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(Click2Houston)   News: Group held hostage in restaurant. Fark: for refusing to pay gratuity   (click2houston.com) divider line 379
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16032 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 May 2012 at 2:00 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-02 04:01:04 PM

CruJones: KatjaMouse: Cheesus: Can we please get rid of gratuity and just pay the waitstaff a decent wage?

This. Then servers won't get all stabby when a nice family after a Sunday lunch leaves them with a Chick Lit at the end of the meal instead of cash. Uh, Chick Lits don't pay for the gas to get home.

Have you ever eaten at a restaurant in Europe? Fark that. Their waiters get paid, and in most places, service sucks ass. Getting a refill of water makes you feel like the waiter just donated a kidney.


fwiw, I didn't have bad service at a single place I ate in Germany, Italy, or the Czech Republic.... so yes, I've eaten at restaurants in Europe, but I would disagree with your characterization of the service there.
 
2012-05-02 04:01:17 PM

Jim_Callahan:
Mayhem of the Black Underclass: A gratuity is a gift, by definition. I don't believe you can demand a gift from anyone, otherwise it's extortion.

The law doesn't work that way, has never worked that way, and if you get the cops called on you for pulling that shiat then you damned well deserve it, whether you're shortchanging a restaurant or declaring you don't have to pay your mortgage because one of the documents spelled your name in all caps.


What are you talking about? Who in this thread is trying to claim that the ALL CAPS is a corporation that has $13M deposited in the federal reserve in their name and if the bank wants their mortgage money they need to petition the government, or whatever the hell it is you think you're talking about.
 
2012-05-02 04:03:02 PM

twfeline: wambu: Gratuities are optional whether they have a "policy" or not.

The group automatic gratuity should be a CALCULATED amount. As in, to help save you the tedium of the calculation.

It should NEVER be a mandatory part of the bill, or there's going to be a stabbin'.


I appreciate that on some receipts, they have the 15/20/25 percentage amounts printed on the bottom for ease.... I don't appreciate when they try to mix them in with real fees and taxes that I am required to pay.
 
2012-05-02 04:06:03 PM
For the record, I have (a) no problem with an automatic gratuity being added to the bill, and (b) I think I have failed to pay a nice tip maybe 3-4 times in my entire 37 years of life.

But I don't think a restaurant can (nor should) legally stop you from leaving for not paying an automatic gratuity.
 
2012-05-02 04:07:01 PM
Printing something about your tipping policy at the bottom of the menu is not a contract. There has to be something called "consideration" (a legal term for give and take) involved.

If the restaurant stated that "we agree to provide superior service to parties of 5 or more in return for a 17% gratuity to be added to the check", now that's a contract.

By the way, there are no laws in any of the 50 states that require one to tip at all. Ironically, "Tip" means "to insure promptness".

Also, the 17% should be calculated on the pre-sales tax portion of the bill, not the whole bill.
 
2012-05-02 04:08:14 PM

Trivia Jockey: I guess all I'm asking is that you provide a citation for your claim that automatic gratuities are always considered legally mandatory and refusing to pay if theft, in all jurisdictions.


I'm sure there are places that have passed ordinances banning them, I never said it was some sort of nationwide law. I think it's safe to assume that restaurants operate within the laws where they're located. Can you cite the ordinance that proves that this restaurant was doing something illegal?

Also, who cares if you're an attorney? Are you an attorney in Houston? Are you familiar with the laws regarding tipping in every state, city and town in the USA? Do you have to be at the gym in 26 minutes?
 
2012-05-02 04:11:47 PM

Orange Guy: Printing something about your tipping policy at the bottom of the menu is not a contract. There has to be something called "consideration" (a legal term for give and take) involved.

If the restaurant stated that "we agree to provide superior service to parties of 5 or more in return for a 17% gratuity to be added to the check", now that's a contract.

By the way, there are no laws in any of the 50 states that require one to tip at all. Ironically, "Tip" means "to insure promptness".

Also, the 17% should be calculated on the pre-sales tax portion of the bill, not the whole bill.


You sounded smart and lawyer-y until the "To Insure Promptness" part: http://www.snopes.com/language/acronyms/tip.asp
 
2012-05-02 04:12:31 PM

Carth: illicit: Carth: Eurotrip: Finallly some support that the standard percentage is 15! I always get crap for leaving 15% rounded up to the nearest dollar(Live/Work in the Cambridge MA area). I've been told that it's just because I'm from New Hampshire and everyone is cheap up there. I think everyone is just stupid down here.

To determine if you're cheap I'm going to need to know if you tip 15% of the pre or post tax total.

What about if we calculate by doubling the tax?

Then you'd only be tipping 13% and definitely cheap. (at least in MA)


Yeah that math only works in NH (16%). I tip based on post-tax, and while I struggle internally every time there is a large bill made up of mostly drinks (high cost/work ratio), I begrudging include those too. My gf has been trying to convince me that anything less than 20%, every time, regardless of the service is cheap. Some people..
 
2012-05-02 04:12:34 PM

9beers: Can you cite the ordinance that proves that this restaurant was doing something illegal?


It wouldn't be an ordinance violation...it would likely be a civil common law issue (e.g. false imprisonment).

Also, just a quick Google search located several instances where people were arrested for this at the restaurant's urging, and the prosecutor declined to prosecute on the basis that it isn't a compulsory fee if it's called a "gratuity".

Lastly, I only added the attorney part to illustrate I'm not just talking out of my ass, I'm reasonably familiar with the general legal concepts at play (and not at play) here.
 
2012-05-02 04:13:23 PM

Eurotrip: Carth: illicit: Carth: Eurotrip: Finallly some support that the standard percentage is 15! I always get crap for leaving 15% rounded up to the nearest dollar(Live/Work in the Cambridge MA area). I've been told that it's just because I'm from New Hampshire and everyone is cheap up there. I think everyone is just stupid down here.

To determine if you're cheap I'm going to need to know if you tip 15% of the pre or post tax total.

What about if we calculate by doubling the tax?

Then you'd only be tipping 13% and definitely cheap. (at least in MA)

Yeah that math only works in NH (16%). I tip based on post-tax, and while I struggle internally every time there is a large bill made up of mostly drinks (high cost/work ratio), I begrudging include those too. My gf has been trying to convince me that anything less than 20%, every time, regardless of the service is cheap. Some people..


In NH you'd be tipping 18% now! they raised it up to 9% a few years back.
 
2012-05-02 04:14:23 PM
Should you pay gratuity on corkage?

Why should I pay 15% gratuity on a bottle of wine when a $100 bottle is the same amount of work as a $20 bottle?
 
2012-05-02 04:15:50 PM

Yoyo: Rapmaster2000: You ever try to get a bill together for a large group without automatic gratuity? There's always some cheapass who's trying to reduce his payment, someone who wants everyone to cover the appetizer they ate as an entree that was supposedly "for the table", and someone who agonizes over tax and tipping on their two $5 dollar beers.

I won't eat with a large group anymore who aren't my closest friends if the place can't split bills. I'm done with my wife's friend's birthday party with a bunch of people I don't know who act like they never get out of the house.

Actually, breakfast at Farkcon for about 10 of us was quite civil when it came to the tab. Even with "GRATUITY INCLUDED" stamped in big red letters. I guess your friends are just cheapskates and your wife's friend is too cheap to pickup the cost of her own birthday party.


I don't really feel any shame taking criticism from a guy who goes to Farkcon.
 
2012-05-02 04:17:17 PM

OtherLittleGuy: Restaurant policy: more than 5 people and there is an automatic 17% tip.

Locking them in and calling police -- this borders on locking in a shoplifter.

Not sure if legal.


No question to me: very illegal
 
2012-05-02 04:20:49 PM

Trivia Jockey: 9beers: If you're made aware of a charge and still choose to dine there, you've entered into a binding contract for services are are obligated to pay.

Do you know how I know you're not a lawyer?


He's pretty clearly a waiter.
 
2012-05-02 04:22:31 PM
So how long until 20% is seen as cheapskate tipping? shiat used to be 10%, now 15% is considered low with 20% being what most of you seem compelled to leave.
 
2012-05-02 04:24:23 PM

Trivia Jockey: 9beers: Trivia Jockey: Do you know how I know you're not a lawyer?

Never said I was. I'll tell you what, go out to dinner tonight at a restaurant that adds a gratuity to the bill and refuse to pay it. Report back on your results.

I guess all I'm asking is that you provide a citation for your claim that automatic gratuities are always considered legally mandatory and refusing to pay if theft, in all jurisdictions. I've provided a couple already to the contrary. Also, I am an attorney FWIW.



You're exactly right. Agreeing to dine there in that restaurant is not legal consideration. Without consideration there is no contract under US law, except in the rarest of cases and this isn't one of them. Preexisting duty (such as a restaurant agreeing to serve food) does not count as consideration. An "illusory promise" (such as "I will serve food well"), or one which the promisor actually has no obligation to keep, also does not count as consideration.

Although try to test that to a Houston beat cop using such large words.
 
2012-05-02 04:25:17 PM

firefly212: CruJones: KatjaMouse: Cheesus: Can we please get rid of gratuity and just pay the waitstaff a decent wage?

This. Then servers won't get all stabby when a nice family after a Sunday lunch leaves them with a Chick Lit at the end of the meal instead of cash. Uh, Chick Lits don't pay for the gas to get home.

Have you ever eaten at a restaurant in Europe? Fark that. Their waiters get paid, and in most places, service sucks ass. Getting a refill of water makes you feel like the waiter just donated a kidney.

fwiw, I didn't have bad service at a single place I ate in Germany, Italy, or the Czech Republic.... so yes, I've eaten at restaurants in Europe, but I would disagree with your characterization of the service there.


THIS...I never had a problem when I was touring Europe for 6 weeks. In fact, there were a couple of times I wished I could have tipped, my waiter was so awesome!
 
2012-05-02 04:25:19 PM

Trivia Jockey: 9beers: Trivia Jockey: Do you know how I know you're not a lawyer?

Never said I was. I'll tell you what, go out to dinner tonight at a restaurant that adds a gratuity to the bill and refuse to pay it. Report back on your results.

I guess all I'm asking is that you provide a citation for your claim that automatic gratuities are always considered legally mandatory and refusing to pay if theft, in all jurisdictions. I've provided a couple already to the contrary. Also, I am an attorney FWIW.


The question I would have for 9bees and all other law types, if choosing to eat at a place is a binding contract, doesn't that go both ways. If I determine that I was not rendered the services that I was implicitly promised, wouldn't the contract determine that I was not obliged to pay the additional fees?
 
2012-05-02 04:25:22 PM

twfeline: lackadaisicalfreakshow: I'll go back to telemarketing, soulsucking hellhole that that is, before I'll "serve" the populace again.

Pleasepleaseplease never work in a restaurant that I go to.


... I just said I'd never go back. That implies I'm not there now. Thank God I have a factory job now.
 
2012-05-02 04:25:44 PM

S.A.S.Q.U.A.T.C.H.: Locking the doors was wrong, but fark you if you're too ignorant to read the part on the menu that says A GRATUITY WILL BE ADDED TO PARTIES OF 5 OR MORE. I deal with these cheapskates all the time, and it's usually the girlfriend/wife that stays behind apologizing for their other while they're out the door in some kind of fake huff. If you want it your way, go to Burger King. If you don't like it, farkin' cook at home. Nobody owes you shiat; you're in our house, and if you can't have respect for our business, or are there to shortchange us or take advantage, then piss off. Being a restaurant manager myself at a mid to high end restaurant, you'd be surprised how many people come in and "invent" problems to save a few bucks. Some people just want to watch the world burn, etc. If he really had a problem with the service, they should have been able to hammer it out with the manager, or got up and left. Not answer "everything is great, thanks" every time the waiter comes over then pull some surprise upset at the last second. Good for them for calling the cops. AND the guy ended up paying after all to avoid "further complications". Uh huh. He was in the right and ended up paying anyways? See above. Sounds like white trash both ways.

/also tell your server you'd like split checks WHEN YOU SIT DOWN, dammit.


Someone missed that fact they are in a "service" industry. You owe me plenty when I sit down at your restaurant, such as:
- Warm or cold dishes, as appropriate, and not "sat under a heat lamp for the last 30 minutes" above room temperature
- Courteous and professional service from the waitstaff. This includes things like checking a time or two if I need a refill or another drink, and making sure my meal was correct after bringing it.
If you can't provide even that to me, or worse are outright rude or hostile, I see no reason to encourage your obvious mistake in career choices by giving you cash.

/Oh, and pull the stick out of your ass and ASK if a party wants to split checks BEFORE taking their order. Frankly, they aren't thinking about the bill right then, so save yourself some trouble by taking a half second instead of whining about it later.
 
2012-05-02 04:26:58 PM

AllUpInYa: Should you pay gratuity on corkage?

Why should I pay 15% gratuity on a bottle of wine when a $100 bottle is the same amount of work as a $20 bottle?


Same reason you tip on the cost of your food at all. Or do you really think a waitress at a nice steakhouse is doing four times the work of one at Olive Garden?
 
2012-05-02 04:30:34 PM

mikebdoss: Orange Guy: Printing something about your tipping policy at the bottom of the menu is not a contract. There has to be something called "consideration" (a legal term for give and take) involved.

If the restaurant stated that "we agree to provide superior service to parties of 5 or more in return for a 17% gratuity to be added to the check", now that's a contract.

By the way, there are no laws in any of the 50 states that require one to tip at all. Ironically, "Tip" means "to insure promptness".


Also, the 17% should be calculated on the pre-sales tax portion of the bill, not the whole bill.

You sounded smart and lawyer-y until the "To Insure Promptness" part: http://www.snopes.com/language/acronyms/tip.asp


No, I'm correct. Snopes is typically full of cr*p. Tips were also given to executioners in France and England by the relatives of a condemned person, to insure prompt execution, instead of sadistically wounding the condemned first with non-lethal steps.
 
2012-05-02 04:34:56 PM

WhippingBoy: Good for you. There's nothing quite so satisfying as putting one of those working class plebeians in their place. Why just this morning Meredith had to chew out our lazy butler because he washed my sock garters, and they were still covered in schmutz. When will these commoners every learn???


They shouldn't complain about being asked to dance after taking a job as a dancing monkey.

/I said DANCE BIATCH!
 
2012-05-02 04:35:39 PM

Orange Guy:
No, I'm correct. Snopes is typically full of cr*p. Tips were also given to executioners in France and England by the relatives of a condemned person, to insure prompt execution, instead of sadistically wounding the condemned first with non-lethal steps.


Your example does nothing to support your case.

Whereas Snopes documents historical examples from literature.

Hmmm ... who to trust: Some guy on the internet or the cited explanation on Snopes? Tough call.
 
2012-05-02 04:36:55 PM

Carth: Rootus: Carth: Put it on a credit card and then do a charge back due to coercion. Let the restaurant and Visa fight it out.

And you'd lose.

/not sure why people think charge backs always work
//while you're reading this, a protip: always require a signature for packages you receive

I'm sure they don't always approve a charge back but in my expirence the credit card company just takes it off your bill instead of arguing with you about it. Unlike the restaurant they realize it isn't worth having you cancel your card over $20. I'm sure if you do it every month they might take a different approach.


For $20 they probably would. For anything of significance, the bank investigates and makes a decision based on what they find. If you sign a receipt, it's a losing battle. If you have something shipped and there's tracking information that says it was delivered, it's a losing battle (doesn't matter if it was delivered to *you*). My wife used to supervise a disputes team for one of the biggest banks in the nation and I've learned a lot of interesting things about disputes, what works and what doesn't, etc. Always do business with reputable companies, because the protection you get through the card issuer isn't nearly as strong as people are led to believe. It's good, don't get me wrong, but there's still a lot of ways to get screwed.
 
2012-05-02 04:38:20 PM

King Something: Don't sound legal to me.


At the very least it's a fire code violation.
 
2012-05-02 04:39:31 PM

Carth: illicit: Carth: Eurotrip: Finallly some support that the standard percentage is 15! I always get crap for leaving 15% rounded up to the nearest dollar(Live/Work in the Cambridge MA area). I've been told that it's just because I'm from New Hampshire and everyone is cheap up there. I think everyone is just stupid down here.

To determine if you're cheap I'm going to need to know if you tip 15% of the pre or post tax total.

What about if we calculate by doubling the tax?

Then you'd only be tipping 13% and definitely cheap. (at least in MA)


And why is that cheap? When I was a kid 10% was considered a good tip. As a teenager/young adult it was 12.5%. When I moved to Chicago it was 15%. Now some people are saying that it is 18% (some even say 20% should be standard) and if you tip 15% you are a cheapskate. Why did it go up?
 
2012-05-02 04:39:39 PM
Would be nice to know how many over 5 it was. 6? 8?

Anything less than 8 or 9, a 17% automatic tip seems a bit much. It's not like this is a fine dining establishment. I'm guessing if they hand out plastic laminated menus, they're probably not laying out fine china and tablecloths, either. Which does make a difference. The higher-end places do usually make an effort to give you decent service, this place, not so much, apparently. If you have more than 5 people at your table, they figure they've already got your money, so fark you, pay up.

If it was 9 or 10 people, just pay it, call it a life lesson and never go back.

I enjoyed the "No spilt check" note on the menu. Clearly, La Fisherman really works hard for that 17%.
 
2012-05-02 04:39:57 PM

Rootus: My wife used to supervise a disputes team for one of the biggest banks in the nation and I've learned a lot of interesting things about disputes, what works and what doesn't, etc.


Such as?
 
2012-05-02 04:45:20 PM
"Same reason you tip on the cost of your food at all. Or do you really think a waitress at a nice steakhouse is doing four times the work of one at Olive Garden?"

this is the same logic that many cops use when they beat the ever loving shiat out of a person, and then they say "You dont know how difficult this job is! Waah!" as a defense.

If it isnt advantageous for you to work there, dont. You signed up for the gig..........................
 
2012-05-02 04:48:22 PM
I'm pretty sure you are not legally required to pay any sort of "gratuity."

This. Everything I've read states that a tip is considered a custom, defined by local etiquette. There is no legal definition provided for patrons or service providers (wait staff, restaurants, hotels, taxi service, etc.), in any state in the U.S., for a "tip", "auto-gratuity", or the like.

From a recent blog post between a food blog and a Philadelphia lawyer discussing such matters* (found here):

"We were always under the impression that if a restaurant puts their auto-grat policy on their menu, it means that the customer has been given fair warning and is then legally required to pay it. But [Philadelphia attorney David] Snyder tells us that this is not codified in law. It might make it easier for the restaurant to argue its case, but it's not actual law....

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, a "tip" is defined as "a sum presented by a customer as a gift or gratuity in recognition of some service performed for him." A tip is distinguished from a service charge, which the restaurant cannot use as a tip credit to offset the minimum wage. The key distinction between the two is that tips/gratuities are within the customer's discretion, but a service charge is not."


Conversely:

"It's true that this law was developed under the FLSA, not criminal law. However,....prosecutors often look to other areas of the law for guidance. If a prosecutor believes an "automatic gratuity" is not voluntary and a restaurant complains that you failed to pay it, he or she may decide to charge you with theft of services, which is a crime.... If the amount in dispute is $50 or under, it's only a summary offense. However, if the amount in dispute is above $50, it's a misdemeanor."

* I fully admit that this is just the summary information I found in a few minutes' time, from one PA food blogger site's interview on the topic with one attorney.

Hmm,...

I initially assumed this would be an open-and-shut case, i.e. "its not illegal", but it appears to be complicated by both the USA's litigious-heavy society as well as some states' legal interpretations. So,...crapola.

/Personally, I hate the concept of an auto-anything charges when it comes to food service. Its sneaky business practice and hurts public opinion.
//Then again, it wasn't the food industry who came up with it...they just got in on the deal once someone figured it out.
 
2012-05-02 04:48:49 PM

Rapmaster2000: I don't really feel any shame taking criticism from a guy who goes to Farkcon.


What's wrong with going to the convention for the website we're using right now?
And I didn't mean to be critical of you as much as your associates, who you refer to as cheapasses. I know my friends are not worth losing over a couple bucks when it's time to split a restaurant bill. YMMV.
 
2012-05-02 04:52:39 PM

Elandriel: They ended up paying it, but this is bad publicity for the restaurant, so I think they win in the end.


Win what, exactly?

Oh, and nice boobs on the female reporter in black, even if they're fake!
 
2012-05-02 04:55:09 PM

Kraftwerk Orange: I recently paid the bill for a large group. I don't have a problem with the auto-gratuity (in that case), but I do have a question about a particular line item.

"Gratuity Tax Tax"

[i555.photobucket.com image 640x427]

Anyone want to try to explain why I got charged an extra $15? State of SC, if it matters.


I am not sure about South Carolina, but in New York a mandatory gratuity is not taxable if 1) the charge is shown separately on the bill; 2) the charge is identified as a gratuity; and 3) the business gives the entire separately stated gratuity amount to its employees.

Kraftwerk Orange: I recently paid the bill for a large group. I don't have a problem with the auto-gratuity (in that case), but I do have a question about a particular line item.

"Gratuity Tax Tax"

[i555.photobucket.com image 640x427]

Anyone want to try to explain why I got charged an extra $15? State of SC, if it matters.


Call and find out. Seriously, please call and find out. I want to know what a gratuity tax tax is.
 
2012-05-02 04:57:47 PM

Cheesus: Can we please get rid of gratuity and just pay the waitstaff a decent wage?

/soshulizm


no because if waiters make $10,$20,$30/hr there is then really no incentive to 'work' for your money which is exactly what gratuity is!!
 
2012-05-02 05:01:13 PM

9beers: Kraftwerk Orange: I recently paid the bill for a large group.

Nobody cares that you have that kind of money to throw away on a meal, get lost.


Not too bright, are you?
 
2012-05-02 05:02:32 PM
In the end, the family ended up paying the 17 percent gratuity because they wanted to avoid any further problems.

Fools. I would have demanded a kidnapping charge.
 
2012-05-02 05:03:16 PM

SuperNinjaToad: Cheesus: Can we please get rid of gratuity and just pay the waitstaff a decent wage?

/soshulizm

no because if waiters make $10,$20,$30/hr there is then really no incentive to 'work' for your money which is exactly what gratuity is!!


Sorry, but that reasoning is bull shiat. Other industries do not have gratuities and there is no problem getting people to work.
 
2012-05-02 05:03:35 PM

lilbjorn: In the end, the family ended up paying the 17 percent gratuity because they wanted to avoid any further problems.

Fools. I would have demanded a kidnapping charge.


Or just follow my usual policy of staying the hell out of Texas.
 
2012-05-02 05:04:44 PM

lilbjorn: lilbjorn: In the end, the family ended up paying the 17 percent gratuity because they wanted to avoid any further problems.

Fools. I would have demanded a kidnapping charge.

Or just follow my usual policy of staying the hell out of Texas.


Thank you.
 
2012-05-02 05:05:38 PM
I don't normally comment in these threads since they are invariably a sinking ship of complaining from service folks; however, that said:

We should start calling these what they are "Service Fees" instead of "Optional X% added for parties of Y or more" because I have witnessed absolutely horrid service in Mom / Pop establishments just as often as chains. I'm beginning to get annoyed at the tip jars placed in establishments as well.

Before you start fanning the flames of damnation at me, yes, I worked in Service, yes I worked for tips.

When I tell you my steak is still mooing at me and it's not what I ordered, blinking at me as if you lost the ability to speak English. Go yell at the cook / prep team and let's move on. I'm not blaming YOU for that. I will blame you if act like it's MY fault or ignore me for the remainder of my meal. Mistakes happen, let's just move on and be done with it.

:: shrugs ::
 
2012-05-02 05:06:29 PM
Tipping is always relative. I tipped a waiter $10.00 on a group of 6 people recently. He made a total of four trips to our table. One to take the order, one to drop off some giant pitchers of soda (so we could do our own refills), a second trip to bring more soda, and one to ask us how our food was. A pair of bus boys actually were tasked to bring the food out. So he did less work than average. I gave him a straight ten and dropped money directly to the bus boys since they did the grunt work with the food and the appetizers. You can normally ID the guy in the restaurant who is picking up the slack and that's the guy I tip.

On the other hand I tipped 35% last weekend. I was in South Haven during the tourist offseason and all the restaurants lower their menu prices to lure people in. I got 5* service at 3* menu prices, so I tipped accordingly.

La Fisherman sounds like one of those places where:

1. The management offers all kinds of group deals
2. Has a heavy group tip included as mandatory.
3. The management takes a cut of the server's tips.

Best just to avoid those places, they're basically hitting you with a stealth price increase to offset their special and tend to have shiatty service.

/used to work at a place like that for a summer
 
2012-05-02 05:07:43 PM

Mock26: SuperNinjaToad: Cheesus: Can we please get rid of gratuity and just pay the waitstaff a decent wage?

/soshulizm

no because if waiters make $10,$20,$30/hr there is then really no incentive to 'work' for your money which is exactly what gratuity is!!

Sorry, but that reasoning is bull shiat. Other industries do not have gratuities and there is no problem getting people to work.


This. I'd much prefer to simply pay a bit more for the food than deal with the whole tipping thing.
 
2012-05-02 05:08:49 PM
This is a common strategy among white trash and black trash. Complain about the same level of service normal humans find more than adequate. Then ax for something for free to make up for the "long" wait, "disrespect", or other make-believe grievance (such as not accepting your rubber check). After that, resort to leaving no tip and try in vein to convince all the other patrons who will listen that you are unaccustomed to this sort of treatment that your group elicits every single time it goes out for dinner.
 
2012-05-02 05:09:41 PM

KatjaMouse: You're in a tip thread and use that tiny violin reference?


Well, yes, because it pertains to my subject. I want physical tiny violins in general to hand out to people. Not just bad wait staff, but everyone. It's all well and good to rub your fingers at a waitress, but there's the chance she might think you're making the "I've want you to pay me' gesture. When you leave an actual tiny violin on the reciept, shes knows she did a bad job, and you went really far out of your way to tell her that.
 
2012-05-02 05:14:08 PM

SuperNinjaToad: Cheesus: Can we please get rid of gratuity and just pay the waitstaff a decent wage?

/soshulizm

no because if waiters make $10,$20,$30/hr there is then really no incentive to 'work' for your money which is exactly what gratuity is!!


If a waiter made $30 an hour, his incentive to work would be him keeping the job, as I am sure there would be plenty of willing and able applicants just waiting for a position to open up.
 
2012-05-02 05:16:22 PM
One of my favorite places to eat used to include the tax in the price. They rounded everything off to the nearest quarter too. It made figuring out how much something was going to cost simple. If I was dictator I'd make all restaurants include tax. I'd also require that if they charge a mandatory tip that that is calculated into the price too. Actually, screw that, I'd raise the minimum wage for waiters and then require that tips are voluntary.

I'd also get rid of pennies.
 
2012-05-02 05:19:20 PM
Most restaurants would go out of business if they were forced to pay their employees even minimum wage. There's not much of a profit margin on a $3.99 breakfast of a $7.99 dinner special.
 
2012-05-02 05:22:03 PM

9beers: Most restaurants would go out of business if they were forced to pay their employees even minimum wage. There's not much of a profit margin on a $3.99 breakfast of a $7.99 dinner special.


Raise their prices 15% to cover it. If it doesn't, they were shortchanging their waitstaff in the first place.
 
2012-05-02 05:25:08 PM

Paris1127: La Fisherman? What kind of a restaurant name is that? What language is that supposed to be?


Louisiana Fisherman wouldn't fit on the sign.
 
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