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(Discover)   Astronomers find a cluster of galaxies 12.7 *billion* light years away. Seriously, that's Farking amazing   (blogs.discovermagazine.com) divider line 95
    More: Cool, Galaxy groups and clusters, light-years, Subaru Telescope, age of the universe, spectroscopy, redshifts, astronomy, Milky Way Galaxy  
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5079 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 May 2012 at 2:19 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-07 01:30:36 PM  
Those were put there by God to help ancient sailors with 8.2 meter infrared telescopes navigate the oceans.
 
2012-05-07 01:54:07 PM  
It's not that amazing

/they've been there for farking years, absolutely years
 
2012-05-07 01:58:14 PM  
that's just a couple of billion years shy of the beginning of the universe. that's pretty farking cool.
 
2012-05-07 02:26:09 PM  
Bullshiat, they look like streetlights to me.


/pretty cool though
 
2012-05-07 02:30:01 PM  
Fake. How in the hell could we even see them if they were more than 6,000 light years away. Stupid scientists and their inconsistent logic.
 
2012-05-07 02:30:13 PM  
Hold on.. I'll be there in 4.3 Femtoseconds.
 
2012-05-07 02:30:32 PM  
From TFA "[Click to bigbangenate.]"

I love you Phil.
 
2012-05-07 02:33:20 PM  
Does it have supernova?
 
2012-05-07 02:35:30 PM  
wait
what?
that makes those galaxies about 2 billion years old???
WTF!!!
 
2012-05-07 02:44:12 PM  
I ain't even mad, bro.
 
2012-05-07 02:48:24 PM  
The astronomers used the massive 8.2 meter Subaru telescope....

Since this is really all I'm taking away from the article, I need someone to photoshop a bunch of lab coats in an observatory looking at the sky through the tailpipe of a Forester. Please.
 
2012-05-07 02:49:42 PM  

Warrener: Fake. How in the hell could we even see them if they were more than 6,000 light years away. Stupid scientists and their inconsistent logic.


c is a lie.
 
2012-05-07 02:56:08 PM  
So the light from those galaxies started traveling towards us billions of years before our little solar system had even formed, and for all we know those galaxies could have been destroyed by a master race of conquering hyper-intelligent super aliens billions of years ago, and no longer exist.

The universe is awesome. *hits the joint again*
 
2012-05-07 03:04:14 PM  

SirTanon: Hold on.. I'll be there in 4.3 Femtoseconds.


I hate to tell you this man, but they ain't there no more. They've been moving for 12.7 billion years. You may have to correct for that.
 
2012-05-07 03:10:08 PM  
Ah, so now I believe the Universe itself may have started.....(points finger)... over there.
 
2012-05-07 03:10:25 PM  

namatad: wait
what?
that makes those galaxies about 2 billion years old???
WTF!!!


I can't wait till we find stuff older than we think the universe is.

Like what if the big bang was like just a local thing man.... That the universe is so insanely big that "big bangs" are happening all the time, in infinite numbers but at such incredible distances that we can't detect them. dude.... so what would we call our "local" version?
 
2012-05-07 03:10:29 PM  

BigBooper: SirTanon: Hold on.. I'll be there in 4.3 Femtoseconds.

I hate to tell you this man, but they ain't there no more. They've been moving for 12.7 billion years. You may have to correct for that.


They could be coming straight at us! Everyone panic!
 
2012-05-07 03:11:13 PM  

BigBooper: SirTanon: Hold on.. I'll be there in 4.3 Femtoseconds.

I hate to tell you this man, but they ain't there no more. They've been moving for 12.7 billion years. You may have to correct for that.


You mean they aren't where they once were? You mean they might be...right behind me...right now...?
 
2012-05-07 03:16:50 PM  
We are always where we once were
 
2012-05-07 03:20:46 PM  
So *THAT'S* where I put it!

/Thanks guys!
 
2012-05-07 03:24:21 PM  

BigBooper: I can't wait till we find stuff older than we think the universe is.


alas, we can only talk about observable universe.
in theory, the amount of the universe outside that bubble might be VERY large.

size matters

wow this is a fun article
brb
 
2012-05-07 03:29:09 PM  
We're not looking out at older things, we're looking in at younger things.
 
2012-05-07 03:33:18 PM  

BigBooper: namatad: wait
what?
that makes those galaxies about 2 billion years old???
WTF!!!

I can't wait till we find stuff older than we think the universe is.

Like what if the big bang was like just a local thing man.... That the universe is so insanely big that "big bangs" are happening all the time, in infinite numbers but at such incredible distances that we can't detect them. dude.... so what would we call our "local" version?


Or the Big Bang was actually the Big Flash Bang, bright lights and noise but not much else?
 
2012-05-07 03:40:31 PM  
There's hundreds of billions of galaxies out there.

It often seems certain astronomers are perpetually amazed by the same things, over and over.
 
2012-05-07 03:51:05 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: There's hundreds of billions of galaxies out there.

It often seems certain astronomers are perpetually amazed by the same things, over and over.


i1208.photobucket.com
 
2012-05-07 03:54:24 PM  
J. Frank Parnell: It often seems certain astronomers are perpetually amazed by the same things, over and over.

Perhaps because some things simply are perpetually amazing.

Not sure what your point is. Are you implying there should be no passion and fascination in science?
 
2012-05-07 04:06:00 PM  

Evil Kirk vs Bad Ash: We're not looking out at older things, we're looking in at younger things.



ts2.mm.bing.net
 
2012-05-07 04:07:00 PM  

FloydA: BigBooper: SirTanon: Hold on.. I'll be there in 4.3 Femtoseconds.

I hate to tell you this man, but they ain't there no more. They've been moving for 12.7 billion years. You may have to correct for that.

You mean they aren't where they once were? You mean they might be...right behind me...right now...?


brightback.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-05-07 04:27:30 PM  

Nogrhi: FloydA: BigBooper: SirTanon: Hold on.. I'll be there in 4.3 Femtoseconds.

I hate to tell you this man, but they ain't there no more. They've been moving for 12.7 billion years. You may have to correct for that.

You mean they aren't where they once were? You mean they might be...right behind me...right now...?

[brightback.files.wordpress.com image 380x281]



Give em the raspberry
 
2012-05-07 04:43:02 PM  

Goodfella: Nogrhi: FloydA: BigBooper: SirTanon: Hold on.. I'll be there in 4.3 Femtoseconds.

I hate to tell you this man, but they ain't there no more. They've been moving for 12.7 billion years. You may have to correct for that.

You mean they aren't where they once were? You mean they might be...right behind me...right now...?

[brightback.files.wordpress.com image 380x281]


Give em the raspberry


PhTHHhuth!!!
 
2012-05-07 04:47:38 PM  
How many parsecs is that?
 
2012-05-07 04:49:10 PM  
I've read Stephen Hawking's books, I was a Science major in school, and as a hobby I try to keep up on all of the modern science ideas and theories. I still don't understand how this works. I don't understand how the light is just now reaching us. The more I think about it the more confused I get. Maybe I shouldn't be thinking about it in 3 dimensions but I can't help myself.
 
2012-05-07 04:54:41 PM  

SirTanon: Hold on.. I'll be there in 4.3 Femtoseconds.


Femto is 10 to the -15. I think you meant to use peta, which is 10 to the +15.
 
2012-05-07 05:08:24 PM  

Barry McCackiner: I've read Stephen Hawking's books, I was a Science major in school, and as a hobby I try to keep up on all of the modern science ideas and theories. I still don't understand how this works. I don't understand how the light is just now reaching us. The more I think about it the more confused I get. Maybe I shouldn't be thinking about it in 3 dimensions but I can't help myself.


Hey look at me! I can do a humble-brag!
 
2012-05-07 05:09:54 PM  
Billion?

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-05-07 05:10:11 PM  
I like the parting shot on religious folks. LOL
 
2012-05-07 05:10:23 PM  

Warrener: Fake. How in the hell could we even see them if they were more than 6,000 light years away. Stupid scientists and their inconsistent logic.


You are assuming that God could not create the light in-transit during the creation of the universe, and you are also ignoring well-respected research that indicates that the speed of light may be slowing down from an initial velocity of almost infinity.
 
2012-05-07 05:18:06 PM  

Russ1642: SirTanon: Hold on.. I'll be there in 4.3 Femtoseconds.

Femto is 10 to the -15. I think you meant to use peta, which is 10 to the +15.


It's from the first Geek Thread of the day. A new theory of warp drives for FTL travel. From that article "Interestingly enough, there is a limit to how much spacetime can be warped under M-theory. These physicists found that the ultimate warp speed limit is 1032C - or roughly 3.3 trillion trillion light years per second, and would require 1031J of energy. This speed is so fast, you could travel to the edge of the visible universe (14 billion light years) in 4.4 femtoseconds."

So in other words, the only thing we need for near infinite speed is near infinite power!
 
2012-05-07 05:21:00 PM  

Barry McCackiner: I've read Stephen Hawking's books, I was a Science major in school, and as a hobby I try to keep up on all of the modern science ideas and theories. I still don't understand how this works. I don't understand how the light is just now reaching us. The more I think about it the more confused I get. Maybe I shouldn't be thinking about it in 3 dimensions but I can't help myself.


Think of it as flying 74676000000000000000000 miles or through 111252000000000 time zones. Light is just now arriving and is jet-lagged all to Hell. Also, it's luggage is missing.
 
2012-05-07 05:23:32 PM  

BigBooper: Russ1642: SirTanon: Hold on.. I'll be there in 4.3 Femtoseconds.

Femto is 10 to the -15. I think you meant to use peta, which is 10 to the +15.

It's from the first Geek Thread of the day. A new theory of warp drives for FTL travel. From that article "Interestingly enough, there is a limit to how much spacetime can be warped under M-theory. These physicists found that the ultimate warp speed limit is 1032C - or roughly 3.3 trillion trillion light years per second, and would require 1031J of energy. This speed is so fast, you could travel to the edge of the visible universe (14 billion light years) in 4.4 femtoseconds."

So in other words, the only thing we need for near infinite speed is near infinite power!


Time to get some Scottish engineers working on it, then you'll have enough power.
 
2012-05-07 05:23:45 PM  

BigBooper: These physicists found that the ultimate warp speed limit is 1032C - or roughly 3.3 trillion trillion light years per second, and would require 1031J of energy. This speed is so fast, you could travel to the edge of the visible universe (14 billion light years) in 4.4 femtoseconds."


That didn't copy right the first time. Now fixed.
 
2012-05-07 05:27:03 PM  

Barry McCackiner: I've read Stephen Hawking's books, I was a Science major in school, and as a hobby I try to keep up on all of the modern science ideas and theories. I still don't understand how this works. I don't understand how the light is just now reaching us. The more I think about it the more confused I get. Maybe I shouldn't be thinking about it in 3 dimensions but I can't help myself.


Marty you're not thinking 4-dimensionally...

Actually, it confuses the crap out of me too. Big band theory (and observed red Doppler shift) indicates that the universe is expanding. So if this new cluster of galaxies is 12.7 billion light years away, then the light that is just now reaching us did not travel 12.7 light-years to get here. The galaxies were actually closer to the Milky Way when the photons actually left the stars. I get a headache just thinking about it, if I actually saw all the math written down on paper I think me head would go super nova.
 
2012-05-07 05:29:26 PM  

Russ1642: Time to get some Scottish engineers working on it, then you'll have enough power.


Pft. It'll only take one one American.
 
2012-05-07 05:33:21 PM  
BigBooper
It's from the first Geek Thread of the day. A new theory of warp drives for FTL travel. From that article "Interestingly enough, there is a limit to how much spacetime can be warped under M-theory. These physicists found that the ultimate warp speed limit is 1032C - or roughly 3.3 trillion trillion light years per second, and would require 1031J of energy. This speed is so fast, you could travel to the edge of the visible universe (14 billion light years) in 4.4 femtoseconds."

So in other words, the only thing we need for near infinite speed is near infinite power!


1.031kJ is a pittance, unless there are some details from the original article I didn't read.
 
2012-05-07 05:33:43 PM  

BigBooper: BigBooper: These physicists found that the ultimate warp speed limit is 1032C - or roughly 3.3 trillion trillion light years per second, and would require 1031J of energy. This speed is so fast, you could travel to the edge of the visible universe (14 billion light years) in 4.4 femtoseconds."

That didn't copy right the first time. Now fixed.


You mean I can't visit the Restaurant at the End of the Universe for less than the amount of metabolic energy in the cheese burger I would eat there? Damn.
 
2012-05-07 05:35:33 PM  

HanShotFirst: Hey look at me! I can do a humble-brag!


It is not about that I'm hoping someone can explain.

max_pooper: Actually, it confuses the crap out of me too. Big band theory (and observed red Doppler shift) indicates that the universe is expanding. So if this new cluster of galaxies is 12.7 billion light years away, then the light that is just now reaching us did not travel 12.7 light-years to get here. The galaxies were actually closer to the Milky Way when the photons actually left the stars. I get a headache just thinking about it, if I actually saw all the math written down on paper I think me head would go super nova.


Right. I get that we are looking back at the spot of the bang when we do something like that. So if we are looking back at it it seems like the light would have passed this place in space by a long time ago. How did we get "ahead" of it?

I get when they talk about the background microwave radiation too, again it makes sense. The analogy is I stomp down some grass in a field, I go running down the length of the field and then look back at the spot of grass and I see the grass still recovering from the stomp. OK. But the light from ancient galaxies like this implies that I was holding a flashlight at the spot where I stomped the grass, then I ran down the field and turned around and could still see the shine from the flashlight in the spot I used to be. Uhh
 
2012-05-07 05:35:58 PM  

max_pooper: Barry McCackiner: I've read Stephen Hawking's books, I was a Science major in school, and as a hobby I try to keep up on all of the modern science ideas and theories. I still don't understand how this works. I don't understand how the light is just now reaching us. The more I think about it the more confused I get. Maybe I shouldn't be thinking about it in 3 dimensions but I can't help myself.

Marty you're not thinking 4-dimensionally...

Actually, it confuses the crap out of me too. Big band theory (and observed red Doppler shift) indicates that the universe is expanding. So if this new cluster of galaxies is 12.7 billion light years away, then the light that is just now reaching us did not travel 12.7 light-years to get here. The galaxies were actually closer to the Milky Way when the photons actually left the stars. I get a headache just thinking about it, if I actually saw all the math written down on paper I think me head would go super nova.


It's so simple! Anything we don't understand is God's way of testing our faith. Um.... or the devil trying to trick us. But only God is powerful enough to make light that appears more than 6,000 years old, so this one must be a test.

Regardless, your confusion means Jesus rode dinosaurs.
 
2012-05-07 05:38:40 PM  
OK I looked it up and I guess the Universe is 93 Billion light years across according to estimates. That doesn't make sense either. If the Universe started at a single point and it is 14.whatever billion years old then the widest it *should* be is 28 billion light years across and that would be assuming that the matter on the leading edge was traveling at an AVERAGE speed of the speed of light for 14 billion years. Yeargh my brain is exploding.
 
2012-05-07 05:38:41 PM  

Roger_the_Shrubber: Perhaps because some things simply are perpetually amazing.

Not sure what your point is. Are you implying there should be no passion and fascination in science?


Are you still fascinated and amazed by magnetism, like the Insane Clown Posse?

Just saying that old news isn't very exciting, even if it's science related. There is nothing about this 'discovery' that should come as a surprise.
 
2012-05-07 05:40:29 PM  

Barry McCackiner: OK I looked it up and I guess the Universe is 93 Billion light years across according to estimates. That doesn't make sense either. If the Universe started at a single point and it is 14.whatever billion years old then the widest it *should* be is 28 billion light years across and that would be assuming that the matter on the leading edge was traveling at an AVERAGE speed of the speed of light for 14 billion years. Yeargh my brain is exploding.


Now I'm replying to my own posts. This is what I mean about 3 dimensionally. I mean like imagining that the universe is one big giant black box and at that center was the big bang and now the universe is spreading outwards from it like a firework in zero G. I know this isn't the right way to think about it.
 
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