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(Yahoo)   Goodwill Industries shows their good will and returns what might be may be 1,000-year-old Native American artifact to the Caddo Indian Nation   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 56
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6694 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 May 2012 at 10:37 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-03 09:16:27 PM
I truly wonder how many items like that - pottery, painting, whatever - are donated to Goodwill and just chucked into the trash compactor as trash.
 
2012-05-03 10:33:29 PM
Might be? This sounds good and all, and while I think this would look great in the shop, I've got to make sure it's real. Let me call a buddy of mine who specializes in this sort of thing....
 
2012-05-03 10:40:09 PM
My day job involves buying stuff at thrift stores, but I've never found anything this good.

Of course, my philosophy is to make thousands of little profits instead of looking for these black swan level finds.
 
2012-05-03 10:41:48 PM

Mark Ratner: Might be? This sounds good and all, and while I think this would look great in the shop, I've got to make sure it's real. Let me call a buddy of mine who specializes in this sort of thing....


It's just gonna sit on my shelf, looking for the right buyer. It might bring as much as $4.99, so I'll offer you two bucks for it.
 
2012-05-03 10:46:11 PM

DiRF: Mark Ratner: Might be? This sounds good and all, and while I think this would look great in the shop, I've got to make sure it's real. Let me call a buddy of mine who specializes in this sort of thing....

It's just gonna sit on my shelf, looking for the right buyer. It might bring as much as $4.99, so I'll offer you two bucks for it.


How about 3 bucks? I want to go the casino. I'm broke.
 
2012-05-03 10:46:30 PM
I got smallpox from a Goodwill blanket, once.
 
2012-05-03 10:48:21 PM
The native American community thanks them for their consideration.

i24.photobucket.comi49.photobucket.com
 
2012-05-03 10:50:23 PM

Grables'Daughter: I truly wonder how many items like that - pottery, painting, whatever - are donated to Goodwill and just chucked into the trash compactor as trash.



Doesn't happen. Goodwill may be "not for profit", but the families who own the individual stores make a mint. Ever wonder why you never find anything good at Goodwill? Because the families, or their agents, go through all of the donations before they sent to the floor. Anything of actual value is hauled away to their own warehouse, and probably sold for cash and no taxes paid on it.

Their workers make 8 bucks an hour and have no rights because it is a "job training program", not a job. The a-hole families who own these things are largely right wing -
 
2012-05-03 10:53:37 PM
If it came from a cursed indian cemetary, I think it should stay there :/.
 
2012-05-03 10:56:25 PM
Looks like it would make a nice spittoon.
 
2012-05-03 10:58:06 PM
I was hoping the artifact would be a blanket
 
2012-05-03 11:02:06 PM
Coolest thing I ever found at a thrift store was a limited edition Buzz Aldrin G.I. Joe made for the 30th anniversary of the moon landing, signed and in the original packaging. I paid $60 for it, which is a lot for a thrift store find, but it usually sells for more online. Plus it's Buzz farking Aldrin.
 
2012-05-03 11:07:33 PM

malaktaus: Coolest thing I ever found at a thrift store was a limited edition Buzz Aldrin G.I. Joe made for the 30th anniversary of the moon landing, signed and in the original packaging. I paid $60 for it, which is a lot for a thrift store find, but it usually sells for more online. Plus it's Buzz farking Aldrin.


pfft. i got a buzz lightyear with no head. how much do you think that's worth. IT HAS NO HEAD
 
2012-05-03 11:13:24 PM
Goodwill Industries receives federal funding (or at least they did, I'm not sure if the teabaggers cut the funding last year or not), so it would be a federal crime for Goodwill to hold on to native American funerary artifacts if the tribe of the original possessors does not approve.
 
2012-05-03 11:21:07 PM
NoScript just told me that page was trying to rape my system. It never does that.
 
2012-05-03 11:21:31 PM

rebelyell2006: Goodwill Industries receives federal funding (or at least they did, I'm not sure if the teabaggers cut the funding last year or not), so it would be a federal crime for Goodwill to hold on to native American funerary artifacts if the tribe of the original possessors does not approve.


That is true on newer artifacts. However this from 1970 and I don't know it grandfathers in or not. I know that NY state surrender a good deal of it collections back to the tribes.
 
2012-05-03 11:22:25 PM

rebelyell2006: Goodwill Industries receives federal funding (or at least they did, I'm not sure if the teabaggers cut the funding last year or not), so it would be a federal crime for Goodwill to hold on to native American funerary artifacts if the tribe of the original possessors does not approve.


I came in here to say this. To the law, since the burial ritual hundreds if not thousands of years ago wasn't intended to relinquish the property rights (making it not abandoned property) you literally are just shiat out of luck when you dig one of these up. Whatever local tribe is nearby gets to claim it (even if it's a loose claim, even if another tribe was around at the time the artifact was put in the ground) and you don't get squat.

So go ahead indians, let all your stuff rot in the ground. Deny anyone the incentive to discover your rich history. And soon, in a hundred years, you'll be hearing myths such as the white man really found North America abandoned. Because that's just what happened in South Africa.

I don't know if you can tell, but I really disagree with this ruling. I am quite smitten with the idea of being able to dig up buried treasure.
 
2012-05-03 11:30:27 PM
It's okay. It would have just sat for a couple of years in one of the glass cases at the counter anyways.
 
2012-05-03 11:32:19 PM

Captain_Ballbeard: Grables'Daughter: I truly wonder how many items like that - pottery, painting, whatever - are donated to Goodwill and just chucked into the trash compactor as trash.

Doesn't happen. Goodwill may be "not for profit", but the families who own the individual stores make a mint. Ever wonder why you never find anything good at Goodwill? Because the families, or their agents, go through all of the donations before they sent to the floor. Anything of actual value is hauled away to their own warehouse, and probably sold for cash and no taxes paid on it.

Their workers make 8 bucks an hour and have no rights because it is a "job training program", not a job. The a-hole families who own these things are largely right wing -


As someone who worked at a pretty damn successful Goodwill, you're wrong.

First off, not all Goodwills are family owned. They are usually part of larger chains, usually just a few stores. I worked at one of the larger ones, that covered most of Northeast Ohio.

Goodwill workers do have rights, even those going through their programs (and those workers are actually more protected, but I can't get too much into that).

From day one at Goodwill, the first thing they ring into your head is that absolutely nothing can be stashed, hidden or kept from the customers. Occasionally, things like disposable plates will be pulled for store use, but anything that can be of value is absolutely made available to the customers. You can walk through the back room and see. The merchandise goes through sorting and the entire process is on camera and accountable. No employees are allowed to purchase anything unless it has been out on the sales floor for a minimum of 24 hours. Employees absolutely do not get "first dibs" on anything.

There are people that come in and buy things cheap in order to turn them around for more money to a bigger audience. But the goal will be to make them pay a fair price to Goodwill. That's why the best Goodwills will tend to employ people that have some experience identifying the "good stuff" like Waterford crystal, Lenox ornaments and other collectables and antiques. The savvy shoppers do tend to be able to turn around a decent profit if they know what they're doing, and that's not a bad thing. They also tend to be the shoppers who are there the most, trying to scope out deals before anyone else (and if they miss a mark-up, invariably some customer will find it and buy it for cheap). When employees run a rack of new merchandise out, it's not uncommon for that rack to be picked over as soon as it is parked in the aisleway by these types.

An example I can give you is this. We had an estate drop off about 200 pieces of clothing. They were suits and sportscoats, all custom Italian and would have cost thousands of dollars to have been made originally (no joke). Of course, they're in one particular gentleman's size, so Goodwlll isn't going to be able to find the best buyers for it. So we put them out for about $100 for the sportscoats, up to $200 for the suits. Every single one of them sold.

Goodwill made a fair bit of money on that, and we noticed a fair amount of those pieces ending up on the internet shortly after. But that was all legitimately sold and that money was put to legitimately charitable use. And Goodwill does a fair amount of good in the community.
 
2012-05-03 11:36:44 PM

lacydog: Captain_Ballbeard: Grables'Daughter: I truly wonder how many items like that - pottery, painting, whatever - are donated to Goodwill and just chucked into the trash compactor as trash.

Doesn't happen. Goodwill may be "not for profit", but the families who own the individual stores make a mint. Ever wonder why you never find anything good at Goodwill? Because the families, or their agents, go through all of the donations before they sent to the floor. Anything of actual value is hauled away to their own warehouse, and probably sold for cash and no taxes paid on it.

Their workers make 8 bucks an hour and have no rights because it is a "job training program", not a job. The a-hole families who own these things are largely right wing -

As someone who worked at a pretty damn successful Goodwill, you're wrong.

First off, not all Goodwills are family owned. They are usually part of larger chains, usually just a few stores. I worked at one of the larger ones, that covered most of Northeast Ohio.

Goodwill workers do have rights, even those going through their programs (and those workers are actually more protected, but I can't get too much into that).

From day one at Goodwill, the first thing they ring into your head is that absolutely nothing can be stashed, hidden or kept from the customers. Occasionally, things like disposable plates will be pulled for store use, but anything that can be of value is absolutely made available to the customers. You can walk through the back room and see. The merchandise goes through sorting and the entire process is on camera and accountable. No employees are allowed to purchase anything unless it has been out on the sales floor for a minimum of 24 hours. Employees absolutely do not get "first dibs" on anything.

There are people that come in and buy things cheap in order to turn them around for more money to a bigger audience. But the goal will be to make them pay a fair price to Goodwill. That's why the best Goodwills will tend to ...




Thanks Shill.
 
2012-05-03 11:43:31 PM

Franco: rebelyell2006: Goodwill Industries receives federal funding (or at least they did, I'm not sure if the teabaggers cut the funding last year or not), so it would be a federal crime for Goodwill to hold on to native American funerary artifacts if the tribe of the original possessors does not approve.

That is true on newer artifacts. However this from 1970 and I don't know it grandfathers in or not. I know that NY state surrender a good deal of it collections back to the tribes.


NAGPRA. Regardless of when it was dug up or how it arrived in the hands of an organization receiving federal funds, the tribe with cultural patrimony claims or direct descendents have ultimate ownership of funerary and ceremonial objects and human remains.
 
2012-05-03 11:43:31 PM

Captain_Ballbeard: thanks shill.


If you're going to spout nonsense about employees picking through donations, I feel obligated, as someone who has worked there and has some firsthand knowledge of what goes on, to tell you that that it doesn't happen. At least not where I worked. I can't speak for every one of them, but I can tell you that it was made abundantly clear to me that no such activities would be tolerated from any of the workers.
 
2012-05-03 11:44:05 PM
fark the Goodwill, been into one of their stores lately? They want top dollar for items that belong in the trash, and even more for the stuff people might actually want. I see used items in poor condition that Goodwill is charging more for than Target wants for the same item brand new. And yes, Goodwill does cherrypick all the good stuff and auctions it on their website shopgoodwill.com and they also sell on Amazon as well.
 
2012-05-03 11:52:31 PM
lacydog: Captain_Ballbeard: Grables'Daughter: I truly wonder how many items like that - pottery, painting, whatever - are donated to Goodwill and just chucked into the trash compactor as trash.

Doesn't happen. Goodwill may be "not for profit", but the families who own the individual stores make a mint. Ever wonder why you never find anything good at Goodwill? Because the families, or their agents, go through all of the donations before they sent to the floor. Anything of actual value is hauled away to their own warehouse, and probably sold for cash and no taxes paid on it.

Their workers make 8 bucks an hour and have no rights because it is a "job training program", not a job. The a-hole families who own these things are largely right wing -

As someone who worked at a pretty damn successful Goodwill, you're wrong.

First off, not all Goodwills are family owned. They are usually part of larger chains, usually just a few stores. I worked at one of the larger ones, that covered most of Northeast Ohio.

Goodwill workers do have rights, even those going through their programs (and those workers are actually more protected, but I can't get too much into that).

From day one at Goodwill, the first thing they ring into your head is that absolutely nothing can be stashed, hidden or kept from the customers. Occasionally, things like disposable plates will be pulled for store use, but anything that can be of value is absolutely made available to the customers. You can walk through the back room and see. The merchandise goes through sorting and the entire process is on camera and accountable. No employees are allowed to purchase anything unless it has been out on the sales floor for a minimum of 24 hours. Employees absolutely do not get "first dibs" on anything.

There are people that come in and buy things cheap in order to turn them around for more money to a bigger audience. But the goal will be to make them pay a fair price to Goodwill. That's why the best Goodwills will tend to ...


Interesting...I frequent a few GWs in my area, they have a set price on clothes, including suits and jackets, while most other thrift stores can vary. Since you have worked at a GW and have some insight, can you confirm they have monkeys in the back on certain days who get to price some other items? Not being snarky, but I've seen some items priced like this - Great deal, ok deal, then "crap, that's more then new"! So I assume there is an actual monkey with a pricing gun in the back on those days. But other then that, I have a certain one I go to where I can often find $100 plus jeans for $8, and the occasional odd item.
 
2012-05-04 12:00:23 AM
spman: fark the Goodwill, been into one of their stores lately? They want top dollar for items that belong in the trash, and even more for the stuff people might actually want. I see used items in poor condition that Goodwill is charging more for than Target wants for the same item brand new. And yes, Goodwill does cherrypick all the good stuff and auctions it on their website shopgoodwill.com and they also sell on Amazon as well.

I agree somewhat, items that should be 25 cents are $1.99, and a pair of Wal-mart jeans are $8 when they are $10 new. But then on the plus side, I have found a few $100 plus jeans for $8 in new condition, plenty of $80 plus dress shirts for $4.50, so it goes both ways. So you just laugh as you pass the monkey priced items or trash and look for the good buys. One time at a Salvation Army, I saw a pair of jeans that had piss stains all over the front of them. Yes, an unwashed piss stained pair of jeans.
 
2012-05-04 12:04:17 AM
Can't say this is for every store, because I'm not a self-important asshole who claims that personal experience and/or anecdotes are they way that everything is done everywhere, but...

Here in the Bay Area, it's not unusual to find clothing that is not only still new, but has store tags from higher-end stores, priced at well over $100 per piece. Nordstroms, Bloomingdales, Saks, and so on.

I've picked up autographed books, sports memorabilia, a PS2 Slim (in original box, unused, $25!) and on and on.

So to claim something as stupid as "And yes, Goodwill does cherrypick all the good stuff and auctions it on their website shopgoodwill.com and they also sell on Amazon as well" as tho it's corporate mandate is both obnoxious and asinine.
 
2012-05-04 12:14:33 AM
What might be may be.

/you can't explain that
 
2012-05-04 12:20:18 AM
I was the mayor of my local Goodwill on Foursquare for a while. I get all of my kids shoes there, and tons of toys.

Also got about $300 worth of really nice picture frames for maybe $40 total. Love that place.
 
2012-05-04 12:22:54 AM

spman: fark the Goodwill, been into one of their stores lately? They want top dollar for items that belong in the trash, and even more for the stuff people might actually want. I see used items in poor condition that Goodwill is charging more for than Target wants for the same item brand new. And yes, Goodwill does cherrypick all the good stuff and auctions it on their website shopgoodwill.com and they also sell on Amazon as well.


I've been to numerous ones here in SW Florida. The local one just up the street is not bad, but it is cluttered because of its small stripmall storefront size. Most of the other ones around are dedicated building and so they can carry a wider variety of things. I've bought lots of goodies from them. A few good quality desks and chairs, play clothes for the kidlet (who wants to pay $15 for a shirt that's just going to get messed up), and assorted electronics. My latest finds were an essentially free color laser printer that just needed an inexpensive part and some TLC as well as an almost complete set of Bose speakers for $40.

/Waiting for the "Bose is over priced crap" audiophiles who have $400 Denon speaker cables and wooden volume knobs.
//The color laser printer cost me $0, needed an $80 part to make it practically factory new, and lists brand new for $350. So I'd say that is a win.
///I need to look in the mail tomorrow to see if my Goodwill shill check is in there.
 
2012-05-04 12:31:52 AM

lacydog: Captain_Ballbeard: thanks shill.

If you're going to spout nonsense about employees picking through donations, I feel obligated, as someone who has worked there and has some firsthand knowledge of what goes on, to tell you that that it doesn't happen. At least not where I worked. I can't speak for every one of them, but I can tell you that it was made abundantly clear to me that no such activities would be tolerated from any of the workers.


I worked/witnessed at two different Goodwills and it really is two different stories. It honestly depends on the managers of the store and what their policies are regarding donations. It also depends on who is the donation taker that day.



"You can walk through the back room and see"

At one store there it was as you said-strict policy regarding Goodwill policies. Employees were tools of the company and worked to clean the store for good little shoppers. Nobody could steal because the managers watched everyone like hawks and regularly checked video cams for stealing. But the store lacked on what they were willing to accept from donators since the store was a small one- we didn't store anything there so I have to say honestly on some weekends we threw away 60-75% of donations (not clothing) because it was all crap or we didn't have the floor space to display it. That wasn't Goodwill policy but store policy because of space issues- and the managers hated it for some reason.

The other store was completely different. Half managers there were friends with the employees before they started working there and one days when they worked there was no store policy. Being near a fairly upper-middle class city helped bring in tons of upscale donations (rare vinyl, nice guitars, computers, audio equipment, rare antiques) which were openly stolen by back of the store employees. These items were sold on ebay or craigslist for 8 to 10 times what they would have been priced at goodwill or in some cases much more (some guitars I saw were priced by a vendor at 700 bucks each and the guy who took them walked right out the donation door to his car with them after the store closed). Some times people found tons of money in clothes too (up to hundreds of dollars) which was just pocketed immediately. Yeah policies were followed when those people were working with the proper managers but in all likelihood the thievery happened quite a bit which makes sense when the employees are paid near shiat. This store also had more space to display stuff so much stuff could go missing or not be displayed since the backroom was so vast.



"first thing they ring into your head is that absolutely nothing can be stashed, hidden or kept from the customers"

While you are right- this happens- it doesn't ever work in reality- I did it with some of the few things I wanted from the store. I never stole items but I did find money which I kept and used to buy items I wanted.

I was probably one of the better employees since I rejected most of the donations that came in largely being peoples waste. All people wanted was that damn donation slip so they could write off their crap for taxes. If they really wanted to do this some would just show up with 1 bag of two items and truck full of furniture and give us the bag for the slip and run to some random dumpsters with the furniture.

/All and all we probably threw away more crap than we ever put out for display in the store because people near the Goodwill donated the worst crap.
 
2012-05-04 12:34:53 AM
I never find anything at Good Will OR yard sales. I think they're evil for that reason. I'm serious, I have the worst luck it's either for old dead ladies (unfortunate but true) or just worn beyond what should be aloud for resale aside from rags. Alright it's not that bad but I seem to be in a "Fark you for losing weight this wont' fit you now." to a "You will find nothing in your size of good/decent make and quality- you just spent a billion bucks in gas. Congrats."

I have bought nothing from good will. I don't even see their furniture as good quality/deals but can see how they can be to some people. I mean for their prices I'll buy cheap badly made Swedish furniture because I have the privilege to do so.
 
2012-05-04 12:35:35 AM

Grables'Daughter: I truly wonder how many items like that - pottery, painting, whatever - are donated to Goodwill and just chucked into the trash compactor as trash.


Basically if its nice looking they will try to sell it- if looks like a kid made it its tossed- This happens a lot. A lot of people have bad opinions on what is art and what is good-including goodwill hardliners who price things on the ideas of what they would pay for something and not what the item should cost. Better for the customers in the long run really.
 
2012-05-04 12:50:35 AM

Maggie_Luna: yard sales.


If you're actually shopping for something, of course yard sales are going to be hit or miss. The drive and the adventure are about 60% of going to yard sales - you just never know what you're going to find.
 
2012-05-04 12:53:54 AM
I'm going to drop a note to my Caddo sister-in-law and see what she thinks about this.

I'm glad it's being returned, it's still too common for these stories to end badly. Now if I can just get my cousin to bring back that DVD.
 
2012-05-04 01:01:16 AM

lacydog: Captain_Ballbeard: thanks shill.

If you're going to spout nonsense about employees picking through donations, I feel obligated, as someone who has worked there and has some firsthand knowledge of what goes on, to tell you that that it doesn't happen. At least not where I worked. I can't speak for every one of them, but I can tell you that it was made abundantly clear to me that no such activities would be tolerated from any of the workers.


Anyone who doesn't agree that a corporation or whatever is Evil Personified run by Greed-Hungry Monsters, is a shill around here. Get used to it.
 
2012-05-04 01:14:01 AM
It belongs in a museum.
 
2012-05-04 01:58:01 AM
the goodwill here in my town never has much of anything good and the stuff is usually a bit pricey but still cheaper than the retail stores here. don't know about the first dibs thing or not, but I do know the salvation army store in my old home town was family owned and the lady who ran it went through all donations and kept what she wanted. of course you could tell by the stuff on the floor, it was all crap.

now one thing i thought was cool was when I worked at one of the local call centers a friend came in to work and he was a technophile and loved all gadgetry. well he always shopped at the goodwill stores around the area and he had found the motherlode at one. they had put usb drives out for sale. this was back in 2006 and these were 1gb drives. Two for a buck and they all worked. funny thing is the clerk who rang him up (he bought all 30 of them)asked what he planned on doing with all of the pez dispensers.
 
2012-05-04 02:03:35 AM

Counter_Intelligent: It belongs in a museum.


It hasn't been buried in the sand for a while, so...
 
2012-05-04 03:07:16 AM

halB: rebelyell2006: Goodwill Industries receives federal funding (or at least they did, I'm not sure if the teabaggers cut the funding last year or not), so it would be a federal crime for Goodwill to hold on to native American funerary artifacts if the tribe of the original possessors does not approve.

I came in here to say this. To the law, since the burial ritual hundreds if not thousands of years ago wasn't intended to relinquish the property rights (making it not abandoned property) you literally are just shiat out of luck when you dig one of these up. Whatever local tribe is nearby gets to claim it (even if it's a loose claim, even if another tribe was around at the time the artifact was put in the ground) and you don't get squat.

So go ahead indians, let all your stuff rot in the ground. Deny anyone the incentive to discover your rich history. And soon, in a hundred years, you'll be hearing myths such as the white man really found North America abandoned. Because that's just what happened in South Africa.

I don't know if you can tell, but I really disagree with this ruling. I am quite smitten with the idea of being able to dig up buried treasure.



There is a lot of archeology going on in North America. Just because you don't hear about it doesn't mean its not happening. And I'd rather not give the treasure hunters any more reason to go out destroying sites than they already do. Its not uncommon for these vultures to find out where some archeologists have worked and then when the scientists leave they come in with backhoes and tear the place up looking for pots like the one from the article to sell on the black market. Next season when the archeologists come back, their site is now totally worthless as far as learning anything is concerned because some greedy amateurs destroyed all the important informative things to get to the big, shiny things.

I'm perfectly happy with not incentivizing anyone to go out looking for ancient sites that don't have an academic, legal, or curiosity interest in it.
 
2012-05-04 03:09:04 AM
The newer ones are much nicer..

Seriously, How can you tell it is 1,000 years old?
 
2012-05-04 03:29:05 AM
Photo caption: This potentially prehistoric vase was donated to Goodwill
Article lead: Pottery donated to Goodwill may be 1,000-year-old Native American artifact

Wow, I didn't know history started less than a thousand years ago!
 
Skr
2012-05-04 05:10:45 AM
I've had bad luck for myself at our local Goodwill, seems the men's section is full of Old Man Golfer Who Recently Croaked clothing. My significant other though has found a brand new tagged pair of Lucky Jeans for $5 (original priced at $129) among other things. They pull from the neighborhood you are in, so I guess if one doesn't suit you, another Goodwill might be better.

Just like any store, the atmosphere depends on things like management, employees, and the customers. 10 or so years ago a Goodwill I lived near was sketchy and did pocket all the really fancy stuff (had acquaintances employed there.) This new one near my new house seems legit though.
 
2012-05-04 05:47:34 AM

Dumb-Ass-Monkey: Can't say this is for every store, because I'm not a self-important asshole who claims that personal experience and/or anecdotes are they way that everything is done everywhere, but...

Here in the Bay Area, it's not unusual to find clothing that is not only still new, but has store tags from higher-end stores, priced at well over $100 per piece. Nordstroms, Bloomingdales, Saks, and so on.

I've picked up autographed books, sports memorabilia, a PS2 Slim (in original box, unused, $25!) and on and on.

So to claim something as stupid as "And yes, Goodwill does cherrypick all the good stuff and auctions it on their website shopgoodwill.com and they also sell on Amazon as well" as tho it's corporate mandate is both obnoxious and asinine.


The only asshole is one that doesn't realize that's exactly how it works. All vintage toys are listed on the action site, the only toys in Goodwill are stuffed animals and some newer stuff donated from Target. I've been to hundreds of Goodwills from NY to North Carolina, and they are all run the same way. Where do you think the auction site gets their stuff? And you do realize when you bid, that it's not from some massive factory, it's from whichever Goodwill is selling it? One auction can be from Seattle, another in Texas. So yes, they do cherrypick through it. I'm not saying it's right or wrong, but if you think a merchandise fairy comes to Goodwill and gives them vintage items separately and everything the customers donate goes right to the floor, you're a nutbag.
 
2012-05-04 06:14:43 AM
"And here's what she said to me:

Que sera, sera...

Whatever might be may be.

The future's not ours to see...

Que sera, sera."

(Lyrics from memory... )
 
2012-05-04 07:34:16 AM
This was found at a yard sale in Westboro, Ma a few years back

http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/conn.river/warclub.html
 
2012-05-04 08:16:39 AM
Nice of them to return it to the Nation, and not the tribe.

Of course the nation will just put it back in the ground.
And back away slowly.
 
2012-05-04 08:36:35 AM

spman: fark the Goodwill, been into one of their stores lately? They want top dollar for items that belong in the trash, and even more for the stuff people might actually want. I see used items in poor condition that Goodwill is charging more for than Target wants for the same item brand new. And yes, Goodwill does cherrypick all the good stuff and auctions it on their website shopgoodwill.com and they also sell on Amazon as well.


So, buy your stuff at Target and quit going to Goodwill. Problem solved.

You don't have to shop any where you don't want to and you don't have to buy anything if you don't like the price. It's called a free market. Welcome to Amurica.
Likewise, once donated to Goodwill, the stuff is theirs to do with as they please. You have no room to complain about it. If selling online makes the most profit for them, that is their prerogative.
 
2012-05-04 08:48:01 AM

Pray 4 Mojo: "And here's what she said to me:

Que sera, sera...

Whatever might be may be.

The future's not ours to see...

Que sera, sera."

(Lyrics from memory... )


Que sere sera...
Lyrics from my memory
I might not know what they be,
Que sera, sera.
 
2012-05-04 09:41:59 AM

Counter_Intelligent: It belongs in a museum.


So do you!
 
2012-05-04 10:04:12 AM
always amazes me what can be found at one of those stores

my wife has new cooking stuff because some yuppies decided to unload their things at good will, my son has a large tub of legos, and I had a working keurig coffee maker(damn calcium in the well water)

friend of ours is one of those obsessive shoppers at good will, if you ask her for it she'll likely find it
 
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