If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Visual.ly)   Five exoplanets that might just be able to support human life. Subby calls dibs on Gliese 667C c   (visual.ly) divider line 167
    More: Spiffy  
•       •       •

10031 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 May 2012 at 7:56 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



167 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-05-12 04:44:28 PM
Wow this would make a great Star Trek serie....oh wait, didn't they try it once and it was all shiatty? Voyager iirc was its name
 
2012-05-12 06:05:40 PM
um
can I call WTF on the tard who made the chart?
the temps reported in degrees kelvin and Fahrenheit do not compute.
 
2012-05-12 07:47:33 PM

namatad: um
can I call WTF on the tard who made the chart?
the temps reported in degrees kelvin and Fahrenheit do not compute.


Probably some Brit. Surprised they didn't estimate the mass of each exoplanet in stones.
 
2012-05-12 07:58:01 PM
Their women won't fark you either, subby.
 
2012-05-12 07:59:17 PM
I call President!
 
2012-05-12 08:00:27 PM
Dang it, now I'm going to have to play Spore.
 
2012-05-12 08:01:09 PM
xanadian: namatad: um
can I call WTF on the tard who made the chart?
the temps reported in degrees kelvin and Fahrenheit do not compute.

Probably some Brit. Surprised they didn't estimate the mass of each exoplanet in stones.


Kelvin is celsius except 0 is absolute 0 instead of the freezing point of H20
 
2012-05-12 08:02:08 PM
Since we don't have warp drive yet I guess it means we'll have to do generational ships
 
2012-05-12 08:02:28 PM
FAIL! Thats only 4. The last one listed was Earf.
 
2012-05-12 08:04:11 PM
Dibs on Metaluna.

\though keep Uncle Scrotor away from me
 
2012-05-12 08:04:15 PM
Silly really. They don't quite have the ability to detect earth-sized planets at earth-sized orbits around sunlike stars, so they announce these not because they're habitable, not because they're typical, but because outsize planets close to starts are easier to see. Ok, there are planets. Show me chlorophyll in a spectrum and I'll be impressed.
 
2012-05-12 08:04:45 PM
An unmanned mission to those systems might be worth while, especially Gliese. Send it out with a solar sail or something similar that constantly accelerates and leave a note for you grand-kids to check back later. It doesn't need to stop there, just send back photos and other information as it fly's through on to the next destination.
 
2012-05-12 08:04:53 PM

namatad: the temps reported in degrees kelvin and Fahrenheit do not compute.


Kepler-22 b is the only incorrect one I see, and just because the fahrenheit is negative; positive would work.
 
2012-05-12 08:05:36 PM
I've heard that Farkers are first in line for 'B'-ark.
 
2012-05-12 08:08:03 PM
Too bad subby, I've already planted my flag, and seeded the land with hot scantily dressed amazonian women at my beck. But feel free to visit, they make a great bbq.
 
2012-05-12 08:08:54 PM
Take my love, take my land

Take me where I cannot stand

I don't care, I'm still free

You can't take the sky from me

Take me out to the black

Tell them I ain't comin' back

Burn the land and boil the sea

You can't take the sky from me

There's no place I can be

Since I found Serenity

But you can't take the sky from me...
 
2012-05-12 08:11:27 PM
This is not Gliese 667C C, this is Gliese 667 C B!
 
2012-05-12 08:13:16 PM

tomWright: information as it fly's through


Oh, my freaking lord, REALLY?

Tell me you're trolling.
 
2012-05-12 08:16:22 PM
Thank God, I cannot wait to get off this planet.
 
2012-05-12 08:18:11 PM

tomWright: An unmanned mission to those systems might be worth while, especially Gliese. Send it out with a solar sail or something similar that constantly accelerates and leave a note for you grand-kids to check back later. It doesn't need to stop there, just send back photos and other information as it fly's through on to the next destination.


Considering that the time it would take for the probe to arrive and send back any telemetry would be longer than the entire history of human civilization thus far, I find it doubtful that we could come up with any sort of "note for you grand-kids" that would be likely to survive that long. And even if it did, it might look to them something like prehistoric cave-paintings look to us, and they might not be able to understand it (or they might not figure out how to read it until after the probe stops transmitting).

I do like the idea of unmanned interplanetary probes, but I think a mission to e.g. Gliese is too ambitious right now. A better starting point would be to get a probe to make it to the Alpha Centauri system--at least in that case there'd hopefully be a few people alive both to see it launch and to see it send back telemetry.
 
2012-05-12 08:18:32 PM

sirgrim: This is not Gliese 667C C, this is Gliese 667 C B!


Nicely played, thank you.
 
2012-05-12 08:18:55 PM
because i can

Alien Planet Full Episode (pops)
 
2012-05-12 08:22:54 PM
Dibs on Urectum.
 
2012-05-12 08:23:54 PM
Are we alone in the universe? Is somebody seriously asking that question? There are HUNDREDS of BILLIONS of stars just in this galaxy. There are as many other galaxies as there are stars in this one, each with just as many stars. And somebody asks if one small speck of dust out of all of that is the only one to have spawned life.
 
2012-05-12 08:26:00 PM
I think it's time I considered glasses. I read that as 'Five eggplants' and was horribly confused and disgusted.
 
2012-05-12 08:27:28 PM
There could be millions of planets, but we'll never get to any of them. Too dumb.
 
2012-05-12 08:28:00 PM

anfrind: tomWright: An unmanned mission to those systems might be worth while, especially Gliese. Send it out with a solar sail or something similar that constantly accelerates and leave a note for you grand-kids to check back later. It doesn't need to stop there, just send back photos and other information as it fly's through on to the next destination.

Considering that the time it would take for the probe to arrive and send back any telemetry would be longer than the entire history of human civilization thus far, I find it doubtful that we could come up with any sort of "note for you grand-kids" that would be likely to survive that long. And even if it did, it might look to them something like prehistoric cave-paintings look to us, and they might not be able to understand it (or they might not figure out how to read it until after the probe stops transmitting).

I do like the idea of unmanned interplanetary probes, but I think a mission to e.g. Gliese is too ambitious right now. A better starting point would be to get a probe to make it to the Alpha Centauri system--at least in that case there'd hopefully be a few people alive both to see it launch and to see it send back telemetry.


Maybe you are right. But sending one out would be relatively cheap, especially if we partnered with others, like Japan, EU, Russia, etc.

But then, a not-uncommon plot point in science fiction is where technology advances faster than travel time. So probes/colonists/soldiers arrive at a destination after a century or more of travel only to meet their descendants that passed them en-route using later, more advance technology.

Who knows? It's worth a try, especially if we can share the cost.
 
2012-05-12 08:29:28 PM

leevis: Are we alone in the universe? Is somebody seriously asking that question? There are HUNDREDS of BILLIONS of stars just in this galaxy. There are as many other galaxies as there are stars in this one, each with just as many stars. And somebody asks if one small speck of dust out of all of that is the only one to have spawned life.


Why not?
 
2012-05-12 08:36:31 PM
In Firefly, they terraformed if a world wasn't quite right PDF
 
2012-05-12 08:37:22 PM
That graphic is goddamn awful. JM.02

The one with a "decent" temperature has an absurd orbital period; like it is some tidally locked swamp around some M class dwarf.
 
2012-05-12 08:43:26 PM

anfrind:
I do like the idea of unmanned interplanetary probes, but I think a mission to e.g. Gliese is too ambitious right now. A better starting point would be to get a probe to make it to the Alpha Centauri system--at least in that case there'd hopefully be a few people alive both to see it launch and to see it send back telemetry.


yeah gliese is probably too much right now. But if you do the science right, the observations will stand the test of time, so for instance, Charles Darwin's study of the cirripedia (barnacles) 1852 is still used today as a reference text and Gray's anatomy published in 1858 is still used today.
 
2012-05-12 08:52:33 PM
Your mom is an exoplanet teeming with life. Suit up.
 
2012-05-12 08:52:35 PM

chewielouie: leevis: Are we alone in the universe? Is somebody seriously asking that question? There are HUNDREDS of BILLIONS of stars just in this galaxy. There are as many other galaxies as there are stars in this one, each with just as many stars. And somebody asks if one small speck of dust out of all of that is the only one to have spawned life.

Why not?


Infinite universe = infinite possibilities

But then I'm an idealist. :)
 
2012-05-12 08:54:09 PM
I don't know, subs, you may just get there and discover Joseph Smith surrounded by his 5 million Lalari wives in plain dress.
 
2012-05-12 08:55:22 PM
I call dibs on Phobos...

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-05-12 08:56:49 PM
Look, I'm sorry. It's not gonna happen. We can barely manage this planet, and we can't even stop ourselves from killing each other, allowing our poor to suffer and die, killing off animal and plant species long before their time, or wasting our natural resources. We're going to die off before we ever have the technology, time, patience, intelligence, wisdom, and brotherhood required to colonize another planet.

It just won't happen with humans. Maybe the species that comes after us will learn from our mistakes, but we're just not equipped to deal with space travel, nor are we mature enough as a species to stop screwing ourselves.

When people stop arguing about "conservative vs liberal", then maybe we'll be a step closer. Right now, we can't do anything without pissing each other off.
 
2012-05-12 09:00:30 PM
The space invader was a nice touch.
 
2012-05-12 09:03:07 PM

Oldiron_79: Take my love, take my land

Take me where I cannot stand

I don't care, I'm still free

You can't take the sky from me

Take me out to the black

Tell them I ain't comin' back

Burn the land and boil the sea

You can't take the sky from me

There's no place I can be

Since I found Serenity

But you can't take the sky from me...


My wife's going to be pissed because now I'm going to have to fire up some Firefly...
 
2012-05-12 09:05:22 PM

leevis: Are we alone in the universe? Is somebody seriously asking that question? There are HUNDREDS of BILLIONS of stars just in this galaxy. There are as many other galaxies as there are stars in this one, each with just as many stars. And somebody asks if one small speck of dust out of all of that is the only one to have spawned life.


Stastically, it does seem unlikely that we could be unique in the Universe but since there is as yet no proof, the question remains unanswered and is worth asking.
 
2012-05-12 09:08:11 PM

ZeroCorpse: Look, I'm sorry. It's not gonna happen. We can barely manage this planet, and we can't even stop ourselves from killing each other, allowing our poor to suffer and die, killing off animal and plant species long before their time, or wasting our natural resources. We're going to die off before we ever have the technology, time, patience, intelligence, wisdom, and brotherhood required to colonize another planet.

It just won't happen with humans. Maybe the species that comes after us will learn from our mistakes, but we're just not equipped to deal with space travel, nor are we mature enough as a species to stop screwing ourselves.

When people stop arguing about "conservative vs liberal", then maybe we'll be a step closer. Right now, we can't do anything without pissing each other off.


Well of course it's not going to happen if you pessimists keep shiatting all over everything.
 
2012-05-12 09:14:30 PM
Gravity, you farkwits.

Look at the size of those exoplanets.

Think about the mass.

Think about trying to merely survive under a constant 3 to 6 G load.
 
2012-05-12 09:15:05 PM

Coelacanth: In Firefly, they terraformed if a world wasn't quite right PDF


Funny your Uncle never mentioned the Bowden's problem.
 
2012-05-12 09:15:38 PM

RoyBatty: sirgrim: This is not Gliese 667C C, this is Gliese 667 C B!

Nicely played, thank you.


Agreed. Well done.

ZeroCorpse: Look, I'm sorry. It's not gonna happen. We can barely manage this planet, and we can't even stop ourselves from killing each other, allowing our poor to suffer and die, killing off animal and plant species long before their time, or wasting our natural resources. We're going to die off before we ever have the technology, time, patience, intelligence, wisdom, and brotherhood required to colonize another planet.

It just won't happen with humans. Maybe the species that comes after us will learn from our mistakes, but we're just not equipped to deal with space travel, nor are we mature enough as a species to stop screwing ourselves.

When people stop arguing about "conservative vs liberal", then maybe we'll be a step closer. Right now, we can't do anything without pissing each other off.


Putting aside the debbie downer aspects of your post, you're dead wrong on all your other assumptions as well. You're a product of the current political environment, and before judging the future, you really should heed your own advice and pay attention to the past.

Every generation that's come before has always believed themselves part of the downswing of Humanity/apocolypse. The Civil War was a time when we were even more sharply divided. People during WWII literally thought the world was coming to an end and had to fight fascism and the destruction of their way of life by a seemingly unstoppable war machine. During the Cold War we were any number of moments from completely destroying ourselves with the flick of a switch.

None of that came to pass.

The dirty little secret that the media and politicians don't want you to know is that we HAVE improved and evolved as a species. We've improved the quality of life for the average citizen around the world compared to 100 years ago, murder rates have gone down, the likelihood of wars and the casualties from them are on a steep downswing.

For every sociopath out there playing with the fire that could destroy humanity, there's thousands of good, honest people you've never heard of working against him trying to prevent that spark of destruction you're so sure will happen from coming to fruition. Billions of dollars are being spent on stem cell research, quantum physics, general purpose research... everything we dreamed of as Science fiction only sixty years ago is slowly coming true (way behind predictions naturally), but we are progressing and evolving as a species.

It's supremely easy to judge the future as lost and beyond hope for all of humanity. You might even get a large percentage of the populace to agree with you. But you'd be wrong. All of you would be. Life, and humanity will progress, and maybe it won't be my grandchildren, or even my great grandchildren that step foot on an alien world, but it will happen, and when it does, you'll look just as foolish as we look on people who swore the world was coming to an end every generation before us.

Things will be OK pumpkin. Trust me. Try and cheer up and enjoy the time we have on this spinning ball of mud trying to help improve it instead of complaining. You'll like your life a lot more.
 
2012-05-12 09:15:48 PM

leevis: Are we alone in the universe? Is somebody seriously asking that question? There are HUNDREDS of BILLIONS of stars just in this galaxy. There are as many other galaxies as there are stars in this one, each with just as many stars. And somebody asks if one small speck of dust out of all of that is the only one to have spawned life.


But where are they?

In this thread people are discussing extra terrestrial travel.

The Milky way contains about 400 billion stars and is about 13 billion years old. Is it reasonable to assume that somehwere in there one of the planets circling one of those stars produced intelligent life?

Earth is only 5 billion years old. So assume that intelligent life beat us by a mere 100 million years and assume that they created a spaceship that could travel at 10X the speed of Voyager 1 (34 year old earth technology). By now, they could have visited every star in the Milky Way at that speed.

So where are they?
 
2012-05-12 09:21:06 PM

Gargoyle: leevis: Are we alone in the universe? Is somebody seriously asking that question? There are HUNDREDS of BILLIONS of stars just in this galaxy. There are as many other galaxies as there are stars in this one, each with just as many stars. And somebody asks if one small speck of dust out of all of that is the only one to have spawned life.

But where are they?

In this thread people are discussing extra terrestrial travel.

The Milky way contains about 400 billion stars and is about 13 billion years old. Is it reasonable to assume that somehwere in there one of the planets circling one of those stars produced intelligent life?

Earth is only 5 billion years old. So assume that intelligent life beat us by a mere 100 million years and assume that they created a spaceship that could travel at 10X the speed of Voyager 1 (34 year old earth technology). By now, they could have visited every star in the Milky Way at that speed.

So where are they?


Not wanting to meet every single species in the galaxy, on the off chance that a species might be filled with psychopathic warmongers?
 
2012-05-12 09:25:58 PM
Nice! Just so happens I'm writing about these. :)

/Camp NaNoWriMo, anyone?
 
2012-05-12 09:32:47 PM

tomWright: anfrind: Considering that the time it would take for the probe to arrive and send back any telemetry would be longer than the entire history of human civilization thus far, I find it doubtful that we could come up with any sort of "note for you grand-kids" that would be likely to survive that long. And even if it did, it might look to them something like prehistoric cave-paintings look to us, and they might not be able to understand it (or they might not figure out how to read it until after the probe stops transmitting).

I do like the idea of unmanned interplanetary probes, but I think a mission to e.g. Gliese is too ambitious right now. A better starting point would be to get a probe to make it to the Alpha Centauri system--at least in that case there'd hopefully be a few people alive both to see it launch and to see it send back telemetry.

Maybe you are right. But sending one out would be relatively cheap, especially if we partnered with others, like Japan, EU, Russia, etc.


There's still a huge political hurdle. Even if it were relatively cheap, no politician would sign off on such a project unless there were a good return on the investment--ideally by the next election cycle, although a few politicians are willing to deal with somewhat longer lead-times. However, we're talking about time-scales that are so huge that it's realistically impossible to even imagine what life will be like on Earth once the probe reports back--anyone alive to receive telemetry from the probe would most likely be as far advanced beyond us as we are from the cro-magnons! The odds that any modern nation would still exist at all are incredibly slim.
 
2012-05-12 09:33:49 PM

anfrind: tomWright: anfrind: Considering that the time it would take for the probe to arrive and send back any telemetry would be longer than the entire history of human civilization thus far, I find it doubtful that we could come up with any sort of "note for you grand-kids" that would be likely to survive that long. And even if it did, it might look to them something like prehistoric cave-paintings look to us, and they might not be able to understand it (or they might not figure out how to read it until after the probe stops transmitting).

I do like the idea of unmanned interplanetary probes, but I think a mission to e.g. Gliese is too ambitious right now. A better starting point would be to get a probe to make it to the Alpha Centauri system--at least in that case there'd hopefully be a few people alive both to see it launch and to see it send back telemetry.

Maybe you are right. But sending one out would be relatively cheap, especially if we partnered with others, like Japan, EU, Russia, etc.

There's still a huge political hurdle. Even if it were relatively cheap, no politician would sign off on such a project unless there were a good return on the investment--ideally by the next election cycle, although a few politicians are willing to deal with somewhat longer lead-times. However, we're talking about time-scales that are so huge that it's realistically impossible to even imagine what life will be like on Earth once the probe reports back--anyone alive to receive telemetry from the probe would most likely be as far advanced beyond us as we are from the cro-magnons! The odds that any modern nation would still exist at all are incredibly slim.


Lets ask Warren Buffet.
 
2012-05-12 09:35:10 PM

Kittypie070: Gravity, you farkwits.

Look at the size of those exoplanets.

Think about the mass.

Think about trying to merely survive under a constant 3 to 6 G load.


we'd all be beefcakes... including the ladyfolk... i dunno about that one
 
2012-05-12 09:35:34 PM

SwiftFox: Silly really. They don't quite have the ability to detect earth-sized planets at earth-sized orbits around sunlike stars, so they announce these not because they're habitable, not because they're typical, but because outsize planets close to starts are easier to see. Ok, there are planets. Show me chlorophyll in a spectrum and I'll be impressed.


Kepler has the ability to detect Earth analogs orbiting G stars; it just hasn't had the time. The discovery protocol requires three consecutive transit observations for confirmation, and Kepler began operations in December 2009, so the next year or so could see some more interesting findings.

Detecting chlorophyll (or some other spectral evidence of life, such as free oxygen) is simple in theory but difficult in practice due to the weakness of the spectral change. Nevertheless, NASA has a couple of proposals to study light reflected by a planet's surface, and the upcoming Venus transit will be used to test a unique method to detect changes caused by light transmitted through a planet's atmosphere.
 
Displayed 50 of 167 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report