If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Illinois State Journal-Register)   Dollar bill received in change has signatures of WWII B17 crew. All I get is "Where's George"   (sj-r.com) divider line 91
    More: Interesting, WWII B17, World War II, Demarco  
•       •       •

11236 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 May 2012 at 12:44 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



91 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-05-09 09:54:50 AM  
Cool tag must have got shot out of the sky and taken prisoner.
 
2012-05-09 10:23:49 AM  
Great story. Thanks for the link subs.
 
2012-05-09 10:25:37 AM  
Why the bill ended up in the cash register is also interesting. Reminds me of something that happened to a friend and me last year, where both of us got 1945 Mercury Dimes in change at two different stores one mile apart. We figure that someone found an old coin collection in a relative's house and just spent it.
 
2012-05-09 10:29:57 AM  
Nice find, subbs.
 
2012-05-09 10:41:23 AM  
Incredible story. Thanks for sharing.
 
2012-05-09 12:03:00 PM  
Very cool story subby, thanks for posting it.

/they only made it 3 missions out of the 25 needed
//it's impossible to comprehend the balls it took to climb into those planes day after day with the odds that much against them
 
2012-05-09 12:35:09 PM  

Recoil Therapy: it's impossible to comprehend the balls it took to climb into those planes day after day with the odds that much against them


I hear you. I've met a number of WWII bomber vets and to hear the accounts of their experiences. Hell, an old man on a crew was all of 25.

Got 39 minutes to kill?
 
2012-05-09 12:50:32 PM  
Steve has three sons at home: Konnor 15, Karter, 13, and Kannon, 8.

24.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-05-09 12:50:44 PM  
I have a $1 bill that my grandfather carried throughout WWII (europe). His rational was that, as long as he carried that $1 bill, he could spend as much of his pay as he wanted and never be broke.

/CSB
 
2012-05-09 12:50:58 PM  
I really find it hard to believe that any paper money issued in 1935 is still in circulation.
 
2012-05-09 12:51:24 PM  

Recoil Therapy: Very cool story subby, thanks for posting it.

/they only made it 3 missions out of the 25 needed
//it's impossible to comprehend the balls it took to climb into those planes day after day with the odds that much against them


My former grandfather-in-law was a bombardier. He wrote a book outlining all their missions and the family had it bound. The amazing thing is how they just got used to it.
 
2012-05-09 12:51:31 PM  
 
2012-05-09 12:55:16 PM  
A few years ago my company had me assigned to a job at a retired Air Force enlisted/officers association. I was invited to their dinner and I was sat at a table full of old WW2 and Korea pilots/crew members. I just pretty much sat there with a big shiat eating grin on my face just listening to their stories. One guy would toss baseballs out of his bomber with anti Hitler messages on them in german. There were even a few Tuskeegee airmen there. Best part was the drunker they got the better the stories were. I dont know if any of them were lies or not but it was one of the best nights I had in a long time.
 
2012-05-09 12:56:49 PM  

FarknGroovn: It's a short snorter


Something tells me that in 70 years, the memes/customs of our day will be much less interesting or historic.
 
2012-05-09 12:57:53 PM  
Very cool find!

I have a WheresGeorge stamp, and it's fun to track where my bills go. I hope you find one of mine, Subby!
 
2012-05-09 12:59:29 PM  

FarknGroovn: It's a short snorter


Indeed. Really cool items. Surprised to see one coming up in these circumstances, most have disappeared or are hanging on a wall somewhere.
 
2012-05-09 01:00:24 PM  
Subby here. Agreed, should have used the cool tag. It was a little dusty in here at the time. I am shocked the bill was still in circulation. Wife is a banker, I'll have to ask her opinion.

/actually lived in Lincoln, IL for 6 months
//NO not in the prison
 
2012-05-09 01:00:54 PM  

Big Man On Campus: I really find it hard to believe that any paper money issued in 1935 is still in circulation.


I received a $100 bill from the 1930s at bank when cashing a check about 4 years ago. 1933 I think
 
2012-05-09 01:01:17 PM  
 
2012-05-09 01:01:53 PM  

Amper: FarknGroovn: It's a short snorter

Something tells me that in 70 years, the memes/customs of our day will be much less interesting or historic.


Gotta be honest. Willing to forego a World War and bomber crews with a life expectancy measured in hours in exchange for less interesting customs.
 
2012-05-09 01:02:51 PM  
I enjoy wheresgeorge.com on a casual basis.
 
2012-05-09 01:03:20 PM  

IamSoSmart_S_M_R_T: [i49.tinypic.com image 400x400]
Episode summary


It wasn't no famous signatures. It had freaking Clark Gable, and the dumbass appraiser couldn't see beyond the value of just the signature to realize it kinda goes up when it's that unique and tied to a World War. That guy is their worst valuation guy.
 
2012-05-09 01:03:22 PM  
Have been fortunate enough to have been around a lot of those b-17 folks when I was a kid. About 15 years ago we had an older guy that served in b-26s during WWII. We use to have lunch together a few times a week and he was at the age where I think he wanted some of his experiences to be known. He never claimed to be a hero or brave.
He finally passed away a few years back and I went to the wake.

RIP Ray...
 
2012-05-09 01:03:27 PM  

IamSoSmart_S_M_R_T: [i49.tinypic.com image 400x400]
Episode summary


$100? fark that guy
 
2012-05-09 01:04:51 PM  
I had a dollar bill that had a bunch of WWII signatures on it, but then I was arrested for trying to use it at a TacoBell...
 
2012-05-09 01:05:31 PM  

SharkTrager: IamSoSmart_S_M_R_T: [i49.tinypic.com image 400x400]
Episode summary

It wasn't no famous signatures. It had freaking Clark Gable, and the dumbass appraiser couldn't see beyond the value of just the signature to realize it kinda goes up when it's that unique and tied to a World War. That guy is their worst valuation guy.


I was talking about the dollar bill in TFA, not the Pawn Stars episode. He's Rick's buddy, so I'm sure the valuations err more towards the Pawn shop side.
 
2012-05-09 01:09:39 PM  
I rather find a B-17 with everyone's signatures on it.


Or maybe a B-17a1:

www.fiddlersgreen.net
 
2012-05-09 01:11:42 PM  
Great story, sad that so many of the WW2 vets are passing away everyday. So much history passes with them.
 
2012-05-09 01:12:52 PM  
if you find a bill that doesn't have "In God we trust" then you have found your self an old bill. In 1955-56 is when they added that. Still the oldest i have gotten in circulation was from the 1970's. The only time I have found older bills is inside books and such. My brother found 125 year old letter to somebodies mother in a book.

the oldest coin i have found in circulation was a penny from 1888.
 
2012-05-09 01:14:53 PM  

Rincewind53: Why the bill ended up in the cash register is also interesting. Reminds me of something that happened to a friend and me last year, where both of us got 1945 Mercury Dimes in change at two different stores one mile apart. We figure that someone found an old coin collection in a relative's house and just spent it.


When I was a kid, I used to have a large collection of coins from around 1900 to 1945. I noticed that my sister (who was around 10 at the time) all of a sudden had a metric shiatload of those plastic vending machine eggs one day. When it finally dawned on me a couple of hours later, I went to check the coins. Pretty much all I had left was pennies.

:|
 
2012-05-09 01:17:02 PM  
Three crew members parachuted to relative safety - Flynn, John Lafferty and the bombardier, Curtis Chapman of Raymond. Chapman, says Flynn, was blown out of the plane by the explosion. He was unconscious as he fell,

Thus the origin of the phrase, "Help the bombardier".
 
2012-05-09 01:19:24 PM  

Rincewind53: Why the bill ended up in the cash register is also interesting. Reminds me of something that happened to a friend and me last year, where both of us got 1945 Mercury Dimes in change at two different stores one mile apart. We figure that someone found an old coin collection in a relative's house and just spent it.


My old roommate's drunken dad used part of his coin collection to feed a parking meter.

My mother-in-law decided to help "clean up" her first husband's coin collection by putting them in rolls and bringing them to the bank.
 
2012-05-09 01:22:03 PM  
Neat! Of course, had to turn off my ad blocker to see the picture... along with a few popups. Not neat.
 
2012-05-09 01:24:50 PM  

Recoil Therapy: Very cool story subby, thanks for posting it.

/they only made it 3 missions out of the 25 needed
//it's impossible to comprehend the balls it took to climb into those planes day after day with the odds that much against them


Well, 2 1/2 if you want to nit pick.

There's a reason why they use teenagers to fight wars.
 
2012-05-09 01:27:10 PM  

Wyro: I have a $1 bill that my grandfather carried throughout WWII (europe). His rational was that, as long as he carried that $1 bill, he could spend as much of his pay as he wanted and never be broke.

/CSB


Did he carry that uncomfortable wad of paper in his ass?

/due respects to your grandfather...
 
2012-05-09 01:27:30 PM  
Big Man On Campus I really find it hard to believe that any paper money issued in 1935 is still in circulation.

As a cashier I'd snag the odd silver certificate-could've been swiped from a Heinold's Link or Happy Bottom Riding Club-type place

The tourist traffic @ Gold & Silver Pawn proves they don't have to lowball ANYBODY, love 2 see them use their Civil War Sables & revolvers the American Pickers in a ThunderDome, But That Ain't Gonna Happen
 
2012-05-09 01:28:15 PM  

ScotterOtter: Recoil Therapy: Very cool story subby, thanks for posting it.

/they only made it 3 missions out of the 25 needed
//it's impossible to comprehend the balls it took to climb into those planes day after day with the odds that much against them

Well, 2 1/2 if you want to nit pick.

There's a reason why they use teenagers to fight wars.


Followup studies done under MKULTRA showed that the children and grandchildren of survivors of all 30 missions had larger than expected lottery winnings compared to the population at large. This started a search for the "luck" gene that is still being carried on today. But you won't hear about it in the media, and even the wikipedia regularly deletes articles written about it.
 
2012-05-09 01:28:43 PM  

Rincewind53: Why the bill ended up in the cash register is also interesting. Reminds me of something that happened to a friend and me last year, where both of us got 1945 Mercury Dimes in change at two different stores one mile apart. We figure that someone found an old coin collection in a relative's house and just spent it.


or some jerk broke into a WWII Vet's house, shot him dead and took off with a few dollars from his jar of change from the war.
 
2012-05-09 01:29:49 PM  

groppet: A few years ago my company had me assigned to a job at a retired Air Force enlisted/officers association. I was invited to their dinner and I was sat at a table full of old WW2 and Korea pilots/crew members. I just pretty much sat there with a big shiat eating grin on my face just listening to their stories. One guy would toss baseballs out of his bomber with anti Hitler messages on them in german. There were even a few Tuskeegee airmen there. Best part was the drunker they got the better the stories were. I dont know if any of them were lies or not but it was one of the best nights I had in a long time.


Awesome.
 
2012-05-09 01:31:55 PM  
This story occurred in my home town of Lincoln, IL. It only took seven years but finally my hometown has made it on FARK.
 
2012-05-09 01:32:05 PM  

puckrock2000: Rincewind53: Why the bill ended up in the cash register is also interesting. Reminds me of something that happened to a friend and me last year, where both of us got 1945 Mercury Dimes in change at two different stores one mile apart. We figure that someone found an old coin collection in a relative's house and just spent it.

My old roommate's drunken dad used part of his coin collection to feed a parking meter.

My mother-in-law decided to help "clean up" her first husband's coin collection by putting them in rolls and bringing them to the bank.


My roomate used them to buy cigarettes and wine. Almost beat her to death with her cat.
 
2012-05-09 01:34:29 PM  
mlkshk.com

TFA page layout reminds me of THIS. I had to hunt for a moment to find the actual content. And I'm all like, "this is a summary which only LINKS to the real page, right?" No, this is it. 3/4 of the page is ads and "suggested links" with a thin river of content text cutting through it.

This better not be a harbinger of layouts to come, that's all I'm sayin'.
 
2012-05-09 01:36:18 PM  

RoyBatty: Three crew members parachuted to relative safety - Flynn, John Lafferty and the bombardier, Curtis Chapman of Raymond. Chapman, says Flynn, was blown out of the plane by the explosion. He was unconscious as he fell,

Thus the origin of the phrase, "Help the bombardier".


I'm the bombardier. I'm all right.

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-05-09 01:37:27 PM  
encrypted-tbn1.google.com
 
2012-05-09 01:38:05 PM  
Oblig for a bomber pilot thread...

www.jokeoverflow.com
 
2012-05-09 01:38:44 PM  

SharkTrager: Recoil Therapy: Very cool story subby, thanks for posting it.

/they only made it 3 missions out of the 25 needed
//it's impossible to comprehend the balls it took to climb into those planes day after day with the odds that much against them

My former grandfather-in-law was a bombardier. He wrote a book outlining all their missions and the family had it bound. The amazing thing is how they just got used to it.


The Bombing of Germany is a PBS documentary about changing American views of bombing. It's available on Netflix streaming. It is fascinating to watch the arc of what America found acceptable behavior from the start of the war to the end of it.
 
2012-05-09 01:39:18 PM  

Rincewind53: Why the bill ended up in the cash register is also interesting. Reminds me of something that happened to a friend and me last year, where both of us got 1945 Mercury Dimes in change at two different stores one mile apart. We figure that someone found an old coin collection in a relative's house and just spent it.


Hopefully it was meant to do that. I think I'd have passed the bill along as a tip to someone if I got it, myself.

/or part of a tip
 
2012-05-09 01:40:00 PM  
Short Snorter dollar bill.
 
2012-05-09 01:42:07 PM  

Rising From Ashes: Big Man On Campus: I really find it hard to believe that any paper money issued in 1935 is still in circulation.

I received a $100 bill from the 1930s at bank when cashing a check about 4 years ago. 1933 I think


Must be tough to work for the Treasury dept where the "obsolete" banknotes and coins are being sent for destruction. I'm pretty sure they don't have any capacity to save historic artifacts.
 
2012-05-09 01:42:22 PM  

Rickenbacker: Subby here. Agreed, should have used the cool tag. It was a little dusty in here at the time. I am shocked the bill was still in circulation. Wife is a banker, I'll have to ask her opinion.

/actually lived in Lincoln, IL for 6 months
//NO not in the prison


I missed this when I added my comment. I grew up in Lincoln; nice find Rickenbacker. Did you happen to know Bill Hollenbeck just wondering because of your handle. Ill be heading back to Lincoln in June for vacation.
 
Displayed 50 of 91 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report