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(Newser)   It's time to end the 60 hour work week. It really doesn't do anybody any good   (newser.com) divider line 146
    More: Interesting, Ford Motor Company, child labor laws  
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6851 clicks; posted to Business » on 06 May 2012 at 3:22 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-06 07:40:20 PM

Fubini: tomWright: Fubini: Why do IT people allow themselves to be classified as exempt? That's an honest question, I don't know. I though that exempt employees were generally those in supervisory positions, or those generally exercising discretion about company activities and policies.

I've met IT people who spend 90% of their time doing grunt work, and yet they're still classified as exempt.

It is written directly in the federal exempt statute. IT workers are one of the few that are specifically targeted.

Why are they specifically targeted? I can't find any explanation on Google. What about their work makes them different?

It sounds like from reading the law, the intent is to exclude employees that perform high level professional functions where there is no nice professional classification (such as an engineering license) to classify them as such. Maybe this made sense 30 years ago, but today you'd be hard pressed to find someone with the title "computer programmer" who exercises any real authority in a company.


Why is anyone targeted? Some people in power thought they could get away with it and got some politicians to go along. I have no evidence for this but from what I was told: IT workers were targeted in the 90's by the big consulting firms and got bills sponsored in Congress to include IT workers in the Exempt Status. Daniel Patrick Moynihan was one of the Senate sponsors of the Senate bill, as most of the big consulting firms were based in NYC. Again, I have no evidence or links, it is just apocryphal.

Someone with better skill at tracking down the source and history of legislation can probably find the actual truth. But why bother? Beating up on nerds has been a U.S. national past-time for decades if not centuries. This time it got enshrined into law.
 
2012-05-06 07:41:29 PM
Work 40, paid for 40.

/hourly FTW
//paid well enough to not care
 
2012-05-06 08:04:03 PM
and if you need more convincing, consider the fact that Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg leaves work at 5:30 everyday

Good for her, but I'm guessing that if she had done this on her way up, she wouldn't be Facebook COO right now.
 
2012-05-06 08:11:02 PM

jjorsett: Good for her, but I'm guessing that if she had done this on her way up, she wouldn't be Facebook COO right now.


I'd expect the powerful position to have more work and responsibility than anything below it. If she's no longer giving it 100%, I don't know why anyone would expect anyone beneath her to do so.
 
2012-05-06 08:26:04 PM
I work 8.5 hours M-Th (7-4, half hour unpaid lunch). On Friday, I leave a few hours early (unless there is an emergency) and I will not stay past 4:00. Most I might work in a week is 42.5 hours.

Of course, I have been working there for six years, and there isn't anybody else in the company that can do I what I do (which is multiple things, so I get thrown around on many different projects) and I don't have time to train people, I can get away with those kinds of things.

Also, I can work from home in emergency situations (like when my wife pulled her back muscle a few days ago).
 
2012-05-06 08:34:59 PM

Donnchadha: You know how I can tell none of you are mothers? 24/7/365 -- no time off and no pay



You need better time management...
I'm a mom, I prefer to work either Sat or Sun so I can take a weekday off when the boys are in school/daycare.
 
2012-05-06 08:47:16 PM
The 'I work 60/70/even80 hours a week is one of the bigger lies told these days.

If you are working 60 hrs/week you are working 5 12 hour days or 6 10 hour days or 7 8+ hour days per week.

If you are working 70 hrs/week you are working 5 14 hour days or 6 11+ hour days or 7 ten hour days.

What bullshiate. No one except possibly those guys in NDak are working those kind of hours.

I won't even bother with the azzhats that claim to work 80 hours per week.
 
2012-05-06 08:49:41 PM
I can't remember the last time I worked more than 40 hours in a week.

/There's overtime available at my job, I just don't want to do it
//It's a soul-sucking gig.
 
2012-05-06 08:57:26 PM
I get paid by the hour....if its good enough for a hooker then its good enough for me.
 
2012-05-06 08:58:20 PM

douchebag/hater: The 'I work 60/70/even80 hours a week is one of the bigger lies told these days.

If you are working 60 hrs/week you are working 5 12 hour days or 6 10 hour days or 7 8+ hour days per week.

If you are working 70 hrs/week you are working 5 14 hour days or 6 11+ hour days or 7 ten hour days.

What bullshiate. No one except possibly those guys in NDak are working those kind of hours.

I won't even bother with the azzhats that claim to work 80 hours per week.


Don't ever become a project manager...
 
2012-05-06 08:59:47 PM

Donnchadha: You know how I can tell none of you are mothers? 24/7/365 -- no time off and no pay


You ever read the blog called "STFU Parents"? I recommend that you do.
 
2012-05-06 09:09:14 PM
What about a 7 days a week, 12 hours a day work week, is that good for your health?
 
Juc
2012-05-06 09:19:53 PM
Reminds me when I worked at a video game company,
During slow times it was nice, 5 days a week 9 hours a day.

During busy times which could last upwards of a year, 5-7 days a week 10-18 hours a day.

I barely remember some stretches when it was like that.

one guy had a stroke.

but it's making games right, so it must be like willy wonka's factory
*twitch*
 
2012-05-06 09:30:32 PM
coffeescholar.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-05-06 09:31:14 PM
Doing "special" engineering, it's feast and famine.

Not one of your customers will get you the spec early. Not one will schedule it in a reasonable period. Every one of them will change the spec constantly, and the changes will be cataclysmic, requiring a scrap and restart, and yet somehow the goal post will stay firmly planted on the delivery date.

Then, because it is what it is, you can only test so much (usually) and you end up at the customer site. While there, you will be eating vending machine or military cafeteria food (not so bad if it's Navy or AF) and for some places sleeping on site, then since 'you're there anyway and you might as well' you end up working 12 hour shifts, 7 days a week, except when you work more.

Of course, the good part is, looks like I get June off. So it's sort of ok, but it does get old.
 
2012-05-06 09:32:35 PM

Corporate Self: Its does some people good.

Corporate profits and cash reserves are actually pretty high at the moment.


Cus they fired the four other guys and scjered you into the 60 ww.
 
2012-05-06 09:41:19 PM
I'm hourly with 1.5x OT. I happen to be one of the last people to come up from the shop floor, and they never reclassified me to Engineering, so I go in at 7 and leave at 3.30. Right now I'm not doing any OT because there isn't anything that urgent to do, plus I'm completely burned out from last winter's 50-60 hour weeks. Of course, they were 5 day weeks, but still pretty grueling.

My Salary CSB: Worked at a place designing stuff out of materials right on the shop floor. Welding, machining, testing, etc. The bosses got all excited to call us all "Engineers" so they made us salaried. No raise, no change in benefits, just "salary." No big deal, we didn't work extra more than occasionally. Then came the day I had this uh, "thing" on my foot. Very painful and finally I couldn't take it anymore and went down to the clinic at lunchtime to have it looked at. The doc breaks out a scalpel, carves the thing out of my foot, has no idea what it is and tells me "stay off it a few days." I went back to work a half hour late from lunch. When I got my check, it was a little short so I went to see HR to find out the deal. They had docked me the extra half hour. "I thought I was salary." says I. "Doesn't mean that I get paid for the week, a set amount, not by the hour?"
"Well," says the HR freak. "It doesn't really work that way. You see, if it did, you could take a whole day off and still get paid for the whole week. Then it's two days, then nobody is coming to work at all, and we are still paying them."
"What does it matter how many hours I am here, if my work gets done?" was my next question.
The response completely firmed up my astonishment, and my resolve to get the fark out of there ASAP.
"Salary is actually based on a 50 hour week, so you really shouldn't be leaving at 5 anyways, you should be staying until 7 so that we get our 50 hours."
From that moment until I left that job, at 8AM I started working, and at 5PM, I left. That just wasn't right. Especially not for a shop floor grunt.
Don't EVEN get me started on working for "Book Time" not in a dealer service bay, but in a restoration shop. Sure, the book says changing the alternator on this car takes an hour, but now add on the fact that it is a concours restored $100K++ goddamn rolling sculpture, and consider how much extra it takes to not scratch the specially plated and date coded bolts.
 
2012-05-06 09:41:35 PM
I'm happy to be down to 60ish hours a week, so I'm really getting a kick...

I get 3-4 Wednesdays a month off. The rest of the month, I'm here at work.

Thursdays are 13 hour days, Fridays and Saturdays are 10 hour days, Sundays are 11 hour days, Mondays are 13 hour days and Tuesdays (and the occasional Wednesdays) are 4 hour days.

But I really don't do anything except yell at people while waving a Spongebob Squarepants bat...

/Yes, I've taken my medication...
 
2012-05-06 09:46:10 PM
am i unamerican for almost never working more than fifty hours a week?

i'm not a filthy socialist, i just kind of think we're also meant to enjoy life a little bit...
 
2012-05-06 10:00:32 PM

Saberus Terras: lokis_mentor: One Bad Apple: Saberus Terras: hej: subby must not be in IT.

^This.

Try working twelve hour shifts for ten days straight.

Know how I can tell you are not a veteran ?

^this

96 hours straight. 18 downtime then 72 hours straight. Wash, rinse and repeat for 18 months.

Well, my coworkers have yet to fark me over like that. I keep a bag packed in the trunk with clothing, food and toiletries for 3 days just in case.


When I lived in SoCal, we called that our standard - earthquake/brushfire/mudslide/riot bag.
 
2012-05-06 10:01:27 PM

Great Janitor: At my previous job, I was up for a promotion. I met with the boss in that department. She first say "This is a salaried position. Is that okay?" I said, "So, if things are slow, I can just go home early and not have to worry about a smaller paycheck that week?"

She said "Actually, no. This position is quite busy, requires at least 45 hours a week, and most employees in this department work more than 60 hours, not counting weekends and time spent on company issued laptops working from home."

I asked, "So, how much time do people work, roughly?"

She answered "Probably 80 to 100 hours a week."

I said, "So basically, I spend my time in this position working, eating and sleeping, with very little time spent with my wife, and in return, I get paid only for the first 40 hours that I work. The other 40 to 60 hours that I work is for free."

She gave me this look, and said "Well...this is a very important position."

I said, "If it really was that important, there would be more people here so you're not having to be so over worked."

She started to say something, and I stood up and said "Look, I'm not going to be a good person for this job. If you're going to pay me a salary based on 40 hours, I am working only 40 hours. You want someone dumb enough to think that working 90 hours and getting paid for 40 is a great deal. I'm not that stupid."

They found someone. I talked to that person one day, telling them that I interviewed for that job and didn't get it. I asked him how many hours he was working. He said on a good week, only 70. I asked how much that position paid, and he told me, bragging about it because he got the job and I did not. I figured it out and found that he wasn't even making minimum wage when figured in the hours he actually worked against his weekly salary.

Salary pay is the best form of corporate slavery around. Pay you a flat pay, work you as many hours as they want, and if you can't work those hours, fire you and find some other dumba ...


It's like I have been saying for the last 10 years. Salary is for suckers.
/Slimy contractor
 
2012-05-06 10:02:33 PM
ZeroCorpse
2012-05-06 05:52:38 PM

"I just turned down a job that required 7 days a week, 12 hours a day, and traveling around the country far from my loved ones. Even though it paid an obscene amount of money, I knew I couldn't do that."

Just curious - for those of us with no family, what was the job you rejected?
 
2012-05-06 10:28:44 PM

douchebag/hater: The 'I work 60/70/even80 hours a week is one of the bigger lies told these days.

If you are working 60 hrs/week you are working 5 12 hour days or 6 10 hour days or 7 8+ hour days per week.

If you are working 70 hrs/week you are working 5 14 hour days or 6 11+ hour days or 7 ten hour days.

What bullshiate. No one except possibly those guys in NDak are working those kind of hours.

I won't even bother with the azzhats that claim to work 80 hours per week.


Oh it happens, GF was managing a place putting in 12hrs a day easily and they abused her so much... for what she put in wasn't worth what she was briniging home in the end.

Many restaurants management positions expect a minimum 60 hour week if not higher...
 
2012-05-06 10:29:25 PM
I work for a consulting engineering firm. My pay is based on a 37.5 hour week. I supervise a dozen people, so I'm in the office by 7am, one hour for lunch and leave at 4:30, 3:30 on Fridays. I'm usually clocking 41.5 hours a week. Overtime is time and a half and starts after 8 hours for a given day.

All the people I supervise are expected to work 37.5 hours a week, but are pretty free to pick their start/end time. Some start/leave early, some prefer to start/end late. Sometimes in order to get work packages out they have to put in extra time, but it's almost always voluntary, and they get time and a half. If anyone works more than 50 hours in a week, I make sure they take an extra day off the next week. I don't allow anyone to work more than 60 hours, unless they are commissioning. As soon as commissioning is complete, I encourage them to take a few days or weeks off.

They can also bank the overtime to take off as they want.

Burnt out workers are a drain on productivity and moral. The company seems to understand this and is pretty good at making sure people keep a reasonable work/life balance.

I've been seconded to other companies that shamed their salaried employees into working long hours. From my observations, they have asses in seats for 12 hours, but they aren't getting any more output than we would get out of our employees in a 7.5 hour day.

/CSB
 
2012-05-06 10:40:11 PM
Last week I had a 26 hour shift followed by an 18 hour shift, so I'm getting a kick.

/Sys. Admin who does Engineer work since the Engineer's an idiot
//At least SA is non-exempt
///Double OT after 12.
 
2012-05-06 10:43:46 PM
Why not link to the actual article instead of this idiotic site?
 
2012-05-06 10:50:47 PM
I dont know about you guys, but 20 hours overtime is good for my pocketbook. I aint afraid of no extra hours.
 
2012-05-06 10:55:43 PM

Donnchadha: lokis_mentor: One Bad Apple: Saberus Terras: hej: subby must not be in IT.

^This.

Try working twelve hour shifts for ten days straight.

Know how I can tell you are not a veteran ?

^this

96 hours straight. 18 downtime then 72 hours straight. Wash, rinse and repeat for 18 months.

You know how I can tell none of you are mothers? 24/7/365 -- no time off and no pay


We're not talking about making a choice to stay home and be a mother full time - an unpaid position, most likely: raising the next generation of chldren, deciding what is best for them, having a degree in autonomy on how you choose to perform that job and for rewards that are more exalted than monetary gain. We're talking about giving your hard work to an external entity that can control you for x-amount of hours in exchange for pay.

If Mr. Quzie could afford for me to stay at home and raise his children I would love to. Alas, we both have debts and bills to pay, so we both need to work outside the home. If I could be a 24/7/365 mom I would, but the reward wouldn't be monetary and I wouldn't expect them to be. I would expect them to be more emotionally fulfilling.
 
2012-05-06 11:00:31 PM

jaylectricity: Then how will Democrats afford to rent property from Republicans?


I'm pretty sure you think that there's a joke in there, but I think it's just that you don't understand voting demographics.
 
2012-05-06 11:04:15 PM
I used to work myself to death for my employer. Then I realized it wasn't doing either of us any good, like TFA says. Now I'll work OT (though I'm salaried and don't get paid for OT) occasionally if there's a good reason, but that's it.
 
2012-05-06 11:04:22 PM

hej: subby must not be in IT.


IT manager here -- if you are IT professionals and regularly work more than 40 hour workweeks, you likely have an idiot for a boss. Your skills are in demand, find a different boss.
 
2012-05-06 11:05:06 PM

lokis_mentor: One Bad Apple: Saberus Terras: hej: subby must not be in IT.

^This.

Try working twelve hour shifts for ten days straight.

Know how I can tell you are not a veteran ?

^this

96 hours straight. 18 downtime then 72 hours straight. Wash, rinse and repeat for 18 months.


Thank you for your service.
 
2012-05-06 11:08:03 PM
It took a while, but I got a few bites -- I'm surprised
 
2012-05-06 11:08:35 PM

tomWright: Fubini: Why do IT people allow themselves to be classified as exempt? That's an honest question, I don't know. I though that exempt employees were generally those in supervisory positions, or those generally exercising discretion about company activities and policies.

I've met IT people who spend 90% of their time doing grunt work, and yet they're still classified as exempt.

It is written directly in the federal exempt statute. IT workers are one of the few that are specifically targeted.


That doesn't mean that your boss can't pay you overtime. It's odd to me that anyone in IT, particularly those with the really rare skills, allow themselves to get treated the way they do.
 
2012-05-06 11:09:22 PM

douchebag/hater: The 'I work 60/70/even80 hours a week is one of the bigger lies told these days.

If you are working 60 hrs/week you are working 5 12 hour days or 6 10 hour days or 7 8+ hour days per week.

If you are working 70 hrs/week you are working 5 14 hour days or 6 11+ hour days or 7 ten hour days.

What bullshiate. No one except possibly those guys in NDak are working those kind of hours.

I won't even bother with the azzhats that claim to work 80 hours per week.


I assume all your experience is in basic minimum wage jobs? Hell I put in a couple 60 hour week as a student at McDonalds. I know a 60 year old woman who used to spend 9 hours in the office each day and at least 4 hours at home each night and 6-10 hours every weekend. She nearly killed herself over a period of 6 months before her boss finally hired some help and her husand made her stop.
This was extreme since basically the entire office staff quit in a couple months and she was the only one left that knew how to do anything.
She was salaried and got paid for 40 hour weeks. she currently has nearly 400 hours in lieu banked that she has to take over the next couple years or she won't get anything from them.

rikkards: It's like I have been saying for the last 10 years. Salary is for suckers.
/Slimy contractor

Salary definitely has a place and can be nice, but it is too often abused by employers. I know some people that over the course of a year will average 40 hour weeks, but each week is highly variable. Since they are on salary they get a constant income rather than not knowing whether they will make a big pile next month or be scaping by.
I would also note that some salaried positions do pay overtime or (like where I used to work) for every hour overtime you work you are entitled to an hour off in the future. I have no problem with these arrangements, though as noted above the latter can get out of hand.
You do have to be careful, but some times you just don't have a choice because salary is standard and you accept it by going into the profession. Doesn't mean you can't disagree with it or fight it, but you have to accept it or change your field.
 
2012-05-06 11:14:35 PM
Work is always there tomorrow. You're a fool (and a tool) to work more than what you're paid for. The occasional emergency/exception is acceptable, if rewarded.
 
2012-05-06 11:17:51 PM

douchebag/hater: The 'I work 60/70/even80 hours a week is one of the bigger lies told these days.


I agree.

If a person claims to work 45-50 hours in a week, that's probably accurate. I figure a claim of 60 means 55, a claim of 70 means 58, and a claim of 80 might equal 60. Or you're lying.

Some people work a lot. A lot of people like to talk.
 
2012-05-06 11:26:47 PM

douchebag/hater: The 'I work 60/70/even80 hours a week is one of the bigger lies told these days.

If you are working 60 hrs/week you are working 5 12 hour days or 6 10 hour days or 7 8+ hour days per week.

If you are working 70 hrs/week you are working 5 14 hour days or 6 11+ hour days or 7 ten hour days.

What bullshiate. No one except possibly those guys in NDak are working those kind of hours.

I won't even bother with the azzhats that claim to work 80 hours per week.


As a former manager with hands-on skills, now contractor, let me explain to you how the 70 hour work week goes in IT:

You're at the office, normal 8-9 hour days, so there's your 40-45 in the office. You're going to be assigned a smart phone, which of course will ping all night. Many IT people, particularly those in small/mid sized shops are unofficially on call, so you have to make time to at least check emails, answer texts, and respond to any system outages. In my personal experience, this would eat up another 30 minutes to an hour a day, including the weekend, so there's another 3.5-7 hours right there. In the current model of IT, very few technical workers in small/mid shops get to just focus on their work without any human interaction. You're going to go to meetings, talk about specs, help your team members, interact with QA, and of course do support on all the stuff that is already deployed. What I've found over and over again is that in most shops if they're lucky half of an IT person's time is spent to new project initiatives. Of course, deadlines are rarely set this way, so most people end up doing a few extra hours here and there at home. After all, with the glories of VPN, your home life isn't sacred anymore. Most people I know do at least an extra 4-8 hours a week remote work.

Hey, look at that, we're at almost 60 hours and we haven't even done anything "unreasonable" yet. Toss in deployments, which if there's a system outage have to be scheduled for slow times (nights/weekends), covering for people on vacation, covering for understaffing (because the IT market is extremely tight, very hard to find good skilled people, unemployment I think was at like 3% or something ridiculous last I checked), and it's very, very easy to push up to 70 hours.

It's very rarely 70 hours in several big shots, it's 40-50 hours in the office, and then the "death of a thousand cuts" from the deluge of information we get from being expected to be constantly plugged in.

/I am much happier as a contractor
 
2012-05-06 11:29:35 PM

Fubini: tomWright: Fubini: Why do IT people allow themselves to be classified as exempt? That's an honest question, I don't know. I though that exempt employees were generally those in supervisory positions, or those generally exercising discretion about company activities and policies.

I've met IT people who spend 90% of their time doing grunt work, and yet they're still classified as exempt.

It is written directly in the federal exempt statute. IT workers are one of the few that are specifically targeted.

Why are they specifically targeted? I can't find any explanation on Google. What about their work makes them different?

It sounds like from reading the law, the intent is to exclude employees that perform high level professional functions where there is no nice professional classification (such as an engineering license) to classify them as such. Maybe this made sense 30 years ago, but today you'd be hard pressed to find someone with the title "computer programmer" who exercises any real authority in a company.


Make sure you are documenting all of your overtime. If there is an overtime request form, fill it out. If you have to submit a timecard (sometimes even exempt employees fill them out) make sure your overtime is captured. Your manager, or payroll (or AP) person can piss and moan about it all they want but no matter, do it. You can tell them it's to make sure your time is accounted for in case you are injured on the job, wherever the job may be. That is a legitimate reason for doing this but it's also to log how much OT you are performing. The BS exemption listing shown used to apply to other pseudo-engineering positions but after the above documentation was done by a large enough number of people, there was a class action lawsuit that overturned the exemption, reclassified the positions and all of the backpay was awarded. So, there is precedent. It's up to you guys. Lawyer up!
 
2012-05-06 11:36:16 PM
As someone working on a Sunday night, I'm getting a kick out of these replies.

But I'm ok with it. My company headquarters is 1,000 miles away and I've worked from home for the past five years. My kids spend the day at home with a nanny and I'm on the other side of the house if needed. I eat lunch with my son every day and when they have a doctors appointment or something comes up, I can take off as needed. As long as I meet deadlines and am in the office when needed, my boss is ok.

I took my daughter to the doctor last week and spent a few mornings hanging out with her while the nanny took my son to his classes. So I'm making it up now, after putting the kids to sleep and spending some time with the wife. Maybe not ideal, but I have no complaints.
 
2012-05-06 11:45:14 PM

douchebag/hater: The 'I work 60/70/even80 hours a week is one of the bigger lies told these days.

If you are working 60 hrs/week you are working 5 12 hour days or 6 10 hour days or 7 8+ hour days per week.

If you are working 70 hrs/week you are working 5 14 hour days or 6 11+ hour days or 7 ten hour days.

What bullshiate. No one except possibly those guys in NDak are working those kind of hours.

I won't even bother with the azzhats that claim to work 80 hours per week.


On my surgery rotation, assuming no on-call nights, a standard expected week was 6a-6p through the workweek, then 6a-noon one weekend day. That's 66, bare minimum. Considering it was normally 0545 to 1815, that's 69.

Call nights? 0600 day 1 to 1200 day 2. That's 30 on its own - call weeks would bump up to 75 easily enough, assuming you got your paperwork done quickly.

Record for me is over 100- three straight nights on, 72 hours on call.

/Med Student
//fark OB/GYN
///fark Surgery
 
2012-05-07 12:27:34 AM

douchebag/hater: The 'I work 60/70/even80 hours a week is one of the bigger lies told these days.

If you are working 60 hrs/week you are working 5 12 hour days or 6 10 hour days or 7 8+ hour days per week.

If you are working 70 hrs/week you are working 5 14 hour days or 6 11+ hour days or 7 ten hour days.

What bullshiate. No one except possibly those guys in NDak are working those kind of hours.

I won't even bother with the azzhats that claim to work 80 hours per week.


When I was in car sales, I worked open to close six days a week, and closing took at least an hour. And that was commission, so I wasn't getting paid for what I did when closing, but it had to be done.

I have a friend who is a former store manager. He told me that he worked at least six days a week, at least 12 hours a day, not counting being on call. He made $80k/year, but the hours he put in to make that money (salary) meant that he had no time with his friends, family, hell, he couldn't even find the time to go to church each week. Something constantly managed to come up preventing him from going.

Me, I'm a business owner. My only day off is Sunday. I don't work just 8 hours a day. If I am home by five that means that I made no money that day. If I get home around 10pm, then it's possible I made money that day. What makes this different than working long hours as a car salesman or as a store manager? Right now I am having to do everything by myself. In less than 10 years I will have enough people working for me that I can basically retire. That means that I can be 45 years old, retired, and have my business running generating a $10k to $50k a month income. If the cost for that means three or five years of long ass hours, I don't care. I won't have that future as a store manager or a salesman or any other employee status.
 
2012-05-07 12:35:15 AM

Saberus Terras: hej: subby must not be in IT.

^This.

Try working twelve hour shifts for ten days straight.


lol. Did you guys also drink from juice bags and take naps at lunch?
 
2012-05-07 12:56:59 AM
I was working 60 hour weeks until I received an email telling me that they were now forbidden. There was no extra pay, but I felt it was the only way to accomplish my goals. My goals are now still being met, just a bit more slowly. Yet still, my company is accomplishing all our objectives. Just slightly more slowly. Our stock has not dropped, and layoffs have not occurred. We're just slowly realizing that our "justifications" for overtime pay benefit ourselves much more than our employers.
 
2012-05-07 01:29:28 AM
I get paid by the hour. It's amazing how a particular assignment changes from "we need this right away" to "can you get it to us sometime tomorrow" once the bosses realize that it's going to cost them extra money.
 
2012-05-07 01:37:35 AM
Screw 60+ hr work weeks. Hell, screw 40 hr work weeks. Life is more than working from dawn until you collapse. 30- 35 hrs a week sounds about right to be productive and still meet goals while maintaining a healthy outside of work balance.
 
2012-05-07 01:44:26 AM

douchebag/hater: The 'I work 60/70/even80 hours a week is one of the bigger lies told these days.

If you are working 60 hrs/week you are working 5 12 hour days or 6 10 hour days or 7 8+ hour days per week.

If you are working 70 hrs/week you are working 5 14 hour days or 6 11+ hour days or 7 ten hour days.

What bullshiate. No one except possibly those guys in NDak are working those kind of hours.

I won't even bother with the azzhats that claim to work 80 hours per week.


I've dolne 80's before in short stretches (once 11 weeks in a row averaging 12 hours a day)

Couldn't do that on a permanent basis.
 
2012-05-07 02:09:33 AM

Corporate Self: Its does some people good.

Corporate profits and cash reserves are actually pretty high at the moment.


The most likely people to work 60+ hours a week are salaried employees, whose pay in general does not increase the more work they do.
 
2012-05-07 02:17:16 AM
We manually fill out a time card and sign it. 8-8-8-8-8 each week. Not sure why. I guess it's because the company endorses lying, for it sure isn't paying overtime to anyone unless something obviously & objectively catastrophic happens involving that person's duties.
 
2012-05-07 02:28:28 AM

Sergeant Grumbles: Great Janitor: Salary pay is the best form of corporate slavery around. Pay you a flat pay, work you as many hours as they want, and if you can't work those hours, fire you and find some other dumbass to take the position. My sister works 80 hours as a store manager for Claires. She's expected to work 80 hours. She only gets salary, no bonuses, no commission, nothing. She is poor. In deep debt, living paycheck to paycheck barely making it. She would get a part time job, but when working 80 hours, there isn't any time to get a part time job. Yeah, Claires owns her.

It's not just that. Try getting two minimum wage jobs. Both will expect you to be available 100% of the time, think nothing of consistent scheduling, and often expect you to stick around after your allotted time because 'things need to get done'. It's criminal.


This.

Or two part time jobs of any kind. One won't pay the bills, yet businesses can't figure out why an employee might take a second.
 
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