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(News On 6 Tulsa)   Protip: If you're going to be bounty hunters, make sure that A: You have the right address, and B: You and your buddy don't already have outstanding warrants on your own heads   (newson6.com ) divider line
    More: Fail, West Tulsa, arrest warrants  
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5155 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 May 2012 at 6:40 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2012-05-14 10:45:37 PM  
That has to be the most frightening thing that I've seen today. Where the hell did that woman learn to put on makeup?
 
2012-05-15 12:03:46 AM  
I hope the people they have rounded up pay them a visit. They are no different, purty moufs.
 
2012-05-15 12:08:01 AM  
southparkstudios.mtvnimages.com
 
2012-05-15 12:21:12 AM  
I like the Cowboy Bebop style where you've got a license and central organization.

There's even a TV show for poular marks.
 
2012-05-15 01:12:09 AM  
susandennard.com

Amateurs
 
2012-05-15 03:02:21 AM  
Bounty Hunter Application Question One: Are you Colt Seaver? (if not, please go take a shower, get a haircut & shave and apply to refrigerator college)
 
2012-05-15 03:48:26 AM  
NOW WE PRAY TO JESUS MMHMM
 
2012-05-15 05:47:21 AM  
Get gun FIRST.

Call cops SECOND.
 
2012-05-15 06:54:38 AM  
Stories like this make me glad in my home state bounty hunting is illegal. Too much room for things like that Dog show.
 
2012-05-15 07:18:17 AM  
"Bounty Hunters, we don't need their scum."
 
2012-05-15 07:29:42 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Are you Colt Seaver?


Now there's a reference you don't see every day.
 
2012-05-15 07:38:39 AM  
i1.ytimg.com


Ah what? Oh, the bounty thing...
 
2012-05-15 07:42:23 AM  
fc05.deviantart.net
 
2012-05-15 07:49:23 AM  
FTA "All three men got tickets for breaking and entering without permission."

What I'm getting from this is that a B&E is a simple ticket and that you can get permission to break into a house, and if you do, you probably won't get a ticket
 
2012-05-15 07:53:45 AM  

2xhelix: That has to be the most frightening thing that I've seen today. Where the hell did that woman learn to put on makeup?


She musta done it up special for the teevee.
 
2012-05-15 08:06:03 AM  
Is one of them named Alonzo Mosley?
 
2012-05-15 08:06:41 AM  

Unoriginal_Username: FTA "All three men got tickets for breaking and entering without permission."

What I'm getting from this is that a B&E is a simple ticket and that you can get permission to break into a house, and if you do, you probably won't get a ticket


Came here to say this and see that it had already been said. So I will add that it must have been written by the same window-lickers that call an infraction in football "False start before the snap."
 
2012-05-15 08:25:13 AM  
The scary thing is that bounty hunters are not held to the same legal standard as cops, and they can do a lot of the same things with a two week course - including carry a firearm and use it in the commission of their work in many states.

These people can kick down your door, brutalize your family looking for someone, and then get away with it scott free.

In a first world soceity, there is no reason to have these wanna-be rentacops running around trying to collect bail bounties. Many countries prohibit them at the federal level thanks to their shenanigans.

Tennessee cracked down on these idiots after one in Nashville broke down the door to the wrong house, and shot a man in the face with a sawed off shotgun as he came out armed to defend himself against someone he thought was breaking in his house.

There's now an entire section of the Tennessee Code dedicated to regulating the profession. Out of state bondsman are looked at rather harshly, and have to conform to the same standards as Tennessee before they can even set foot in the state. Anyone with POST training, or elected in a LE Position - like a constible - can go to jail for bounty hunting.

Many of the jurisdictions in Tennessee are openly harsh to Bounty Hunters, and will go so far as to arrest someone for any charge they can find to do so when they are caught bounty hunting.
 
2012-05-15 08:31:23 AM  
I don't know if anything in the history of man has been such a dumbass magnet as bounty hunting. It is my hope that the 5% or so of the guys who actually make a living at this are sane and competent professionals. Sadly, it speaks so strongly to everyones inner 10 year old that the field seems to attract some real pieces of work.
 
2012-05-15 08:31:58 AM  
www.cookmuseumwhitby.co.uk

Bounty hunter
 
2012-05-15 08:32:56 AM  
FTFA:
"I'm still nervous," Mary said. "I get knots thinking about it. That scared the liver out of me."

kotv.images.worldnow.com

Apparently, losing your liver has a direct impact on your eyebrows.

/The more you know
 
2012-05-15 08:34:27 AM  
1.bp.blogspot.com

Quicker picker upper.
 
2012-05-15 08:37:01 AM  

BronyMedic: The scary thing is that bounty hunters are not held to the same legal standard as cops, and they can do a lot of the same things with a two week course - including carry a firearm and use it in the commission of their work in many states.

These people can kick down your door, brutalize your family looking for someone, and then get away with it scott free.


Until they break down the door of an armed homeowner.
 
2012-05-15 08:45:13 AM  

BronyMedic: Many of the jurisdictions in Tennessee are openly harsh to Bounty Hunters, and will go so far as to arrest someone for any charge they can find to do so when they are caught bounty hunting.


One thing I like about Kentucky law is that it's one of the few states where bounty hunting is outright illegal.

Kentucky doesn't allow bail bondsmen, so no bounty hunters.

Local LEO's around here love to find out-of-state bounty hunters and throw the book at them.
 
2012-05-15 08:50:13 AM  

Unoriginal_Username: FTA "All three men got tickets for breaking and entering without permission."

What I'm getting from this is that a B&E is a simple ticket and that you can get permission to break into a house, and if you do, you probably won't get a ticket


I think the "permission" part is there so cops won't try ticketing/arresting people who are trying to fix a stuck door, locked their keys inside, etc.

But legit cases of B&E should come with an arrest at the absolute minimum.
 
2012-05-15 09:01:12 AM  
It is a real shame they did not kick in the door of my 80yo mother.
Story would have been about a nickel plated 12g pump used to belong to a Texas border sheriff in the 1920's enforcing the border restrictions.

Another lost art.
 
2012-05-15 09:02:12 AM  

Silverstaff: BronyMedic: Many of the jurisdictions in Tennessee are openly harsh to Bounty Hunters, and will go so far as to arrest someone for any charge they can find to do so when they are caught bounty hunting.

One thing I like about Kentucky law is that it's one of the few states where bounty hunting is outright illegal.

Kentucky doesn't allow bail bondsmen, so no bounty hunters.

Local LEO's around here love to find out-of-state bounty hunters and throw the book at them.


Soo, retirement in Kentuck is a good thing?
 
2012-05-15 09:06:10 AM  
Canadian farker here trying to get my head around why bounty hunting is legal in the states.

You have these people who are allowed to break into houses and wield firearms after just a couple weeks of training and a cleared cheque? And you're shocked then this attracts a bunch of mouthbreathers who think they can play Batman? And if/when they do screw up like here, they get at most a slap on the wrist if they're in the right state?

Wow, just wow. That's all I gotta say...

/You pull that shiat here you'd be in the pokey so fast it would make your head spin
 
2012-05-15 09:16:13 AM  
"I'm still nervous," Mary said. "I get knots thinking about it. That scared the liver out of me."

My search for a new catch phrase is over!
 
2012-05-15 09:24:30 AM  
Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Until they break down the door of an armed homeowner.

Then they shoot them in the face, clean the scene up, and stage it to look like self-defense. It happened in Nashville in the early 90s.

Bounty Hunters are not nice, methodical people. The "Dog the Bounty Hunters" of the world are showboats that do not really exist out there. All these people care about is money, and frequenly illegally arm themselves with weapons to get their way. They have been known to hold families hostage waiting on their bond target to show up, for christ sakes.

I have nothing but contempt and disrespect for these people. They get to do the same thing as police, and there is NO STANDARD for them other than the limited wording of the laws in many states.
 
2012-05-15 09:26:28 AM  

cleveoh: "I'm still nervous," Mary said. "I get knots thinking about it. That scared the liver out of me."

My search for a new catch phrase is over!


Wonder if she had a bottle of Merlot in the pantry.
 
2012-05-15 09:32:29 AM  

Ronin_S:
You have these people who are allowed to break into houses and wield firearms after just a couple weeks of training and a cleared cheque? And you're shocked then this attracts a bunch of mouthbreathers who think they can play Batman? And if/when they do screw up like here, they get at most a slap on the wrist if they're in the right state?


On the upside, if they do break into your house here, you get to shoot them no questions asked!
 
2012-05-15 09:40:53 AM  

the ha ha guy: Unoriginal_Username: FTA "All three men got tickets for breaking and entering without permission."

What I'm getting from this is that a B&E is a simple ticket and that you can get permission to break into a house, and if you do, you probably won't get a ticket

I think the "permission" part is there so cops won't try ticketing/arresting people who are trying to fix a stuck door, locked their keys inside, etc.

But legit cases of B&E should come with an arrest at the absolute minimum.


That's a good point, but for I can actually see a cop tazing a person opening their door because their hands are full of groceries.
 
2012-05-15 09:50:44 AM  

Ronin_S: Canadian farker here trying to get my head around why bounty hunting is legal in the states.


Here's how it's legal in the US.

Bail bonds. If you get arrested and have to pay bail to get out, in most states you can contract with a bail bondsman. He puts the money down, you pay him a portion of the money, and he gets the money back when you show up to court. If you flee, he is out the money, but gets it back if you are brought to justice.

Thus, bail bondsmen pay the bounty hunters a portion of the money they will get back once they haul the fugitive in.

Why they can pursue and arrest like this is from an antiquated Supreme Court ruling. Taylor v. Taintor, 83 U.S. 366 (1872) (Link)

In 1872, the Supreme Court ruled that since legally when a bail bondsman pays your bail, you are released into his custody, he can do whatever it takes to assert that legal custody, including hiring agents working on his behalf to detain the person who was released into his custody.

Technically you agree to if when you accept a bail bond. If you pay your own bail, or are just a plain 'ol fugitive then that ruling doesn't apply. Bounty Hunters aren't (supposed to) just track down random wanted guys and haul them in for rewards, they are supposed to be going after people who skipped bail.

Thus, in states that don't allow paying other people's bail for hire, like Kentucky, the bounty hunter system isn't allowed since the legal underpinning of it isn't allowed here.
 
2012-05-15 10:08:26 AM  

Silverstaff: Ronin_S: Canadian farker here trying to get my head around why bounty hunting is legal in the states.


Here's how it's legal in the US.

Bail bonds. If you get arrested and have to pay bail to get out, in most states you can contract with a bail bondsman. He puts the money down, you pay him a portion of the money, and he gets the money back when you show up to court. If you flee, he is out the money, but gets it back if you are brought to justice.

Thus, bail bondsmen pay the bounty hunters a portion of the money they will get back once they haul the fugitive in.

Why they can pursue and arrest like this is from an antiquated Supreme Court ruling. Taylor v. Taintor, 83 U.S. 366 (1872) (Link)

In 1872, the Supreme Court ruled that since legally when a bail bondsman pays your bail, you are released into his custody, he can do whatever it takes to assert that legal custody, including hiring agents working on his behalf to detain the person who was released into his custody.

Technically you agree to if when you accept a bail bond. If you pay your own bail, or are just a plain 'ol fugitive then that ruling doesn't apply. Bounty Hunters aren't (supposed to) just track down random wanted guys and haul them in for rewards, they are supposed to be going after people who skipped bail.

Thus, in states that don't allow paying other people's bail for hire, like Kentucky, the bounty hunter system isn't allowed since the legal underpinning of it isn't allowed here.


So in a sense, this is protective custody that has been privatized/contracted out?
 
2012-05-15 02:50:17 PM  
I almost got taken in on a warrant on a Friday evening, would've sat in jail all weekend, and Monday was a holiday, all over a $30 fine I was never given notice of.

I had a parts truck I parted out parked down a grass alleyway and a local municipality picked it up as abandoned, a $30 fine, but they sent all the notices to the apt below mine with no name on it, so they're returned. Then they sent a summons to the wrong address, again RTS. Then they issued a warrant over the issue of the $30 fine.

I'm sleeping and I hear all his banging going on at the door of the vacant downstairs apt. Stuff like, "OPEN UP, I KNOW YOU'RE IN THERE!!" Knowing it's vacant I decided to go down and tell the guy nobody lives there, get dressed, but by the time I open my door I can see him leaving. I notice a card on the door so I walk down and check it out, such and such bounty, but it has MY NAME on it! I gather some stuff, leave out the back, take a bus a few blocks and make a call from the payphone. He tells me he doesn't know what it's about, but I would find it in my advantage to come to him and not make him hunt me down. Nope. I called the local police and they tell me about the warrant/fine. I told them I never got it, wrong address, that the bounty guy even left his card at the wrong address. They acted like it was no big deal, just come down and drop off a check. So, I did that, dropped it off, but I made sure they cleared it with the bounty guy before I left. All that nonsense over a pickup in some unused alley that I was going to remove in a month anyway.

This was a small town within a large PA city, weird laws.
 
2012-05-15 05:19:08 PM  

doglover: [fc05.deviantart.net image 600x800]


That's too funny!

/Woot! Managed to not say 'Candle Jack!'
//Go
 
2012-05-15 07:45:08 PM  

Doink_Boink: I almost got taken in on a warrant on a Friday evening, would've sat in jail all weekend, and Monday was a holiday, all over a $30 fine I was never given notice of.

I had a parts truck I parted out parked down a grass alleyway and a local municipality picked it up as abandoned, a $30 fine, but they sent all the notices to the apt below mine with no name on it, so they're returned. Then they sent a summons to the wrong address, again RTS. Then they issued a warrant over the issue of the $30 fine.

I'm sleeping and I hear all his banging going on at the door of the vacant downstairs apt. Stuff like, "OPEN UP, I KNOW YOU'RE IN THERE!!" Knowing it's vacant I decided to go down and tell the guy nobody lives there, get dressed, but by the time I open my door I can see him leaving. I notice a card on the door so I walk down and check it out, such and such bounty, but it has MY NAME on it! I gather some stuff, leave out the back, take a bus a few blocks and make a call from the payphone. He tells me he doesn't know what it's about, but I would find it in my advantage to come to him and not make him hunt me down. Nope. I called the local police and they tell me about the warrant/fine. I told them I never got it, wrong address, that the bounty guy even left his card at the wrong address. They acted like it was no big deal, just come down and drop off a check. So, I did that, dropped it off, but I made sure they cleared it with the bounty guy before I left. All that nonsense over a pickup in some unused alley that I was going to remove in a month anyway.

This was a small town within a large PA city, weird laws.


I don't want to call BS on that, but how the hell was a bounty hunter involved with serving a warrant?

Bounty hunting in the US is related to bail jumpers. An outstanding warrant over an unpaid parking ticket, when you've never been in custody to begin with wouldn't have a bounty hunter involved.

I've tried to look up Pennsylvania laws related to bounty hunting to see how a bounty hunter could take an outstanding warrant, that has never touched a bail bondsman, and go out trying to arrest somebody. Can't find anything, got any links?

Who was paying the bounty hunter? It obviously wasn't a bail bondsman.
 
2012-05-15 09:19:43 PM  

Silverstaff: It obviously wasn't a bail bondsman.


My guess is that it was a process server and not a bounty hunter.
 
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