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(Humans Invent)   The designer of the London tube map turned cartography on its head...breaking all design rules...the map is now one of the most iconic images in the world   (humansinvent.com) divider line 53
    More: Cool, design rules  
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8141 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 May 2012 at 2:06 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-04 02:11:22 PM
F*CK GEOGRAPHY!
 
2012-05-04 02:12:02 PM
Mind the gap
 
2012-05-04 02:15:25 PM
*Yawn*
 
2012-05-04 02:15:29 PM
Finally I got in before a tube thread turned into a Mornington Crescent thread.

/Now how many points is that worth?
 
2012-05-04 02:23:11 PM
It's all right...but at best it is among the most iconic images in the world...subby sucks.
 
2012-05-04 02:23:29 PM
I'd really rather have both. I like having a geographic map before I hop on a train so I can figure out where I am, where I want to go, and what the best route to take is, then get a diagramatic map while on the train so I know which stops will get me where I want to go.

But, like, that 1913 map they show doesn't look dauting or confusing at all, so maybe this really is just something only people a very small niche get excited about?
 
2012-05-04 02:24:19 PM
Chicago uses a very similar design for their rail system map too. Actual geography is not important if you are stuck on a single track and underground. Just show what order the stops are in and where the lines intersect.
 
2012-05-04 02:27:46 PM

cgraves67: Chicago uses a very similar design for their rail system map too. Actual geography is not important if you are stuck on a single track and underground. Just show what order the stops are in and where the lines intersect.


Yep, as long as the person using the map realizes that the stops aren't geographically accurate and the distances aren't to any useful scale. If all you need to know are points & relationships, the London tube map is fantastic. For anything other than that, it's useless and dangerous - but, for anything other than that, you'd probably also need a more cartographically accurate map, and so you can manage the translation.

It's a lovely bit of visual reference, it is.
 
2012-05-04 02:27:56 PM
I had a big copy of the Underground Map framed on the wall at home for a long time. Just because I thought it was cool ;)
 
2012-05-04 02:28:39 PM
Couldn't see Hobbes End on that map...
 
2012-05-04 02:31:29 PM
"This is a Piccadilly Line service to Heathrow Airport. The next station is Earl's Court. Change at Earl's Court for the District Line. Please stand clear of the closing doors..."

/Dated a woman in Parson's Green during my time working in the city and living in Hertfordshire.
//Ah, sweet memories...
 
2012-05-04 02:31:44 PM

cgraves67: Chicago uses a very similar design for their rail system map too. Actual geography is not important if you are stuck on a single track and underground. Just show what order the stops are in and where the lines intersect.


I think many places have adopted the style for rail lines both above and below ground. Dallas Area Rapid Transit uses it for the light rail.
www.dart.org
 
2012-05-04 02:33:41 PM

SpinStopper: I had a big copy of the Underground Map framed on the wall at home for a long time. Just because I thought it was cool ;)


You can get it on a shower curtain.
 
2012-05-04 02:34:15 PM

FormlessOne: cgraves67: Chicago uses a very similar design for their rail system map too. Actual geography is not important if you are stuck on a single track and underground. Just show what order the stops are in and where the lines intersect.

Yep, as long as the person using the map realizes that the stops aren't geographically accurate and the distances aren't to any useful scale. If all you need to know are points & relationships, the London tube map is fantastic. For anything other than that, it's useless and dangerous - but, for anything other than that, you'd probably also need a more cartographically accurate map, and so you can manage the translation.

It's a lovely bit of visual reference, it is.


But if it was geographically accurate then where would the fun be giving directions to get from Great Portland Street to Regents Park station?
 
2012-05-04 02:35:20 PM
 
2012-05-04 02:37:09 PM
see-you-in-moscow.com
As opposed to more accidental subway designs. Here you see the remains of the coffee cup Joe Stalin put on the map of the Moscow Metro, so the story goes...
 
2012-05-04 02:43:01 PM

FormlessOne: Yep, as long as the person using the map realizes that the stops aren't geographically accurate and the distances aren't to any useful scale.


You only make the mistake of relying on scale once though.

/I think I went from Covent Garden to Charing Cross; walking from the tube entrance to the platforms alone seems like a mile; above ground it's only half a mile. I spent more time walking that on the train. Though I did pass through Mornington Crescent station, which is always lovely in summertime.

TTIWWP
 
2012-05-04 02:45:48 PM
Maybe it's just growing up with NY's subway map that makes me feels this way, but I very much disliked the London Tube map when I was there. I can see the appeal of making it easier to navigate the train network but, unless your entire trip takes place in the underground, you need a secondary map to get you the rest of the way. Seems inefficient.

Sure, it looks cool. But I need a map, not a shower curtain.
 
2012-05-04 02:47:09 PM

FormlessOne: cgraves67: Chicago uses a very similar design for their rail system map too. Actual geography is not important if you are stuck on a single track and underground. Just show what order the stops are in and where the lines intersect.

Yep, as long as the person using the map realizes that the stops aren't geographically accurate and the distances aren't to any useful scale. If all you need to know are points & relationships, the London tube map is fantastic. For anything other than that, it's useless and dangerous - but, for anything other than that, you'd probably also need a more cartographically accurate map, and so you can manage the translation.

It's a lovely bit of visual reference, it is.


Oh, sure, until you get japped on the platform.
 
2012-05-04 02:50:04 PM
Portland's MAX map. Not as interesting as others.

trimet.org
 
2012-05-04 02:52:17 PM
Good luck finding your way around Tokyo

i2.photobucket.com
 
2012-05-04 02:54:29 PM
www.apamanusa.com
 
2012-05-04 03:10:47 PM

Gonad the Ballbarian: Good luck finding your way around Tokyo

[i2.photobucket.com image 640x353]


I did. It's actually pretty easy to figure out once you're in it.
 
2012-05-04 03:22:52 PM
Cartograms for the win!
 
2012-05-04 03:23:33 PM

error 303: I'd really rather have both. I like having a geographic map before I hop on a train so I can figure out where I am, where I want to go, and what the best route to take is, then get a diagramatic map while on the train so I know which stops will get me where I want to go.



The Paris Métro does this, and it makes it quite easy to use. All of the stations also have a map of the surrounding neighborhood, with the station exits, connecting bus stops, and local landmarks all pointed out. Really very nice, that, since it lets you find where you're going in an unfamiliar neighborhood without having to wander about with a map and looking like a clueless tourist.
 
2012-05-04 03:25:14 PM
Montreal:
www.stm.info

Also, a relevant book (and quite an interesting one, too)
www.renaud-bray.com

/hot like a third rail
 
2012-05-04 03:32:33 PM
Let's throw Chicago in the mix:

www.rususa.com
 
2012-05-04 03:41:32 PM
Sometimes it just turns into a giant bowl of multicolored spaghetti, no matter how you organize it ...
www.aparisguide.com

Rescaling 1134 x 1143 image to 640 x 645 -- no shiat.
 
2012-05-04 04:23:20 PM

moof: FormlessOne: Yep, as long as the person using the map realizes that the stops aren't geographically accurate and the distances aren't to any useful scale.

You only make the mistake of relying on scale once though.

/I think I went from Covent Garden to Charing Cross; walking from the tube entrance to the platforms alone seems like a mile; above ground it's only half a mile. I spent more time walking that on the train. Though I did pass through Mornington Crescent station, which is always lovely in summertime.



I cry foul as to go from Covent Garden to Charring Cross there is no need to pass thru Mornington Crescent.

//Unless claiming the Lorenz Strange Attractor theorem.....
///but everyone knows that....
 
2012-05-04 04:35:29 PM

JuicePats: [www.apamanusa.com image 357x420]


I recognized that one instantly, even though haven't been to Boston in 15 years.

/BU West
 
2012-05-04 04:37:36 PM
I was going to post an ironic map of the Hellgate: London tube system but I guess it's been taken down.
 
2012-05-04 05:08:15 PM

chopit: JuicePats: [www.apamanusa.com image 357x420]

I recognized that one instantly, even though haven't been to Boston in 15 years.

/BU West


A lot of the Green Line stops on the branches are gone compared to that map.
 
2012-05-04 05:21:30 PM
FormlessOne Yep, as long as the person using the map realizes that the stops aren't geographically accurate and the distances aren't to any useful scale. If all you need to know are points & relationships, the London tube map is fantastic. For anything other than that, it's useless and dangerous -but, for anything other than that, you'd probably also need a more cartographically accurate map, and so you can manage the translation.

Which is why I like having my mobile Google Maps or a real map when riding transit, even at home. I can see how far the walk is to the train or after leaving the station.

For those going to Washington, DC, the Stationmasters book and website are very useful.
 
2012-05-04 05:33:07 PM
For starters:

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-05-04 05:36:01 PM
What? No love for BART
blogs.sfweekly.com

or the DC metro?
living-in-washingtondc.com

I might argue that they're a bit counterproductive in tourist-heavy cities... or that maybe a geographical map should be next to / nearby?

/ that Tokyo map scares me!
 
2012-05-04 05:49:26 PM
the tokyo map is pretty crazy, but it was a lot of fun to navigate over there. what's weirder is navigating at street level. a lot of the time you have to kind of triangulate your position using different high rise buildings as reference points. the other thing was making sure you exit a station on the right side. go east instead of west, and you're kinda farked in some places.

/going for job interviews in tokyo... some of the most nerve-wracking commutes i've ever had.
 
2012-05-04 05:57:05 PM
I personally hate the tube map, because it has no relevance to geography.

ni.chol.as

/personally love the Metro line in the evenings, not because it's packed as fark, but because there's usually a driver who will hop on the com and chew idiots out for blocking the doors
 
2012-05-04 06:33:32 PM
I had lived in London for about a week before I realised it was quicker to walk from Leicester Sq to Covent Garden.

I also lost count the amount of times I had to explain to tourists above ground that the station they had just exited was nowhere near the other one they wanted to get to which was close, according to the tube map.

On a side note - before the internet, everyone I knew who lived in London carried an A-Z with them. Basically a paperback book with maps of central London.
 
2012-05-04 06:33:42 PM
Compare the Montreal map to the actual geography and you are in for a shock.

Fortunately, they have both types of maps at the stations.

Both have a place, but this type of map annoys me.
 
2012-05-04 06:43:11 PM
Sacramento's is mind-bending
www.sacrt.com
 
2012-05-04 07:23:53 PM
Is there one for Sodor?
/off to the googles
 
2012-05-04 07:25:11 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
/I seriously thought that would be harder to find, if it existed at all
 
2012-05-04 07:42:25 PM
The Sodor Rail logo looks a little to fascistic for my liking. Did Mussolini fake his death and become the Fat Controller? He always had a thing for making the trains run on time.
 
2012-05-04 08:06:28 PM
The LA subway map is ridiculously complicated:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-q3swmw_TPDk /TX1IdB36n8I/AAAAAAAAFpY/TeKaeOM n Z7k/s1600/map-red-line.jpg
 
2012-05-04 11:38:31 PM
gothamist.com
 
Skr
2012-05-04 11:47:43 PM
guides.gamepressure.com


F'ing ferals
 
2012-05-04 11:59:59 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
(click to embiggen)

Beijing may not be the most complicated (yet), but they make up for it in station names that are a baffling ordeal for the non-Mandarin speaker.

Quick! Do you need to go to Fuxingmen or Fuchengmen? Guangqumennei or Guangqumenwai? Guanzhuang or the OTHER Guanzhuang? I don't have all day!!
 
2012-05-05 01:36:23 AM
We got the tube in LA

LA Underground

It don't go direct to LAX or the beach or.....
 
2012-05-05 05:45:56 AM

OniExpress: I personally hate the tube map, because it has no relevance to geography.

[ni.chol.as image 640x429]

/personally love the Metro line in the evenings, not because it's packed as fark, but because there's usually a driver who will hop on the com and chew idiots out for blocking the doors


Thanks for posting that - had always wondered what it looked like in real life but it never entered my mind to look.

/The big red slidey things are the doors. Let's try that again shall we?
 
2012-05-05 07:29:01 PM
Just for fun, here is Toronto's:

i.thestar.com

/the TTC can't even make their subway maps look decent
 
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