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(Neatorama)   Oh boy, candy corn. AHHHHHHHHHHHHH. OH GOD, MY TEEF   (neatorama.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, gods, seeds  
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5890 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 May 2012 at 10:21 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



45 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2012-05-15 10:27:38 AM  
i75.photobucket.com
 
2012-05-15 10:34:30 AM  
Corn! Corn! Corn!
 
2012-05-15 10:36:09 AM  
We're on a bridge, Charlie!
 
2012-05-15 10:42:22 AM  
Uhhh am I the only one who thinks that candy corn has nothing to do with actual corn? Did they mean popcorn?
 
2012-05-15 10:42:27 AM  
"Seeds Trust, a family seed company, got the seeds for glass gem corn from Greg Schoen who got his seeds from his "corn-teacher", Carl Barnes, an 80ish year old part-Cherokee man, in Oklahoma."

That ain't GM corn, is it. Barnes has been hiding it in the prairie all this time...
 
2012-05-15 10:43:38 AM  
I want to make poop with that
 
2012-05-15 10:46:58 AM  
The internet says fake.

Cue the Romulan.
 
2012-05-15 10:49:30 AM  

Grither: Uhhh am I the only one who thinks that candy corn has nothing to do with actual corn? Did they mean popcorn?


Candy corn is candy corn
 
2012-05-15 10:51:08 AM  

jamspoon: Candy corn is candy corn


Right. And that has fark-all to do with the colored corn in the article, right?
 
2012-05-15 10:52:26 AM  
That would make one fabulous blinged-out turd the next day.

`Honey, come look at this! I can't flush it cuz it's so pretty!'
 
2012-05-15 10:57:13 AM  

Expolaris: [i75.photobucket.com image 512x384]


It's just a variety of Indian corn, science didn't do this.
 
2012-05-15 11:06:28 AM  

Larofeticus: The internet says fake.

Cue the Romulan.



Here's the site for the seed collective, though it looks like it's getting a lot of traffic today and is running slow. I don't really have any reason to doubt it's real. The seed collective certainly seems to be real.

If it's a new heirloom variety, and something as neat as that, a small seed collective probably can't keep up with demand. It takes a while to grow seeds, as the plants actually have to grow, and during growing seasons. You also have to be careful about cross-pollination, so indoor growing is probably what they'll do, but then your space for growing will be limited.

So yeah, it looks like a seed they only got hold of last year, so I'm not too surprised they don't have it for sale in quantity yet. I'd sure as hell be interested in growing some in my backyard gardens next year if I could. Now that I see I don't need near as much space for leafy greens as I thought I would, next year I'll have an 8'x8' garden to grow things in, and that looks like a great candidate!
 
2012-05-15 11:06:42 AM  
Candy corn.
Corn that tastes like candy.
I can't wait.

SON OF A BIATCH.
 
2012-05-15 11:33:48 AM  

Grither: Uhhh am I the only one who thinks that candy corn has nothing to do with actual corn? Did they mean popcorn?


I remember being immensity disappointed when i was a kid that the fancy multicolored popcorn still popped up white.
 
2012-05-15 11:47:55 AM  
MAKE ALL CORN LOOK LIKE THIS
 
2012-05-15 11:56:12 AM  
Nobody has ever seen Indian corn before?
 
2012-05-15 12:14:14 PM  

LoneCoon: Candy corn.
Corn that tastes like candy.
I can't wait.

SON OF A BIATCH.


Came for this reference, leaving happy, etc
 
2012-05-15 12:15:42 PM  
The pic in the article is glass beads (you can see where they are strung together). I've seen some very colorful Indian corn before, but nothing that amazing.
 
2012-05-15 12:24:54 PM  

Soulcatcher: The pic in the article is glass beads (you can see where they are strung together). I've seen some very colorful Indian corn before, but nothing that amazing.


Phyllotaxis, how does it work?
 
2012-05-15 12:25:41 PM  
big deal...if it's like regular indian corn, it all turns white when popped
 
2012-05-15 12:27:55 PM  

Soulcatcher: The pic in the article is glass beads (you can see where they are strung together). I've seen some very colorful Indian corn before, but nothing that amazing.



re-read the photo caption...the pic is a handful of strung kernels

the linked article includes a lot more pics including:

www.geekologie.com
 
2012-05-15 12:28:37 PM  

Soulcatcher: The pic in the article is glass beads (you can see where they are strung together). I've seen some very colorful Indian corn before, but nothing that amazing.


Those are remnants of the dried corn tassels I think.
 
2012-05-15 12:32:26 PM  

PainInTheASP: Soulcatcher: The pic in the article is glass beads (you can see where they are strung together). I've seen some very colorful Indian corn before, but nothing that amazing.

Those are remnants of the dried corn tassels I think.


I had to take a closer look, but I think this is spot on.
 
2012-05-15 12:38:31 PM  
Like to see if the color is maintained as a kernel of popcorn
 
2012-05-15 01:06:06 PM  

Grither: jamspoon: Candy corn is candy corn

Right. And that has fark-all to do with the colored corn in the article, right?


It prefers to be called corn of color.
 
2012-05-15 01:56:57 PM  

LoneCoon: Candy corn.
Corn that tastes like candy.
I can't wait.

SON OF A BIATCH.


They wash it. They wash it.
 
2012-05-15 02:17:12 PM  
The corn is real, it isn't GMO, the Indians had awesome genetic sciences before anyone even knew what genetic science was.
 
2012-05-15 02:25:33 PM  
seemslegit.com
 
2012-05-15 03:05:39 PM  

jaggspb: LoneCoon: Candy corn.
Corn that tastes like candy.
I can't wait.

SON OF A BIATCH.

They wash it. They wash it.


every halloween.. like an alzheimer's patient...
 
2012-05-15 03:15:49 PM  

mc_hfcs: The corn is real, it isn't GMO, the Indians had awesome genetic sciences before anyone even knew what genetic science was.


that doesn't fit my confirmation bias, it's clearly fake or something
 
2012-05-15 03:32:38 PM  

naveline: mc_hfcs: The corn is real, it isn't GMO, the Indians had awesome genetic sciences before anyone even knew what genetic science was.

that doesn't fit my confirmation bias, it's clearly fake or something


They noticed that traits tend to get passed on before we had a way to really understand genetic science? God they must be geniuses, being the only ones to ever figure that out.
 
2012-05-15 03:39:19 PM  

Grither: jamspoon: Candy corn is candy corn

Right. And that has fark-all to do with the colored corn in the article, right?


Because it's colorful and looks like candy and it's in the shape of corn, therefore...candy corn

/some people's kids
 
2012-05-15 03:45:20 PM  

NateAsbestos: being the only ones to ever figure that out.


He didn't even imply that.

He did claim that it was impressive. I agree. Sure, lots of people did it, but they were more educated and advanced all around because they were not as secluded as people in the America's.
 
2012-05-15 04:09:46 PM  
Seems like our daily gardening thread, and a good enough thread to ask in... I'm planning on planting a cover crop in my gardens over the winter (I've got two 8' x 16' raised beds in my backyard. I was planning on trying out winter rye in my tomato garden. Anyone have any other suggestions?

Garden 1 is my older garden, and has pretty rich soil in it. I had blight pretty bad two years running, so I planted all leafy greens in there this year (lettuce, arugula, spinach) and they're doing great so far. I was thinking I might plant some garlic or onions in there come fall.

Garden 2 is my new tomato garden. I had a soil delivery dropped off while I wasn't at home, and it wasn't quite as rich and black as I was expecting. Still, it was topsoil so it's doing the trick, I've just needed to do a little more fertilizing than I would like to. So I was hoping to plant something over the winter which I might be able to make use of, like a grain to make bread from, or something which might enrich the soil some that I could till under come spring.
 
2012-05-15 04:16:52 PM  

mongbiohazard: Seems like our daily gardening thread, and a good enough thread to ask in... I'm planning on planting a cover crop in my gardens over the winter (I've got two 8' x 16' raised beds in my backyard. I was planning on trying out winter rye in my tomato garden. Anyone have any other suggestions?

Garden 1 is my older garden, and has pretty rich soil in it. I had blight pretty bad two years running, so I planted all leafy greens in there this year (lettuce, arugula, spinach) and they're doing great so far. I was thinking I might plant some garlic or onions in there come fall.

Garden 2 is my new tomato garden. I had a soil delivery dropped off while I wasn't at home, and it wasn't quite as rich and black as I was expecting. Still, it was topsoil so it's doing the trick, I've just needed to do a little more fertilizing than I would like to. So I was hoping to plant something over the winter which I might be able to make use of, like a grain to make bread from, or something which might enrich the soil some that I could till under come spring.


I'm no expert but where my garden is, there used to be an above ground pool for an unknown period of time, so most stuff didn't grow well the first couple of years. I am lucky enough to have access to free composted cow manure, which does amazing things for my MIL's garden. Her kale, spinach, zucchinis, etc are huge and she doesn't use commercial stuff except for keeping bugs off the broccoli. If you can get it and till it in, that should help a lot with the soil.
 
2012-05-15 05:05:03 PM  

ladyfortuna: I'm no expert but where my garden is, there used to be an above ground pool for an unknown period of time, so most stuff didn't grow well the first couple of years. I am lucky enough to have access to free composted cow manure, which does amazing things for my MIL's garden. Her kale, spinach, zucchinis, etc are huge and she doesn't use commercial stuff except for keeping bugs off the broccoli. If you can get it and till it in, that should help a lot with the soil.



Thanks! Yeah, I was figuring I'd work some manure/compost in in early spring before I did my planting. I was just also hoping to add a nitrogen fixing cover crop as well to help even more, and maybe get some of that goodness down a little deeper than I've mixed compost into.
 
2012-05-15 08:01:55 PM  
OMFG. WANT when they have some seeds available for sale (they aren't QUITE to that point yet, alas).

And--if it's like most "Indian corn"--actually, there's two ways you could eat it without it being Toothbreaker Crunch. :D

a) If it's a field corn variety, you leach the hard skin off (with boiling water with just enough lye or potash in there to bite the tongue) and then pound it into grits (or just wash it off and serve as hominy).

b) If it's a popcorn variety (as a LOT of "Indian corn" is), you pretty much stick it in the microwave, cob and all, for two to three minutes :D

Then again, I'm a wee bit of a sucker for old varieties of plants...trying to grow romanesco (the famous fractal "broccoflower" variety) as well as Cherokee Purple tomatoes...at least after the hailstorm, the weather's been a BIT more cooperative this year in regards to growing plants, and I found a good local source for pre-started heritage varieties :D

By next year I'll actually have the baaaaaaaaaaaaaaby greenhouse set up for starting off seedlings (namely: some of those plastic see-through cabinets you can get for damn cheap at Wal-Mart or Big Lots--yes, these work surprisingly well :D) and should be able to do more from seed--mostly concentrated on the romanesco this year as that's stuff you can start in colder weather than tomatoes :D

I'll also vouch for the fact that composted cow manure is a wonderful thing, especially if you're starting out a raised-bed or "square foot" garden (like myself) and the idea of "tilling" involves a Garden Weasel and not a half-horsepower engine :D Worm castings are also utterly awesome and win if you can get them :D

(Yes, doing the square foot garden thing NOT for lack of space but because it's easier to weed/feed/take care of in general and I'm a lazy bastard :D A lazy bastard that likes their crops, though.)
 
2012-05-15 08:44:31 PM  

Great Porn Dragon: OMFG. WANT when they have some seeds available for sale (they aren't QUITE to that point yet, alas).

And--if it's like most "Indian corn"--actually, there's two ways you could eat it without it being Toothbreaker Crunch. :D

a) If it's a field corn variety, you leach the hard skin off (with boiling water with just enough lye or potash in there to bite the tongue) and then pound it into grits (or just wash it off and serve as hominy).

b) If it's a popcorn variety (as a LOT of "Indian corn" is), you pretty much stick it in the microwave, cob and all, for two to three minutes :D

Then again, I'm a wee bit of a sucker for old varieties of plants...trying to grow romanesco (the famous fractal "broccoflower" variety) as well as Cherokee Purple tomatoes...at least after the hailstorm, the weather's been a BIT more cooperative this year in regards to growing plants, and I found a good local source for pre-started heritage varieties :D

By next year I'll actually have the baaaaaaaaaaaaaaby greenhouse set up for starting off seedlings (namely: some of those plastic see-through cabinets you can get for damn cheap at Wal-Mart or Big Lots--yes, these work surprisingly well :D) and should be able to do more from seed--mostly concentrated on the romanesco this year as that's stuff you can start in colder weather than tomatoes :D

I'll also vouch for the fact that composted cow manure is a wonderful thing, especially if you're starting out a raised-bed or "square foot" garden (like myself) and the idea of "tilling" involves a Garden Weasel and not a half-horsepower engine :D Worm castings are also utterly awesome and win if you can get them :D

(Yes, doing the square foot garden thing NOT for lack of space but because it's easier to weed/feed/take care of in general and I'm a lazy bastard :D A lazy bastard that likes their crops, though.)


When my grandparents were still running the farm, they preferred field corn to sweet corn for corn on the cob. They picked it well before the usual corn harvest and prepared it like sweet corn.

/They also used dried corn cobs to heat the house as well as a substitute for TP until the Sears catalog came. There are parts of the good old days that I don't miss....
 
2012-05-16 12:14:20 AM  

mongbiohazard: ladyfortuna:

Thanks! Yeah, I was figuring I'd work some manure/compost in in early spring before I did my planting. I was just also hoping to add a nitrogen fixing cover crop as well to help even more, and maybe get some of that goodness down a little deeper than I've mixed compost into.


I honestly don't know what you'd use for that. Around here some of the farmers use clover as a cover crop when they're resting the fields, but I have no idea how it affects the nitrogen content. I'm interested in that stuff but have never really had a reason to do serious research. As to the manure compost, what I've gotten from the MIL is from primarily grass fed highland cattle that they raise; don't mistake this for a serious organic operation, more just that they are kind of lazy farmers :) - the cows live year round in pasture and only get grain as a treat/bribe to stay in the fence.

For my garden, as I live about 13 miles from them, we've just been digging up old piles of manure from the barn or pasture and bringing bags/buckets into town, but it's all pretty well composted which is a relief. MIL has been adding pretty much the same to her garden for a couple of decades, and has a nice tiller since her garden footprint could host an entire house. Last year we turned our smaller garden soil with shovels and it was a pain; a tiller is a great investment if you have a serious garden going on. Lordfortuna borrowed their tiller this past weekend and it is simply amazing how well it mixes compared to doing it by hand; sort of like a spoon versus an electric mixer.
 
2012-05-16 12:16:47 AM  
Incidentally, Mongbiohazard, if you want to discuss further gardening stuff, EIP.
 
2012-05-16 02:36:25 AM  
Not fake. Here is the Discovery article on it:

ear you go
 
2012-05-16 05:36:50 AM  

ladyfortuna: a tiller is a great investment if you have a serious garden going on


I just bought the missus one of the Mantis tillers with all the appropriate garden attachments. It is light enough for her to use effectively and is very effective (tilling up to 10" deep). She loves it and it is really well built from my views. My total was about $500 shipped so it really is quite a bargain considering the use factor.
 
2012-05-16 07:34:25 AM  
Kernel color has also been used to unravel an odd phenomenon in non-Mendelian inheritance: transposons, or jumping genes. (from the discovery article)

I can't wait for the hippies to freak out about this.
"We warned you about GMO, dude. Now you can, like, catch that stuff; like a communicable disease. Next thing you know, you'll be growing jellyfish tentacles, and like, there's nothing you can do about it, man."
 
2012-05-17 03:02:00 PM  
I would put that into my mouth and eat the fark out of it.
 
2012-05-17 04:31:40 PM  

Gough: When my grandparents were still running the farm, they preferred field corn to sweet corn for corn on the cob...


I'd heard/read you could do that with old varietals of corn (pretty much old cultivars grown by First Nations--there's still a Green Corn Ceremony among a lot of different First Nations) but wasn't aware you could do that with modern field corn varieties...fun with learning something :D

Hell, this one I'd want to grow even as an ornamental, much less for eatin' corn :D Hopefully they eventually grow enough of it where they can start offering seeds for sale, and we can see if it's closer to popcorn, sweet corn, or field corn (alas, the article doesn't mention this--I'm assuming some sort of field corn, but I've also seen popcorn that has colouration like "decorative Indian corn"). :D
 
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