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(Chronicle of Higher Education)   How's that Ph.D. in medieval history workin' out for ya? "I find it horrifying that someone who stands in front of college classes and teaches is on welfare"   (chronicle.com) divider line 485
    More: Dumbass, Ph.D.  
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12815 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 May 2012 at 1:39 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-08 02:23:50 PM
Community college? Really?
 
2012-05-08 02:24:17 PM

jfsimpson: A bigger problem: why is medieval studies taught at a community college? The only thing dumber than teaching medieval studies at a community college is taking it.


Administrators set goals for building their programs. Adding medieval studies to the curriculum accomplishes that. It's empire-building. The problem with empire-building is that it eventually becomes unsustainable to an organization.
 
2012-05-08 02:24:29 PM
At least it wasn't a PhD in Clinical Psychology
 
2012-05-08 02:24:39 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: RexTalionis: Universities really screw adjuncts professors when it comes to compensation. For the amount of work they put in, the university usually pays something like 15-20K with no benefits. It's worse than minimum wage.

It's just an apprenticeship. You get treated like dirty and you dont get pay enough. Then later you have a job for life.

You would think that a person with a PhD in medieval history would recognize that.


Its like starting out in any job. Why is anyone shocked by this?
 
2012-05-08 02:24:41 PM
Getting a PhD is a noble achievement, but it's no guarantee of any financial success. I chose not to pursue that career path in engineering, largely because it's pretty freaking tough to get a tenured, salaried position at a university. The first several years after you've gotten your degree are pretty tough financially, and that's in engineering, a field that gets lots and lots of money for research. I can't imagine there are too many grants outside the science/health/technology fields.

Tough break for her and those like her. But it's the classic disconnect between 'following your dream' and making a living.
 
2012-05-08 02:24:43 PM

Donnchadha: Sure that's just one community college, but it's a systematic trend of not investing in education.


No it is not. The issue is not funding, the issue is WHAT are the states funding. Are we getting value for the money spent?

The current professor, higher education system is basically the same union mentality that crashed the auto industry. The inmates will decide what they do, no outside governance nor oversight allowed. Do we need college professors. Absolutely. Should a tenured college professor never have to set foot in the classroom because of their "research". Absolutely NOT.

Look at the student / professor ratio 50 years ago and now. Certainly more students, but higher staff levels. Since the funding is from student loans nobody seems to care about the spiraling price.

The states are flat out of cash, end of story. They have spent themselves into the pit. Promised pensions, providing all things to all people, bloated governments; the road (which needs to be repaired) is a dead end.
 
2012-05-08 02:24:59 PM

Bob16: Hows that worthless EE or CS degree working out for you.
_________________________________________________

clip - Forget the conventional wisdom. U.S. schools are turning out more capable science and engineering grads than the job market can support

http://www.businessweek.com/smallbiz/content/oct2007/sb20071025_82739 8 .htm

No Shortage of Technical People

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2009-07-08-science-engineer-jobs _ N.htm

clip - information technology has turned into one of the biggest job-growth disappointments of all time.

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/06_39/b4002001.htm


Pretty good. I make six figures, work from home, and set my own hours.
 
2012-05-08 02:25:21 PM

WhyteRaven74: Why on earth do we need so many MBAs? See how that works?


I am not reading many articles about how we need to pay MBA's more.


jfsimpson: A bigger problem: why is medieval studies taught at a community college? The only thing dumber than teaching medieval studies at a community college is taking it.


A lot of colleges still require electives.
 
2012-05-08 02:25:46 PM

ph0rk: If there was no job for the PhD, why did the university grant it or let her into the program?


Ph.D. programs are about advanced research, not job placement.
 
2012-05-08 02:25:51 PM

Somacandra: Remember, unless your job involves some sort of IT you'll never be regarded as worthwhile, at least on Fark.


Oh I don't know. A good stripper is always welcome here too.
 
2012-05-08 02:25:54 PM

TheRedMonkey: The Stealth Hippopotamus: RexTalionis: Universities really screw adjuncts professors when it comes to compensation. For the amount of work they put in, the university usually pays something like 15-20K with no benefits. It's worse than minimum wage.

It's just an apprenticeship. You get treated like dirty and you dont get pay enough. Then later you have a job for life.

You would think that a person with a PhD in medieval history would recognize that.

Its like starting out in any job. Why is anyone shocked by this?


Incorrect - adjuncting is typically an alternate path. You do that for a year or two and tenure track positions are all but unattainable.
 
2012-05-08 02:26:04 PM

Pocket Ninja: There may or may not have been some bad decision-making in this woman's past, but the adjunct system that colleges and universities have rigged in order to secure what is essentially slave labor is a the far bigger problem. It's Wal-Mart level manipulation and exploitation of a workforce but on an even far more insidious level, because those same people trapped in it have actually already had to pay tens of thousands of dollars into it to even earn the most minimal "right" to work.


Oh no its Evil "Big Education" keeping the little guy down.
 
2012-05-08 02:26:21 PM

Felgraf: I'm in nanophysics- specifically, working with my adviser on a method for controlled self-assembly of gold nanoparticles.


Cool. I did nanophysics too, but in a kind of dull backwater subfield that was once more popular but no longer is ... kind of fell into that for complicated reasons.
 
2012-05-08 02:27:27 PM

melopene: ArkAngel: Adjuncts are traditionally brought in from the outside to teach a specific thing or fill a hole left by a retiring professor. You're pretty much expected to have another job, that's why the pay is so little. You are also excused from doing research and most administrative requirements of professors and lecturers.

Not anymore. They are increasingly being used as replacements for full-time, permanent tenure-track faculty.

I'm actually having a back-and-forth with a friend from my PhD program. We both have TT jobs for the fall; I'm graduating this week and he's graduating this summer. It's starting to get a little spirited, because while we're both in public administration, he's from an econ perspective and does budgeting, while I'm from a sociology perspective and do nonprofit work. He's insisting that it's just the market's preferences, while I'm going off about just how inefficient the market actually is.


sociology, as in like critical feminist theory of power dynamics sociology? or more traditional sociology?
because if it is the former, that is the market not giving a shiat about stuff that brings zero value to the table.
 
2012-05-08 02:27:39 PM

kwame: ph0rk: If there was no job for the PhD, why did the university grant it or let her into the program?

Ph.D. programs are about advanced research, not job placement.


No, they're about exploiting the labor of the graduate students. I'm sure she taught plenty of classes for pennies while she was working on her PhD.

Graduate programs present themselves as master/apprentice mentoring programs. That is a lie, although you may have a master/apprentice relationship in one.
 
2012-05-08 02:27:40 PM
Ms. Bruninga-Matteau does not blame Yavapai College for her situation but rather the "systematic defunding of higher education."


Yes, dear, the whole world owes you a living.

Everyone is morally obligated to work in shiatty jobs they hate, producing goods and services that customers will voluntarily pay for, and forego everything else they might have bought with that money or done with their time, just so YOU can be a perpetual student.

They OWE you.

Besides, the "funding" that (by rights) ought to be flowing in your direction doesn't actually cost anyone anything. The money to which you are clearly entitled just falls out of the sky, like in that Skittles commercial.
 
2012-05-08 02:28:37 PM
I have no sympathy for Ph.D.'s in medieval history. CSB:

I took an intro to medieval history class as a gen ed. First test, one of the questions was: (obviously not literally, but not as far off as you might think)

The author of your text believes that the primary cause of cancer in the middle ages was____.
A. smoke from cooking fires
B. a vitamin-poor diet
C. aliens
D. the Illuminati

The very first sentence of the very first chapter of the text was "The primary cause of cancer in the middle ages was aliens." The first lecture in class started with, "The primary cause of cancer in the middle ages was aliens." Easiest question ever, if you were paying the least bit of attention, right?

No, the answer was "The Illuminati". "If you read between the lines of the author's more recent papers (neither assigned, nor mentioned) you'll see that he doesn't actually believe aliens were responsible, but that the Illuminati, psychicly controlling aliens, were ultimately responsible."

Every single farking test was like that. Random things from random unassigned sources that didn't even appear in those sources unless you had tenure, really good weed, and just didn't give a fark. Or things like "King Bob died in 1124" "There is an error in your text. If you had read a paper published the day before your exam, you'd find that Bob actually died shortly before midnight on New Years Eve 1123, but due to the delays in getting news out in the 12th century, the year of his death was misrecorded."

I switched to pass-fail, and took the strategy of avoiding giving answers to which I immediately knew the answer. I got at least a D, which was good enough for me.

So fark you, medieval history Ph.D.'s. fark you all. Everything I know about trolling, I learned from you.
 
2012-05-08 02:29:10 PM

Ambitwistor: A postdoc (or two, or three) has become near-mandatory in a lot of fields.


With no guarantee of a permanent position at the end... I myself am debating now whether to look for a second postdoc or to look for a job outside academia. But where? Dammit I should have done experiment....
 
2012-05-08 02:29:15 PM

kwame: I_Can't_Believe_it's_not_Boutros: So that's why I paid, anyway. I ended up leaving the program to pursue a more lucrative area of teaching, but finishing my diss would have essentially guaranteed me a job.

So you did all that and yet you never followed through?


That is correct. I'm a long, slow, dropout. But I taught enough college classes to know I didn't have the passion for it that I had for my other teaching job. I realized I was killing myself to get a piece of paper that was essentially a license for a job that I no longer wanted. And leaving my part-time job to take a job as an assistant or associate professor would have meant a decrease in income.

I took all the classes--hell, I took twice as much graduate coursework as most PhDs--so I got the education. I took all the tests and such. I just don't get called doctor.
 
2012-05-08 02:29:19 PM

Rapmaster2000: Administrators set goals for building their programs. Adding medieval studies to the curriculum accomplishes that. It's empire-building. The problem with empire-building is that it eventually becomes unsustainable to an organization.


A look over Northern Arizona University's degree requirements shows that a course in medieval studies would satisfy part of the BA/BS requirements. It's a simple attempt to reconcile community college and university requirements, not some big boogeyman conspiracy.
 
2012-05-08 02:29:48 PM

The Muthaship: Cyclometh: Witness that a job at Burger King pays more than teaching.

More people want to teach than want to work at Burger King, so they will do it for less.

I'm all for education. But, education of the kind she has should come after you learn to take care of yourself.


You're all for education as a luxury. That's not how you build a sucessful society- However, it is the perfect way to flush a sucessful one down the drain.

When we as a society say you can't "take care of yourself" by being in education, we essentialy say that education is not valued. If becoming educated is a luxury, it will be treated as one. A less educated America is good for a lot of people, but it's not good for America as a whole.
 
2012-05-08 02:30:47 PM

I_Can't_Believe_it's_not_Boutros: kwame: I_Can't_Believe_it's_not_Boutros: So that's why I paid, anyway. I ended up leaving the program to pursue a more lucrative area of teaching, but finishing my diss would have essentially guaranteed me a job.

So you did all that and yet you never followed through?

That is correct. I'm a long, slow, dropout. But I taught enough college classes to know I didn't have the passion for it that I had for my other teaching job. I realized I was killing myself to get a piece of paper that was essentially a license for a job that I no longer wanted. And leaving my part-time job to take a job as an assistant or associate professor would have meant a decrease in income.

I took all the classes--hell, I took twice as much graduate coursework as most PhDs--so I got the education. I took all the tests and such. I just don't get called doctor.


You don't get called doctor for taking tests or courses.
 
2012-05-08 02:30:50 PM

Ambitwistor: Cool. I did nanophysics too, but in a kind of dull backwater subfield that was once more popular but no longer is ... kind of fell into that for complicated reasons.


ah really? your name implies that you were into strings...

/also doing nano, but not experiment...
 
2012-05-08 02:31:48 PM

junkmetal: Meh, she picked her "bliss" over a useful study or vocation. Follow your bliss after you have a job that can pay for it.


There's a term for something you love to do, from which you cannot earn a living.

It's called a "hobby".

This woman has a hobby. What she needs is a career. She's angry because her hobby can't be her career, and she's determined to make the rest of us pay for it because she believes that she is entitled to have her hobby be her career. But she's not entitled to that. Nobody is.

She evidently knows how to go to school. She should go back to school and learn to do something that pays well enough to support her and her hobby.
 
2012-05-08 02:31:55 PM
When I was little, Momma told me to do what I love. I love smoking weed, watching movies, and playing video games so I practiced every single day until I was the best. I still can't find a job for the life of me though. The assholes that interview me keep asking what I bring to the table for them. For them? The farkers need to be asking what they can do for ME! I put in tons of time and effort and it is time to get paid biatch!

Anyway, I have sadly come to the realization that well-honed skills and dedication to your craft aren't important in this country anymore. It makes me sad.
 
2012-05-08 02:32:16 PM

red5ish: Today's students would be well advised to study medieval history in order to better understand the society the GOP is attempting to create in the United States.


You would be well advised to study anything objective.
 
2012-05-08 02:32:38 PM
there's too much rubbish in these comments to counter, but...

1: i have a phd in greek and latin (see screen name). i've been in the classroom 25 years this year, never been unemployed a day in my life, all of it teaching what i took my degrees in. so that medieval history degree - it too can work for some people.
2: the treatment of adjuncts is similar to the treatment of all workers under corporate capitalism: squeeze the already-lowly ever further down into drones so that others can pocket the difference.
 
2012-05-08 02:33:09 PM
EatHam:

I can't understand why people pay money to get a Ph.D in something like medieval history. Sure, it's interesting, but does eating later in life not occur to these people?

Actually, I wonder why they have to be rewarded with a PhD to show off in order to feel themselves to be "Scholars." Some of the most brilliant and original scholars and thinkers I've read didn't have any kind of degree in the field, if they had much formal education at all. Nietzsche, for example, was a philology professor before quitting to wander Europe reading, thinking and scribbling in his notebooks, and Confucius certainly didn't have an advanced degree in "Confucian Studies."

IMHO a true scholar learns for the sake of learning, whether anybody ever finds out or not. It's nice to be recognized and read but it's hardly necessary. Then too, one might always indulge oneself by such non-remunerative means as, oh, Fark comments.
 
2012-05-08 02:33:43 PM

I_Can't_Believe_it's_not_Boutros: I realized I was killing myself to get a piece of paper that was essentially a license for a job that I no longer wanted.


Good for you for figuring that out before you got buried into a tenured position.
 
2012-05-08 02:34:50 PM

Bob16: clip - Forget the conventional wisdom. U.S. schools are turning out more capable science and engineering grads than the job market can support


Actually the market could support them just fine, the problem is the market is kind of skewed. In part because of some of the attitudes on display in this thread.
 
2012-05-08 02:34:52 PM
I was surprised to see this one piece of rationality buried in the article:

"I had devoted myself to the world of cerebral activity. I had learned a practical skill that was elitist," he says. "Perhaps I should have been learning a skill that the economy supports."

This at least shows awareness ...

Remove the concept of education for a minute, because it has emotional connotations for many people. Just think of it as a sprocket.

You are going to buy a sprocket. It costs time and effort and money to buy it. Some types of sprockets work like investments, and though there's an element of risk, tend to pay off in the long run - they help you get good jobs. Other sprockets would be considered bad investments, even though they may have other values, like being distinct, entertaining, appeasing curiosity, or simply well suited to an individual.

In the sprocket market then, lets label this second group what they are - luxuries. Buying one of these sprockets when you don't have the money to afford it It's just as obvious an example of personal responsibility as running up your credit limit when you have no job.

Does being a luxury mean that no one else but the rich should get one of these luxury sprockets? Of course not. With a good job, with careful management of your priorities, it's possible to have the money and free time to purchase one, if that's a priority. So focus on getting a good job first. You do that so you can do what you want on your own time, thanks to the flexibility money provides, and that can go to the purchase of a luxury sprocket if you want.

When we look to assign blame, and to fix the problem, where do we go? Well, blame the purchaser to start, and to fix it, you could start by denying loans for luxury sprockets, to use our mandatory education system to provide better fiscal understanding, and last, to destroy the pipe dream that everyone gets, deserves, and will thrive with any sprocket of their choice, and that everyone without a sprocket is unhappy, poor, and miserable.

Naturally, these comments make sense when we're talking about sprockets, but mistakenly replace sprockets with 'education' and suddenly we've got some sort of emotional debate. Why is education exempt from the reality?
 
2012-05-08 02:35:20 PM

kwame: Rapmaster2000: Administrators set goals for building their programs. Adding medieval studies to the curriculum accomplishes that. It's empire-building. The problem with empire-building is that it eventually becomes unsustainable to an organization.

A look over Northern Arizona University's degree requirements shows that a course in medieval studies would satisfy part of the BA/BS requirements. It's a simple attempt to reconcile community college and university requirements, not some big boogeyman conspiracy.


Empire-building is not a boogeyman conspiracy. It's a natural human impulse.

The question posed was why was medieval studies added at all at something like the expense of an additional US history course and not "does medieval history satisfy BA/BS requirements."

Furthermore, I never get why a critique of university administrators is seen as an attack on education. You people are weird.
 
2012-05-08 02:35:27 PM

Cyclometh: You're all for education as a luxury.


I really don't. I do think a PhD in Medieval History is a bit indulgent, unless you are in a position to support yourself and your family while you pursue it, and thereafter. If there was a need for it, she'd have a good paying job. That means we have plenty of people tending to our wariness of of the recurrence rat born plagues and such.
 
2012-05-08 02:36:08 PM

Cyclometh: The Muthaship: Cyclometh: When a job slinging burgers and requiring no education pays more than a job in education requiring an advanced degree, you know this country has a problem.

When people respond to this issue by saying that someone should take a job in fast food over working in education, you know this country is done for.

We will reap the benefits of what we value as a society. Since we obviously value fast food over people with degrees in history, it's no surprise to see what a feces-strewn downward spiral this nation is on.

The idea that everyone must go to college (and the increasing pressure that followed to go to grad school, because a bachelor's degree became as valuable as a high school diploma) has created a glut of useless, but well educated people like the chick in the article. There are only so many positions available to do her "dream job", she should have known that. It's a shame she was too stupid to see that she needed something to fall back on. The fact that she continues to pursue it even though she can't provide for herself and her child doing it is testimony to her selfishness. The epidemic of that kind of selfishness is what's leading the downward spiral.

The root of the problem is that we have been on an anti-education kick for decades in this country. What you just said is a perfect example; people who are educated are "selfish",


That isn't what he said. He said pursuing such extended education when you are attempting to support a child is selfish. The amount of jobs designed for someone with a PhD in history is miniscule.

spending time gaining expertise in a field is "stupid",

Gaining expertise in an overcrowded and reducing field (history professors) is stupid. Even more so if you are going into heavy debt because of it.

and being well-educated is "useless".

She could be making more working at Walmart.

While there is some merit to the idea that too many people go into "soft" education instead of training for careers in industry (witness the critical shortage of qualified welders), it's never been the case that getting a post-secondary education was a negative thing.

It's called "overqualified" and it's a reason many workplaces will reject you. If for no other reason, because they know that when something in your field comes along, they have no chance of keeping you there. Add that to many post-secondary grads having thousands of dollars in debt and not having needed job skills and it certainly can be a negative thing.

The real problem is that the people of the US are largely anti-intellectual and anti-education. Witness that a job at Burger King pays more than teaching.

A full time job pays better than a part time job. Go figure. She is only in the classroom for 6 hours a week. If she were, say, a high school history teacher in class teaching for 6 hours a day, her monthly take home pay would be (scaled) $4500 a month. Pretty damn good.
 
2012-05-08 02:36:10 PM
GAT_00:


It's cute how little you know about the world works. And by cute I mean horrifying, when you realize that you think you're a genius and you're explaining the real world to the rest of us, yet you have no actual experience with the world you're telling us about.


Hey! Who told you? That's supposed be my secret!1!
 
2012-05-08 02:36:28 PM

relcec: sociology, as in like critical feminist theory of power dynamics sociology? or more traditional sociology?
because if it is the former, that is the market not giving a shiat about stuff that brings zero value to the table.


My undergrad major was sociology, my master's and PhD are in public administration. I mainly do applied work in the nonprofit sector. Our argument, though, was about this very article and the exploitation of adjunct labor.
 
2012-05-08 02:36:34 PM

RexTalionis: Universities really screw adjuncts professors when it comes to compensation. For the amount of work they put in, the university usually pays something like 15-20K with no benefits. It's worse than minimum wage.


Then get a minimum-wage job and take a step-up. I went through grad school and got a PhD in a subject that I knew would pay (engineering). If I ignored reality, I'd have become a professional astronomer. Or an astronaut -- hell, why not.

I have little sympathy for people who pay no attention to the job market, spend 10 years in school, then sell themselves for whatever pittance they can find, just to have their dream-job -- and then complain about the situation.

If there is not a strong demand for medieval history professors (and there probably never will be), then don't expect to be paid well.
 
2012-05-08 02:36:36 PM
If you're not milking the life blood out of the economy on wallstreet you're not really doing anything with your life.
 
2012-05-08 02:36:51 PM

quietwalker: Just think of it as a sprocket.


Education is not a sprocket. You're not going to be able to simplify it to make a point that easily.

quietwalker: Naturally, these comments make sense when we're talking about sprockets, but mistakenly replace sprockets with 'education' and suddenly we've got some sort of emotional debate. Why is education exempt from the reality?


Because in an effective production, every sprocket is made the same way and take the same amount of time to produce. That's one of about 12 reasons why you can't simplify it that way.
 
2012-05-08 02:36:52 PM

Donnchadha: Argue the merits of a degree in medieval history all you want, but the real issue here is this:

In Arizona last year, Gov. Jan Brewer [...] signed a budget that cut the state's allocation to Yavapai's operating budget from $4.3-million to $900,000

Sure that's just one community college, but it's a systematic trend of not investing in education. This results in all sorts of things such as our students performing worse overall, not being able to compete on the world markets, falling behind other countries in technology and innovation and outsourcing more and more "high level" jobs such as engineering and design not just "grunt work nobody else wants to do". Furthermore, a decrease in state funding for schools means that the schools must raise tuition to meet the lost operating budget, which then puts more burden on students to take out student loans and all the problems that come with that.

What we need is a fundamental shift in thinking in this country -- lets invest in our future. Put more money into schools of all levels. Don't screw over teachers because you think they get the summers off. It's not sexy because we're not competing with somebody towards a specific goal (such as the Moon Race -- go listen to Neil deGrasse Tyson for that one) and that the results will be seen in 20 years, not in 6 months. We need to invest in long term strategies, not short term budget balancing and we need to start doing that yesterday. I promise you that the return on this investment will be greater than anybody can truly measure (which is yet another problem), even if it means a little deficit spending right now.



images.wikia.com

/you a college boy? or somethin?

//now fill it up on #7
 
2012-05-08 02:37:17 PM
We have degrees in midi-evil history and film studies. (Doctorate I assume)

State governments are cutting back, in essence transferring the cost to Federal programs.

Sadly enough college is so expensive and times are tough, students would rather take an extra course in something that will earn them a living and less a well rounded person.

I'm sure the people mentioned in the article are more than competent at what they do. One rule in business, if no one is buying your product, you need to take a look at the product
 
2012-05-08 02:38:00 PM

WhyteRaven74: Why on earth do we need so many MBAs? See how that works?


Sure. If the supply outstrips the demand, then an MBA is just as worthless as that obscure history degree. Did you have a point to make?
 
2012-05-08 02:38:20 PM

Cybernetic: What she needs is a career.


Yes it's all her fault and the schools using adjuncts as cheap labor isn't the problem.

quietwalker: Why is education exempt from the reality?


Walk up to any economist or economics professor and say what you just said. The result will either be a faceplam, laughter or a sprint to the nearest bar.
 
2012-05-08 02:38:32 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: RexTalionis: Universities really screw adjuncts professors when it comes to compensation. For the amount of work they put in, the university usually pays something like 15-20K with no benefits. It's worse than minimum wage.

It's just an apprenticeship. You get treated like dirty and you dont get pay enough. Then later you have a job for life.


Is that before or after the winged monkeys deliver the unicorn to your cloud castle?

/stealth hippopotamus
//obvious fool
 
2012-05-08 02:38:57 PM

Ambitwistor: melopene: I'm actually having a back-and-forth with a friend from my PhD program. We both have TT jobs for the fall; I'm graduating this week and he's graduating this summer.

Must be nice to be in a field that hires fresh PhDs straight into TT positions. A postdoc (or two, or three) has become near-mandatory in a lot of fields.


It's a growing field, and it helps to be coming out of a highly ranked school, yeah.

ArkAngel: I said traditionally. While they may have changed the way they do things at many colleges, the pay scale stays the same. She's getting paid $1800 a course. That's actually reasonably good for a history teacher at a community college. If she had majored in a STEM field or was teaching at a university, she'd be doing better.


Not really. Take a look at the adjunct project's spreadsheet of adjunct pay, and you'll be amazed.
 
2012-05-08 02:38:59 PM

Cythraul: Yes, yes. Certain degrees are worthless in today's culture. I guess having experts around in subjects such as specific historical periods is superfluous. We should get rid of such educational programs. We don't need experts in such fields anyway. No one needs to know what happened during the medieval period. Not important.


A long time ago before the advent of mickey mouse business degrees corporations hired humanities majors for white collar jobs because they had proved they were reasonable smart, and could read and write well. I'm not sure hiring MBA"s for those positions has been any improvement.
 
2012-05-08 02:39:15 PM

Rapmaster2000: The question posed was why was medieval studies added at all at something like the expense of an additional US history course and not "does medieval history satisfy BA/BS requirements."


But that's most likely the reason. That and the availability of faculty who can teach it. Sometimes history courses are offered only because they have faculty support to teach them. Maybe it just happened that there were a few people who could teach that and a shortage of US history people. At adjunct prices, they're not going to fly faculty in, so you add medieval history and continue to give students an education that has practical use.
 
2012-05-08 02:39:24 PM

Doc Daneeka: I'm a postdoc in biomedical research, so I'm really getting a kick, etc.

Getting out of academia as soon as I can.


See, I'm the opposite, I WANT to work in academia but so far have been unable to get anywhere. And yes, I've followed my passion, much to my financial detriment.
 
2012-05-08 02:40:28 PM
funnyfixx.com

What a waste of time! I mean, for someone else that would be an incredible waste of time. It's so bold of you to choose that. It's incredible; you must have been a very very strong person.
 
2012-05-08 02:41:29 PM

kwame:

But that's most likely the reason. That and the availability of faculty who can teach it. Sometimes history courses are offered only because they have faculty support to teach them. Maybe it just happened that there were a few people who could teach that and a shortage of US history people. At adjunct prices, they're not going to fly faculty in, so you add medieval history and continue to give students an education that has practical use.


Cool. I'll accept your reasoning over mine.
 
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