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(CBS Dallas/Ft. Worth)   Trying to acquire drugs legally can get you arrested too   (dfw.cbslocal.com) divider line 156
    More: Scary, Dallas County, false imprisonments, Anne Lenhart  
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16236 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 May 2012 at 10:23 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-06 04:14:29 PM  
I'm gonna guess that she has multiple doctors. They probably called her regular doctor who was already in their system instead of the specialist that prescribed her the pain meds.

Not that it makes what they did any more right, but that's my guess as to what happened.
 
2012-05-06 04:17:53 PM  
namegoeshere: This pharmacist should lose his/her license.

And yet, she won't. She didn't do anything illegal or unethical. Maybe unprofessional, but not unethical. She thought she had a forged prescription. Rather than calling the doctor's office and verifying the prescription and patient information, and refusing to fill it until they corrected the prescription, she chose to jump the gun and call the police.

Fired, yes. License lost? That's rather harsh.

Isildur: True. It goes beyond a simple a mistake. You don't call a cop on someone in such a circumstance unless you've double triple checked.

All the more reason for a nation-wide electronic prescribing system to become mandatory for high risk, or high abuse potential drugs. Eliminates the issues with fradulant scripts.

TheMega: Cop needs jailed for felony kidnapping charges and barred from ever being an officer again...

The officer was being told by a medical expert that the script was fake. He doesn't have the training, or the qualification to argue that. It was a legitimate arrest at the time, as their was reasonable suspicion the prescription WAS faked, and that IS a crime.

TheMega: They want to go batshiat crazy with arresting people, do it right and maybe people will start doing their damned jobs correctly

Cops are not Physicians and are not Pharmacists. He was doing his job.

TheMega: /also hope she sues the living hell out of both the police force and CVS

I hope they do sue CVS, I'm pretty sure that the pharmacist didn't follow policy on this one.
 
2012-05-06 04:25:08 PM  
Big tough pigs pickin' on a crippled girl. COWARDS!
(All too typical)
 
2012-05-06 04:27:58 PM  
I'm glad I get my meds from the VA. By mail. (Tramadol)
 
2012-05-06 04:40:04 PM  
What I don't understand is how she was able to call for a refill. There are more than a few narcotics on the market that cannot be called in. The prescription must be printed on security paper, signed in a different color ink, cannot have more than so many doses, and most doctors don't even try to add refills to the original script. Then again, maybe she was in so much pain, she was CONFUSED and the pharmacist was an idiot.

It sounds almost like there is some sort of reward or bonus system in place. Maybe the cops or the higher management pays a bounty.
 
2012-05-06 04:46:05 PM  

cherryl taggart: What I don't understand is how she was able to call for a refill. There are more than a few narcotics on the market that cannot be called in. The prescription must be printed on security paper, signed in a different color ink, cannot have more than so many doses, and most doctors don't even try to add refills to the original script. Then again, maybe she was in so much pain, she was CONFUSED and the pharmacist was an idiot.

It sounds almost like there is some sort of reward or bonus system in place. Maybe the cops or the higher management pays a bounty.


You would think, but it's not. It's just regular old piglover bootlicking. Homeland Security or the DEA or someone probably approached the pharmacist, as they do under the "infraguard" bullshiat guise, and told them they can help stop TURRISTS!! They'll be keeping the nation safe from people in turbans and other brown people if they just report anything out of the ordinary they might see in the customers and patients.

You know, if you hear someone talking about the constitution or their "rights", maybe check up on them a little harder and give us a call if you find anything strange. That way they can make sure the dangerous people are kept tabs on (like yoga instructors) and no brown people can hurt any more white people. Because yoga instructors on Norco help Anwar al-Alaki kill blue eyed, blond, God-Fearing Texas babies! No money needs to be involved, it's just the Stasi on Steriods.
 
2012-05-06 04:58:42 PM  
Anyone who wants to tell CVS how you really feel, should email the last guy on this page. Or is that illegal too?
 
2012-05-06 05:17:21 PM  
All the problematic drug laws have been passed under Republican administrations. The 1973 establishment of DEA (Nixon -R) . The 1984 DEA physician number (Reagan -R), likewise the '86 and '88 Omnibus acts allowing the military for the first time to be used against civilians in enforcement. Surveillance enhancements and property seizures, all this sort of thing. The 2005 pseudophedrine ridiculousness (Bush -R). Republican administrations suck when it comes to War on Drugs, so appears we can blame them, rather than a pharmacist attempting to keep her job and their store's DEA number in a morass of ill-advised laws and regulations.
 
2012-05-06 05:21:51 PM  
Hunter_S_Thompson: Anyone who wants to tell CVS how you really feel, should email the last guy on this page. Or is that illegal too?

You linked personal contact information on FARK which is against the FArQ. I highly recommend you read it so you don't end up getting banned.

http://www.fark.com/farq/posting/#Posting_Rules
 
2012-05-06 06:14:10 PM  
Brother worked for CVS a number of years. The way they treat their employees seems to be spilling unto its customers.
Haven't shopped there since I got to see it for what they are. Next time your in there ask one of the cashiers how they are treated..
 
2012-05-06 06:18:19 PM  

BronyMedic: Hunter_S_Thompson: Anyone who wants to tell CVS how you really feel, should email the last guy on this page. Or is that illegal too?

You linked personal contact information on FARK which is against the FArQ. I highly recommend you read it so you don't end up getting banned.

http://www.fark.com/farq/posting/#Posting_Rules


"Messages containing public OR private information: We are aware that most of this information can be found using Whois, or Google, or a phone book - however, posts containing personal names, contact information such as: email addresses, phone numbers, street addresses, social networking profiles, credit card numbers, etc. are not allowed."

It says nothing about LINKING to such information.
 
2012-05-06 06:31:02 PM  

BronyMedic: namegoeshere: This pharmacist should lose his/her license.

And yet, she won't. She didn't do anything illegal or unethical. Maybe unprofessional, but not unethical. She thought she had a forged prescription. Rather than calling the doctor's office and verifying the prescription and patient information, and refusing to fill it until they corrected the prescription, she chose to jump the gun and call the police.

Fired, yes. License lost? That's rather harsh.


I disagree. I find it completely and totally unethical to accuse a patient of a crime and in fact have that patient arrested for said crime with zero evidence, and after having neglected to do his job. Which was to confirm the DEA number on the scrip. This also caused the patient to suffer unnecessary pain.

License lost is completely appropriate.
 
2012-05-06 06:34:49 PM  

Staffist: I will never fill another prescription with CVS.


I would but my insurance MAKES me use CVS this yr. idk how but im a type 1 diabetic and at wal greens my whole life i had no co pay & now im paying $300 for a month of insulin from CVS. I think that whole chains farked up
 
2012-05-06 06:41:09 PM  
BEST HEALTH CARE IN THE WORLD!
 
2012-05-06 06:51:41 PM  

BronyMedic: namegoeshere: This pharmacist should lose his/her license.

And yet, she won't. She didn't do anything illegal or unethical. Maybe unprofessional, but not unethical. She thought she had a forged prescription. Rather than calling the doctor's office and verifying the prescription and patient information, and refusing to fill it until they corrected the prescription, she chose to jump the gun and call the police.

Fired, yes. License lost? That's rather harsh.



When a person chooses to act unprofessionally by skipping a standard procedure -- with the full knowledge that a) the standard procedures are in place to prevent mistakes, and b) mistakes in such matters can cause unnecessary harm to innocent people -- you bet your ass that being unprofessional in that manner rises (or perhaps more accurately, sinks) to the level of being unethical.

What the pharmacist's gut told him is immaterial. He knows the procedures are there to protect patients, and he chose not to abide by them. Even if she had turned out to indeed be a drug addict, the gamble the pharmacist took would still have been both unprofessional and unethical.

/btw, the pharmacist is a "he", according to TFA.
 
2012-05-06 07:26:47 PM  

Lsherm: If, God forbid, you have to get prescriptions that aren't covered by your insurance (or you don't have insurance) - Walmart is always cheaper, sometimes by up to 25% in my experience if the drug in question has gone generic.

Just FYI - no reason to spend money you don't have to.



If you have a Costco membership, it can get better even if you have insurance. A prescription that is $15 at Smith's AFTER insurance is $6.20 at Costco without insurance. 6 months and the Costco membership pays for itself with enough left over for a polish dog combo.
 
2012-05-06 07:34:36 PM  

krackpipe: All the problematic drug laws have been passed under Republican administrations. The 1973 establishment of DEA (Nixon -R) . The 1984 DEA physician number (Reagan -R), likewise the '86 and '88 Omnibus acts allowing the military for the first time to be used against civilians in enforcement. Surveillance enhancements and property seizures, all this sort of thing. The 2005 pseudophedrine ridiculousness (Bush -R). Republican administrations suck when it comes to War on Drugs, so appears we can blame them, rather than a pharmacist attempting to keep her job and their store's DEA number in a morass of ill-advised laws and regulations.


Wow.

Don't forget about the Marihuana Tax Act or the Harrison Act, both of which are the parents of the modern day war on drugs and both were signed by DEMOCRATS. Bill Clinton LOVED the war on drugs and was happy to expand it. Obama is no slouch either, raiding more marijuana clinics in his first term then GWB did in both of his.
 
2012-05-06 07:46:48 PM  

pedrop357: krackpipe: All the problematic drug laws have been passed under Republican administrations. The 1973 establishment of DEA (Nixon -R) . The 1984 DEA physician number (Reagan -R), likewise the '86 and '88 Omnibus acts allowing the military for the first time to be used against civilians in enforcement. Surveillance enhancements and property seizures, all this sort of thing. The 2005 pseudophedrine ridiculousness (Bush -R). Republican administrations suck when it comes to War on Drugs, so appears we can blame them, rather than a pharmacist attempting to keep her job and their store's DEA number in a morass of ill-advised laws and regulations.

Wow.

Don't forget about the Marihuana Tax Act or the Harrison Act, both of which are the parents of the modern day war on drugs and both were signed by DEMOCRATS. Bill Clinton LOVED the war on drugs and was happy to expand it. Obama is no slouch either, raiding more marijuana clinics in his first term then GWB did in both of his.


Bush and Obama raided clinics?

/for your own peace of mind, don't even attempt to answer that as if it was not a rhetorical question meant to highlight how ridiculous your implication was
 
2012-05-06 07:58:41 PM  

thamike: Bush and Obama raided clinics?

/for your own peace of mind, don't even attempt to answer that as if it was not a rhetorical question meant to highlight how ridiculous your implication was


Ass. Nice change of subject. I guess it's implied that they have presided over an administration that did. It's fairly common for people to say the president did it even though it's really his administration. May not be accurate, but it happens.
 
2012-05-06 08:03:51 PM  

pedrop357: May not be accurate,


It may not be.

Nice change of subject.

Which one raided more of the clinics again and how many times, Cap'n Stick To The Topic?
 
2012-05-06 08:31:58 PM  

ROBOTwHUM4NHAIR: Staffist: I will never fill another prescription with CVS.

I would but my insurance MAKES me use CVS this yr. idk how but im a type 1 diabetic and at wal greens my whole life i had no co pay & now im paying $300 for a month of insulin from CVS. I think that whole chains farked up


HOW is the chain farked up?
Your insurance changed and your costs changed. How is this CVS fault, problem or anything ??
LOL
 
2012-05-06 08:37:17 PM  
I avoid CVS because they're the most expensive and awful pharmacy where I live,plus the local pharmacies offer free delivery/very cheap copays and they're compound pharmacies.
 
2012-05-06 08:43:18 PM  

namatad: ROBOTwHUM4NHAIR: Staffist: I will never fill another prescription with CVS.

I would but my insurance MAKES me use CVS this yr. idk how but im a type 1 diabetic and at wal greens my whole life i had no co pay & now im paying $300 for a month of insulin from CVS. I think that whole chains farked up

HOW is the chain farked up?
Your insurance changed and your costs changed. How is this CVS fault, problem or anything ??
LOL


Insurance didnt change, still the same coverage they just couldnt reach an agreement with walgreens
 
2012-05-06 09:13:12 PM  

DontMakeMeComeBackThere: LarryDan43: Well we believe that you have forged your pain pill prescription and we are calling your doctor now. But I've worked with this pharmacist a number of times and he's never made a mistake,

Overzealous pharmacist.

No, lie by the cop in order to get a confession. Police do this ALL the time - claim they have proof of your guilt. Lots of the time (when the person is guilty) this works.

(for the impending cop haters): It's legal, I don't have a problem with it, and NO, it does not cause innocent people to confess.


Actually, when used on people like mongoloids, or schizophrenics, or children, it DOES produce false confessions. It's a much more troubling tactic than you think, with real risk of being abused by incompetent or crooked cops.
 
2012-05-06 09:13:51 PM  

BronyMedic: namegoeshere: This pharmacist should lose his/her license.

And yet, she won't. She didn't do anything illegal or unethical. Maybe unprofessional, but not unethical. She thought she had a forged prescription. Rather than calling the doctor's office and verifying the prescription and patient information, and refusing to fill it until they corrected the prescription, she chose to jump the gun and call the police.

Fired, yes. License lost? That's rather harsh.


"Harsh" is getting arrested for trying to get a refill on a legitimate Rx while in severe pain, in a brace and toting an IV. Losing your pharmacist license for creating this harshness by not following established procedures is, in my opinion, most appropriate.
 
2012-05-06 10:07:04 PM  

forgotmydamnusername: DontMakeMeComeBackThere: LarryDan43: Well we believe that you have forged your pain pill prescription and we are calling your doctor now. But I've worked with this pharmacist a number of times and he's never made a mistake,

Overzealous pharmacist.

No, lie by the cop in order to get a confession. Police do this ALL the time - claim they have proof of your guilt. Lots of the time (when the person is guilty) this works.

(for the impending cop haters): It's legal, I don't have a problem with it, and NO, it does not cause innocent people to confess.

Actually, when used on people like mongoloids, or schizophrenics, or children, it DOES produce false confessions. It's a much more troubling tactic than you think, with real risk of being abused by incompetent or crooked cops.


Mongoloid? Which definition?

From dictionary.com...

Mon·gol·oid (mngg-loid, mn-)
adj.
1. Anthropology Of or being a major human racial classification traditionally distinguished by physical characteristics such as yellowish-brown skin pigmentation, straight black hair, dark eyes with pronounced epicanthic folds, and prominent cheekbones and including peoples indigenous to central and eastern Asia. See Usage Note at race1.
2. Characteristic of or resembling a Mongol.
3. also mongoloid Offensive Of or relating to Down syndrome.
 
2012-05-06 10:41:01 PM  

cherryl taggart: What I don't understand is how she was able to call for a refill. There are more than a few narcotics on the market that cannot be called in. The prescription must be printed on security paper, signed in a different color ink, cannot have more than so many doses, and most doctors don't even try to add refills to the original script. Then again, maybe she was in so much pain, she was CONFUSED and the pharmacist was an idiot.

It sounds almost like there is some sort of reward or bonus system in place. Maybe the cops or the higher management pays a bounty.


Norco is not in that category. It's essentially the same thing as Vicodin. My vicodin Rx is written on a regular prescription pad and came with a refill. Same for my husband's Norco.

It says she called in a refill, that means the same CVS location filled the original prescription. Did they verify it when they first filled it? What made the pharmacist question the refill?

I'm sure CVS has some very specific policies on verifying prescriptions and reporting fraudulent prescriptions to the police. I'd be surprised if the pharmacist isn't required to get approval from higher up. There's usually a regional pharmacist manager; I would think that person would have to be contacted, if not the corporate office. Did this pharmacist follow proper company procedure? I'm guessing not.
 
2012-05-06 10:42:52 PM  

Phins: I'm sure CVS has some very specific policies on verifying prescriptions and reporting fraudulent prescriptions to the police. I'd be surprised if the pharmacist isn't required to get approval from higher up. There's usually a regional pharmacist manager; I would think that person would have to be contacted, if not the corporate office. Did this pharmacist follow proper company procedure? I'm guessing not.


The CVS in my area filled prescriptions from a woman who called in pretending she worked at a doctors office,all the prescriptions were for narcotics. They're not that bright.
 
2012-05-06 10:51:22 PM  

cman: Staffist: I will never fill another prescription with CVS.

One pharmacist screwed up so you are gonna boycott the whole chain? Either you are a)subby trying to get more clicks for his link, b)high off of sniffing glue, C:\>, or d)trollin


I stopped getting my prescriptions filled at CVS because they're morans. There was always a problem and they apparently put the dumbest employees at the pharmacy counter. They're incapable of understanding the simplest thing, so it was a struggle to get the problem corrected. And since "always a problem" was their SOP, there was always a long slow line.

I switched to Target and they're awesome. They have actual licensed pharmacy techs, which means people with brains and pharmacy training are waiting on you. When the insurance company denied coverage for a prescription, the pharmacy tech figured out the problem and told me to ask my doctor to write the prescription in a different way. Once I did that, it went through with no problem. They remember my name and I recently got a call telling me that a generic had just come out (two days earlier) for one of my meds and asking if I wanted to switch.

/Target plug now over.
 
2012-05-06 11:01:43 PM  
fredklein: BronyMedic: Hunter_S_Thompson: Anyone who wants to tell CVS how you really feel, should email the last guy on this page. Or is that illegal too?

You linked personal contact information on FARK which is against the FArQ. I highly recommend you read it so you don't end up getting banned.

http://www.fark.com/farq/posting/#Posting_Rules

"Messages containing public OR private information: We are aware that most of this information can be found using Whois, or Google, or a phone book - however, posts containing personal names, contact information such as: email addresses, phone numbers, street addresses, social networking profiles, credit card numbers, etc. are not allowed."

It says nothing about LINKING to such information.


Uh, Fredklein? Before you white knight, you might want to know something....

They deleted the post he made because he put direct contact information to a local corporate guy on FARK, and told people to email him their hate. He didn't link to it. He did exactly what was prohibited in the FArQ.
 
2012-05-06 11:19:02 PM  

Isildur: It sounds like the pharmacist had some sort of ongoing relationship or arrangement with that particular officer, feeding him arrests, judging by what the cop said.


You start wondering about that. I'm on a Schedule II medication. The prescription got farked up a few times. Once it was on the wrong form, no DEA number, the pharmacy was suspicious, but just told me to call the doctor.
 
2012-05-06 11:46:37 PM  
fark CVS, I'd be going after the cop who arrested her, the booking officer who booked her in and every damn officer she had contact with on her night in jail!

What kind of morons do they have working at the Dallas PD anyway? The woman is on crutches, has a brace on her leg and has a damn IV hanging out of her. You mean to tell me not one of those officers looked at her condition, scratched their head and thought "Gee, I wonder if there's been some kind of misunderstanding here?"

farking cops are supposed to investigate crimes before they make an arrest!
 
2012-05-07 12:16:34 AM  
I've had nine kinds of problems with CVS from being hung up on and not getting my birth control pills to being told that my IBS meds weren't in the system because the farking pharmacist couldn't read right! With the last one I marched back in there (in a full length, train and all 14th century gown because I needed that Rx, man!) and slammed the bottle down on the cabinet in front of her and said, "THIS! Suggests otherwise to you saying there are no refills for this prescription!" I've also had problems with them not getting faxes from the other CVS across town... because the one across town was all "It'll be here Tuesday." (I was from out of town) I was like, "You... You can't see if the other CVS has it?!" "We didn't think of that." And then my FAVOURITE was when I called a refill for my birth control pills, went to pick it up, and they were all "Well, we put them back on the shelf after two weeks." ... I started screaming because I'd just called it in two hours earlier! I'm slowly moving to Walgreens. D= Oh and I switched to CVS? Because Wal Mart was incompetent. But at least at Wal Mart my thyroid pills are 4 bucks instead of 15 like they are at CVS.
 
2012-05-07 12:18:21 AM  

snocone: quoinguy: Fark CVS and Walgreen's. Those mega pharmacies are a total pain in the ass with complicated prescriptions.

My wife needed high doses of Oxy for back issues for a few years (80mg a day). When we started off at a big place they were constantly confused, never had it in stock, and acted like we were trying to get Hitler's brain wrapped in UFO secrets out of Fort Knox.

We went to a small local pharmacy and never had a problem getting it because they knew who we were and really looked out for us, since such an unusual medicine was a special order for them. They actually cared that a single missed dose would put my wife in the hospital for withdrawal.

Their care even extended to harassing the drug company for a missed delivery to the point the VP of sales got on a plane and hand-delivered the medicine. The pharmacy made it clear they would help us sue them if my wife missed a dose. I seriously doubt CVS or Walgreen's would even give a shiat.

Currently going to Costco. Amazingly, they have some decent employees behind the counter where I spend $20K a year.
CVS and Walgreens seemed to feel $20K was not enough to actually provide anything but predatory "service".


If you can possibly get any service out of Costco, it's almost always in your best interest to do so. They're one of the last great employee-loving retail companies left in the US. (Maybe the world?) In the five years I've lived here, nearly every employee I see now is someone I remember from back then - and the guy who is the manager I remember checking out my items when I started. Otherwise, I buy everything I can from a grocery store based in my hometown, because hey, hometown pride, even if I never actually want to go back.

Target loves to give a lot of cultish lip service to the idea that they care about their team, but actions speak louder than words, and they have a very high turnover as well.
 
2012-05-07 12:36:27 AM  

Gilligann: I'm gonna guess that she has multiple doctors. They probably called her regular doctor who was already in their system instead of the specialist that prescribed her the pain meds.

Not that it makes what they did any more right, but that's my guess as to what happened.


That doesnt even make it remotely right, the script has a DEA number assigned to the doctor who called it in, calling the wrong doctor is still a fark up that cost this woman a night in jail.

cherryl taggart: What I don't understand is how she was able to call for a refill. There are more than a few narcotics on the market that cannot be called in.


In certain circumstances it can be called in, like after major surgeries. I was a dummy and worked out too hard after having a chest infection that lasted 3 weeks which weakened my abdominal wall, well it ended up giving me a hernia through my belly button and I had to get it fixed, I ran out of pain meds the hospital gave me so my doctor called in a refill since I was unable to move without a lot of pain. Script filled, no arrest.

krackpipe: All the problematic drug laws have been passed under Republican administrations


The script crackdowns have been recent and thats under obama, not defending what most republicans have done but all have been in agreement since they went into affect, with the exception of Carter. The whole "piss test for certain drugs" is a recent addition and is complete shiat, unless you are talking 90 pills in a month then you shouldnt need over sight, and then if you are then most likely most of them are either dealing or had back surgeries/other ailments and cant move much to be an issue anyway.

I dont give a shiat who started the drug war, NEITHER PARTY has made even the slightest effort to real this farktards in .
 
2012-05-07 12:45:47 AM  

al's hat: forgotmydamnusername: DontMakeMeComeBackThere: LarryDan43: Well we believe that you have forged your pain pill prescription and we are calling your doctor now. But I've worked with this pharmacist a number of times and he's never made a mistake,

Overzealous pharmacist.

No, lie by the cop in order to get a confession. Police do this ALL the time - claim they have proof of your guilt. Lots of the time (when the person is guilty) this works.

(for the impending cop haters): It's legal, I don't have a problem with it, and NO, it does not cause innocent people to confess.

Actually, when used on people like mongoloids, or schizophrenics, or children, it DOES produce false confessions. It's a much more troubling tactic than you think, with real risk of being abused by incompetent or crooked cops.

Mongoloid? Which definition?

From dictionary.com...

Mon·gol·oid (mngg-loid, mn-)
adj.
1. Anthropology Of or being a major human racial classification traditionally distinguished by physical characteristics such as yellowish-brown skin pigmentation, straight black hair, dark eyes with pronounced epicanthic folds, and prominent cheekbones and including peoples indigenous to central and eastern Asia. See Usage Note at race1.
2. Characteristic of or resembling a Mongol.
3. also mongoloid Offensive Of or relating to Down syndrome.


The Riders of the Short Bus, of course. Being Asian doesn't cause you to be confused and gullible enough to get conned into confessing to a crime you didn't do.
 
2012-05-07 01:03:44 AM  

gibbon1: Isildur: It sounds like the pharmacist had some sort of ongoing relationship or arrangement with that particular officer, feeding him arrests, judging by what the cop said.

You start wondering about that. I'm on a Schedule II medication. The prescription got farked up a few times. Once it was on the wrong form, no DEA number, the pharmacy was suspicious, but just told me to call the doctor.


Why the fark do we still use paper pads to pass around prescriptions if we're going to be arresting people who don't show up in the computerized database? It boggles the mind, it makes no goddam sense.

BronyMedic: They deleted the post he made because he put direct contact information to a local corporate guy on FARK, and told people to email him their hate. He didn't link to it. He did exactly what was prohibited in the FArQ.


Looks like Hunter's post is still there to me.
 
2012-05-07 01:13:13 AM  

ReapTheChaos: fark CVS, I'd be going after the cop who arrested her, the booking officer who booked her in and every damn officer she had contact with on her night in jail!

What kind of morons do they have working at the Dallas PD anyway? The woman is on crutches, has a brace on her leg and has a damn IV hanging out of her. You mean to tell me not one of those officers looked at her condition, scratched their head and thought "Gee, I wonder if there's been some kind of misunderstanding here?"

farking cops are supposed to investigate crimes before they make an arrest!


I don't really have a problem with the officers detaining her while they attempt to verify the doctor's name, address, phone number, etc with dispatch, call and try to get the emergency contact number, call that and try to get hold of him to find out if it's legit. Verify her ID and make sure she's still at that address, then release her with a warning. Really, that would be a big inconvenience, but in the grand scheme of getting your leg broken in Tibet and emergency surgery by crystal people before being airlifted back to the states, it's not really such a big deal. But getting put in a cell overnight IS a big deal. That's where it crosses the line. Being too arrest-happy is just itching for a promotion, not doing your goddam job.

And I'd say the same thing if it was a junkie. If you can't verify anything at all, take them downtown until you can, but keep trying and don't leave them all night. If you verify that they're full of shiat, obviously, lock them up. Usually, you can at least verify their address so you can pick them up later if necessary.

I'll be adding my voice to CVS's email headache and hoping that pharmacist is out a job tomorrow.
 
2012-05-07 01:17:59 AM  
foxyshadis: I don't really have a problem with the officers detaining her while they attempt to verify the doctor's name, address, phone number, etc with dispatch, call and try to get the emergency contact number, call that and try to get hold of him to find out if it's legit. Verify her ID and make sure she's still at that address, then release her with a warning. Really, that would be a big inconvenience, but in the grand scheme of getting your leg broken in Tibet and emergency surgery by crystal people before being airlifted back to the states, it's not really such a big deal. But getting put in a cell overnight IS a big deal. That's where it crosses the line. Being too arrest-happy is just itching for a promotion, not doing your goddam job.

THIS. The cop had no legal standing to argue with a medical professional who was telling him that the script was faked. They're not trained on how to read scripts and tell if they're legitimate or not. At the very least, they should have been able to contact the physician and verified it without putting her in jail.

This was worthless heavy handing, and it ended up - at the very least - emotionally damaging a woman who had already been through a lot.

foxyshadis: Looks like Hunter's post is still there to me.

The one he made before it was deleted. He posted personal contact numbers directly in thread, rather than linking.

foxyshadis: And I'd say the same thing if it was a junkie. If you can't verify anything at all, take them downtown until you can, but keep trying and don't leave them all night. If you verify that they're full of shiat, obviously, lock them up.

It shouldn't be hard to do this.
 
2012-05-07 01:42:51 AM  

DontMakeMeComeBackThere: LarryDan43: Well we believe that you have forged your pain pill prescription and we are calling your doctor now. But I've worked with this pharmacist a number of times and he's never made a mistake,

Overzealous pharmacist.

No, lie by the cop in order to get a confession. Police do this ALL the time - claim they have proof of your guilt. Lots of the time (when the person is guilty) this works.

(for the impending cop haters): It's legal, I don't have a problem with it, and NO, it does not cause innocent people to confess.


i.imgur.com
link



/I still love that owl. I say it's about time he came out of retirement
 
2012-05-07 01:49:25 AM  

foxyshadis: ReapTheChaos: fark CVS, I'd be going after the cop who arrested her, the booking officer who booked her in and every damn officer she had contact with on her night in jail!

What kind of morons do they have working at the Dallas PD anyway? The woman is on crutches, has a brace on her leg and has a damn IV hanging out of her. You mean to tell me not one of those officers looked at her condition, scratched their head and thought "Gee, I wonder if there's been some kind of misunderstanding here?"

farking cops are supposed to investigate crimes before they make an arrest!

I don't really have a problem with the officers detaining her while they attempt to verify the doctor's name, address, phone number, etc with dispatch, call and try to get the emergency contact number, call that and try to get hold of him to find out if it's legit. Verify her ID and make sure she's still at that address, then release her with a warning. Really, that would be a big inconvenience, but in the grand scheme of getting your leg broken in Tibet and emergency surgery by crystal people before being airlifted back to the states, it's not really such a big deal. But getting put in a cell overnight IS a big deal. That's where it crosses the line. Being too arrest-happy is just itching for a promotion, not doing your goddam job.

And I'd say the same thing if it was a junkie. If you can't verify anything at all, take them downtown until you can, but keep trying and don't leave them all night. If you verify that they're full of shiat, obviously, lock them up. Usually, you can at least verify their address so you can pick them up later if necessary.

I'll be adding my voice to CVS's email headache and hoping that pharmacist is out a job tomorrow.


Add to it the fact that this was a refill of a prescription that had already been filled a month earlier. It's not like she walked in off the street with some bogus prescription that turned out to be fake, if she had it filled once before it should have set off some kind of light bulb over someone's head that something didn't add up.
 
2012-05-07 02:24:30 AM  

ReapTheChaos: Add to it the fact that this was a refill of a prescription that had already been filled a month earlier. It's not like she walked in off the street with some bogus prescription that turned out to be fake, if she had it filled once before it should have set off some kind of light bulb over someone's head that something didn't add up.


This. Good god CVS is terrible but the worst time they can be terrible is when it comes to epilepsy medications. You've been a customer here for the last two years and have a refill for Phenobarbital? NOPE CAN'T GIVE IT TO YOU BECAUSE WE LOST THE PRESCRIPTION. These two things interact terribly? NO PROBLEM WE'LL FILL IT AND NEVER TELL YOU THERE'S AN ISSUE. fark CVS and most chain pharmacies,the only good chain pharmacy where I live is Rite Aid.
 
2012-05-07 02:52:22 AM  
ReapTheChaos: Add to it the fact that this was a refill of a prescription that had already been filled a month earlier. It's not like she walked in off the street with some bogus prescription that turned out to be fake, if she had it filled once before it should have set off some kind of light bulb over someone's head that something didn't add up.

Erm, that doesn't matter when you're dealing with scheduled drugs. There's a lot of rules that are different for picking up a Schedule II/III narcotic then there are for picking up cholesterol medication.

http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/pubs/manuals/pract/section5.htm

Schedule II Substances

Schedule II controlled substances require a written prescription which must be signed by the practitioner. There is no federal time limit within which a Schedule II prescription must be filled after being signed by the practitioner.

While some states and many insurance carriers limit the quantity of controlled substance dispensed to a 30-day supply, there are no specific federal limits to quantities of drugs dispensed via a prescription. For Schedule II controlled substances, an oral order is only permitted in an emergency situation.

Refills

The refilling of a prescription for a controlled substance listed in Schedule II is prohibited (Title 21 U.S. Code § 829(a)).

Issuance of Multiple Prescriptions for Schedule II Substances


DEA has revised its regulations regarding the issuance of multiple prescriptions for schedule II controlled substances. Under the new regulation, which became effective December 19, 2007, an individual practitioner may issue multiple prescriptions authorizing the patient to receive a total of up to a 90-day supply of a schedule II controlled substance provided the following conditions are met:
1.Each separate prescription is issued for a legitimate medical purpose by an individual practitioner acting in the usual course of professional practice.

2.The individual practitioner provides written instructions on each prescription (other than the first prescription, if the prescribing practitioner intends for that prescription to be filled immediately) indicating the earliest date on which a pharmacy may fill each prescription.

3.The individual practitioner concludes that providing the patient with multiple prescriptions in this manner does not create an undue risk of diversion or abuse.

4.The issuance of multiple prescriptions is permissible under applicable state laws.

5.The individual practitioner complies fully with all other applicable requirements under the Controlled Substances Act and Code of Federal Regulations, as well as any additional requirements under state law.

It should be noted that the implementation of this change in the regulation should not be construed as encouraging individual practitioners to issue multiple prescriptions or to see their patients only once every 90 days when prescribing schedule II controlled substances. Rather, individual practitioners must determine on their own, based on sound medical judgment, and in accordance with established medical standards, whether it is appropriate to issue multiple prescriptions and how often to see their patients when doing so.

Facsimile Prescriptions for Schedule II Controlled Substances


In order to expedite the filling of a prescription, a prescriber may transmit a Schedule II prescription to the pharmacy by facsimile. The original Schedule II prescription must be presented to the pharmacist for review prior to the actual dispensing of the controlled substance.

In an emergency, a practitioner may call-in a prescription for a Schedule II controlled substance by telephone to the pharmacy, and the pharmacist may dispense the prescription provided that the quantity prescribed and dispensed is limited to the amount adequate to treat the patient during the emergency period. The prescribing practitioner must provide a written and signed prescription to the pharmacist within seven days. Further, the pharmacist must notify DEA if the prescription is not received.


Schedule III-V Substances


A prescription for controlled substances in Schedules III, IV, and V issued by a practitioner, may be communicated either orally, in writing, or by facsimile to the pharmacist, and may be refilled if so authorized on the prescription or by call-in.

Refills


Schedule III and IV controlled substances may be refilled if authorized on the prescription. However, the prescription may only be refilled up to five times within six months after the date on which the prescription was issued. After five refills or after six months, whichever occurs first, a new prescription is required.
 
2012-05-07 02:54:55 AM  
A Terrible Human: You've been a customer here for the last two years and have a refill for Phenobarbital? NOPE CAN'T GIVE IT TO YOU BECAUSE WE LOST THE PRESCRIPTION.

Phenobarbital is a Schedule IV drug. They can't just give it to you without a valid script on file.
 
2012-05-07 02:54:58 AM  

ChuDogg: Pharmacists are some of the most of the over-paid, overly self important professions I know. Why does the pharmacist get all up in my grill every time I get a prescription?... I've ALREADY talked to the DOCTOR about all this stuff, I don't care that you can read what it says right on the bag, just hand it over-like a good drive through employee. The Obama admin has really been cracking down nationwide on the controlled substances. So Sometimes I have to wait and stuff for adderrall. Everytime I go in the drive through lady gasps "zomg Have you taken this before do you know what this is?!?", so I've come to just answer "just check the computer" every time so I don't have to do 20 questions with some drive through worker that wants to play "Doctor"

I've seen it get works since 09 and this doesn't surprise me at all. I don't care that people are "abusing" them, that's their right and they probably should.


God help me if Ritalin doesn't work out and I have to get something crazy like desoxyn (surprise! it's meth). It's already hassle enough with getting anabolic steroids filled.

/I've got treatment-resistant depression caused by the male equivalent of menopause.... starting at 16.
//I wouldn't wish it on the worst person in the world.
 
2012-05-07 03:43:45 AM  

BronyMedic: A Terrible Human: You've been a customer here for the last two years and have a refill for Phenobarbital? NOPE CAN'T GIVE IT TO YOU BECAUSE WE LOST THE PRESCRIPTION.

Phenobarbital is a Schedule IV drug. They can't just give it to you without a valid script on file.


I know that. It was a valid prescription,they had refilled the month before and there were refills left but when I went to pick it up they claimed they had lost the prescription. How does that happen? How unorganized does a place have to be to behave that way? I've only EVER had that specific problem with CVS,no other pharmacy I've been to has ever claimed they lost a prescription. fark them and chain pharmacies in general.
 
2012-05-07 04:27:54 AM  

ROBOTwHUM4NHAIR: namatad: ROBOTwHUM4NHAIR: Staffist: I will never fill another prescription with CVS.

I would but my insurance MAKES me use CVS this yr. idk how but im a type 1 diabetic and at wal greens my whole life i had no co pay & now im paying $300 for a month of insulin from CVS. I think that whole chains farked up

HOW is the chain farked up?
Your insurance changed and your costs changed. How is this CVS fault, problem or anything ??
LOL

Insurance didnt change, still the same coverage they just couldnt reach an agreement with walgreens


UM
your insurance CHANGED ....
your insurance changed by forcing you to change pharmacies. that changed caused your costs to go up. this was not caused by CVS, but by the change in your insurance ...
 
2012-05-07 04:54:51 AM  

A Terrible Human: BronyMedic: A Terrible Human: You've been a customer here for the last two years and have a refill for Phenobarbital? NOPE CAN'T GIVE IT TO YOU BECAUSE WE LOST THE PRESCRIPTION.

Phenobarbital is a Schedule IV drug. They can't just give it to you without a valid script on file.

I know that. It was a valid prescription,they had refilled the month before and there were refills left but when I went to pick it up they claimed they had lost the prescription. How does that happen? How unorganized does a place have to be to behave that way? I've only EVER had that specific problem with CVS,no other pharmacy I've been to has ever claimed they lost a prescription. fark them and chain pharmacies in general.


Depends... Eckerd would file them away in boxes in a back room. Could take an hour just to find the slip of paper. However, there was always a digital copy ready to pull up.

Pharmacy work is the worst I ever had to do.(Except for talking to the nice old people who just wanted their thyroid medication.)
 
2012-05-07 08:06:44 AM  
Mugato [TotalFark] 2012-05-06 07:53:38 AM

Jeez did we need her whole origin story for that?


Yes. Because otherwise you'd have people saying that she shouldn't have been trying to get the drugs in the first place and she had it coming for trying to buy skittles and iced tea.

So much for innocent until proven guilty but I guess we passed that yard arm a long time ago.
 
2012-05-07 10:47:16 AM  

BronyMedic: ReapTheChaos: Add to it the fact that this was a refill of a prescription that had already been filled a month earlier. It's not like she walked in off the street with some bogus prescription that turned out to be fake, if she had it filled once before it should have set off some kind of light bulb over someone's head that something didn't add up.

Erm, that doesn't matter when you're dealing with scheduled drugs. There's a lot of rules that are different for picking up a Schedule II/III narcotic then there are for picking up cholesterol medication.

http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/pubs/manuals/pract/section5.htm



Yeah, except she had fulfilled those requirements. ReapTheChaos wasn't saying she should be allowed to skip fulfilling them because of a previous prescription, just that it was even stupider of the pharmacist to assume her prescription was fake without double checking, given that the woman previously had had a prescription filled with no problem.

From all appearances, she did everything correctly and the pharmacist didn't, and the previous prescription was just one extra thing that should have made the pharmacist think "Never mind what my gut says, I had better make sure I have this info right -- the way I'm supposed to anyway".
 
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