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(Stanford University)   Interactive online simulation allows you to chart a route through the Roman world circa 200 AD. It's like a Google Maps for the Ancient Roman Empire. And hey, I found the brothel your mom worked at. It's marked with an enormous X   (orbis.stanford.edu) divider line 18
    More: Spiffy, Roman World, web-based simulation, complex network, determinants, means of transportation, information technology, seasonal variation, video tutorials  
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4164 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 May 2012 at 9:30 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-19 07:11:52 AM
Spiffy indeed. Good find subby.
 
2012-05-19 09:43:19 AM
"NOTE: Due to an unexpectedly high volume of traffic to the site, performance of the routing map and interactive cartogram are not what they should be and you may experience delays. Please do try them out - if there's a problem, come back next week; these issues will be solved by 22 May. Very sorry for any inconvenience!"

/In other words: we've been farked
//cool site, btw - thanks subby!
 
2012-05-19 10:04:24 AM

AliceBToklasLives: NOTE: Due to an unexpectedly high volume of traffic to the site, performance of the routing map and interactive cartogram are not what they should be and you may experience delays. Please do try them out - if there's a problem, come back next week; these issues will be solved by 22 May. Very sorry for any inconvenience!


ERROR XXXVII
 
2012-05-19 11:08:24 AM

Branch Dravidian: AliceBToklasLives: NOTE: Due to an unexpectedly high volume of traffic to the site, performance of the routing map and interactive cartogram are not what they should be and you may experience delays. Please do try them out - if there's a problem, come back next week; these issues will be solved by 22 May. Very sorry for any inconvenience!

ERROR XXXVII


You win.

/naptime
 
2012-05-19 11:37:17 AM
Incontinentia ButtoxXx

Acthept no thubthtituteth.
 
2012-05-19 11:40:47 AM
brothel rating is one enormous X, rather than several little xxx's, size matters...
 
2012-05-19 01:07:43 PM
In fact it took 63 days for news of the accession of Emperor Pertinax on January 1, 193 AD to travel from Rome to Alexandria. (He was only emperor for 3 months, so it was kind of tough to keep up on current events.)

I'm having a hard time picking options on this map that will give a travel time between those points that's not way shorter or way longer than that. The real-life variables seem incalculable.
 
2012-05-19 01:16:58 PM
Oh no Plato died of dysentery
 
2012-05-19 02:32:20 PM
I got a CDIV error.
 
2012-05-19 03:29:52 PM

Saberus Terras: I got a CDIV error.


Carpe Diem Immunodeficiency Virus?

What a horribly positive name for a disease.
 
2012-05-19 04:01:02 PM
Must not have been a Roman brothel. They were marked with a Y.
 
2012-05-19 04:14:42 PM
interesting that the default route to look up, Roma to Constantinopolis (at least for me) is the same trip Ezio took in Revelations.
 
2012-05-19 04:21:32 PM

Nem Wan: In fact it took 63 days for news of the accession of Emperor Pertinax on January 1, 193 AD to travel from Rome to Alexandria. (He was only emperor for 3 months, so it was kind of tough to keep up on current events.)

I'm having a hard time picking options on this map that will give a travel time between those points that's not way shorter or way longer than that. The real-life variables seem incalculable.


I got 62 days with Road/River/Coastal Sea (daylight), military for river speed, slower for ocean speed.
 
2012-05-19 04:57:13 PM
Serious question: had they not figured out carrier pigeons by then, or was it strictly runners, armies and ships that delivered communications?
 
2012-05-19 08:49:59 PM
"puella dēfutūta" - Latin for "yo mamma"
 
2012-05-19 09:11:52 PM

RedVentrue: Must not have been a Roman brothel. They were marked with a Y.


"Well bury me in a Y-shaped coffin!" as your mom always says.
 
2012-05-19 10:18:38 PM

buckler: Serious question: had they not figured out carrier pigeons by then, or was it strictly runners, armies and ships that delivered communications?


You cannot put very much on a pigeon. Any decently long report is going to easily reach their carrying capacity. And that is before you factor in predation and/or human "intervention". It also cuts out any elaboration or experiences a human may provide. Size, complexity, and the ability to ask 'So, how bad is it?" to a sentient, reasoning human more than make up for brute-force speed. The Romans didn't really care if they were the first guys to the start of a fight, just that they were the last ones standing at the end.
 
2012-05-19 11:34:38 PM

buckler: Serious question: had they not figured out carrier pigeons by then, or was it strictly runners, armies and ships that delivered communications?


Carrier Pigeons have been in use for over 2,500 years and Caesar himself made use of them.

And it's not true that they are not extremely useful.
No you can't put a lot of information into it, but armies and empires didn't work that way back then anyhow.
That's why places like Rome had so many problems with generals coming back trying to conquer Rome.

You had to give the guys out in the field lot's of power to get things done.

Frankly even the small message that XX is attacking YY with AA many troops getting to your main army in less than a week compared to a month it would have taken by horseback is a huge advantage.

The Romans made huge use of carrier pigeons.
 
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