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(Short List) Video First clip from the set of the US Sherlock. Looks appalling. Guess subby's nationality   (shortlist.com) divider line 111
    More: Video, Lucy Liu, Benedict Cumberbatch, Jonny Lee Miller  
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6170 clicks; posted to Video » on 17 May 2012 at 9:37 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-18 02:37:54 AM

DjangoStonereaver: rudemix: IlGreven: rudemix: If not Jeremey Brett, then Benedict Cumberbatch. If not either, then no.

If it's not Basil Rathbone, it's CRAP!

It's not Basil that drives me away from his Holmes, it's the wide varying from original source and even worse the making of Dr. Watson into a bumbling farking idiot. One of the things I most enjoy about the books is Watson. He is a very intelligent, educated and travelled man. He is not to be a dumski to be compared to Holmes to show how smart Holmes is, he is meant to be above average and still look far below mediocre in comparison. Both Brett and Cumberbatch benefit from solid Watsons. I would bet Rathbone reading it would be great listening if it followed original Holmes stories, or at least stayed in the world of Holmes.

And on that note I will prepare some reports listening to some solid gold. A Scandal in Bohemia(pops)

The saddest thing about Lionel Bruce was that he would have made a damn
fine 'straight' Watson; the Rathbone HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES was
the first of their films together, and was a fairly faithful (for the time) adaptation
of the story and Watson comes off rather well (not surprising given that he was
front and center throughout a good portion of the original novel).


That's Nigel Bruce.
 
2012-05-18 02:58:59 AM

B.L.Z. Bub: DjangoStonereaver: rudemix: IlGreven: rudemix: If not Jeremey Brett, then Benedict Cumberbatch. If not either, then no.

If it's not Basil Rathbone, it's CRAP!

It's not Basil that drives me away from his Holmes, it's the wide varying from original source and even worse the making of Dr. Watson into a bumbling farking idiot. One of the things I most enjoy about the books is Watson. He is a very intelligent, educated and travelled man. He is not to be a dumski to be compared to Holmes to show how smart Holmes is, he is meant to be above average and still look far below mediocre in comparison. Both Brett and Cumberbatch benefit from solid Watsons. I would bet Rathbone reading it would be great listening if it followed original Holmes stories, or at least stayed in the world of Holmes.

And on that note I will prepare some reports listening to some solid gold. A Scandal in Bohemia(pops)

The saddest thing about Lionel Bruce was that he would have made a damn
fine 'straight' Watson; the Rathbone HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES was
the first of their films together, and was a fairly faithful (for the time) adaptation
of the story and Watson comes off rather well (not surprising given that he was
front and center throughout a good portion of the original novel).

That's Nigel Bruce.


IOU an opening for you to give me one NCIS-style headslap if we ever meet in person.

But, you obviously got the idea.
 
2012-05-18 04:32:13 AM

Max Awesome: As long as they do their own thing and don't just copy the British series scene-by-scene, I know I'll enjoy it. I'm already intrigued by the possibilities of Lucy Liu as Watson, and by the New York setting.


They can't, because they will have the everloving shiat sued out of them.

They couldn't claim innocence because they actually approached the British lot and ask to use their scripts to make the American version. They were told to get lost. When Sue Virtue talked about it on the PBS live thingy, I got the feeling they had trouble being polite to CBS.

So if the plots of Elementary even vaguely resemble Sherlock there will be lawsuits a-flying.
 
2012-05-18 04:40:12 AM

Samwise Gamgee: The Moriarty from 'Sherlock' was a 'light' version of The Dark Knight's Joker. Nutty anarchist with a flair for the dramatic, etc. In fact, the resolution was the same, too - Sherlock had to trash his public image and 'die', just as Batman took the heat for offing Harvey Dent...


Er, no.

I get most people are not actual Sherlock freaks and so haven't seen any makings or interviews or anything, but Moffat explained that the original Sherlock Holmes Moriarty was THE archetype for every Big Bad since. He was the first mob boss, intelligent and dark evil mastermind character. Every single Big Bad since him has been built on him. So they didn't want to do that again because it's old, it's tired, and people would think it was lame and stereotypical.

Quoth the Moffat "With Moriarty, Doyle does such a brilliant job of writing a mafia don before they were invented. Every other supervillain ever since sounds like Moriarty. Goldfinger sounds exactly like Moriarty. He invented the supervillain. If you do him like that now, he sounds like the biggest cliche on earth. So we did a quite different kind of Moriarty, one that would be more alarming, I suppose, to Sherlock. He's super-clever. But then I don't think super-clever people behave the way that super-clever people used to. He's different. And you could not do Moriarty the way he's done before. Everyone else has done it. Sherlock and John I think are very much the originals, but Moriarty is different."

/I apologise for misspelling Sue Vertue's name in the previous post
 
2012-05-18 02:40:14 PM

if_i_really_have_to: Samwise Gamgee: The Moriarty from 'Sherlock' was a 'light' version of The Dark Knight's Joker. Nutty anarchist with a flair for the dramatic, etc. In fact, the resolution was the same, too - Sherlock had to trash his public image and 'die', just as Batman took the heat for offing Harvey Dent...

Er, no.

I get most people are not actual Sherlock freaks and so haven't seen any makings or interviews or anything, but Moffat explained that the original Sherlock Holmes Moriarty was THE archetype for every Big Bad since. He was the first mob boss, intelligent and dark evil mastermind character. Every single Big Bad since him has been built on him. So they didn't want to do that again because it's old, it's tired, and people would think it was lame and stereotypical.

Quoth the Moffat "With Moriarty, Doyle does such a brilliant job of writing a mafia don before they were invented. Every other supervillain ever since sounds like Moriarty. Goldfinger sounds exactly like Moriarty. He invented the supervillain. If you do him like that now, he sounds like the biggest cliche on earth. So we did a quite different kind of Moriarty, one that would be more alarming, I suppose, to Sherlock. He's super-clever. But then I don't think super-clever people behave the way that super-clever people used to. He's different. And you could not do Moriarty the way he's done before. Everyone else has done it. Sherlock and John I think are very much the originals, but Moriarty is different."

/I apologise for misspelling Sue Vertue's name in the previous post


So, what's your quote supposed to prove in regards to the Joker argument? All he's saying there is that the Moriarty of the show is not the one from the books, which we already know. I already stated that I preferred Jared Harris' Moriarty from the last film. I didn't find the idea 'old' or 'tired'. It's all in the execution.
 
2012-05-18 03:35:52 PM

Samwise Gamgee: So, what's your quote supposed to prove in regards to the Joker argument? All he's saying there is that the Moriarty of the show is not the one from the books, which we already know. I already stated that I preferred Jared Harris' Moriarty from the last film. I didn't find the idea 'old' or 'tired'. It's all in the execution.


I think the point he's making is that the Joker, in any form, is derivative of Moriarty from Doyle's original work. Much the same way that all "Big Bad" characters that have occurred in literature (and now movies) since the publication of the Sherlock Holmes stories are derivative of Moriarty.

Also, I disagree with your assertion that "The Moriarty from 'Sherlock' was a 'light' version of The Dark Knight's Joker." By your own "Nutty anarchist with a flair for the dramatic, etc." standards, the "Dark Knight" Joker was a painful rip-off of tons of movie villains that came before him (including the other movies versions). Besides, Sherlock's Moriarty isn't nutty. Ignore the vocal affectations and look at his deeds. There was nothing remotely 'nutty' or even spontaneous to any of his actions.
 
2012-05-18 07:54:50 PM
that show looks awful. i'll stick to the PBS version.
 
2012-05-18 08:19:28 PM
homoslavian?

its got sick boy in it. im good.
 
2012-05-18 11:31:56 PM

browneye: Also prefer the American version of Being Human to the UK version.


The American version has been smart and learned from the mistakes made in the UK show.

On the other hand, the UK show had Russell Tovey
 
2012-05-19 03:57:16 AM

Surool: Samwise Gamgee: So, what's your quote supposed to prove in regards to the Joker argument? All he's saying there is that the Moriarty of the show is not the one from the books, which we already know. I already stated that I preferred Jared Harris' Moriarty from the last film. I didn't find the idea 'old' or 'tired'. It's all in the execution.

I think the point he's making is that the Joker, in any form, is derivative of Moriarty from Doyle's original work. Much the same way that all "Big Bad" characters that have occurred in literature (and now movies) since the publication of the Sherlock Holmes stories are derivative of Moriarty.


That's not the point he was making. The passage he quoted was Moffatt stating that he couldn't put the literary Moriarty on the screen because it's 'been done to death', 'old and tired', etc. Which is a crap assertion in itself, but it had nothing to do with the Joker, and no, the Joker owes NOTHING to the literary Moriarty. Lex Luthor, sure, but not the Joker. There no common ground - at least not until the BBC's Moriarty...

Also, I disagree with your assertion that "The Moriarty from 'Sherlock' was a 'light' version of The Dark Knight's Joker." By your own "Nutty anarchist with a flair for the dramatic, etc." standards, the "Dark Knight" Joker was a painful rip-off of tons of movie villains that came before him (including the other movies versions). Besides, Sherlock's Moriarty isn't nutty. Ignore the vocal affectations and look at his deeds. There was nothing remotely 'nutty' or even spontaneous to any of his actions.

Wha? To quote him: 'BUT I'M SO CHANGEABLE!!!!' - Moriarty, when he randomly decides first not to kill the heroes, but then kill them, but then not kill them...
 
2012-05-20 02:21:54 PM
I caught both Seasons of Sherlock a couple months ago thaks to the magic of bittorrent, and I'm here to tell you that it so does NOT need a CBS remake.

/Honestly, how do you people watch broadcast tv?
 
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