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(C|Net)   Three tech bargains you shouldn't fall for... but probably will   (reviews.cnet.com) divider line 128
    More: Obvious, World Wide Web, rechargeable batteries, Kindle Fire, netbooks, usability, microwave popcorn, Google Docs  
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21483 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 May 2012 at 12:07 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-12 08:54:30 PM
The bargain tabs are prototypes for specialty-built systems, like those for point of sale. Purpose built handhelds/tabs are at a minimum $500. Hell, a decent multi-meter runs exactly that. Not to mention medical devices.

The value in all these systems is software. These guys are banking on building generic systems that can be customized to accept a limited variety of inputs and run various analysis programs on it.

The days of the $800 cable tester kit are numbered, and not a moment too soon. The $100 tab is a way for these companies to make a little cash and work out the kinks while they build competence around the OS and hardware.

If you realize this when you buy it, you'll be a happy camper. Don't expect it to be a general purpose computer.
 
2012-05-12 09:01:47 PM
I'm certainly no audiophile or tech guy, but why would you pay $800 for Air Play speakers when you can buy an Air Play receiver for a couple hundred dollars? What am I missing? Serious question.
 
2012-05-12 09:07:47 PM

sigdiamond2000: I'm certainly no audiophile or tech guy, but why would you pay $800 for Air Play speakers when you can buy an Air Play receiver for a couple hundred dollars? What am I missing? Serious question.


Doesn't an AirPlay receiver require an iPod/Phone/Pad as a sender? Even if there are other senders, ya gotta consider that there's a lot Wifi-enabled senders that might not have airplay capability.

/Serious question
//Not an apple user.
 
2012-05-12 09:30:58 PM
Chromebooks, lol


Google has lost their touch. They once shat gold now they shiat feces
 
2012-05-12 09:34:54 PM
Let's see...

Nope.
Aw HELLS no.
Aaaaaand, nope. Unless you count the HP Touchpad I got when they fire saled them.

I didn't fall for any of them! What do I win?
 
2012-05-12 09:39:59 PM

cman: Google has lost their touch. They once shat gold now they shiat feces


There's a theory around that they'll do anything to distract Microsoft. They've put very nearly no investment in Chromebook, knowing that it has very near zero chance of success. But Microsoft will chase that bone with millions of dollars and (more importantly) years of talent.
 
2012-05-12 09:57:55 PM

cman: Chromebooks, lol


Google has lost their touch. They once shat gold now they shiat feces


I've got a Google TV in one of my spare bedrooms that I bought a year and a half ago that I don't think you can even buy anymore. They haven't released a system update in like 8 months. I think it has one channel that just plays an episode of Mr. Dressup on a continuous loop.
 
2012-05-12 10:59:03 PM
i think the main problem with cheap tablets is that these reviewers aren't very smart.

They use an ipad, and instead of thinking "This is what an ipad is." they think "This is what a tablet is." and wind up ruining the market because they force companies to produce only ipads and ipad clones.

Bargain basement tablets are slower, they don't have the same apps, and they don't respond to the same kind of tactile input. That doesn't mean you can't put them to good use! There's a million different things you can do with a tiny little $75 dollar tablet that would make the investment worth it.
 
2012-05-12 11:21:51 PM
Because they're terrible. Most of these dirt-cheap tablets have excruciatingly slow processors; you tap an icon, and nothing happens for several seconds. Scrolling a Web page can be an unresponsive exercise in frustration. The usability here pales in comparison to what you get from a more mainstream tablet.

Uhh, most high end netbooks can suffer from this.. Especially anything made by Samsung..

Normal practice for buying a Samsung android phone or tablet: (with the exception of the Nexus line)

Make purchase
Go to XDA and get root kit
Root it / Install new ROM
Enjoy your Android phone / Netbook

My Galaxy Tab 10.1 was farking awful with the optimized with a shiat sandwich Samsung loaded on it.
 
2012-05-12 11:22:26 PM
Er. Netbooks = Tablets.
 
2012-05-12 11:25:26 PM
I got a netbook a few years back for $250. Why the hell does Google's cost $300 after discounts?

Also, there is one decent cheap tablet in the Nook Tablet. By basically every review, it's better than Kindle's, and is a decent price/capability middle ground than you'd expect. Plus it's really easy to hack so you're not running the limited OS it comes with.
 
2012-05-13 12:14:22 AM

GAT_00: I got a netbook a few years back for $250. Why the hell does Google's cost $300 after discounts?


The plan was to sell these to businesses as a kind of thin client fo employees for less than $20 a month. The idea being to drive Google's cloud services.
 
2012-05-13 12:16:03 AM
Nope.

Won't get Airplay because I don't like being locked down to Apple products. I have an iPod classic and an Nano 6G, and that's it. And I don't even use those that much anymore because my Droid Bionic holds most of the music I want. If I get wireless speakers, they won't be from Apple.

Not getting a Chromebook. I already have a Asus Transformer and with the keyboard dock it works amazing.

"Off-brand tablet'? Again, my Asus Transformer does everything an iPad does, and more. And it does it cheaper and better. My next tablet will probably be a Windows 7 tablet if I can find one, just because I want to be able to run full fledged programs like VLC, Chrome, Word (real MS word, not a clone). But I would never take a step backwards and get an iPad. I've become too used to the capabilities of the Transformer, I would feel chained down with an iPad.
 
2012-05-13 12:17:02 AM

GAT_00: I got a netbook a few years back for $250. Why the hell does Google's cost $300 after discounts?

Also, there is one decent cheap tablet in the Nook Tablet. By basically every review, it's better than Kindle's, and is a decent price/capability middle ground than you'd expect. Plus it's really easy to hack so you're not running the limited OS it comes with.


Best way to go. Dont buy into that tablet bullshiat.

/Although I did, but it was for different reasons
//Nothing says more than I have good tastes bringing an iPad to Starbucks and having some good coffee.
///Government gives me WAAAY too much money a month
////$2800 a month and all it cost me was my sanity
 
2012-05-13 12:28:41 AM

cman: Best way to go. Dont buy into that tablet bullshiat.


The netbook sucks. I never use it. Have a low-end decent laptop I use a lot more than I planned and a powerful desktop I never turn on despite probably being quite a bit faster for processing.

As bad as the netbook is though, I have even less reason to use a tablet. It's why I don't have one. I just know which one I would buy if I ever felt like wasting the money. Plus iPads really hurt my hand. Too much torque for the Carpel-Tunnel I know I'm working towards.
 
2012-05-13 12:33:24 AM

GAT_00: cman: Best way to go. Dont buy into that tablet bullshiat.

The netbook sucks. I never use it. Have a low-end decent laptop I use a lot more than I planned and a powerful desktop I never turn on despite probably being quite a bit faster for processing.

As bad as the netbook is though, I have even less reason to use a tablet. It's why I don't have one. I just know which one I would buy if I ever felt like wasting the money. Plus iPads really hurt my hand. Too much torque for the Carpel-Tunnel I know I'm working towards.


I had one once. Twas a shiatty Acer Aspire One. Cheap POS. Had an Intel 950 GMA. Try to throw 480p YouTube vids at it and watch it stutter. It was awful. Not only that, but with the power consumption of the Atom, I expected to have decent battery life. Not so, I got maybe 2 hours tops of web browsing.

I am in the market for a HTPC. Looking at a Zotac Nano. Probably gonna throw XP on it (would be FreeBSD if Netflix ever worked on non-silverlight technologies for the *nix based community.)
 
2012-05-13 12:50:46 AM
Batteries in speakers? This is a bad idea.
 
2012-05-13 12:56:16 AM

taurusowner: Not getting a Chromebook. I already have a Asus Transformer and with the keyboard dock it works amazing.

"Off-brand tablet'? Again, my Asus Transformer does everything an iPad does, and more. And it does it cheaper and better. My next tablet will probably be a Windows 7 tablet if I can find one, just because I want to be able to run full fledged programs like VLC, Chrome, Word (real MS word, not a clone). But I would never take a step backwards and get an iPad. I've become too used to the capabilities of the Transformer, I would feel chained down with an iPad.



I'm a very happy Transformer owner too, but I don't think that he's talking about the Transformer for that one when he says "off-brand". Or Samsung's Tab, or the Motorola XOOM. Those are all legitimate machines with dual and quad core processors and are coming from established name brands.

He's talking about the bargain basement shiat from some company you've never heard from before. The shiat like this which I'm forever seeing come up on my deal-a-day sites. Kacaso? WTF is that? Might as well go with a genuine "Sorny" or "Magnetbox". Sure, it's an 8" tablet for $140, but hiding in that "great deal" is the fact that it will be very frustrating to actually use, day to day because of it's shiatty hardware. Single core processor, capacitive touchscreen, low resolution screen, crap software, etc...
 
2012-05-13 12:58:11 AM
I love the netbook bashing. I hope y'all realize that, without netbooks, there would be no "ultrabook" market. Nobody was making super-small laptops because it was assumed there was no market. Then Asus put out the Eee PC and it was clear that there was a lot of pent up demand for extremely portable, fully functional PCs and people were willing to sacrifice power and storage for portability. And, after a few years, it's not even necessary to sacrifice power or storage. I've got 3 pound notebook with an i7 CPU, 8 gigs of RAM, and a 500 gig hard drive.

Without all those underpowered netbooks proving that the demand existed, I doubt we'd have the portable powerhouses we have today.
 
2012-05-13 12:59:17 AM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Let's see...

Nope.
Aw HELLS no.
Aaaaaand, nope. Unless you count the HP Touchpad I got when they fire saled them.

I didn't fall for any of them! What do I win?


Smugness?
 
2012-05-13 01:05:03 AM

styckx: Because they're terrible. Most of these dirt-cheap tablets have excruciatingly slow processors; you tap an icon, and nothing happens for several seconds. Scrolling a Web page can be an unresponsive exercise in frustration. The usability here pales in comparison to what you get from a more mainstream tablet.

Uhh, most high end netbooks can suffer from this.. Especially anything made by Samsung..

Normal practice for buying a Samsung android phone or tablet: (with the exception of the Nexus line)

Make purchase
Go to XDA and get root kit
Root it / Install new ROM
Enjoy your Android phone / Netbook

My Galaxy Tab 10.1 was farking awful with the optimized with a shiat sandwich Samsung loaded on it.



Yeah, that's why when given the choice of a new Verizon phone, I picked up a Galaxy Nexus from Amazon Wireless for $50 with contract instead of screwing around with a phone that Samsung has ruined with their attempts at "value-add".
 
2012-05-13 01:12:15 AM
I have an offbrand tablet that I love. But it's old, you certainly should not buy one.

It's the Huawei S7. It's basically a 7" Nexus One. It's a tablet, only because it's 7" in size, but Huawei just took a phone and blew it up. Because it's a GSM phone, because it has GPS, it makes for a terrific aftermarket car navigation / sound system.

I bought a stalk for my car and mount it there, and then wander down the road listening to Rhapsody, Google Music, GPSing my way around, and then at the motel, can use the thing for Netflix or as a Kindle.

I serve it data using a rooted Tmo SGSII with wifi tethering.

It's only drawback is that I bought one about six months soon and it has a resistive display not a capacitative display.

But really, it's about as fast as a Nexus One, and it can do some very nice things for me.
 
2012-05-13 01:12:19 AM

moothemagiccow: Batteries in speakers? This is a bad idea.



I have an old portable speaker which runs on either an AC adapter or four AA batteries. It's one of the awesomest things I've ever spent $30 on. It doesn't use bluetooth, it just connects with a standard headphone jack cable, we plug it in to my wife's laptop's headphone jack, my tablet, etc. Hell, I used it today to listen to my my mp3's I was playing through my phone out in the backyard today while BBQ'ing and entertaining the inlaws. I have gotten SO much damn use on it and have had it for many years.

Last week I was looking for a second one, because my wife and I use it so much... but I can't find one I want - a single piece unit (stereo speakers in one body) that runs on both an AC adapter or standard sized batteries (AA, AAA, C, etc). All the ones they're making now have internal rechargeable batteries, which isn't as convenient for me, and many of them don't even have the AC adapter option.
 
2012-05-13 01:15:36 AM
$99 touchpad, upgrayedd to Cyanogen 9 Ice cream sammich nightlies, best bargain I've scored in awhile.
 
2012-05-13 01:26:45 AM

cman: I had one once. Twas a shiatty Acer Aspire One. Cheap POS. Had an Intel 950 GMA. Try to throw 480p YouTube vids at it and watch it stutter. It was awful. Not only that, but with the power consumption of the Atom, I expected to have decent battery life. Not so, I got maybe 2 hours tops of web browsing.


I had one of those too, only with the big battery. It was a little better experience once I upgraded it from XP to Win 7, but overall it was SLOW to do anything but the most basic of tasks. Even without things like USB ports and Flash support, the first gen iPad was much better than the Aspire One for anything dealing with video playback or web browsing.
 
2012-05-13 01:30:38 AM

cman: Google has lost their touch. They once shat gold now they shiat feces


I don't know. I think it's more "Whatever Google was going to become...they've become." They're still the best at search, and the Chrome browser is surprisingly good, but Chromebooks? Wave? Google+? Most companies are only really good at a couple things - Microsoft and McDonald's for two other examples.
 
2012-05-13 01:43:47 AM

jtown: I love the netbook bashing. I hope y'all realize that, without netbooks, there would be no "ultrabook" market. Nobody was making super-small laptops because it was assumed there was no market. Then Asus put out the Eee PC and it was clear that there was a lot of pent up demand for extremely portable, fully functional PCs and people were willing to sacrifice power and storage for portability. And, after a few years, it's not even necessary to sacrifice power or storage. I've got 3 pound notebook with an i7 CPU, 8 gigs of RAM, and a 500 gig hard drive.

Without all those underpowered netbooks proving that the demand existed, I doubt we'd have the portable powerhouses we have today.



Netbooks really didn't have much to do with it. Ultraportables like the circa 2004 Sony X505 have been around for years:

reviews.cnet.com

HP and Lenovo have also been making thin and light business computers in the 12" size for years that traded a built in optical drive for less bulk and weight. What really kicked off demand for ultrabooks was the success of this guy, the first generation of which was released in early 2008, when the Asus EEE PC was still a Linux only affair more akin to a Chromebook in functionality:

zapp1.staticworld.net

Once they got the bugs worked out of the first gen design in 2010 by beefing up the processor and adding reasonably affordable SSDs to the entry level models, the Air has pretty much become the template upon which the Ultrabooks have been based. Netbooks were really nothing but a but a passing fad that was pretty much displaced by tablets. I personally get WAY more use out of my Kindle Fire than I ever did my Aspire One. even though the Aspire had a full version of Windows.
 
2012-05-13 01:46:24 AM

Fuggin Bizzy: cman: Google has lost their touch. They once shat gold now they shiat feces

I don't know. I think it's more "Whatever Google was going to become...they've become." They're still the best at search, and the Chrome browser is surprisingly good, but Chromebooks? Wave? Google+? Most companies are only really good at a couple things - Microsoft and McDonald's for two other examples.


Don't forget Android, which pretty much rules the smartphone market now in terms of largest OS install base, with 50% marketshare in the US compared to 30% for iOS. That's likely as big a win as Microsoft taking the largest chunk of the PC market in the early 80s.
 
2012-05-13 01:51:06 AM

Mad_Radhu: jtown: I love the netbook bashing. I hope y'all realize that, without netbooks, there would be no "ultrabook" market. Nobody was making super-small laptops because it was assumed there was no market. Then Asus put out the Eee PC and it was clear that there was a lot of pent up demand for extremely portable, fully functional PCs and people were willing to sacrifice power and storage for portability. And, after a few years, it's not even necessary to sacrifice power or storage. I've got 3 pound notebook with an i7 CPU, 8 gigs of RAM, and a 500 gig hard drive.

Without all those underpowered netbooks proving that the demand existed, I doubt we'd have the portable powerhouses we have today.


Netbooks really didn't have much to do with it. Ultraportables like the circa 2004 Sony X505 have been around for years:

[reviews.cnet.com image 440x330]

HP and Lenovo have also been making thin and light business computers in the 12" size for years that traded a built in optical drive for less bulk and weight. What really kicked off demand for ultrabooks was the success of this guy, the first generation of which was released in early 2008, when the Asus EEE PC was still a Linux only affair more akin to a Chromebook in functionality:

[zapp1.staticworld.net image 606x403]

Once they got the bugs worked out of the first gen design in 2010 by beefing up the processor and adding reasonably affordable SSDs to the entry level models, the Air has pretty much become the template upon which the Ultrabooks have been based. Netbooks were really nothing but a but a passing fad that was pretty much displaced by tablets. I personally get WAY more use out of my Kindle Fire than I ever did my Aspire One. even though the Aspire had a full version of Windows.


If you want to be pedantic, I guess I should have said inexpensive small portables. Happy now?
 
2012-05-13 01:55:14 AM

jtown: I love the netbook bashing. I hope y'all realize that, without netbooks, there would be no "ultrabook" market. Nobody was making super-small laptops because it was assumed there was no market. Then Asus put out the Eee PC and it was clear that there was a lot of pent up demand for extremely portable, fully functional PCs and people were willing to sacrifice power and storage for portability. And, after a few years, it's not even necessary to sacrifice power or storage. I've got 3 pound notebook with an i7 CPU, 8 gigs of RAM, and a 500 gig hard drive.

Without all those underpowered netbooks proving that the demand existed, I doubt we'd have the portable powerhouses we have today.


CSB:

I went to Office Max [or Depot? I can't tell the difference] about a month ago looking for a cheap netbook. All I needed was something sub-$400, not super powerful. Didn't care what operating system was on it as I was going to end up installing Linux anyway.

They had no netbooks. They only had tablets, regular laptops, and "ultrabooks". Even better, when the sales kid came over to harass me about it, I asked if they had any netbooks... and he looked at me as if I was speaking Farsi or something.

Obviously I didn't buy anything that day. I still don't have a netbook.
 
2012-05-13 02:04:49 AM

jtown: If you want to be pedantic, I guess I should have said inexpensive small portables. Happy now?


I'm not sure if you can consider $800 and up for Ultrabooks to be inexpensive, especially when compared to traditional notebooks of a similar size. Instead of netbooks becoming more capable, it seems like the ultraportables became more mainstream with the MacBook Air and the $1000 price point of the 2010 11" model, so the components needed to make an ultraportable became more of a commodity, dropping the prices of what used to be fairly exclusive hardware (just like the large flat panel TV that was a luxury ten years ago is now a sale item at Wal-Mart). They are really more of an evolution of the ultraportable than the netbook.
 
2012-05-13 02:09:52 AM

jtown: I love the netbook bashing. I hope y'all realize that, without netbooks, there would be no "ultrabook" market. Nobody was making super-small laptops because it was assumed there was no market. Then Asus put out the Eee PC and it was clear that there was a lot of pent up demand for extremely portable, fully functional PCs and people were willing to sacrifice power and storage for portability. And, after a few years, it's not even necessary to sacrifice power or storage. I've got 3 pound notebook with an i7 CPU, 8 gigs of RAM, and a 500 gig hard drive.

Without all those underpowered netbooks proving that the demand existed, I doubt we'd have the portable powerhouses we have today.


You're welcome! I still have my EEE PC 701, and it still works great for what I bought it for, basic web browsing, e-mail, music server...
 
2012-05-13 02:19:21 AM

NateAsbestos: jtown: I love the netbook bashing. I hope y'all realize that, without netbooks, there would be no "ultrabook" market. Nobody was making super-small laptops because it was assumed there was no market. Then Asus put out the Eee PC and it was clear that there was a lot of pent up demand for extremely portable, fully functional PCs and people were willing to sacrifice power and storage for portability. And, after a few years, it's not even necessary to sacrifice power or storage. I've got 3 pound notebook with an i7 CPU, 8 gigs of RAM, and a 500 gig hard drive.

Without all those underpowered netbooks proving that the demand existed, I doubt we'd have the portable powerhouses we have today.

CSB:

I went to Office Max [or Depot? I can't tell the difference] about a month ago looking for a cheap netbook. All I needed was something sub-$400, not super powerful. Didn't care what operating system was on it as I was going to end up installing Linux anyway.

They had no netbooks. They only had tablets, regular laptops, and "ultrabooks". Even better, when the sales kid came over to harass me about it, I asked if they had any netbooks... and he looked at me as if I was speaking Farsi or something.

Obviously I didn't buy anything that day. I still don't have a netbook.


Tablets are hot.

My mother, who isnt all into the tech thing, called me one day at Best Buy. She was astounded at how low laptop prices have come down. She thought they were so cheap due to a few bad batches
 
2012-05-13 02:48:06 AM
I got a netbook about a year ago for $225- they are great for travel! you can download ebooks and movies to them, run MS Office (powerpoint and word mostly) and surf the internet and read email. Why would anyone buy an $800 tablet that doesn't do half this? Also they are tiny, easy to use on an airplane and don't weigh half a ton like a laptop.
 
2012-05-13 02:50:15 AM

cman: NateAsbestos: jtown:...
Tablets are hot...
She was astounded at how low laptop prices have come down. She thought they were so cheap due to a few bad batches


I detest tablets, and most phones. I love the idea of the smartbook. My greatest concern is that no matter what class of device is produced in any significant quantity, they'll still be made of shiatty components, like the poor quality heatsinks that seem so common these days with thermal compound (if any) that looks like it is made of silly putty. The greatest advance for me, though, would be towards a battery that doesn't die outright six times in the life cycle of the product, and a (hopefully off-main) power sub board and female connector that don't break as easily as a cheap cordial glass. But then, it should serve as no surprise in an era when the trend is towards shiattier quality, less maintainable hardware, so long as it incorporates a few bells and whistles and a camera with a few more megapixels. I remember when am/fm radios which were commercial grade were not only generally decent, but were expected to be, and when ten different kinds of RF devices didn't all use frequencies in the 2-5GHz range simultaneously, and these days I can't seem to find many consumer electronics devices that don't require some sort of emergent repair, or hours of tweaking, just to get to a basically usable state.

/clouds
 
2012-05-13 02:55:57 AM

elbows_deep_silent_queef: cman: NateAsbestos: jtown:...
...
/clouds


Also, I'm highly amused at the sheer popularity/obsession in regards to mobile devices among [certain of] people who don't really do much on them or go anywhere. The box/desk computer "model" is still useful, it's just not trendy any more.
 
2012-05-13 02:57:48 AM

Mad_Radhu: Netbooks were really nothing but a but a passing fad that was pretty much displaced by tablets.


Disagree. To find out why netbook sales fell through the floor, compare the prices of a modern netbook against the EEE PC 701. Then compare the prices of the modern ones to the cheapest, nastiest Dell laptop you can find on their website.

The netbook, in nearly all cases, will be of poorer specifications than the Dell yet cost more.

So... yeah... I'll buy the Dell then.
 
2012-05-13 03:08:35 AM

Vaneshi: Mad_Radhu:...

The netbook, in nearly all cases, will be of poorer specifications than the Dell yet cost more.

So... yeah... I'll buy the Dell then.


Indeed, it is amusing that there seems to be a whole niche market of selling a device that underperforms on the basis that it's generally more affordable, significantly lighter and consumes much less power, then fail to instill some or all of those traits in the device.

As much as I hate Dell, I'd rather buy a refurbished dell than most of what I've seen release in the past 4+ years.
 
2012-05-13 04:01:46 AM
Non-brand tablets work okay if you spend the few extra seconds it takes to look the specs up and check if there is a custom Android ROM for them. Very useful for things like wall skype phones in your country house, cupboard-top recipe books/calendars/shopping lists, home automation UI modules, etc.
 
2012-05-13 04:04:53 AM
3 things to not put in your eye:
1. salt
2. flesh-eating bacteria
3. a sharp stick

Did anyone really need to be told not to buy any of those things?
 
2012-05-13 04:47:59 AM

Babwa Wawa: cman: Google has lost their touch. They once shat gold now they shiat feces

There's a theory around that they'll do anything to distract Microsoft. They've put very nearly no investment in Chromebook, knowing that it has very near zero chance of success. But Microsoft will chase that bone with millions of dollars and (more importantly) years of talent.


This is an awesome way to redefine failure.

In reality 98% of Google's revenue comes from one source - Advertising. Apple and Microsoft have multiple revenue streams. If iPad died and if Office died completely tomorrow, Apple and Microsoft would both have more than 80% of their revenue streams intact.

Google keeps throwing stuff at the wall to find other revenue streams because they know that someone can come along and distrupt their good thing. It's why the other big companies have more than one tentacle in different pies.
 
2012-05-13 04:55:36 AM

Babwa Wawa: Doesn't an AirPlay receiver require an iPod/Phone/Pad as a sender? Even if there are other senders, ya gotta consider that there's a lot Wifi-enabled senders that might not have airplay capability.


There are senders available for many OSes, including non-Apple mobile devices. For example, PulseAudio -- the default audio system in many linux distros -- is happy to output to AirPlay.

The article is correct when they say that AirPlay is overkill to get an audio stream to a pair of battery-powered speakers. But there are valid uses for AirPlay; it's not just a replacement for a stereo audio cable to a nearby amp.
 
2012-05-13 05:11:21 AM

narkor: In reality 98% of Google's revenue comes from one source - Advertising. Apple and Microsoft have multiple revenue streams. If iPad died and if Office died completely tomorrow, Apple and Microsoft would both have more than 80% of their revenue streams intact.

Google keeps throwing stuff at the wall to find other revenue streams because they know that someone can come along and distrupt their good thing. It's why the other big companies have more than one tentacle in different pies.


I read it's updates of 95% of their revenue. But, well:

Leela: Didn't you have ads in the 20th century?

Fry: Well, sure, but not in our dreams. Only on TV and radio. And in magazines and movies and at ball games and on buses and milk cartons and T-shirts and written in the sky. But not in dreams. No, sir-ee!


Ad revenue isn't some small, risky deal. It's actually a safer, more mature business model than trying to sell new technology, really.

Anyway. When you talk about their "failure," are you saying it's that since they haven't found other large revenue streams, they should stop "throwing shiat at the wall" (trying)?
 
2012-05-13 05:13:04 AM

sendtodave: I read it's updates of 95% of their revenue.


Upwards, I mean.

Matter of fact, just strike that whole sentence, we'll just go with 98%
 
2012-05-13 05:39:24 AM

sendtodave: narkor: In reality 98% of Google's revenue comes from one source - Advertising. Apple and Microsoft have multiple revenue streams. If iPad died and if Office died completely tomorrow, Apple and Microsoft would both have more than 80% of their revenue streams intact.

Google keeps throwing stuff at the wall to find other revenue streams because they know that someone can come along and distrupt their good thing. It's why the other big companies have more than one tentacle in different pies.

I read it's updates of 95% of their revenue. But, well:

Leela: Didn't you have ads in the 20th century?

Fry: Well, sure, but not in our dreams. Only on TV and radio. And in magazines and movies and at ball games and on buses and milk cartons and T-shirts and written in the sky. But not in dreams. No, sir-ee!

Ad revenue isn't some small, risky deal. It's actually a safer, more mature business model than trying to sell new technology, really.

Anyway. When you talk about their "failure," are you saying it's that since they haven't found other large revenue streams, they should stop "throwing shiat at the wall" (trying)?


I could be wrong, but I think he is trying to say that Google is failing because they have no direction. They are throwing stuff out there to try to see if it will work.
 
2012-05-13 07:01:16 AM

sigdiamond2000: cman: Chromebooks, lol


Google has lost their touch. They once shat gold now they shiat feces

I've got a Google TV in one of my spare bedrooms that I bought a year and a half ago that I don't think you can even buy anymore. They haven't released a system update in like 8 months. I think it has one channel that just plays an episode of Mr. Dressup on a continuous loop.


Well at least it isn't Polka Dot Door, the theme would always be in your head. (like right now Sorry!)
 
2012-05-13 07:03:10 AM

styckx: Because they're terrible. Most of these dirt-cheap tablets have excruciatingly slow processors; you tap an icon, and nothing happens for several seconds. Scrolling a Web page can be an unresponsive exercise in frustration. The usability here pales in comparison to what you get from a more mainstream tablet.

Uhh, most high end netbooks can suffer from this.. Especially anything made by Samsung..

Normal practice for buying a Samsung android phone or tablet: (with the exception of the Nexus line)

Make purchase
Go to XDA and get root kit
Root it / Install new ROM
Enjoy your Android phone / Netbook

My Galaxy Tab 10.1 was farking awful with the optimized with a shiat sandwich Samsung loaded on it.


Sounds like the Playbook especially after the last OS Upgrade.
 
2012-05-13 07:42:14 AM
i like my netbook and my small android tablet just fine. Netbooks haven't gone by the wayside, they've been superceded by ultralight notebooks. Lot's of ppl own netbooks, this reviewer is just a computing snob so he acts like that market never existed.

If you buy only Apple products you should be glad there are alternatives because the competition from android and other computing options is driving the price of Apple products down.
If Apple were the only game in town iPads would go for $1000 a pop.
 
2012-05-13 08:01:54 AM

narkor: Google keeps throwing stuff at the wall to find other revenue streams because they know that someone can come along and distrupt their good thing. It's why the other big companies have more than one tentacle in different pies.


You're kidding, right? What about Android? Even if the Internet got sucked into a black hole somehow, rendering their search engine, browser, email system and advertisements useless, they'd still make more than enough just taking their cut from phone sales.
 
2012-05-13 08:26:37 AM
I bought an off-brand e-reader from one of those daily deal sites and almost instantly regretted it. Just needed it to read stuff and whoever made it tried to make it into an iPad ripoff but it barely worked. Have a kindle fire now after my Sony PRS died and couldn't be happier.
 
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