worth much, but when there are dozens or hundreds posted about a specific product, you can sometimes get a good idea of what you're looking at.

When I wanted an iPod Shuffle, I looked at the reviews for the existing model and it was almost universally panned - when 200+ reviewers all say that it's crap because of where the controls are placed (on the headphones), they might have a point.

Then, of course, there's the cult of satirical reviews.
 
2012-05-19 11:38:36 AM  

Bungles:
50 people giving a product 4 or 5 stars means more than any professional review could. Wisdom of the crowd and all that.


um... I guess if you think that Michael Bay is the best director ever, McDonald's makes the tastiest food in the world, and Nickleback are the best rock band this makes sense.
 
2012-05-19 11:44:55 AM  
Oh, and I actually bought something *because* of the one-star reviews on Amazon.

See, my old place had this problem where it would get an AM station. All the time. On everything. Even when no radios were on. Trouble was, I wanted to listen to a different AM radio station. Someone suggested an HD radio. I went to Amazon, and discovered that one particular low-end model got a lot of one-star reviews because it made the AM band unlistenable, even on other devices nearby.

Score!
 
2012-05-19 11:58:22 AM  

sexy-fetus: Mike_LowELL: "Proffessional critics review stuff from a point so far removed from the realities of watching" is no longer a valid talking point, because one's failure to comprehend a complex, intelligent, and well-written analysis of a work or product is not the critic's fault. It's the user's fault.

Jubal Harshaw had some very harsh words for Ben Caxton regarding this line of thought.


If somebody writes a book on advanced calculus, it is not the writer's fault that somebody who only knows algebra has trouble understanding the content.
 
2012-05-19 12:29:19 PM  
I usually check Amazon customer reviews before buying something just to see if the complaints follow a trend. I've always felt that complaints about a product are more valuable than praise. I don't want to read a review where you're gushing about how great a product is. I want you to list your three biggest complaints or nitpicks.

If, after reading dozens of reviews, the harshest complaint is little more than a minor annoyance then it's probably a decent product. On the other hand, if legitimate complaints about a particular problem appear repeatedly in numerous reviews, it's probably a red flag and you should do more research before buying.
 
2012-05-19 12:32:46 PM  

Mike_LowELL: sexy-fetus: Mike_LowELL: "Proffessional critics review stuff from a point so far removed from the realities of watching" is no longer a valid talking point, because one's failure to comprehend a complex, intelligent, and well-written analysis of a work or product is not the critic's fault. It's the user's fault.

Jubal Harshaw had some very harsh words for Ben Caxton regarding this line of thought.

If somebody writes a book on advanced calculus, it is not the writer's fault that somebody who only knows algebra has trouble understanding the content.


When someone writes a comic book of fart jokes and the reviewers bash it for not being a book on calculus, it is a problem understanding the content.

I don't have trouble 'getting' reviews, other than they tend to use in-industry technical terms I don't know offhand, and make comparisons to writers/directors/styles I may not know, since I don't associate a producer with a title.

I discard reviewers because, and I'll use movies for the easiest example, every critic wants every movie to be a dramatic look into the human soul/condition/psyche, with grandious overtones other shiat. Rarely does a 'stupid' movie score above the bottom run of existance for them because it's not what they want. The vast majority of critically acclaimed and scored movies are Oscar Bait movies which bore me to tears. It's not like 'The Hurt Locker' or other dreck has some deep insight into human condition.

I've plumbed the depths of this shiat in college courses for a few years where I did tolerably well for someone with no interest in historic writing or philosophy. I've seen the classics, read or pretended to read most of them, and frankly, when I watch a movie, I just want it to be entertaining.

For me, reviewers are simply looking for more depth than is justifiable in a movie, and I have found what I'm willing to watch and not walk out on, or be farking bored to tears by, is divorced from critics.

My payola comments were more directed towards the video game industry, as roughly all of the critics there are directly paid by the companies they're supposed to be analyzing, or are indirectly compensated by them (or, directly threatened with 'give us good reviews or no more advance copies', which kills bottom line by not having pre-release information/reviews/etc).
 
2012-05-19 12:33:55 PM  

kroonermanblack: (when was the last time ANY film critic of renown reviewed a comedy movie as good?)


Three days ago.
 
2012-05-19 01:09:16 PM  
for sure... been using Amazon reviews for ages. id say they're about as reliable as wiki
 
2012-05-19 01:17:04 PM  
addendum ... Amazon reviews will alert you to the major flaws of an item, but they may not reveal the subtle nuances of it's inherent qualities
 
2012-05-19 01:18:24 PM  

kroonermanblack: When someone writes a comic book of fart jokes and the reviewers bash it for not being a book on calculus, it is a problem understanding the content.


Some fart jokes are better than others and should be graded on the scale accordingly, just as there are bad action movies and good action movies.

kroonermanblack: I don't have trouble 'getting' reviews, other than they tend to use in-industry technical terms I don't know offhand, and make comparisons to writers/directors/styles I may not know, since I don't associate a producer with a title.

...

For me, reviewers are simply looking for more depth than is justifiable in a movie, and I have found what I'm willing to watch and not walk out on, or be farking bored to tears by, is divorced from critics.


I think we largely agree on this. As I'm sure you're aware, this is how "artgames" get middling scores (The Path, Dear Esther) to incredible scores (Braid, Journey) despite being universally lousy games. The goal should be to derive entertainment value from those emotional lessons and supplement the entertainment value of a work. Culling from my pop-culture-addled mind, "Jurassic Bark" from Futurama plus "And Maggie Makes Three" from The Simpsons are perfect examples of television episodes that sucked their audience in with the purpose of being entertaining and then hit them with a sob ending right at the end. Art for the sake of art is shiat. "Deeper emotional meaning" for the sake of "deeper emotional meaning" is shiat.

That said, types of entertainment within a medium, genre, or subset can be worlds more complex and entertaining than other types of entertainment, and within that realm of work. And as a supplement to the purpose of being entertaining, "deeper emotional meaning" can make a work more entertaining. When someone says an action movie is a bad action movie because "it's stupid", they're not saying that they expected emotional or literary genius. They just wanted a good action movie, a complex and entertaining action movie that either takes unique or interesting approaches to its film-making process, and the movie failed at that.

kroonermanblack: My payola comments were more directed towards the video game industry, as roughly all of the critics there are directly paid by the companies they're supposed to be analyzing, or are indirectly compensated by them (or, directly threatened with 'give us good reviews or no more advance copies', which kills bottom line by not having pre-release information/reviews/etc).


No worries, I'm familiar with the racket. Video game journalism just sucks, for more than the reasons you listed above. Although I think further discussion of the topic is for another day, it's fairly endemic of the issue. Everyone skips down to the score at the bottom of the review or just looks at the MetaCritic average because nobody being scored on MetaCritic has a thought process worth analyzing.
 
2012-05-19 01:49:20 PM  
The up side with professional critics is they always have one control: Armond White.
 
2012-05-19 02:37:30 PM  
Professional critics are useful when you can follow their work and gauge how they sit on various topics. For example, if the local movie reviewer always gives horror movies low ratings, you can eventually work within that to translate her review into your own rating and decide from there if you'd like it.

Amateur reviews are useful when in large numbers. Face it, this is internet and there are a lot of farkwads out there; three reviews of 1 star and single-word-insult responses don't really tell you much. When a product has 2500 reviews and 2000 of them are 1 and 2 stars, you can get a more realistic picture.

/shiatcock
 
2012-05-19 03:28:16 PM  
Just remember Consumer Reports just rated Coors as the best beer in America.

Of course the highest rated beer on Amazon probably has passed through the kidneys of some endangered Central American jungle cat...
 
2012-05-19 03:52:15 PM  

kroonermanblack: All critics are farking worthless.

Professional critics review stuff from a point so far removed from the realities of watching that they're not on the same plane of existance any more.


Truly. Walt Mossberg at WSJ recently said that it's worth $99 and a trip to a Microsoft Store to have crapware removed from your computer.
 
2012-05-19 03:58:43 PM  
imgs.xkcd.com
 
2012-05-19 04:44:02 PM  
Reviews can be very useful. Numerical ratings, on the other hand, are normally worthless as they can be manipulated by the company making the product or are subject to the sophistication of the crowds using the item. A 3.5 item meant for the mainstream doesn't mean the same thing as a 3.5 item meant for the pros.
 
2012-05-19 04:53:45 PM  

theorellior: I've been very happy with my Tuscan Whole Milk and Three Wolves Shirt, after all.


If you haven't read it, you should see "Edgar's" review for Tuscan Whole Milk. It is the best review I have read for any product. Ever.
 
2012-05-19 05:49:57 PM  

Tyrone Biggums: theorellior: I've been very happy with my Tuscan Whole Milk and Three Wolves Shirt, after all.

If you haven't read it, you should see "Edgar's" review for Tuscan Whole Milk. It is the best review I have read for any product. Ever.



Awesome review!
 
2012-05-19 05:59:10 PM  

drjekel_mrhyde: For movies I go straight to IMDB forums for said movie instead of their reviews.
/Too many paid assholes in the reviews


Here's the thing about reviewing art: everyone is obviously entitled to their opinion, but some aspects of art are objected. With film specifically, there is a large objective dimension to cinematography, camera work, editing and even acting.

What pisses my off about non-professional movie reviews is that it has moved away from "I liked this movie" to decelerations of what is good filmmaking from people who know nothing about film, have never seen a movie made before 1970, and the number of truly non-American films they have seen can be counted on 1 hand.

To be clear, I don't care what movies people like, but please don't go around making claims about movies like Batman being the finest achievement in cinema.
 
2012-05-19 06:31:09 PM  

oh_please: whizbangthedirtfarmer: No. I will check Amazon reviews, but I will usually go with what the professional industry and pro reviewers suggest. That's because there are a fair amount of idiots who put one star on something because they can't figure out how it works, or a third party shipper took too long to send, or they expected it to be a different shade of red.

True, but then you have the other end of the spectrum, where someone bought something yesterday, loves it because it's all shiny and new, and gives it 5 stars across the board because it makes them feel even better about their purchase. I never read 5-star or 1-star reviews, because they tend to be bullshiat.



I ignore five stars, but I love one star reviews. I can pretty much get a handle on who's upset over bullshiat, and who actually has a valid gripe. I pay attention to four stars, though. Negative reviews have the potential to be awesome -- but only from people who actually tried a product. Like you, I skip over any review where someone just brought the product; what's the point of giving a review to something one hasn't even opened the box on?

------------

drjekel_mrhyde: For movies I go straight to IMDB forums for said movie instead of their reviews.
/Too many paid assholes in the reviews

THIS.

------------

arcas: I usually check Amazon customer reviews before buying something just to see if the complaints follow a trend. I've always felt that complaints about a product are more valuable than praise. I don't want to read a review where you're gushing about how great a product is. I want you to list your three biggest complaints or nitpicks.

If, after reading dozens of reviews, the harshest complaint is little more than a minor annoyance then it's probably a decent product. On the other hand, if legitimate complaints about a particular problem appear repeatedly in numerous reviews, it's probably a red flag and you should do more research before buying.


And that.
 
2012-05-19 08:42:22 PM  
oh_please: True, but then you have the other end of the spectrum, where someone bought something yesterday, loves it because it's all shiny and new, and gives it 5 stars across the board because it makes them feel even better about their purchase. I never read 5-star or 1-star reviews, because they tend to be bullshiat.

I read 1 star reviews, to see if they all list a specific problem, or if they're empty bullshiat.
I read 5 star reviews, to see if it's just empty pandering, or if they actually go into detail.

To date, I have just 1 review on amazon (after having been on amazon for something like a decade).

It's a one star review, meaning that finally, some product that I got from amazon pissed me off enough that I submitted my first and only review ever. Not only that, I actually took photos of the issue and posted them ... for a $2 cable ... in the hopes that someone else would avoid the same BS that I had to deal with.

Basically, the manufacturer changed the product significantly, without changing the part number. So the product has a few 4&5 star reviews from the previous version, and 1 star reviews from the current version.

Since you don't read 1 star reviews, you would miss that.
 
Displayed 50 of 56 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report