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(Science Daily)   Sunscreen ingredient may increase skin cancer risk. The sun is there   (sciencedaily.com) divider line 39
    More: Ironic, skin cancers, active ingredients, assimilation, protective clothing, epithelial cells, science and technology, ScienceDaily, commercial products  
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2203 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 May 2012 at 6:41 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-07 05:26:39 PM
Ha ha, I avoid sunburns by avoiding the sun and only coming out at night.
 
2012-05-07 05:39:01 PM
Duh. That's why people who use sunscreen end up with skin cancer.
 
2012-05-07 05:39:23 PM

cretinbob: Duh. That's why people who use sunscreen end up with skin cancer.


Exactly. I'm not a vampire, I prefer the term "indoorsey".
 
2012-05-07 06:36:29 PM
FTFA: Cell toxicity studies by Dr. Yinfa Ma, Curators' Teaching Professor of chemistry at Missouri S&T, and his graduate student Qingbo Yang, suggest that when exposed to sunlight, zinc oxide, a common ingredient in sunscreens, undergoes a chemical reaction that may release unstable molecules known as free radicals. Free radicals seek to bond with other molecules, but in the process, they can damage cells or the DNA contained within those cells. This in turn could increase the risk of skin cancer.

Oh crap... Just what we need... Fodder for a whole new line of non-cancer-causing sun care products. More infomercials... They could hire that brown/bronze woman who took her 5-year-old to the tanning bed...
 
2012-05-07 06:45:26 PM
Zinc Oxide could be more properly termed sunblock. The organic molecules in many sunscreens do allow a small amount of UVA and UVB through, which is the basis of the SPF factor. Zinc Oxide pretty much blocks all UVA and UVB.

/This is not really news.
//Concerns about Zinc Oxide has been around for quite awhile.
 
2012-05-07 06:51:11 PM
And exactly how is this relevant to a group of people who rarely leave their mom's basement?

/it's sunscreen, dammit, not lube
 
2012-05-07 07:03:27 PM
Where is Lewis Black, right now?
 
2012-05-07 07:05:58 PM
Cell toxicity studies ... suggest that when exposed to sunlight, zinc oxide, a common ingredient in sunscreens, undergoes a chemical reaction that may release unstable molecules

What someone with unstable molecules might look like:

upload.wikimedia.org

/been a lot of superhero talk lately, so I'm gettin' my geek on
 
Xai
2012-05-07 07:09:31 PM
chance of getting skin cancer from sun exposure:

chance of getting skin cancer from ingredient;


Media sells fear
 
2012-05-07 07:10:41 PM
It's strange. My mother has said that for years. I mean, my generation is supposed to be the "sunscreen generation" and skin cancer rates have gone up steadily over the years. We have GEDs in science, so what do we know.
 
2012-05-07 07:21:02 PM
I use the motor oil intended for high-mileage vehicles, you slather yourself in it, it sticks to your skin better than regular motor oil.
 
2012-05-07 07:22:57 PM

The Shatner Incident: It's strange. My mother has said that for years. I mean, my generation is supposed to be the "sunscreen generation" and skin cancer rates have gone up steadily over the years. We have GEDs in science, so what do we know.


Yes but are the skin cancer rates in the sunscreen generation going up?
 
2012-05-07 07:26:46 PM

The Shatner Incident: It's strange. My mother has said that for years. I mean, my generation is supposed to be the "sunscreen generation" and skin cancer rates have gone up steadily over the years. We have GEDs in science, so what do we know.


Not terribly surprising. I know it's just an anecdote, but having grown up using sunscreen quite a bit I found it damned strange when I ended up with skin cancer at 27 years old.
 
2012-05-07 07:28:30 PM
Funny... Cavemen didn't use sunscreen, whatsoever...
 
2012-05-07 07:40:40 PM
Finally. I thought they were going to forget to do the "sunscreen ingredient may cause skin cancer" story this year.

I've seen the fashion story; "women's bathing suits to have more material this season" already

now we just need the "Thin models out of jobs? New trend in fashion models is to put on weight" story.
 
2012-05-07 07:42:19 PM
"The Kurt Vonnegut Commencement Speech"

Ladies and gentlemen of the class of '97:

Wear sunscreen.

If I could offer you only one tip for the future, sunscreen would be it. The long-term benefits of sunscreen have been proved by scientists, whereas the rest of my advice has no basis more reliable than my own meandering experience. I will dispense this advice now.

Enjoy the power and beauty of your youth. Oh, never mind. You will not understand the power and beauty of your youth until they've faded. But trust me, in 20 years, you'll look back at photos of yourself and recall in a way you can't grasp now how much possibility lay before you and how fabulous you really looked. You are not as fat as you imagine.

Don't worry about the future. Or worry, but know that worrying is as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum. The real troubles in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, the kind that blindside you at 4 pm on some idle Tuesday.

Do one thing every day that scares you.

Sing.

Don't be reckless with other people's hearts. Don't put up with people who are reckless with yours.

Floss.

Don't waste your time on jealousy. Sometimes you're ahead, sometimes you're behind. The race is long and, in the end, it's only with yourself.

Remember compliments you receive. Forget the insults. If you succeed in doing this, tell me how.

Keep your old love letters. Throw away your old bank statements.

Stretch.

Don't feel guilty if you don't know what you want to do with your life. The most interesting people I know didn't know at 22 what they wanted to do with their lives. Some of the most interesting 40-year-olds I know still don't.

Get plenty of calcium. Be kind to your knees. You'll miss them when they're gone.

Maybe you'll marry, maybe you won't. Maybe you'll have children, maybe you won't. Maybe you'll divorce at 40, maybe you'll dance the funky chicken on your 75th wedding anniversary. Whatever you do, don't congratulate yourself too much, or berate yourself either. Your choices are half chance. So are everybody else's. Enjoy your body. Use it every way you can. Don't be afraid of it or of what other people think of it. It's the greatest instrument you'll ever own.

Dance, even if you have nowhere to do it but your living room. Read the directions, even if you don't follow them. Do not read beauty magazines. They will only make you feel ugly.

Get to know your parents. You never know when they'll be gone for good. Be nice to your siblings. They're your best link to your past and the people most likely to stick with you in the future.

Understand that friends come and go, but with a precious few you should hold on. Work hard to bridge the gaps in geography and lifestyle, because the older you get, the more you need the people who knew you when you were young.

Live in New York City once, but leave before it makes you hard. Live in Northern California once, but leave before it makes you soft. Travel.

Accept certain inalienable truths: Prices will rise. Politicians will philander. You, too, will get old. And when you do, you'll fantasize that when you were young, prices were reasonable, politicians were noble, and children respected their elders.

Respect your elders.

Don't expect anyone else to support you. Maybe you have a trust fund. Maybe you'll have a wealthy spouse. But you never know when either one might run out.

Don't mess too much with your hair or by the time you're 40 it will look 85.

Be careful whose advice you buy, but be patient with those who supply it. Advice is a form of nostalgia. Dispensing it is a way of fishing the past from the disposal, wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts and recycling it for more than it's worth. But trust me on the sunscreen.
 
2012-05-07 07:55:00 PM
Nothing to do with Vonnegut, it's this woman:
http://www.lovstrand.com/Quotes/Sunscreen.html
Mary Schimch
 
zez
2012-05-07 07:56:35 PM
Ma studied how human lung cells immersed in a solution containing nano-particles of zinc oxide react when exposed to different types of light over numerous time frames.

Solution, don't breathe your sunscreen and keep your lungs on the inside of your body.

/didn't we have this discussion in the 80's about how sunscreen caused skin cancer?
 
zez
2012-05-07 07:58:31 PM
Ma also found that the longer zinc oxide is exposed to sunlight, the greater the potential damage to human cells.

www.dvdclassicscorner.net
 
2012-05-07 07:59:44 PM

T.rex: Funny... Cavemen didn't use sunscreen, whatsoever...


They also didn't have dermatopathologists.
 
2012-05-07 08:10:29 PM
mimg.ugo.com
 
2012-05-07 08:18:26 PM

zez: Ma studied how human lung cells immersed in a solution containing nano-particles of zinc oxide react when exposed to different types of light over numerous time frames.

Solution, don't breathe your sunscreen and keep your lungs on the inside of your body.

/didn't we have this discussion in the 80's about how sunscreen caused skin cancer?


Yeah, in vitro studies into cancer signaling always translate 100% to what happens physiologically, which is why we're been able to cure cancer through every discovery made in a culture dish.

Thank you media, for not sensationalizing science for the benefit of the ignorant.

/snert
 
2012-05-07 08:50:21 PM
Of course without zinc oxide we'd be without many things we use in our everyday lives as seen in this old educational film. Link pops
 
2012-05-07 08:56:30 PM

Britney Spear's Speculum: T.rex: Funny... Cavemen didn't use sunscreen, whatsoever...

They also didn't have dermatopathologists.


They also usually died after 25-30 years. Perhaps the best solution for people to avoid cancer is to die sooner of something else.
 
2012-05-07 09:23:51 PM
Ha! My Alma Mater, go Miners!
 
2012-05-07 10:17:02 PM
Ma studied how human lung cells immersed in a solution containing nano-particles of zinc oxide react when exposed to different types of light over numerous time frames.

If the sun is shining so brightly that you need sunblock on your lungs I think it may be game over.
 
2012-05-07 10:30:38 PM
is it the zebra cum?
 
2012-05-07 11:13:20 PM

exactly three days: Britney Spear's Speculum: T.rex: Funny... Cavemen didn't use sunscreen, whatsoever...

They also didn't have dermatopathologists.

They also usually died after 25-30 years. Perhaps the best solution for people to avoid cancer is to die sooner of something else.


They didn't usually die at that age. Most who made it that far had more than half their life ahead of them. The low average is skewed by very high infant mortality and the low survivability of trauma.
 
2012-05-07 11:21:58 PM

Nem Wan: exactly three days: Britney Spear's Speculum: T.rex: Funny... Cavemen didn't use sunscreen, whatsoever...

They also didn't have dermatopathologists.

They also usually died after 25-30 years. Perhaps the best solution for people to avoid cancer is to die sooner of something else.

They didn't usually die at that age. Most who made it that far had more than half their life ahead of them. The low average is skewed by very high infant mortality and the low survivability of trauma.


My paleo diet and nonsunscreen wearing self seem to be living pretty well, I think cavemen did a couple of things right. Living naturally being one of them.
 
2012-05-07 11:25:09 PM
gee, funny headline if the article was in The Sun...
 
2012-05-08 12:17:29 AM
28.media.tumblr.com

ZINC!
 
2012-05-08 12:47:22 AM
At first I thought this was going to be about nanoparticles in sunscreen, then I read "zinc oxide" and though, "oh crap", since old-fashioned zinc oxide has been touted as a safer alternative to the newer, nanoparticle-based sunscreens. Then I read that the study involved nanoparticles of zinc oxide.

/I guess I'll stick with my old standby: long pants, long sleeves, and a hat..although that sucks when it gets above 100 F.
 
2012-05-08 01:47:23 AM

Britney Spear's Speculum: The Shatner Incident: It's strange. My mother has said that for years. I mean, my generation is supposed to be the "sunscreen generation" and skin cancer rates have gone up steadily over the years. We have GEDs in science, so what do we know.

Yes but are the skin cancer rates in the sunscreen generation going up?



Yes, they are because the sunscreen generation is also the "tanning bed generation".
 
2012-05-08 07:45:45 AM

Halstread: Nem Wan: exactly three days: Britney Spear's Speculum: T.rex: Funny... Cavemen didn't use sunscreen, whatsoever...

They also didn't have dermatopathologists.

They also usually died after 25-30 years. Perhaps the best solution for people to avoid cancer is to die sooner of something else.

They didn't usually die at that age. Most who made it that far had more than half their life ahead of them. The low average is skewed by very high infant mortality and the low survivability of trauma.

My paleo diet and nonsunscreen wearing self seem to be living pretty well, I think cavemen did a couple of things right. Living naturally being one of them.


If it works for you, good, but modern humans are adapted to eating grains and other crops.
 
2012-05-08 08:30:47 AM

Jlop985: Halstread: Nem Wan: exactly three days: Britney Spear's Speculum: T.rex: Funny... Cavemen didn't use sunscreen, whatsoever...

They also didn't have dermatopathologists.

They also usually died after 25-30 years. Perhaps the best solution for people to avoid cancer is to die sooner of something else.

They didn't usually die at that age. Most who made it that far had more than half their life ahead of them. The low average is skewed by very high infant mortality and the low survivability of trauma.

My paleo diet and nonsunscreen wearing self seem to be living pretty well, I think cavemen did a couple of things right. Living naturally being one of them.

If it works for you, good, but modern humans are adapted to eating grains and other crops.


Modern humans? What is your timetable for that? How long was "ancient man" eating raw meats, fruits and vegetables? Is modern man also equipped to handle preservatives, salts, and added chemicals in our food? Rubbed on our skin?
 
2012-05-08 11:45:24 AM
img23.imageshack.us
 
2012-05-08 02:26:40 PM
Ma's research on zinc oxide's effect on cells is still in the early stages, so he cautions people from drawing conclusions about the safety or dangers of sunscreen based on this preliminary research.


/// Slick how they waited until the next to last paragraph of the article to note this !
 
2012-05-08 04:48:16 PM
FTFA: Cell toxicity studies by Dr. Yinfa Ma, Curators' Teaching Professor of chemistry at Missouri S&T, and his graduate student Qingbo Yang, suggest that when exposed to sunlight, zinc oxide, a common ingredient in sunscreens, undergoes a chemical reaction that may release unstable molecules known as free radicals. Free radicals seek to bond with other molecules, but in the process, they can damage cells or the DNA contained within those cells. This in turn could increase the risk of skin cancer.

Ah, yes, the Missouri University of Science and Technology... our sister campus and engineering college. Where if a woman finds a guy who bathes regularly and doesn't speak Klingon, she's found her husband.

Sex kills. Move to S&T and live forever.
 
2012-05-09 02:43:51 PM
Ah, the usual gem that the fearmongers fail to comment upon:

Ma's research on zinc oxide's effect on cells is still in the early stages, so he cautions people from drawing conclusions about the safety or dangers of sunscreen based on this preliminary research. "More extensive study is still needed," May says. "This is just the first step."

For instance, Ma plans to conduct electron spin resonance tests to see whether zinc oxide truly does generate free radicals, as he suspects. In addition, clinical trials will be needed before any conclusive evidence may be drawn from his studies.


Bacterial studies are your first step, since the Ames test pretty much gives you the Yes/No answer to "does it cause mutation?". Second step is cell culture, but since cell cultures don't 100% mimic biological systems - and the fact that certain cell types lose their inherent features in vitro (liver cells without the proper hormonal and chemical supplements, not to mention the culture substrate, will turn into connective tissue cells) - it's a step above bacteria. I'm not too familiar with lung cell culture uses (I used small-cell lung carcinoma lines for adenocarcinoma research, but not for free radical-type testing), but was curious why lung cells were used for melanoma research when many cell lines are available for epidermal cell-type issues. I know that melanoma spreads fast to the lungs (which is why metastatic forms are so deadly and fast), so it may be my ignorance of the research standards.

Assuming your cell culture pans out (as the researcher commented on) you then get some animal studies going where you take mice and paint the sunscreen on the epidermis, and determine the approximate levels of UV needed to trigger cancer transformation.

In short, a non-news story. Useful to toxicologists and scientists studying free-radical detox systems, but too early to inform the general public, especially given that zinc oxide is pretty much ubiquitous treatment on every ass rash known to man. Granted most people aren't exposing diaper rash to the sun, but you never know.

/Toxicologist
//Cue the PHD "Science News Cycle" cartoon
 
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